Boxing Odds – Bradley vs. Chaves Saturday from Vegas!

Timothy Bradley will be looking to get back into championship form after suffering the only loss of his career in his last bout which cost him the WBO World Welterweight title. Timothy “Desert Storm” Bradley will face Diego “LaJoya” Gabriel Chaves on Saturday, December 13 at the Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas. Bradley opened as a -800 favorite with the Boxing odds while Chaves was a +500 dog.

Timothy “Desert Storm” Bradley

The 31 year old Timothy Bradley stands at five feet six inches tall with a reach of 69 inches and fights from an orthodox stance. Bradley is a native of California where he now resides in Palm Springs. Bradly is ranked second in the United States and ranked fifth in the world. Bradley has a career record of 31 wins, one loss, and no draws. Out of his 31 wins a total of 12 have come by knockout. Bradley has never suffered a knockout loss.

Bradley is coming off a unanimous decision loss in a 12 round bout that was for the WBO World Welterweight title. The bout took place at the MGM Grand Garden Arena on April 12, 2014. The loss was the third title defense bout for Bradley since winning the Welterweight title.

Bradley scored a split decision win over Juan Manuel Marquez on October 12, 2013 in a 12 round bout that took place on October 12, 2013 at the Thomas and Mack Center in Las Vegas. The bout was for the WBO World Welterweight title.

Diego “LaJoya” Gabriel Chaves

The 28 year old Diego Gabriel Chaves stands at five feet seven and one half inches tall with a reach of 66.5 inches and fights from an orthodox stance. Chaves is a native of Argentina where he still resides. Chaves is ranked second in Argentina and 28th in the world. Chaves has a career record of 23 wins, two losses and no draws. Out of his 23 career wins a total of 19 have come by knockout. Chaves has suffered one knockout loss for his career.

Chaves is coming off a DQ loss to Brandon Rios in the ninth round of a ten round bout that took place at the Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas on August 2, 2014.

The Pick

We really like Bradley in this one to roar back to contention with a big win!

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COMMENTS

-The Commish :

I have a feeling Bradley is not only going to win, but look spectacular in doing so. He is going to box circles around Chaves. Stop him? I don't think so. But an easy, one-sided decision. -Randy G.


-Froggy :

I think you are 100% right Randy G. it's just a tune up fight for Bradley ! Tune up for who, beats me !


-Skibbz :

Chaves is going to catch and hurt Bradley at some point, and then it's going to turn into fight for a round at least. That'll be his best shot but other than that I can't see Chaves winning, Bradley UD.


-Radam G :

Chaves is going to be doing a lot of dirt. And on him, Bradley is going to put the hurt. Easy win for Bradley. Holla!


-brownsugar :

Chavez was bursting with tenacity determination and hard core bravery that comes with being undefeated when he faced Thurman... You could tell Chavez was a man who had never been broken. Somewhat Like Hatton before Mayweather. Ever since Keith broke him in, Chavez has not been the same. His performance against Rio was inconsistent , uninspired, and dirtier than the fine print on one of Don King's contracts. If Chavez hasn't rededicated himself and his damaged pride hasn't been healed from the Thurman loss Bradley will win by a comfortable margin.... If Chavez is back to his old self he will cause Bradley to endure some embarrassing moments.... an upset would not be an impossible task.


-amayseng :

Chavez was bursting with tenacity determination and hard core bravery that comes with being undefeated when he faced Thurman... You could tell Chavez was a man who had never been broken. Somewhat Like Hatton before Mayweather. Ever since Keith broke him in, Chavez has not been the same. His performance against Rio was inconsistent , uninspired, and
"dirtier than the fine print on one of Don King's contracts." If Chavez hasn't rededicated himself and his damaged pride hasn't been healed from the Thurman loss Bradley will win by a comfortable margin.... If Chavez is back to his old self he will cause Bradley to endure some embarrassing moments.... an upset would not be an impossible task.
Great line. Good fight for sure, I favor TB to box and move ala JMM to a clear cut victory. Chavez has some good moments and keeps his stock as contender relevant.


