Check Out New Boxing Short Doc From Eric Drath

30 for 30 Shorts: “Robbed” Looks at Intersection of Boxing Injustice and Urban Chaos in the 1970s

The latest film in the 30 for 30 Shorts series, from Emmy Award-winning director Eric Drath, debuted today on Grantland.com.

“Robbed” delves into the 1976 Muhammad Ali and Ken Norton fight inside the ring at Yankee Stadium. The conclusion of this fight would go down as one of the most controversial decisions in the sport of boxing. But this fight, which should have been remembered for what happened inside the ring, was tainted by gang activity and theft in the wake of the NYPD strike happening just outside the stadium’s doors. This short reveals a little-known story of the chaos taking place behind the scenes, recanted by legendary boxing promoter Bob Arum.

ESPN Films’ 30 for 30 Shorts series is artfully crafted by Blue Moon. Previous films from the series can be viewed at espn.com/30for30/shorts.

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COMMENTS

-Radam G :

[br] title="Check Out New Boxing Short Doc From Eric Drath"[/br] 30 for 30 Shorts: “Robbed” Looks at Intersection of Boxing Injustice and Urban Chaos in the 1970s The latest film in the 30 for 30 Shorts series, from Emmy Award-winning director Eric Drath, debuted today on Grantland.com. [url=http://www.thesweetscience.com/http://grantland.com/features/30-for-30-shorts-robbed/]“Robbed” delves into the 1976 Muhammad Ali and Ken Norton fight inside the ring at Yankee Stadium. The conclusion of this fight would go down as one of the most controversial decisions in the sport of boxing. But this fight, which should have been remembered for what happened inside the ring, was tainted by gang activity and theft in the wake of the NYPD strike happening just outside the stadium's doors. This short reveals a little-known story of the chaos taking place behind the scenes, recanted by legendary boxing promoter Bob Arum. ESPN Films’ 30 for 30 Shorts series is artfully crafted by Blue Moon. Previous films from the series can be viewed at [url=http://www.thesweetscience.com/http://espn.go.com/30for30/shorts]espn.com/30for30/shorts.
Wow! Eric D is known for stretching and ratcheting the true. So I believe most of his film documentaries like I believe the Mayweather boksing family. Holla!


-The Commish :

I am looking forward to seeing the doc. Eric Drath is a brilliant Executive Producer/Director. He won an Emmy for "Assault in the Ring" and another one for "No 'Mas." The fight took place on Sept. 28, 1976, just a few days shy of the first anniversary of Ali's hard-fought victory against Joe Frazier in the "Thrilla' in Manila." I was ringside at Yankee Stadium that night, and writers were scared to death about leaving the stadium and walking into the street, where gangs were literally waiting to mug anybody they could get their hands on. I wasn't afraid, as about 12 writers all said we'd walk out together to our cars, which were parked in a designated area for Working Press. Also, as we exited, we latched onto a policeman, who, although the NYPD was on strike, was on Special Assignment at Yankee Stadium. He said "Let's go, fellas. Let's take a walk to the press parking area. We stayed in a tight group, and you could see the prowling gangs wondering, "Should we go after them, or not?" The vision of the uniformed officer might have stopped them, who looked to be around 20 thugs. Controversial decision? It was the furthest thing From my mind at that moment. A few years later, I asked Norton does he ever think of that fight. "Are you kidding?" he asked. "I think about it all the time. I still have regrets about not going all out in the 15th and final round. I thought I had the fight wrapped up, so I took my foot off the gas. I still don't know why I did that." Ali didn't take his foot off the gas. He won the round, along with the fight. As I recall, the scores were 8-6, and two 8-7's. I believe the 8-6 was turned in by referee Arthur Mercante. Back then, the refs scored the fight. In New York, the winner ofnthe round simply won the round. If he won it by a large margin, the scorer could give him an additional point. I never found out why Mercante's card was 8-6. It was certainly not on my mind as I left Yankee Stadium, prepared for a fight of my own. Not a fun night. But an incredible memory. -Randy G.


-Radam G :

Sorry, Commish! But Eric D's "Assault in The Ring" was full of deliberated errors in facts, exaggerations and "d@mn lies." This man pays the truth absolutely no attention. And he constantly exaggerates the mildest thing to get awards. I know that you will be down for your friends. Loyalty knows no boundaries for some. But for we Asians, we have something call shame. So we will pull one of our own to the side and tell him to cut out da bullsyet. And if he doesn't, we'll just drop him like a bad habit or kick his arse. Holla!


