Arum And Lomachenko Were Outmaneuvered By Salido

BY Frank Lotierzo ON March 03, 2014
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salido lomachenko1 1fb82His name is Vasyl Lomachenko, he's from the Ukraine, he's 26 years old and is a two time Olympic gold medalist. As an amateur he was a reported 396-1. He's long, strong and he can fight inside and outside. His fundamentals and basics are good and he can hit with either hand. The plan his promoter Bob Arum had mapped out for him was to win a world title in his second pro bout after winning a regional title in his debut a little less than four months ago. It would've been an astounding achievement.

A world title after two fights would've launched Lomachenko into an overnight sensation and fighters already representing boxing's future such as Mikey Garcia, Andre Ward and Ganady Golovkin would've been joined by a new contemporary.

Enter Orlando Salido, who is 33 years old and has been fighting grown men as a pro since he was about 15 years old. Salido, a veteran of 55 professional bouts 41-12-2 (28) was the chosen title holder (who didn't make the featherweight limit and relinquished his title the day before the fight) was thought to be the sacrificial lamb and launch pad for Lomachenko's impending stardom. Only things didn't go as planned and boxing's next must see fighter has to regroup and learn from his twelve round crash course this past weekend.

As the fight unfolded, it was painfully obvious to all watching that the supposedly shrewd course Bob Arum had charted for Lomachenko was on a collision with a huge detour. For starters, Salido who obviously has been paying attention to how the boxing game operates, was onto their game and had a few tricks of his own up his sleeve. Add to the equation that Salido was nearly a 4 1/2 -1 underdog, he no doubt was insulted and was clearly on a mission to upend Lomachenko and company. At the weigh in the day before the bout Salido came in at 128 1/4, two and a quarter pounds over the featherweight limit. He had to pay Lomachenko a small percentage of his purse along with being forced to relinquish his WBO title. This was a gamble that he no doubt figured would pay off if he could beat Lomachenko. Orlando knows that titles don't mean much today and are really just a vehicle in which promoters and the powers in charge manipulate the sport of boxing and fighters. Salido knew a win over the next big thing in boxing would pay huge dividends down the road without the title. Lomachenko made the weight at 125 1/4 as expected. On fight night Salido scaled 147, 11 pounds more than the 136 that Lomachenko would enter the ring at. In other words Salido the welterweight was fully ready to manhandle and rough up the inexperienced lightweight that Lomachenko showed up being.

Right from the onset, Salido made the fight ugly, used his weight, stepped on Lomachenko's feet, hit him on the hips, punched low, roughed him up on the inside, even raked his gloves across Lomachenko's face. There was no question about who won the fight, it was a slow ugly fight that suited Salido's best interest. To his credit, Lomachenko's best round was the 12th, where he actually had Salido in some trouble. But it really was a rough introduction to the pros for Lomachenko, who lost a split decision (116-112, 115-113 and 115-113). Remember, Lomachenko's whole persona was based on his being the Golden Boy, completely unbeatable even at the top levels of the division. At 1-1 you have to wonder how the marketing for him will go now.

Lomachenko showed grit for a guy who's really still, in many ways, an amateur. However, he and his team were dumb to agree to fight after Salido weighed in that morning at 147. That had to make Salido a good 20 plus pounds bigger than any fighter Lomachenko ever fought. In addition to that, Vasyl was foolish to continue his amateur approach to how to fight a dirty fighter (in effect to say "he can fight dirty, but I'm above that.") There are a lot of sharks out there at 126-130 who will eat him up (Rigondeaux, Donaire, and Garcia would have a picnic with him). Now he should be moved back to safer waters in order to build up his record. Sure, they could probably get him another title shot, and winning a world title in his third bout would be a herculean effort, but he's surely not a given and very well could get beat again, and that would be a catastrophe.