-stormcentre :

BS will probably think I am trying to haunt and continually oppose him on the subject of Bradley (which is not the case). But, despite concerns about his limitations, I actually like Timothy Bradley. Personally, I think from the Junior Witter upset right through to (but not including) his first Pacquiao fight, Bradley has delivered some pretty good performances against really good - if not excellent - competition. Against Peterson (27-0-0 going into the fight with Bradley) in 2009 - for the WBO light welterweight title that I think Bradley won off of Kendall Holt in April of the same year - Tim gave a great performance, showing a variety of different combinations and moves, to score a unanimous decision. Peterson was undefeated before he met Bradley and is not only still a live dog today - but went on to win world titles after his loss to Tim. Before fighting Lamont Peterson, if my memory serves me correctly, Tim fought Edner Cherry (in 2008) in what was Tim's his first defence of the above-mentioned WBC light welterweight title that Bradley raided from Witter (36-1-2 going into the fight with Bradley) whilst in the UK on Junior's home turf. Bradley almost completely shut Cherry out, and Edner's career - aside from regular appointments as a sparring partner - took a slight nosedive from then on. In between fighting Kendall Holt and Peterson in 2009, Bradley also defended his WBO light welterweight title (that he won whilst against Kendall Holt) against Nate Cambell. Unfortunately this fight was stopped in the 3rd round and ruled a no contest as a result of a cut over Nate's left eye. After Peterson, and whilst still really a light welterweight fighter, Bradley then took on Luis Carlos Abregu (in a keep busy fight) who was (29-0-0 going in), and both a full welterweight and unbeaten. There are some similarities between (Tim's next fight this weekend with) Diego Chavez and Chavez' style, and Abregu. Anyway, in 2010 Tim used speed and skill to win a unanimous decision over 12 rounds against Abregu, in what was a non-title fight. After Abregu Bradley then moved back to contesting light welterweights and fought Devon Alexander and Casamayor; both far from light touches or soft/easy fights. Shawn Porter aside (whom didn't stop Devon like Tim did); I don't think anyone has dominated Alexander more - who was undefeated going into his fight with Bradley. As a result, in 2011, Tim got the "W" over Alexander (21-0-0 going in) by way of a technical decision stoppage in round 10 of a 12 round contest - for Bradley's WBO and WBC light welterweight titles. Bradley was Devon's first loss, and he remains responsible today for Devon's only stoppage loss. After Alexander, and still in 2011 and at light welterweight; Tim then fought Joel Casamayor (38-5-1 going in) who was probably past his prime when he fought Bradley - but nonetheless still considered to be a Cuban boxing wizard. From about 2000 (or perhaps just before in 1999 when he fought Davide Santos) onwards, Joel Casamayor's record reads like a who's who of world class super featherweight and lightweight contenders and champions; the guy was good. 2011, At the MGM Grand in Las Vegas; Bradley successfully defended his WBO light welterweight title (that he originally won from Kendall Holt), and in doing so he blew Casamayor out in 8 rounds of the scheduled 12; effectively retiring Casamayor. Casamayor has not fought since. Prior to fighting Bradley, Casamayor had only lost 5 times (out of 38 bouts). Of those Casamayor-losses only one was inside the distance; courtesy of Juan Manuel Marquez (48-4-1 going in with Casamayor); whom, in 2008, stopped Joel in the 11th round of a 12 round non-title fight. After beating Casamayor, Bradley then - in 2012 - fought Pacquaio (54-3-2 going in) for the first time. The (first) fight between Bradley and Pacquaio was for the WBO welterweight title. Bradley's first fight with Pacquaio has been so extensively covered in these forums I am not going to get into any more than stating a few facts about it, such as; a) Bradley did genuinely hurt his ankle. b) Pacquaio appeared to