-The Commish :

Sometimes, filmmakers use what they call "journalistic liberty" when making documentaries. Exactly what were the "d@mn lies" you refer to? There is no question Drath is anti-Panama Lewis in the doc & somewhat pro-Luis Resto in it. Both have been banned from boxing for life. Panama still makes a nice living working with top-level fighters in Florida, while Resto lives in a small, dark, basement apartment in The Bronx, NY, barely able to clothe and feed himself. But, facts are facts: -Padding was illegally removed from Resto's gloves. -Billy Collins Jr. Absorbed a horrific beating with those tampered gloves. -The assault which took place that night affected many lives. Just where are the "d@mn lies" you refer to, and did those "d@mn lies affect what this documentary was about? -Randy G.


-Domenic :

That was a brutally violent card. Collins-Resto happened on the undercard of Duran-Moore, a fight in which Moore endured a savage beating (a completely incompetent referee too, who seemed to have action on a brain-bleed for Moore). Resto is the very definition of a broken man.


-The Commish :

That was a brutally violent card. Collins-Resto happened on the undercard of Duran-Moore, a fight in which Moore endured a savage beating (a completely incompetent referee too, who seemed to have action on a brain-bleed for Moore). Resto is the very definition of a broken man.
Domenic, have you seen Resto lately? He looks like a homeless man. If it weren't for Promoter Joe DeGuardia and his stepdad, who allow Resto to live beneath their gym rent free while doing menial gym chores, the man would be living on the street. He is a man-child who was taken advantage of by Panama Lewis. Resto's IQ is not very high, and, although he knew what was being done to his gloves, didn't know what to do about it or how to handle the situation. When Resto asked Panama what he was doing, Lewis replied, "Let me worry about what is going on right now. I will handle this, you handle the fighting. Do you understand?" He understood. Because of his fear of Lewis, who controlled just about everything in his life, Resto said nothing. Even after coming out of prison, Resto said nothing about what happened to his gloves that night. When he applied for his boxer's license in New York in 1989, he was turned down by the Commissioner. Soon afterwards, the Commissioner turned down Resto's request for a Trainer's license. Resto was banned from the sport forever. By the way, I was the Commissioner who turned him down for both of his licenses. "Hello, Commissioner," is the way Resto greets me whenever I run into him at a Joe DeGuardia show. Then he adds, "You ruined my life, Commissioner." I just sadly shake my head, but not because he is in the sorry existence which he is. I am sorry he really feels that way! -Randy G.


-Domenic :

I only saw the documentary, and thought Resto was a feeble, pathetic, and broken man. My recollection of it's that neither Resto nor Lewis came off as sympathetic figures (perhaps this is subjective). Resto slightly more, I suppose, but was he contrite over Collins' fate or his own? You lived it, which is quite extraordinary, as this event always intrigued me. I highly doubt that this was Lewis' maiden voyage into plaster too. Would be curious to read your thoughts. Also those on the ''mix" in the AP-AA fight. Side note, just read your name in the Tyson book, interviewing him after the Zouski fight when he was on the rise. What a journey in the sweet science you've had sir.


-Radam G :

