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Duran Should Never Again Answer Why He Quit Leonard Rematch

BY Frank Lotierzo ON October 17, 2013
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Leonard-Duran 4-23-80a 1c990Having watched the ESPN 30 for 30 documentary "No Mas" I was disappointed that nothing new regarding the circumstances surrounding why Roberto Duran resigned during the eighth round of his rematch with Sugar Ray Leonard and relinquished his WBC welterweight title belt was exposed.

However, it was great to see during the show that Duran has lost weight and lives a very comfortable life with his legacy intact. Leonard has aged well and still has the charm and charisma that made him boxing's biggest star during the 1980's. And watching the "No Mas" special brought back memories of just how great and complete both Leonard and Duran were as fighters.

After beating the undefeated Leonard in June of 1980, it was highly publicized that Duran was partying, drinking and eating as if New Year’s eve were a three-month holiday. Having defeated the fighter who was the darling of the America media, Roberto was relishing the sweet taste of victory like he never had before. Duran's tenacity during the first Leonard bout was incredible and only rivaled by "Smokin" Joe Frazier's refusal to be denied during his first meeting with the superstar of the 1960's and 1970's, Muhammad Ali.

To Leonard's credit he couldn't handle being defeated and having Duran rub it in his face and sought a rematch as soon as possible. And as it was pointed out during the film, Duran was all about getting more money than Leonard in the rematch, and Ray's money man, Mike Trainer, knew it. So they threw millions at Duran and scheduled the fight quickly knowing that there was no way he could get in phenomenal shape and gain the psychological advantage over Leonard he had the first time.

The rematch took place five months and five days after the first fight. Everybody saw from the onset of the second bout that Leonard wasn't going to be lured into a street fight with Duran this time. He used his foot speed like he never had before and had Duran following and chasing him all over the ring. After seven rounds Leonard was leading on the scorecards 68-66 twice and 67-66. I had it 4-3 Leonard in rounds watching it live that Tuesday night as a 21 year old amateur middleweight golden glove champ fighting out of Philadelphia. It wasn't as if Duran was being taken apart by Leonard after seven rounds and the fight was still yet to be decided. Leonard was having a good eighth round and landed some terrific body shots and counter rights to Roberto's head, not to mention he was at his showboating best. Then with 15 seconds left in the round Duran turned his back and waved Leonard off with his right hand and resigned from the fight, thus handing Leonard an eighth round TKO victory.

The speculation as to why Duran quit during a round in which he didn't appear to be hurt and wasn't being beat up or punched around hasn't quelled in the 33 years since the fight. Yes, immediately after the fight Duran said he had stomach cramps and felt weak. To Leonard's surprise this is something he again endorsed during the documentary with both of them standing face to face in the middle of a ring in Panama. Leonard acted as if he took Duran at his word and later implied that he didn't think Roberto was being truthful regarding why he quit during the fight. And you know what, nobody believed Duran on 11/26/80 and no one believes him today. And that's why Roberto Duran should never again as long as he lives, answer the question why he quit during the second bout versus Sugar Ray Leonard.

Duran is in a no win predicament. There's nothing he can say that anyone would believe. People and especially die-hard fans believe whatever they want to believe and oftentimes facts never cloud their judgment or beliefs. Depending on whom you were rooting for that night or who you are a bigger fan of, that determines what one deems plausible as to the reason for Duran withdrawing from the fight. Depending on what reason makes their man look better drives what many believe.

For instance….

If you're a big fan of Leonard and were rooting for him to win, you want to believe that Ray was handling Roberto so thoroughly that Duran feared he was going to get knocked out and quit so he could deny Leonard a clean victory over him. If you're a Leonard guy that fits your perfect world perfectly. However, if Duran came out and said he quit because he feared Leonard was going to stop him, you wouldn't believe that either. You'd rationalize that by reminding yourself how fearless and tough Duran was and never backed down from anyone.

If you're a big fan of Duran and were rooting for him to win, you rationalize his action due to the fact that Leonard wasn't really fighting him. You tell yourself that Leonard was running around the ring, not boxing, and was more interested in mocking Roberto than actually beating him up. Then you'd justify that by telling yourself that after the first war they had, Leonard didn't want any part of that again. And once Duran figured that out in the eighth round he said, "screw it, if you want to fight like a girl, you can have the title. I'll taint Leonard's victory and kick his ass in our third fight when I'm really in shape." If you're a Duran guy that fits your perfect world perfectly.

Then there's the possibility alleged by a minority that Duran took a dive so there could be a third fight with Leonard. But what if Duran looked Leonard in the eye during the filming of the documentary and said, "Ray, I bet on you to win our second fight, but I couldn't lay down and act as if I were being counted out with you standing over me defiantly looking down, that's why I did what I did." Who'd believe that? Nobody, other than maybe some rabid Duran fans. 