beat Bradley but was not awarded the decision. c) The judges, controversially, decided Bradley was the winner. I don't blame anyone for not looking good against Pacquaio. I also don't blame anyone for not looking too good against Ruslan (caveat; if you elect to fight his fight and punch it out with him) for that matter either. Conversely, an argument could easily be made for Bradley, in that he has the skills to out box Provodnikov - should he have chosen that route. Tim then fought Ruslan Provodnikov (22-1-0); after he won against Pacquaio in their first fight. Tim's fight with Provodnikov was a tremendously rough and tough affair, in which Bradley showed (if not his skills and experience, then) his stamina, determination and ability to win even with the wrong game-plan. Perhaps unsurprisingly but also a consideration that stood testament to the difficulties of the fight and how deep Tim will go; Bradley complained that he had headaches and was not thinking straight for sometime after his fight with Provodnikov. After a layoff and whilst looking and waiting for a rematch with Pacquaio; Bradley then turned to Juan Manuel Marquez (55-6-1 going in) for his next dance partner. Marquez, arguably, during his entire career, probably could not have been more dangerous and confident; than when the fight between him and Bradley was designed and contracted.
Rationale for that view; Juan Manuel Marquez . . . . . . a) Prior to being approached to fight Bradley. b) And just before Pacquaio had a relatively easy win in 2013 against Brandon Rios (31-1-1), in what represented a "come-back-after-a-knockout-loss-fight". . . . had just knocked Manny Pacquaio out cold. So bitter was Marquez with his perception of the wrongful decisions associated with his first 3 Pacquaio fights, that defeating Manny had now become an understandable lifelong obsession. So the knockout win against Pacquaio - just as it seemed Pacman was about to dominate beyond question in their 4th fight - had come for Marquez when it was seriously required in similar quantities to how unobtainable it, at the time, appeared to be. Furthermore, previous to (and including) that sensational knockout win, both Marquez and Pacquaio had quite literally given each other all they could handle (in the same vein as Marco Antonio Barrera and Eric Morales) over several antagonistic years. As a result during and after the Marquez and Pacquaio rivalry, the rivalry itself took on a life of its own and as such became most boxing commentators' reference point for ongoing rivalries; eclipsing the Gatti - Ward and also Morales - Barerra rivalries. Riding on top of this wave and the knockout of Pacquaio - the so called Mexican assassin - was the Mexican Marquez; when Bradley fought him. In summary, between Pacquaio and Marquez their history reads like this;
First fight; in 2004 for the WBA and IBF featherweight title, and in what was a sensational fight - no-one officially won - the bout controversially ended in a draw.
Note: A case could easily be made for either fighter getting the victory.
Second fight; in 2008 Marquez fought Pacquaio for the WBC super featherweight title and received a split decision loss for his efforts.
Third fight; in 2011 Marquez again fought Pacquaio. This time for the WBO welterweight title. Again Marquez lost to Pacquaio. Despite the fight being for the WBO welterweight title, it was contracted/fought at 144, rather than 147 pounds.
Note: Marquez (depending on who you talk to) has, vehemently, either never believed or accepted that he lost the first 3 fights.