Domenic, have you seen Resto lately? He looks like a homeless man. If it weren't for Promoter Joe DeGuardia and his stepdad, who allow Resto to live beneath their gym rent free while doing menial gym chores, the man would be living on the street. He is a man-child who was taken advantage of by Panama Lewis. Resto's IQ is not very high, and, although he knew what was being done to his gloves, didn't know what to do about it or how to handle the situation. When Resto asked Panama what he was doing, Lewis replied, "Let me worry about what is going on right now. I will handle this, you handle the fighting. Do you understand?" He understood. Because of his fear of Lewis, who controlled just about everything in his life, Resto said nothing. Even after coming out of prison, Resto said nothing about what happened to his gloves that night. When he applied for his boxer's license in New York in 1989, he was turned down by the Commissioner. Soon afterwards, the Commissioner turned down Resto's request for a Trainer's license. Resto was banned from the sport forever. By the way, I was the Commissioner who turned him down for both of his licenses. "Hello, Commissioner," is the way Resto greets me whenever I run into him at a Joe DeGuardia show. Then he adds, "You ruined my life, Commissioner." I just sadly shake my head, but not because he is in the sorry existence which he is. I am sorry he really feels that way! -Randy G.
Wow! Imma stay outta this one, because people tell the same story until it is believed to be the actuality of the reality. Resto had New Yorkers jive up his gloves long before Panama Lewis started working with him. Resto got kicked out of the amateurs long before I was born. New Yorkers Black and an American man named Lewis were tampering with his gloves. Resto had tampered gloves on when my cousin whipped his arse at the 1976 National United States AAU in Sin City. But Eric D tells a d@mn lie that Resto made it to the semi-finals of the 1976 U.S. O-Game Boxing Trials. Everything that I post, I can always prove it with 100-percent accuracy unless I'm being jivy and joking around. I've put up the results in this Universe of the 1976 O-Game Trials. And Luis Resto was not in them. Resto had on tampered gloves on the night that Bruce Curry knocked him out -- giving him his first defeat as a pro. Panama Lewis was no where on the scene. Panama Lewis has been a scapegoat for the sneaky, rotten behaviours of boxing on the American scene for too long. He is solid with spitting skills. Not splitting gloves and taking the horse hair outta them and giving pugs Plaster of Paris and crushed-up asthma pills in the bottle that he "mixed." C'mon, Commish! "Journalistic liberty" my arse! Eric D is full of it -- tabloid journalism, the "National Enquirer Magazine" to da max. Okay! You say that Luis Resto is a man child with a low IQ. Well high IQ Eric D took advantage him too. And that is no Fairy Tail. Holla!


-The Commish :

Eric Drath actually tried to help Resto. He pleaded with me to use my influence to try and get him his Trainer's License and Cornerman's License. I told him this was way too big of an issue and that there was no way the New York State Athletic Commission would ever approve him for any kind of license. Panama Lewis was not a scapegoat here. He did that stuff before--lots of guys did--but were never caught. Hall-of-Fame legend Ray Arcel admitted to me that kind of stuff went on regularly in the 20's, 30's, 40's and 50's. He told me that if they didn't remove the horse hair, they worked the gloves, bending them back and forth, moving the horsehair padding away from the knuckles. It's just that, when Lewis did it on June 16, 1983, he was caught. "Those are the gloves they gave me. Those are the gloves they gave me," he shouted as NYSAC officials cut the gloves off of Resto's hands moments after Billy Collins Sr. Discovered the gloves had no padding. He played as dumb as Resto. I'm not saying that kind of cheating did not go on throughout the sport. I'm just saying, on this one night, the perpetrators of the crime were caught. As for Drath saying Resto made it to the semis of the 1976 Olympic Games Trials, that did not affect the storyline one bit. Padding taken out. Fighter beaten to a pulp. Goes into a massive depression and takes his life. Resto and Lewis do jail time then are banished from the sport. I wish the ending could have been different. It's what it is. I feel bad for Resto, not for Lewis. Panama made his bed. Now, let him sleep in it. Resto was just a pawn in Lewis' plan to win an important fight over an undefeated prospect. Drath set out to tell the story of what happened that night at Madison. Square Garden. He succeeded in doing so. -Randy G.


-Radam G :

NAW! Resto is a smart weasel. He knows who to play dumb and low IQ around. I know what time it is. Brown and black Yank dudes got it down pack with fooling the white power structure, especially when they feel like they are being looked down upon. Dudes be acting meek and weak. And like in their noggins, they have a leak. And then the minute the white-power structure steps away -- OH, SYET! Dudes light up with intelligence and awareness and mad knowledge and know how. And I ain't snitching on them. I'm just saying, WATCH IT! You will never know "da hustle" that they are doing on your "$uperior brain muscle." These gonna-jive-you cats are good with it. I'm not going to mess up Lulu's hustle, but he's living the way that he's comfortable with. I know his successful sons, ex wife and sister. As for Panama Lewis, he is a boxing guru genius who has help train Russian, Caribbean, Brazilian and Cuban pugs transitioning over to pro boksing. There are optical illusion everywhere up in da game. And PL is working some 2 da bone! PL is no worse than any other crook in da game. He is still producing champions without being in their corners. So gloves jive about him is a BIG myth. The man makes champions to this day with genius know how. I doubt that he needs to be a cheat or ever was. Did he stretch the limits? YUP! It is all about getting da edge. And all the pugs that he is training and teaching nowadays, don't have tampered gloves, or something in a bottle. The one he "mixed." One last thing about Eric D. He told LR what to do and say for that documentary. And pay him nicely. Journalism liberty, I guess that you will call it. Hehehe! The following too: "Plaster of Paris" on the hands, and "crushed asthma pills in koolaid and water" were classical. Hehe! No hate. But Eric D would make a wonderful character on "Saturday Night Live." Holla"