What was also troubling is how Lomachenko didn't retaliate with an eye for an eye approach when it was obvious that Salido didn't respect him. Granted, referee Laurence Cole did a terrible job in dealing with Salido, but we'll never know whether he would have given Lomachenko the same leeway that he gave Salido, since he never tried to retaliate. That was on him, not Cole. The reality is Lomachenko's passivity represents a mindset regarding his personality and makeup more than it does his lack of experience. Then again when you're so conditioned to fighting for ribbons and trophies, Lomachenko was undone by the hardness and bravado of a solid pro like Salido.

And after the bout Lomachenko didn't seem particularly upset about having lost when he should've been beside himself. Again, that's a little troubling. Before the broadcast it was even talked about how Salido is always brought in as the "other guy." And how often it's a mistake to dismiss him that way. Salido was very smart to trade the title and pay a few dollars in order for him to game the system the other way. Having the extra weight played into his hands and he fully understood that his title didn't mean much and that a win over the future golden boy is all that anyone will remember, and he's right. He'll now be known for being the supposed cannon fodder that struck down a fighter who things were being set up for him to become an overnight star in boxing. Yes, it registered to him how Lomachenko was having things handed to him.

It was a calculated and gutsy gamble, and I give Lomachenko props for lasting the twelve rounds against a rough guy who was using all kinds of old pro tactics and tricks to get him out of there. But it turned out to be a mistake in that they picked on the wrong fighter who was tired of being the set-up guy.

Vasyl Lomachenko has tools to work with and it's not out of the question that if he takes the type of fights that he should be taking at this stage of his career, he might one day be one of boxing's brightest stars. However, for that to happen he has to ditch his father as his trainer and bring in a real one to work his corner. He's not an amateur anymore.

Also, Salido served notice on how fighters who are forced to fight Floyd Mayweather, and perhaps even Manny Pacquiao at some gimmick catchweight should handle their business. Like say maybe Saul Alvarez shouldn't have come in at the contracted 152 for Mayweather and came in at 155 and given up his title. Force Mayweather to fight him at his real weight and see if he takes the fight or backs out. Mayweather would have a hard time living that down and if he goes through with it and Alvarez beat him, it would've paid Saul back exponentially what he had to pay Floyd for not making weight. Remember how Mayweather paid Marquez after he came in two pounds over the contracted weight and then took the smaller Marquez apart the night they fought? That should've been lesson 101 on how to deal with the catch-weight hussle.

Yes, Arum and Lomachenko were outmaneuvered from the weigh-in to the final bell by team Salido. Arum and Team Lomachenko were playing marbles when they should've been playing chess.

Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at GlovedFist@Gmail.com

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Comment on this article

deepwater2 says:

Where in the world was Joey gamache during all this? He should of demanded a weight limit on the day of the fight to counter salidos trick. Vl dad just telling him to jab was of no use in a fight like this. My trainer would of slapped me around in the corner and said nail him in the balls and who cares if we get dq'd. Either way welcome to the pro ranks. It's not nice in there.

ultimoshogun says:

Pride comes before the fall. Lomachenko even admitted his arrogance in the pre-fight interview, so from their perspective this wasn't a foolish move to challenge Salido so early. They even had most of the boxing world convinced he would dominate Salido. At the end of the day this humbling loss could be a good thing for Lomachenko. There's a saying I read a while back that goes "Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn." I think Lomachenko learned a lot in this loss....time will tell.

Radam G says:

Wow! Super Scribe F-Lo has said it all. Da Bobfather and Team V-Lo lost their dang marbles. You have to stay in your lane. Because arrogance and labeling will show you to be temporary insane. For every fighter, you must show respect. Because anyone of them can turn your best laid plan into a pathetic wreck.

True dat, true dat! From a ref on da cheat, who's always in heat, Salido had help and not a lot of boksing pep. So what! Jesus wept! And the big-MONEY plan for V-Lo has been swept.

Life is a bytch, and then you die. Such watch what you do on the fly. You may get somebody who you think is dumb, but he's quite sly. Hiding his plan in plain sight, Salido got by.