Fourth fight; in 2012 Marquez met his nemesis and finally gets revenge by conclusively winning and knocking Pacquaio out cold in round 6 of their scheduled 12 round non-title fight. The result sends an earthquake through the boxing world as Mayweather smiles. So, after the extremely taxing Provodnikov fight in 2013, Bradley - in the same year - then took on Juan Manuel Marquez. And as touched on above, he did this straight after Juan had knocked out someone that was arguably the best pound for pound, and most decorated, boxer/fighter on the planet; Manny Pacquaio. Marquez didn't represent Pacquaio's 1st loss though; as Pacquaio had lost before his 4th fight with Marquez. That loss took place at the MGM Grand in Las vegas against the above-mentioned Eric Morales, in 2005. However, Pacquaio's loss to Eric Morales (47-2-0 going in) - for the vacant WBC and IBA super featherweight titles - was not by way of stoppage; it was a unanimous decison. Despite the above-mentioned loss to Eric Morales in 2005, Pacquaio would go onto to conclusively avenge it in just under a year, as in January 2006 Pacquaio again fought Morales (48-3-0 going in) in Las Vegas. However, this time it was at the Thomas and Mack Center in Las Vegas, and this time Pacquaio defeated Morales by a TKO in the 10th round of a scheduled 12; for the WBC "International" super featherweight title. Aside from the (avenged) loss to Eric Morales, which was - before his KO loss to Marquez in 2012 - Pacquaio's most recent defeat; there were also 2 knockout losses for Pacquaio early on in his career; they also came before the above-mentioned knockout loss for Pacquaio at the hands of Marquez. To understand when Pacquaio was last (before his 4th fight with Marquez in 2012, when he was knocked out) stopped or knocked out, we have to go way back to 1999; in what was Manny's 28th fight. In that fight, against Medgoen Singsurat, for the WBC flyweight title in Thailand, Pacquaio not only failed to make weight - but was also stopped in the 3rd round of a scheduled 12. In 1996, prior to Pacquaio's aforementioned fight with Singsurat, in what was Manny's 12th fight - against Rustico Torrecampo in the Philippines - Pacquaio was also/again stopped in the 3rd round - but this time 10 rounds were scheduled; as the fight was a non-title fight. As mentioned above, Marquez had lost a few times (to Pacquaio and others {1993; Javier Duran: 1999; Freddie Norwood: 2006; Chris John: Pacquaio losses mentioned above: 2009; Floyd Mayweather}) before fighting Bradley; but he has never been knocked out or stopped. OK, so that's the background on Pacquaio and Marquez sorted. Back to Bradley and his fight with Juan Manuel Marquez. The fight between Bradley and Marquez took place in 2013 after Tim had defeated Provodkinov, and almost a year after Marquez had beaten Pacquaio by KO. At stake in the bout between Bradley and Marquez was Tim's WBO welterweight title that he had lifted from Pacquaio in 2012 - when Tim had controversially beat Pacquaio via a points split decision win. In that fight, between Bradley and Marquez, which took place at the Thomas and Mack Center in Las Vegas; like his earlier win against Pacquaio; Tim not only beat Juan Manuel Marquez by split decision - but also managed scores that were eerily similar. In beating Juan Manuel Marquez Timothy Bradley retained his WBO welterweight title. With Pacquaio's above-mentioned 2013 win against Brandon Rios, he was also awarded with an "International" WBO welterweight title. Next for Bradley came a rematch with Manny Pacquaio whom was determined not to let his recent (prior to Rios) KO loss to Marquez stunt his sporting growth. Bradley fought Pacquaio a second time in April, 2014; at stake was Bradley's WBO welterweight title that Bradley had initially lifted from Pacquaio in their first fight. Against Pacquaio for the second time, Timothy lost a unanimous decision over 12 rounds. Pacquaio's southpaw stance, stamina, power, speed and agility, was largely successful for closing down most of the attributes that enables Bradley to win and look good doing so, and I have no doubt that Mayweather has taken note of that. Still, Bradley has pretty much fought a rouges gallery of opponents since 2008, when he lifted his first legitimate and meaningful (light welterweight) world title from Junior Witter - fighting Witter in his own backyard, and for the most part looking good doing it. There certainly has been other similarly or better decorated (recent) fighters that have not fought the same level of opposition and/or looked as good doing it. If in doubt check Bradley V Peterson, Alexander, Casamayor, Provodnikov, Witter and Abregu.