-The Commish :

NAW! Resto is a smart weasel. He knows who to play dumb and low IQ around. I know what time it is. Brown and black Yank dudes got it down pack with fooling the white power structure, especially when they feel like they are being looked down upon. Dudes be acting meek and weak. And like in their noggins, they have a leak. And then the minute the white-power structure steps away -- OH, SYET! Dudes light up with intelligence and awareness and mad knowledge and know how. And I ain't snitching on them. I'm just saying, WATCH IT! You will never know "da hustle" that they are doing on your "$uperior brain muscle." These gonna-jive-you cats are good with it. I'm not going to mess up Lulu's hustle, but he's living the way that he's comfortable with. I know his successful sons, ex wife and sister. As for Panama Lewis, he is a boxing guru genius who has help train Russian, Caribbean, Brazilian and Cuban pugs transitioning over to pro boksing. There are optical illusion everywhere up in da game. And PL is working some 2 da bone! PL is no worse than any other crook in da game. He is still producing champions without being in their corners. So gloves jive about him is a BIG myth. The man makes champions to this day with genius know how. I doubt that he needs to be a cheat or ever was. Did he stretch the limits? YUP! It is all about getting da edge. And all the pugs that he is training and teaching nowadays, don't have tampered gloves, or something in a bottle. The one he "mixed." One last thing about Eric D. He told LR what to do and say for that documentary. And pay him nicely. Journalism liberty, I guess that you will call it. Hehehe! The following too: "Plaster of Paris" on the hands, and "crushed asthma pills in koolaid and water" were classical. Hehe! No hate. But Eric D would make a wonderful character on "Saturday Night Live." Holla"
That was one tough blog to get through. Your first sentence showed where you were going: Resto is one smart weasel. I hope that was a joke I missed. Luis Resto is what I call "mentally limited." I won't even go any further in explaining myself. I will give you this: Panama Lewis is indeed a fine trainer. A guru? Let's not go that far. He is a crook, a criminal, a cheat and is indirectly responsible for the death of Billy Collins Jr. "Gloves jive?" What "gloves jive?" Are you going to tell me he didn't take the padding out? Are you going to tell me we should believe his b.s. cries of "Those are the gloves they gave me?" As far as Eric Drath telling Luis Resto what to say and paying him, the story is this: Eric Drath is a warm, sensitive person who was deeply touched by this tragic story. When he looked into it, he saw many story lines. They were story lines he felt he had to tell. Guess what? Luis Resto wasn't talking, just the way he refused to talk to me and my staff when he came in for his license. He thought by telling us he would be arrested again. And jailed again. I told him he couldn't go to jail again for the same crime he had already been convicted of. He didn't understand me. One of my top staffers, Emma Elizondo, told him the same thing in Spanish. The poor, "mentally limited" Resto didn't understand Elizondo, either. He wore the same look that actor Ed Norton wore in his dual role as a bumbling, stuttering idiot and a cold-blooded killer in "Primal Fear." However, Ed Norton is a brilliant actor. LUis Resto is neither brilliant or an actor. He is a 4-year-old in a man's body. Like a dog which has been beaten and beaten throughout its life, Luis Resto was withdrawn and trusted nobody. But, as the filming went on, Resto took a liking to the warm, soft-spoken and sensitive Drath. Drath took a liking to him. He gave Resto money, much the way you'd give a friend who was down on their luck some money. It doesn't matter if it was $10 or $10,000 or $100,000,000. Drath gave Resto money because he felt horrible for this club fighter whose life had turned into one big Knockout loss. Resto began to open up to Drath, who had become one of the first men not to treat Resto like a piece of meat. In their own way, theybstruck up a friendship. Drath didn't tell Resto to do anything. He asked him. He explained things to him in a fatherly way. If Resto didn't want to do it, Drath didn't pressure him to. To this day, Eric Drath gets emotional when he thinks of the hell Luis Resto lives in. Resto would have done better--and lived better and more comfortably--had he been incarcerated for the remainder of his days. In jail, he would have been free. Outside, he is anything but free. Speaking about characters on the very funny "Saturday Night Live"... -Randy G.