There is a time for everything under the professional pugilism sun. And knowing when to play marbles and when to play chess, will help you beat any shogun. Holla!

amayseng says:

Loma had a terrible game plan. Why was he not going to the body early and often to wear down an aging vet who couldnt make weight??? hell he didnt go to the body at all.. why wasnt he bursting in combinations where Salido would have to cover and just allow himself to dictate the pace better? sometimes you throw punches with not the intention to land, but to slow the other mans pace, score points or just keep him at bay at times.

and secondly Loma, as good as he is had no inside game in there with Salido. He should have been leaning and turning and ripping hooks and elbows in there.

For every time Salido hit me low i would have hit him low twice or ripped elbows inside on his grill and see how he liked it.

At some point you gotta take things personally and get even. Even Floyd fake hugged /tricked Ortiz and blasted him out.

TotoyBato says:

Lomachenko believed in his own hype.

kenhissner says:

Brilliantly written and easily understood even for those like me who didn't witness the fight. I did cover Salido and Mikey Garcia and felt Salido was given a raw deal and should have retained his title in Atlantic City, NJ.

stormcentre says:

Lomachenko is really good.

There is no doubt about it.

He just hasn't had to think about all those technical and dirty tricks for 12 rounds.

Salido is a pretty seasoned veteran also, and at welterweight he was just too much for Lomachenko whom no doubt knew that he could still cruise to a points loss without experiencing too much ridicule.

Still, please, I don't want to hear any more talk of Lomachenko beating Rigo now.

Rigo would jab and cross this guy's head off.

Maybe similar experience levels - but different skills and ability to think in a fight.

For now at least

stormcentre says:

Lomachenko is really good.

There is no doubt about it.

He just hasn't had to think about all those technical and dirty tricks for 12 rounds.

Salido is a pretty seasoned veteran also, and at welterweight he was just too much for Lomachenko whom no doubt knew that he could still cruise to a points loss without experiencing too much ridicule.

Still, please, I don't want to hear any more talk of Lomachenko beating Rigo now.

Rigo would jab and cross this guy's head off.

Maybe similar experience levels - but different skills and ability to think in a fight.

For now at least

Radam G says:

Let the truth be told. V-Lo was in his 9th or 10th professional bout. Don't forget that while an amateur, he was allowed to complete in the professional boxing league known as WSB.

So second pro fight, NYET! But with that said, Salido should've been D'Qed for fouling more than100 times.

The corrupted WBO should overturn this bout. And ban ref Larry Cole[$law] from refereeing without having a seeing dog. Hehehe! Holla!

The Shadow says:

Lomachenko is really good.

There is no doubt about it.

He just hasn't had to think about all those technical and dirty tricks for 12 rounds.

Salido is a pretty seasoned veteran also, and at welterweight he was just too much for Lomachenko whom no doubt knew that he could still cruise to a points loss without experiencing too much ridicule.

Still, please, I don't want to hear any more talk of Lomachenko beating Rigo now.

Rigo would jab and cross this guy's head off.

Maybe similar experience levels - but different skills and ability to think in a fight.

For now at least


Storm, I appreciate your posts and insight so much that I would like to pose a "challenge." Something that shouldn't take you too long.

I'd like for you to break down a fight, or even a round, in trademark Stormcentre fashion, where Rigo exhibits this superior tactical ring IQ, how and why.

Up for it?

And random question: what do you weigh nowadays?

stormcentre says:

Hi There,

Not sure.

I rather enjoy just randomly dropping in and speaking my mind without too much thought.

If I did a lot of what I would say would revolve around or silently rely on the fact that Rigo's balance and ability to always be in a position to throw a punch is superior to Lomanchenko.

I assume you're talking about a round of a fight between Lomanchenko and Rigo; is that right?

stormcentre says:

Hi There,

Not sure.

I rather enjoy just randomly dropping in and speaking my mind without too much thought.