-brownsugar :

BS will probably think I am trying to haunt and continually oppose him on the subject of Bradley (which is not the case). But, despite concerns about his limitations, I actually like Timothy Bradley. Personally, I think from the Junior Witter upset right through to (but not including) his first Pacquiao fight, Bradley has delivered some pretty good performances against really good - if not excellent - competition. Against Peterson (27-0-0 going into the fight with Bradley) in 2009 - for the WBO light welterweight title that I think Bradley won off of Kendall Holt in April of the same year - Tim gave a great performance, showing a variety of different combinations and moves, to score a unanimous decision. Peterson was undefeated before he met Bradley and is not only still a live dog today - but went on to win world titles after his loss to Tim. Before fighting Lamont Peterson, if my memory serves me correctly, Tim fought Edner Cherry (in 2008) in what was Tim's his first defence of the above-mentioned WBC light welterweight title that Bradley raided from Witter (36-1-2 going into the fight with Bradley) whilst in the UK on Junior's home turf. Bradley almost completely shut Cherry out, and Edner's career - aside from regular appointments as a sparring partner - took a slight nosedive from then on. In between fighting Kendall Holt and Peterson in 2009, Bradley also defended his WBO light welterweight title (that he won whilst against Kendall Holt) against Nate Cambell. Unfortunately this fight was stopped in the 3rd round and ruled a no contest as a result of a cut over Nate's left eye. After Peterson, and whilst still really a light welterweight fighter, Bradley then took on Luis Carlos Abregu (in a keep busy fight) who was (29-0-0 going in), and both a full welterweight and unbeaten. There are some similarities between (Tim's next fight this weekend with) Diego Chavez and Chavez' style, and Abregu. Anyway, in 2010 Tim used speed and skill to win a unanimous decision over 12 rounds against Abregu, in what was a non-title fight. After Abregu Bradley then moved back to contesting light welterweights and fought Devon Alexander and Casamayor; both far from light touches or soft/easy fights. Shawn Porter aside (whom didn't stop Devon like Tim did); I don't think anyone has dominated Alexander more - who was undefeated going into his fight with Bradley. As a result, in 2011, Tim got the "W" over Alexander (21-0-0 going in) by way of a technical decision stoppage in round 10 of a 12 round contest - for Bradley's WBO and WBC light welterweight titles. Bradley was Devon's first loss, and he remains responsible today for Devon's only stoppage loss. After Alexander, and still in 2011 and at light welterweight; Tim then fought Joel Casamayor (38-5-1 going in) who was probably past his prime when he fought Bradley - but nonetheless still considered to be a Cuban boxing wizard. From about 2000 (or perhaps just before in 1999 when he fought Davide Santos) onwards, Joel Casamayor's record reads like a who's who of world class super featherweight and lightweight contenders and champions; the guy was good. 2011, At the MGM Grand in Las Vegas; Bradley successfully defended his WBO light welterweight title (that he originally won from Kendall Holt), and in doing so he blew Casamayor out in 8 rounds of the scheduled 12; effectively retiring Casamayor. Casamayor has not fought since. Prior to fighting Bradley, Casamayor had only lost 5 times (out of 38 bouts). Of those Casamayor-losses only one was inside the distance; courtesy of Juan Manuel Marquez (48-4-1 going in with Casamayor); whom, in 2008, stopped Joel in the 11th round of a 12 round non-title fight. After beating Casamayor, Bradley then - in 2012 - fought Pacquaio (54-3-2 going in) for the first time. The (first) fight between Bradley and Pacquaio was for the WBO welterweight title. Bradley's first fight with Pacquaio has been so extensively covered in these forums I am not going to get into any more than stating a few facts about it, such as; a) Bradley did genuinely hurt his ankle. b) Pacquaio appeared to beat Bradley but was not awarded the decision. c) The judges, controversially, decided Bradley was the winner. I don't blame anyone for not looking good against Pacquaio. I also don't blame anyone for not looking too good against Ruslan (caveat; if you elect to fight his fight and punch it out with him) for that matter either. Conversely, an argument could easily be made for Bradley, in that he has the skills to out box Provodnikov - should he have chosen that route. Tim then fought Ruslan Provodnikov (22-1-0); after he won against Pacquaio in their first fight. Tim's fight with Provodnikov was a tremendously rough and tough affair, in which Bradley showed (if not his skills and experience, then) his stamina, determination and ability to win even with the wrong game-plan. Perhaps unsurprisingly but also a consideration that stood testament to the difficulties of the fight and how deep Tim will go; Bradley complained that he had headaches and was not thinking straight for sometime after his fight with Provodnikov. After a layoff and whilst looking and waiting for a rematch with Pacquaio; Bradley then turned to Juan Manuel Marquez (55-6-1 going in) for his next dance partner. Marquez, arguably, during his entire career, probably could not have been more dangerous and confident; than when the fight between him and Bradley was designed and contracted.