-Domenic :

The visual of the Commissioner explaining double jeopardy to Resto, and his wearing the expression of Ed Norton in Primal Fear is priceless. I need to re-watch AITR. Hopefully it's on YouTube. One thing I recall about the documentary was the meeting between Resto and Lewis, after all those years and all the tragedy that had transpired, and he just shrunk and was completely subordinate to him. That jail would have been a better life for him speaks volumes. I also remember Collins' father wouldn't speak on the matter.


-Radam G :

That was one tough blog to get through. Your first sentence showed where you were going: Resto is one smart weasel. I hope that was a joke I missed. Luis Resto is what I call "mentally limited." I won't even go any further in explaining myself. I will give you this: Panama Lewis is indeed a fine trainer. A guru? Let's not go that far. He is a crook, a criminal, a cheat and is indirectly responsible for the death of Billy Collins Jr. "Gloves jive?" What "gloves jive?" Are you going to tell me he didn't take the padding out? Are you going to tell me we should believe his b.s. cries of "Those are the gloves they gave me?" As far as Eric Drath telling Luis Resto what to say and paying him, the story is this: Eric Drath is a warm, sensitive person who was deeply touched by this tragic story. When he looked into it, he saw many story lines. They were story lines he felt he had to tell. Guess what? Luis Resto wasn't talking, just the way he refused to talk to me and my staff when he came in for his license. He thought by telling us he would be arrested again. And jailed again. I told him he couldn't go to jail again for the same crime he had already been convicted of. He didn't understand me. One of my top staffers, Emma Elizondo, told him the same thing in Spanish. The poor, "mentally limited" Resto didn't understand Elizondo, either. He wore the same look that actor Ed Norton wore in his dual role as a bumbling, stuttering idiot and a cold-blooded killer in "Primal Fear." However, Ed Norton is a brilliant actor. LUis Resto is neither brilliant or an actor. He is a 4-year-old in a man's body. Like a dog which has been beaten and beaten throughout its life, Luis Resto was withdrawn and trusted nobody. But, as the filming went on, Resto took a liking to the warm, soft-spoken and sensitive Drath. Drath took a liking to him. He gave Resto money, much the way you'd give a friend who was down on their luck some money. It doesn't matter if it was $10 or $10,000 or $100,000,000. Drath gave Resto money because he felt horrible for this club fighter whose life had turned into one big Knockout loss. Resto began to open up to Drath, who had become one of the first men not to treat Resto like a piece of meat. In their own way, theybstruck up a friendship. Drath didn't tell Resto to do anything. He asked him. He explained things to him in a fatherly way. If Resto didn't want to do it, Drath didn't pressure him to. To this day, Eric Drath gets emotional when he thinks of the hell Luis Resto lives in. Resto would have done better--and lived better and more comfortably--had he been incarcerated for the remainder of his days. In jail, he would have been free. Outside, he is anything but free. Speaking about characters on the very funny "Saturday Night Live"... -Randy G.
Hehehehe! Houston, we have a problem! I'm tempted to holla at LR, bring him to the P-Islands, and put a camera on him, and let you see him open up as a grown-arse man. We got Cubans coming to the Islands now, Resto can help train them. Resto is about 60 years old now. Nothing is going to change for him in the Empire State. He can come to the P-Islands and eat some beet and coconut leaves. They will man him up. He can only go forward in life. The past is nevermore, except a nightmare in his cranium. Holla!


-Radam G :

The visual of the Commissioner explaining double jeopardy to Resto, and his wearing the expression of Ed Norton in Primal Fear is priceless. I need to re-watch AITR. Hopefully it's on YouTube. One thing I recall about the documentary was the meeting between Resto and Lewis, after all those years and all the tragedy that had transpired, and he just shrunk and was completely subordinate to him. That jail would have been a better life for him speaks volumes. I also remember Collins' father wouldn't speak on the matter.
Holla at it.
->http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEVdywAtk50. Holla!


-The Commish :

As I simply can't watch this brutal fight again, I ask, if you do, watch the ending, where Billy Collins Sr. Goes to shake the hand of Luis Resto, only to discover there is no padding in the gloves. As an inspector removes the gloves, Panama Lewis goes into his "Those are the gloves they gave me! Those are the gloves they gave me!" act. So many trainers back in the day removed padding, then sent their guy out to commit an assault. Only, on June 16, 1983, Panama and Luis Resto were caught! It's too bad they weren't caught before the fight! -Randy G.


-Domenic :

The Commissioner is interviewed at the 5:32 mark, demonstrating the horsehair removal.
->http://youtu.be/DpTZwUTjWgY