The point is, there's nothing that Duran can say, the truth, whatever it may be, or anything else that'll satisfy boxing fans. People/fans will believe what they want to believe as long as it makes their guy look good. Nobody will ever take Duran at his word regardless of how plausible or crazy they think it is. The minds of boxing fans were made up the morning following the fight. They'll never change regardless of what comes out or is said by either Roberto or Ray.

No, we'll never be satisfied with the reason that Duran gives for his abrupt action on the night of November 25th, 1980, so why bother to answer the question again for the millionth time? And if forced to do so, he should say he bet on Leonard as he smiles and walks away. After giving fans over 30 years of the best boxing in most of our lifetimes, Duran doesn't owe the public anything.

POSTSCRIPT: On the night that Sugar Ray Leonard and Roberto Duran met for the second time, I was pulling for Leonard to win heading into the bout. During the first seven rounds I felt Leonard had a slight lead in the fight, but was a little disappointed that he wasn't engaging with Duran more. He damn near fought him to a stand still fighting Roberto's fight the first time. Sure, I was glad that he was winning but inside I was a little disenchanted that Ray didn't try to put some real hurt on Duran. My initial instinct when Duran turned his back and waved Leonard off was, Duran is disgusted that Leonard won't fight him like the warrior he did the first time they fought. And if he's going to hit and move away, he doesn't want to fight, so can have the title.

In my opinion based on no inside knowledge, just my experience of partaking in ring combat, I believe Duran felt that Leonard was running and not trying to fight him. I think Roberto felt that Leonard was more intent on winning the show and making an ass out of him than he was proving he was the better and tougher fighter. Duran felt humiliated during the seventh and eighth rounds and fighters fear being embarrassed more than they do getting knocked out. I believe Duran sensed that with the tactics Leonard was employing, he was never going to pull the fight out and decided to resign instead being further humiliated by Leonard for another seven rounds. Being a fighter who saw himself as a 165 pound Ray Mancini, I almost rationalized at the time why Duran said the hell with it and walked away. It's no fun chasing quick guys around the ring who are mocking you in the process while you can't get a hold of them or hit them cleanly. Duran was frustrated that Leonard wouldn't let him beat him up, not because Leonard was beating him up. So in what was a terrible impulsive reaction, Duran said screw it and bailed, figuring he'd kick Leonard's ass in the rubber match. The problem was that due to Duran making a mockery out of the fight, he was blackballed from getting a third fight with Leonard for nine years. 

I'm not sure there's anything Duran could say or reveal that would change my mind. That's why Duran should never address it again because I'm not the only one whose mind most likely can't be changed.

Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at GlovedFist@Gmail.com

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Comment on this article

teaser says:

yup....he knew he wasn't in top shape for the second bout and with the clowning of Leonard rubbing it in Roberto just said pizz on it ...the money's in the bank and will get you next time ...he hated fighter's like Viruet who wouldn't engage...

DaveB says:

I just think Duran overreacted at that moment. He probably wished he could have taken it back right after he did it. In the third match Duran never caught Leonard. Leonard said any fight with him will never be close as long as I fight like this. Duran just got disgusted especially when Leonard mocked and gave up and that is all there is to it and I'm satisfied with that answer.

Coxs Corner says:

I agree that most people's minds are made up. At the time I thought it was Duran was afraid he was going to lose and just quit. After watching the No Mas broadcast and realzing how much weight Duran had to lose before the fight I put a little more credence on that facet but I still think Duran quit out of frustration. He quit because perhaps he felt weak and ill prepared and was frustrated and embarassed so he threw his hands up in the air and said screw it

Matthew says:

I believe that Duran had a moment of temporary insanity. He couldn't handle the fact that Leonard was humiliating him, so he threw up his hands and walked away. Nobody laughs at Roberto Duran. My gut says he regretted it the instant he did it. What gets lost in all this is that he never actually said "No Mas." In English, what he actually told referee Octavio Meyran was " I do not wish to continue fighting with this clown." "No Mas" was something that the media came up with, quite possibly Howard Cosell. I found it interesting that his handlers immediately started coming up with excuses for him, telling him that they would do the talking for him. I'm not surprised that Duran didn't give a straight answer at the end. Machismo has been so ingrained in his public persona that he won't do anything to compromise that image. Finally, Leonard has never received the credit he deserves for making Duran quit. The story was always about Duran quitting and not about what Leonard was able to do to him to make him quit.

kidcanvas says:

if roberto was in the shape he was in the first one which Leonard made sure he wouldnt be, he beat leonard 100 out of a hundred , everyone with any boxing brains knows that ...

amayseng says:

From what I gathered Duran quit because he did not to continued fighting this "clown"

ray leonard was everything that Duran hated. The showboating, the big cocky mouth, the American persona of we are better than everyone else, rich and spoiled through the media....Duran came from humble and a tough road and thats why he had such rage for fighting srl in the first fight. he absolutely hated leonard and everything he stood for.