Rationale for that view; Juan Manuel Marquez . . . . . . a) Prior to being approached to fight Bradley. b) And just before Pacquaio had a relatively easy win in 2013 against Brandon Rios (31-1-1), in what represented a "come-back-after-a-knockout-loss-fight". . . . had just knocked Manny Pacquaio out cold. So bitter was Marquez with his perception of the wrongful decisions associated with his first 3 Pacquaio fights, that defeating Manny had now become an understandable lifelong obsession. So the knockout win against Pacquaio - just as it seemed Pacman was about to dominate beyond question in their 4th fight - had come for Marquez when it was seriously required in similar quantities to how unobtainable it, at the time, appeared to be. Furthermore, previous to (and including) that sensational knockout win, both Marquez and Pacquaio had quite literally given each other all they could handle (in the same vein as Marco Antonio Barrera and Eric Morales) over several antagonistic years. As a result during and after the Marquez and Pacquaio rivalry, the rivalry itself took on a life of its own and as such became most boxing commentators' reference point for ongoing rivalries; eclipsing the Gatti - Ward and also Morales - Barerra rivalries. Riding on top of this wave and the knockout of Pacquaio - the so called Mexican assassin - was the Mexican Marquez; when Bradley fought him. In summary, between Pacquaio and Marquez their history reads like this;
First fight; in 2004 for the WBA and IBF featherweight title, and in what was a sensational fight - no-one officially won - the bout controversially ended in a draw.
Note: A case could easily be made for either fighter getting the victory.
Second fight; in 2008 Marquez fought Pacquaio for the WBC super featherweight title and received a split decision loss for his efforts.
Third fight; in 2011 Marquez again fought Pacquaio. This time for the WBO welterweight title. Again Marquez lost to Pacquaio. Despite the fight being for the WBO welterweight title, it was contracted/fought at 144, rather than 147 pounds.
Note: Marquez (depending on who you talk to) has, vehemently, either never believed or accepted that he lost the first 3 fights.
Fourth fight; in 2012 Marquez met his nemesis and finally gets revenge by conclusively winning and knocking Pacquaio out cold in round 6 of their scheduled 12 round non-title fight. The result sends an earthquake through the boxing world as Mayweather smiles. So, after the extremely taxing Provodnikov fight in 2013, Bradley - in the same year - then took on Juan Manuel Marquez. And as touched on above, he did this straight after Juan had knocked out someone that was arguably the best pound for pound, and most decorated, boxer/fighter on the planet; Manny Pacquaio. Marquez didn't represent Pacquaio's 1st loss though; as Pacquaio had lost before his 4th fight with Marquez. That loss took place at the MGM Grand in Las vegas against the above-mentioned Eric Morales, in 2005. However, Pacquaio's loss to Eric Morales (47-2-0 going in) - for the vacant WBC and IBA super featherweight titles - was not by way of stoppage; it was a unanimous decison. Despite the above-mentioned loss to Eric Morales in 2005, Pacquaio would go onto to conclusively avenge it in just under a year, as in January 2006 Pacquaio again fought Morales (48-3-0 going in) in Las Vegas. However, this time it was at the Thomas and Mack Center in Las Vegas, and this time Pacquaio defeated Morales by a TKO in the 10th round of a scheduled 12; for the WBC "International" super featherweight title. Aside from the (avenged) loss to Eric Morales, which was - before his KO loss to Marquez in 2012 - Pacquaio's most recent defeat; there were also 2 knockout losses for Pacquaio early on in his career; before the knockout loss at the hands of Marquez. To understand when Pacquaio was last (before his 4th fight with Marquez in 2012, when he was knocked out) stopped or knocked out, we have to go way back to 1999; in what was Manny's 28th fight. In that fight, against Medgoen Singsurat, for the WBC flyweight title in Thailand, Pacquaio not only failed to make weight - but was also stopped in the 3rd round of a scheduled 12. In 1996, prior to Pacquaio's aforementioned fight with Singsurat, in what was Manny's 12th fight - against Rustico Torrecampo in the Philippines - Pacquaio was also/again stopped in the 3rd round - but this time 10 rounds were scheduled; as the fight was a non-title fight. As mentioned above, Marquez had lost a few times (to Pacquaio and others {1993; Javier Duran: 1999; Freddie Norwood: 2006; Chris John: Pacquaio losses mentioned above: 2009; Floyd Mayweather}) before fighting Bradley; but he has never been knocked out or stopped. OK, so that's the background on Pacquaio