If I did a lot of what I would say would revolve around or silently rely on the fact that Rigo's balance and ability to always be in a position to throw a punch is superior to Lomanchenko.

I assume you're talking about a round of a fight between Lomanchenko and Rigo; is that right?

stormcentre says:

I mean you can't always tell by fighter “A” beating fighter “B” comparisons.

But, Gamboa beat Salido pretty easily in 2010.

And I don’t think Rigo is too far behind Gamboa’s skills and ability; if he indeed is not already ahead.

stormcentre says:

I mean you can't always tell by fighter “A” beating fighter “B” comparisons.

But, Gamboa beat Salido pretty easily in 2010.

And I don’t think Rigo is too far behind Gamboa’s skills and ability; if he indeed is not already ahead.

stormcentre says:

Let the truth be told. V-Lo was in his 9th or 10th professional bout. Don't forget that while an amateur, he was allowed to complete in the professional boxing league known as WSB.

So second pro fight, NYET! But with that said, Salido should've been D'Qed for fouling more than100 times.

The corrupted WBO should overturn this bout. And ban ref Larry Cole[$law] from refereeing without having a seeing dog. Hehehe! Holla!


Yes you're right.

I forgot about that.

The Shadow says:

Hi There,

Not sure.

I rather enjoy just randomly dropping in and speaking my mind without too much thought.

If I did a lot of what I would say would revolve around or silently rely on the fact that Rigo's balance and ability to always be in a position to throw a punch is superior to Lomanchenko.

I assume you're talking about a round of a fight between Lomanchenko and Rigo; is that right?


No no, any fight he's had. A round that exists.

stormcentre says:

Why what do you want me to do?

Analyse what I think makes his brilliant, superior and unique

stormcentre says:

Why what do you want me to do?

Analyse what I think makes his brilliant, superior and unique

The Shadow says:

Why what do you want me to do?

Analyse what I think makes his brilliant, superior and unique


Remember how you broke GGG down? I'd like to read a trademark insightful Stormcentre post about what he does that makes him special that may go unnoticed by the untrained eye.

Basically what you always do, my man! I'm just giving you a topic. Lol

stormcentre says:

OK well I will make you a deal.

How about you remind me of this in May 2014.

That way we know that it really is still important to you - which I am cool with.

And that way I can get a chance to do it when I am perhaps in a better frame of mind to do it.

Sorry, but you have probably caught me at the most busiest time of my life.

Rigo is an interesting guy though. Aside from experience, most of his superior ability comes from skills associated with balance, speed, timing, and how - within reason - he only fights when he wants. The last bit means Rigo will usually, if he can, wait until the other guy is in a position where he can't mount a counter/attack. This is one reason why he executes complete 1 or 2 punch combination feints.

Sure he is looking to see what his opponent is doing in response, and the fact that they believe they have sold him the wrong message on that is alright too. Rigo wants them to do that, because as they do it they're getting positioned such that . . . for instance (there are many variations) all their weight is on their back foot.

So, if you're a righty. You wont be throwing any serious power punches then. Of course you may also have just been lulled into thinking any extension of your opponent's hands was not for contact purposes.

Both situations are perfect for a fast, powerful, Rigo, left cross.

stormcentre says:

OK well I will make you a deal.

How about you remind me of this in May 2014.

That way we know that it really is still important to you - which I am cool with.

And that way I can get a chance to do it when I am perhaps in a better frame of mind to do it.

Sorry, but you have probably caught me at the most busiest time of my life.

Rigo is an interesting guy though. Aside from experience, most of his superior ability comes from skills associated with balance, speed, timing, and how - within reason - he only fights when he wants. The last bit means Rigo will usually, if he can, wait until the other guy is in a position where he can't mount a counter/attack. This is one reason why he executes complete 1 or 2 punch combination feints.

Sure he is looking to see what his opponent is doing in response, and the fact that they believe they have sold him the wrong message on that is alright too. Rigo wants them to do that, because as they do it they're getting positioned such that . . . for instance (there are many variations) all their weight is on their back foot.

