Oscar Saw "Signs of Vulnerability" in Floyd

BY Michael Woods ON May 08, 2014
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De la Hoya

Oscar De La Hoya, near fighting trim, clear-eyed, seemingly serene, referring to "my company" several times, was in NYC for another leg of the Canelo Alvarez-Erislandy Lara press tour on Thursday afternoon, at the Hard Rock in Times Square.

He won points with the media for self deprecation, noting that THIS TIME, he truly believed the principle bout was a coin flip scrap, and also touched on other bouts and scrappers, including Floyd Mayweather.

I asked Oscar what he thought of Floyd's showing on May 3; did he see any sign of slippage?

"I don't think he's slipping," Oscar said. "But I saw signs of vulnerability. It can happen to anyone. It catches up to everyone. Eventually it happens to all fighters. Bernard Hopkins, I don't know when...But you can't turn back time. I can't say Floyd's lost a step. It's hard to say, it could have been Maidanas' style. He's awkward, he made him look that way."

And, does a fighter go into denial mode, when his legs felt heavy, the snap, the crackle weren't present in the same way they'd been in the past? "In a heartbeat," Oscar said. He said he went into denial mode a bit after beating Fernando Vargas (in 2002, he went 4-4 after that bout, or 3-5 if you think he lost to Felix Sturm), and said he felt signs of slippage at 35...no...33 years old...no, actually, around age 30, because of how hard he lived off the court, so to speak.

I hear folks debating whether or not Floyd showed clear and present signs of aging on May 3, or not. You guys, what do you say? Father Time got his clamps into the 37-year-old?

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Comment on this article

amayseng says:

Floyds footwork and speed is still there.


Chino zapped him early by damaging that body in rounds 1 and 2, re watch and see. those were some hardass thudding shots.

El Dude says:

Oscar De La Hoya, in and out of the ring is a true Legend and a gentleman of the sport of Boxing . A prime Oscar De La Hoya would have destroyed Floyd Mayweather and Maidana combined. Oscar during his prime time was awesome, just look at what he did at a downhill in his career vs a prime Floyd, the dude got robbed at least a draw. I want to meet Oscar in person to shake his hand and tell him thank you for the hope that he has given not just me but for the entire world in believing that one day, we will see the breaking down of the barriers that have been dividing the sport that I love. I have nothing but respect for Oscar De La Hoya and I admire his professional Boxing Legacy. The Boxing Legacy that Oscar left behind lives strong in the memories of all the fans. Life is a struggle but just like in Boxing we should never give up. Great men remind you of no one else and Oscar is one of those dudes.
by El Dude.

The Good Doctor says:

Are we being a little quick to denounce Floyd and in the process of doing so minimizing the fact that Chino fought one helluva fight? When Chino came out in the first round and threw 100 punches everybody thought that was a pace he couldn't keep. In all honesty it wasn't, he only averaged 70 punches a round after that!!!!!!. Combine that with the fact that he was muscling Floyd from being 20+ lbs heavier, played a little dirty, and kept a relentless pressure, I am not sure anyone would have looked good against that. I am not sure that Floyd has slipped at all as it more have to do with the fact that someone came in with a good gameplan, executed it well, and was not afraid to be hit or play dirty.

@EL Dude: I have to disagree with you about the Oscar vs. Floyd fight. I hated Floyd at the time and still thought he won it pretty clearly. I have re-watched it several times and I found it a clear 8-4 for Floyd.

HeNeverSawTheHookComing! says:

Floyds footwork and speed is still there.


Chino zapped him early by damaging that body in rounds 1 and 2, re watch and see. those were some hardass thudding shots.


Exactly Amayseng. Maidana was landing some tremendous body shots! I am a fan of Floyd's skill, but not his antics. Don't let Floyd fool you when he says: He wanted to give the fans their worth so he stayed inside with Maidana. The truth is if Floyd had his legs of 5 years ago he would have box the socks off of Chino. Age catches up to everyone, Period! Yet in still his hand & eye coordination are still off the charts.

I really don't care for Jim (I can't see nobody but HBO's money fighters landing punches) Lampley much, but he is spot on about MP being tailored-made for FM.

The Shadow says:

Exactly Amayseng. Maidana was landing some tremendous body shots! I am a fan of Floyd's skill, but not his antics. Don't let Floyd fool you when he says: He wanted to give the fans their worth so he stayed inside with Maidana. The truth is if Floyd had his legs of 5 years ago he would have box the socks off of Chino. Age catches up to everyone, Period! Yet in still his hand & eye coordination are still off the charts.

I really don't care for Jim (I can't see nobody but HBO's money fighters landing punches) Lampley much, but he is spot on about MP being tailored-made for FM.


People are missing the fact that Chino is adept at cutting off the ring. It has nothing to do with whether Floyd's legs are there or not; he's got the best legs in the game at the moment, possibly only next to Guillermo Rigondeaux.

He realized, just Ali did in Zaire, that he would wear himself out trying to dance away so he could work off the ropes and break him down to the body, which he does well anyway.

Make no mistake about it, Floyd can bounce around for 25 rounds if he has to.

Other than that, you're right, his eyes are supreme. His athleticism is still intact. He just doesn't have to move. But as Lee broke down, Maidana's tactics influenced his decision to go to the ropes -- just like a skilled pressure fighter is trains to do.