and Marquez sorted. Back to Bradley and his fight with Juan Manuel Marquez. The fight between Bradley and Marquez took place in 2013 after Tim had defeated Provodkinov, and almost a year after Marquez had beaten Pacquaio by KO. At stake in the bout between Bradley and Marquez was Tim's WBO welterweight title that he had lifted from Pacquaio in 2012 - when Tim had controversially beat Pacquaio via a points split decision win. In that fight, between Bradley and Marquez, which took place at the Thomas and Mack Center in Las Vegas; like his earlier win against Pacquaio; Tim not only beat Juan Manuel Marquez by split decision - but also managed scores that were eerily similar. In beating Juan Manuel Marquez Timothy Bradley retained his WBO welterweight title. With Pacquaio's above-mentioned 2013 win against Brandon Rios, he was also awarded with an "International" WBO welterweight title. Next for Bradley came a rematch with Manny Pacquaio whom was determined not to let his recent (prior to Rios) KO loss to Marquez stunt his sporting growth. Bradley fought Pacquaio a second time in April, 2014; at stake was Bradley's WBO welterweight title that Bradley had initially lifted from Pacquaio in their first fight. Against Pacquaio for the second time, Timothy lost a unanimous decision over 12 rounds. Pacquaio's southpaw stance, stamina, power, speed and agility, was largely successful for closing down most of the attributes that enables Bradley to win and look good doing so, and I have no doubt that Mayweather has taken note of that. Still, Bradley has pretty much fought a rouges gallery of opponents since 2008, when he lifted his first legitimate and meaningful (light welterweight) world title from Junior Witter - fighting Witter in his own backyard, and for the most part looking good doing it. There certainly has been other similarly or better decorated (recent) fighters that have not fought the same level of opposition and/or looked as good doing it. If in doubt check Bradley V Peterson, Alexander, Casamayor, Provodnikov, Witter and Abregu.
No argument from me on this one Storm... That was a very exhaustive and accurate walkthru of Tim's career. I agree with 99.9% of it...... Bradley is the scrappiest fighter you will ever find at 147 but he struggles to break an egg. However has a winners mentality..... Bradley is the epitome of determination and tenacity. If I had a single hair to split, it would be that I don't think the Marquez who Bradley fought JMM 5 years later and five pounds heavier was as good as the version whom Floyd fought Floyd five years earlier and exactly five pounds lighter (Floyd also weighed exactly five lbs lighter than Bradley). I have heard the term Manhandled used by other bloggers but Floyd beat Marquez effortlessly without leaning, grappling, holding or shoving. Although he did put his supurb 73 in reach to work as he stabbed JMM effortlessly with jabs hooks and right hands enroute to one of the most dominate boxing exhibitions ever perpetrated against a fell P4P fighter. ....I use the word perpetrate because of the two pound weight discrepancy. But it was still skills that won the fight. In contrast JMM beat a hulking 165lbs Alvarado with ease even though he faced a natural height, weight and reach disadvantage. And Mike couldnt come close to muscling JMM around. That why I put Bradley a full class below Manny and Floyd Berenstain (JMM's trainer) even said publically that Juan had sunk into a temporary state of depression after the Floyd..fight because he was totally dominated. JMM took a good rest after that fight... and he still tells every one who would listen that Floyd would beat Paq.....yet he hounded Bradley for a year to get a rematch. Its only a minor quibble...and certainly subject to a huge amount of debate and conjecture...... But yours was a fantastic breakdown nonetheless. Yes I believe Bradley should win clearly and decisively......but if the best Chavez shows up...this could be a rerun of the Provodnikov fight...sorta.


-stormcentre :

Good points. You're right about Bradley's power, or lack of it at the top level; it's one of his limitations. But then, so too, does Mayweather have a distinct lack of power at the top level. That said Floyd makes up the gap with mad/consistent skills and by always sticking to a smart and almost unbeatable game-plan. I agree with most of what you say about JMM too. Floyd owned that azz so much and had him in such a spin, that JMM just never expected to be owned like that and as a result he did look inward. I have previously . .
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?18772-Source-Mayweather-Haymon-and-Espinoza-Given-Ultimatums-by-Moonves&p=71552&viewfull=1#post71552 Given some reasons for this, but still (aside from the augmented power) Floyd's skill level, defence and speed played havoc with Marquez beyond what his unfamiliarity with the weight could completely excuse. Bradley probably is a class under Pacman and Mayweather, but in my opinion he is also class beyond some of Pacquaio and Floyd's typical/recent opponents; which makes him a dangerous proposition in my books.