So, if you're a righty. You wont be throwing any serious power punches then. Of course you may also have just been lulled into thinking any extension of your opponent's hands was not for contact purposes.

Both situations are perfect for a fast, powerful, Rigo, left cross.

Carmine Cas says:

Loma had a terrible game plan. Why was he not going to the body early and often to wear down an aging vet who couldnt make weight??? hell he didnt go to the body at all.. why wasnt he bursting in combinations where Salido would have to cover and just allow himself to dictate the pace better? sometimes you throw punches with not the intention to land, but to slow the other mans pace, score points or just keep him at bay at times.

and secondly Loma, as good as he is had no inside game in there with Salido. He should have been leaning and turning and ripping hooks and elbows in there.

For every time Salido hit me low i would have hit him low twice or ripped elbows inside on his grill and see how he liked it.

At some point you gotta take things personally and get even. Even Floyd fake hugged /tricked Ortiz and blasted him out.


Yeah neither Loma or Vera went to the body that night, bad game plans against bigger opponents.

Salido nullified Loma's speed with his inside attack

Carmine Cas says:

Lomachenko is definitely not ready for the elite level, Rigo would have a field day with him and Mikey G would probably smash him.

Carmine Cas says:

And Laurence Cole should be banned from the ring, it can't be anymore blatant. Daddy Cole needs to go too.

stormcentre says:

When a guy gets away with as much as Salido did, it throws your game plan.

Since Loma didn’t have the ability to control Salido (like Gamboa did) and wasn’t fighting as good as he should on the inside, he lost.

Salido’s weight would have also played a major factor, particularly late in the rounds.

Basically, Salido was too much too soon and I bet Rigo is now smirking at Arum and his previous inference and/or suggestion (intended to scare Rigo into doing what Arum wanted and fighting in a style that Arum wanted) that Loma should glove up with Rigo.

If the Loma that fought Salido showed up against Rigo, I reckon it would be hard not to envisage Rigo toying with him.

The Shadow says:

OK well I will make you a deal.

How about you remind me of this in May 2014.

That way we know that it really is still important to you - which I am cool with.

And that way I can get a chance to do it when I am perhaps in a better frame of mind to do it.

Sorry, but you have probably caught me at the most busiest time of my life.

Rigo is an interesting guy though. Aside from experience, most of his superior ability comes from skills associated with balance, speed, timing, and how - within reason - he only fights when he wants. The last bit means Rigo will usually, if he can, wait until the other guy is in a position where he can't mount a counter/attack. This is one reason why he executes complete 1 or 2 punch combination feints.

Sure he is looking to see what his opponent is doing in response, and the fact that they believe they have sold him the wrong message on that is alright too. Rigo wants them to do that, because as they do it they're getting positioned such that . . . for instance (there are many variations) all their weight is on their back foot.

So, if you're a righty. You wont be throwing any serious power punches then. Of course you may also have just been lulled into thinking any extension of your opponent's hands was not for contact purposes.

Both situations are perfect for a fast, powerful, Rigo, left cross.


I like it, I like it.

Are you in training camp?

The Shadow says:

When a guy gets away with as much as Salido did, it throws your game plan.

Since Loma didn’t have the ability to control Salido (like Gamboa did) and wasn’t fighting as good as he should on the inside, he lost.

Salido’s weight would have also played a major factor, particularly late in the rounds.

Basically, Salido was too much too soon and I bet Rigo is now smirking at Arum and his previous inference and/or suggestion (intended to scare Rigo into doing what Arum wanted and fighting in a style that Arum wanted) that Loma should glove up with Rigo.

If the Loma that fought Salido showed up against Rigo, I reckon it would be hard not to envisage Rigo toying with him.


LOL I agree. What a lot of people don't know is that Rigo actually tried appeasing those people who said he should fight in the pocket. While he can, that is not his style and totally against his temperament.