Remember, Joe Frazier caught Ali on the ropes all the time and George Foreman even more so. Jesus Chavez caught and pinned Floyd on the ropes in similar fashion all night.

Just because you get trapped doesn't mean your legs are gone. I'm honestly a little tired of people attributing fighter A's good performance to fighter B's purported erosion.

Maidana fought and executed an EXCELLENT strategy. Athletically, Floyd is fine. He'll adjust next time but this time, lets praise Maidana for doing what most said he couldn't -- give Floyd a tough fight.

oubobcat says:

People are missing the fact that Chino is adept at cutting off the ring. It has nothing to do with whether Floyd's legs are there or not; he's got the best legs in the game at the moment, possibly only next to Guillermo Rigondeaux.

He realized, just like Ali did in Zaire, that he would wear himself out trying to dance away so he could work off the ropes and break him down to the body, which he does well anyway.

Make no mistake about it, Floyd can bounce around for 25 rounds if he has to. Maidana forced him to the ropes with great technique.

Other than that, you're right, his eyes are supreme. His athleticism is still intact. He just doesn't have to move. But as Lee broke down, Maidana's tactics forced Floyd's decision to go to the ropes -- just like a skilled pressure fighter is trains to do.

Remember, Joe Frazier caught Ali on the ropes all the time and George Foreman even more so. Jesus Chavez caught and pinned Floyd on the ropes in similar fashion all night.

Just because you get trapped doesn't mean your legs are gone. I'm honestly a little tired of people attributing fighter A's good performance to fighter B's purported erosion.

Maidana fought and executed an EXCELLENT strategy. Athletically, Floyd is fine. He'll adjust next time but this time, lets praise Maidana for doing what most said he couldn't -- give Floyd a tough fight.


Shadow, I think you make a couple excellent points.

Maidana fought Devon Alexander a few years ago and Alexander out boxed Maidana with relative ease. Maidana realized he had to do something to change his career and that something was bring in Robert Garcia. In addition to Garcia adding some subtle boxing skills and a jab to Maidan'a arsenal, he taught Maidana how to cut off the ring. This is apparent in bouts with Josesito Lopez and Adrien Broner prior to the Mayweather fight. It was a different Maidana that fought Alexander and one of the big reasons was he has learned how to cut off the ring.

Second, Floyd's skills have not eroded. Styles make fights in this sport and the way Maidana fought is a tough style for Floyd to deal with. Not that he can't deal with it however and seemed to come around in the 2nd half of the fight after making some adjustments.

Fighters who age quickly in this sport are those that take punishment and don't take care of themselves outside of the ring. However, a fighter at 37 who has never really taken a tremendous amount of punishment in the ring and took care of himself outside the ring can fight at a typically advanced age for the sport at a high level without their skills eroded. Bernard Hopkins is still doing it and so is Floyd Mayweather. The Maidana fight was not about an erosion of skills but about running into an opponent who fought in such a manner and style that made things more difficult that is usually the case for Floyd.

Radam G says:

Shadow, I think you make a couple excellent points.

Maidana fought Devon Alexander a few years ago and Alexander out boxed Maidana with relative ease. Maidana realized he had to do something to change his career and that something was bring in Robert Garcia. In addition to Garcia adding some subtle boxing skills and a jab to Maidan'a arsenal, he taught Maidana how to cut off the ring. This is apparent in bouts with Josesito Lopez and Adrien Broner prior to the Mayweather fight. It was a different Maidana that fought Alexander and one of the big reasons was he has learned how to cut off the ring.

Second, Floyd's skills have not eroded. Styles make fights in this sport and the way Maidana fought is a tough style for Floyd to deal with. Not that he can't deal with it however and seemed to come around in the 2nd half of the fight after making some adjustments.

Fighters who age quickly in this sport are those that take punishment and don't take care of themselves outside of the ring. However, a fighter at 37 who has never really taken a tremendous amount of punishment in the ring and took care of himself outside the ring can fight at a typically advanced age for the sport at a high level without their skills eroded. Bernard Hopkins is still doing it and so is Floyd Mayweather. The Maidana fight was not about an erosion of skills but about running into an opponent who fought in such a manner and style that made things more difficult that is usually the case for Floyd.


As human being, we erode day by day, hour by hour, second by second. There is no escape from it. No sense in going overboard on Money May or B-Hop.

They have lasted longer because of all the above that you posted, no doubt. But also because of good, selective matching, genius of themselves and a crop of less talented fighters unlike yesteryears when you had murder rows in every weight division.

And scribes and sidekicks sell you on this uniqueness of Money May and B-Hop because of their age. A look into history will show that they are not unique, but a bit special and sneaky smart.

Going back over a 100 years, you will find quite a few fighters still ruling in their late 30$ and 40$. And fought well into their 50$.

The late, great Bob FitzSimmon, to name one, was a multi world champion on into his 40$ when their were just one corrupted sanctioning organizations over a 100 years ago.

A bit of research will show a lot of exaggeration about nowadays fighters, when fighter of long ago routinely fought into their 40$ and 50$.

Human anatomy has not change in umpteen centuries. We just tell ourselves that we have. And sell it to the uneducated and research lazies. Holla!

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