He's like a cat. They don't like being on their backs. He doesn't like anything that's unnatural to him.

This is why he ditched Ronnie Shields, because he tried to turn him from a master into a blaster which ended in disaster. The fight with Cordoba, you can see Rigo taking Shields' and take it to him on the inside and force shots that weren't there.

Instead, he got hit. His southpaw shoulder roll stance isn't suited for inside trading with bigger guys. So he reverted to what he knew. Getting that 12 round pro experience is so important.

Still, it was like telling Picasso to to dumb down his art by drawing 5th grade paintings. He found it utterly offensive. This is why he's so defiant today. He tried. It didn't work.

Like Max Kellerman astutely pointed out, this guy wants to land every shot he throws while making sure you don't hit him at all.

"ESTO ES BOXEO, MARICON! BOXEO!"

stormcentre says:

When a guy gets away with as much as Salido did, it throws your game plan.

Since Loma didn’t have the ability to control Salido (like Gamboa did) and wasn’t fighting as good as he should on the inside, he lost.

Salido’s weight would have also played a major factor, particularly late in the rounds.

Basically, Salido was too much too soon and I bet Rigo is now smirking at Arum and his previous inference and/or suggestion (intended to scare Rigo into doing what Arum wanted and fighting in a style that Arum wanted) that Loma should glove up with Rigo.

If the Loma that fought Salido showed up against Rigo, I reckon it would be hard not to envisage Rigo toying with him.

stormcentre says:

LOL I agree. What a lot of people don't know is that Rigo actually tried appeasing those people who said he should fight in the pocket. While he can, that is not his style and totally against his temperament.

He's like a cat. They don't like being on their backs. He doesn't like anything that's unnatural to him.

This is why he ditched Ronnie Shields, because he tried to turn him from a master into a blaster which ended in disaster. The fight with Cordoba, you can see Rigo taking Shields' and take it to him on the inside and force shots that weren't there.

Instead, he got hit. His southpaw shoulder roll stance isn't suited for inside trading with bigger guys. So he reverted to what he knew. Getting that 12 round pro experience is so important.

Still, it was like telling Picasso to to dumb down his art by drawing 5th grade paintings. He found it utterly offensive. This is why he's so defiant today. He tried. It didn't work.

Like Max Kellerman astutely pointed out, this guy wants to land every shot he throws while making sure you don't hit him at all.

"ESTO ES BOXEO, MARICON! BOXEO!"


Yes, that makes sense.

Rigo just looks at people that want him to fight differently as if to say "are you an idiot? I have developed a way to flog people, be brilliant, make money, box beautifully, win and make them miss, and you want me to take unnecessary risks, get hit and possibly lose".

It just doesn't make sense to those that know.

stormcentre says:

LOL I agree. What a lot of people don't know is that Rigo actually tried appeasing those people who said he should fight in the pocket. While he can, that is not his style and totally against his temperament.

He's like a cat. They don't like being on their backs. He doesn't like anything that's unnatural to him.

This is why he ditched Ronnie Shields, because he tried to turn him from a master into a blaster which ended in disaster. The fight with Cordoba, you can see Rigo taking Shields' and take it to him on the inside and force shots that weren't there.

Instead, he got hit. His southpaw shoulder roll stance isn't suited for inside trading with bigger guys. So he reverted to what he knew. Getting that 12 round pro experience is so important.

Still, it was like telling Picasso to to dumb down his art by drawing 5th grade paintings. He found it utterly offensive. This is why he's so defiant today. He tried. It didn't work.

Like Max Kellerman astutely pointed out, this guy wants to land every shot he throws while making sure you don't hit him at all.

"ESTO ES BOXEO, MARICON! BOXEO!"


Yes, that makes sense.

Rigo just looks at people that want him to fight differently as if to say "are you an idiot? I have developed a way to flog people, be brilliant, make money, box beautifully, win and make them miss, and you want me to take unnecessary risks, get hit and possibly lose".

It just doesn't make sense to those that know.

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