In the rematch, after duran dominated and beat ray all over the ring, ray was clowning, showboating and running and running and running...Duran sady F this and F this arrogant clown I am not giving him the time of day....


and in a few minutes of reflection i am sure he regretted it....

there is NO way he quit because he was getting beat up or out boxed the fight was still close even with ray running away the entire fight.

and i dont think he quit imho because he was getting humiliated.......he felt ray was the clown acting like a fool what was he getting humiliated from? ray acting a fool, unprofessional and running from duran the entire fight?

Matthew says:

Whether you liked or disliked Leonard's showboating and clowning, let's not forget that while all this was happening, Leonard was also outpunching Duran at nearly every turn. When Duran thought he had Leonard trapped on the ropes or in the corner, Leonard would counter and spin off the ropes or out of the corner. This happened time and time again. I lost count of how many left hooks and straight right hands bounced off Duran's chin as he tried to work his way in. And Leonard hit him to the body as well. Leonard was not dominating, but he was controlling the action and forcing Duran to fight his fight. Duran had had difficulty with boxers before (Buchanan, and to an extent Viruet), but he had not faced a fighter as complete as Leonard, and he could not seem to effectively cut the ring off and force Leonard to fight his fight, as he had in Montreal. Combine that with the taunting and clowning, and Duran simply blew a fuse. Since Leonard fought Duran on nearly even terms fighting the wrong style in their first fight, I think he would have beaten a more thoroughly prepared Duran anyway, as long as he boxed him.

amayseng says:

great points matthew,

first i dont think ray chose to fight durans fight the first fight....in the first and second rounds he was hurt badly to the body and never recovered his legs....he was getting beat up pretty bad, if he could he would have went to his boxing ability sticking and moving....he just couldnt, when you take shots like that to the body your organs take a toll and you just dont have the legs to move.....

as for the second fight i agree with you, although running ray was landing a shot here and there before he spun out...for you or me we would be getting beat up, for Duran those amateurish punches were nothing on him other than scoring shots.... duran was not taking any punishment...i agree i think he just blew a fuse of ray and his clowning.......i am sure he regrets it....and what is a shame is ray would not give him a rematch for ten years.....that is bullshit, duran gave ray an immediate rematch, but ray is who he is and was and that was one of the characteristics that duran hated and ray proved he was what duran thought, an arrogant, showboating, clowning fool.....

ray was definitely one of the best ww of all times.

Matthew says:

Duran took the immediate rematch because he was offered 8 million. Carlos Eleta wasn't going to turn down that type of money, and Leonard was the only opponent who could guarantee that type of payday. Nobody forced Duran to eat and drink himself out of shape after he won in Montreal; he has only himself to blame. A third fight, in either '81 or '82 could have been interesting, although it may have been a tough sell to the public. Let's also not forget that Duran retired in the immediate aftermath of the second fight. By early '81 Leonard had his sights set firmly on Hearns. By early '82, Duran had been thoroughly outboxed by Benitez and was considered washed up after the loss to Laing. To me, Duran's prime ended in New Orleans, even though he still had some great moments.

DaveB says:

I don't understand why people call what Ali, Leonard, Holmes and even Bradley do running. That is a boxer's style of fighting. Hit without getting hit and fighting in spots when they want to and the other guy isn't prepared to. I call it master boxing. Of course guys like Shavers, Liston and Foreman hated that type of fighter. They just don't like it when the are on the receiving end of the knock out. To stand their and slug with them was the stupidest thing you could do unless you wanted to get knocked out or at least give them their best chance of knocking you out. Leonard made the fight easiest on himself in the subsequent fights. The first one was hard even though Duran just barely eked it out.

Brad says:

it's like nails on a chalkboard to me hearing the line "Duran had trouble with boxers before (Buchanan and Viruet)." He didn't have any "problems' with Buchanan or Viruet. If you think he did go to youtube and re-watch those contests because Duran completely dominated those fights. Buchanan was never in that fight. He was getting it handed to him from round one on...Viruet simple made faces at Duran, ran, threw a few feather duster shots and retreated. Viruet lost both of those fights by huge margins and never really did anything except act like a clown and finish the fight on his feet. Which is easier to do if you never really try to win.

Brad says:

I agree with the article that Duran shouldn't answer any more questions about No Mas. The man has more than served his time for the crime. It pissed me off that Leonard, who after realizing that Duran wasn't the same man he fought in Montreal and posed little threat, doesn't go after Roberto, he decided to sit safely back and humiliate him. Now 33 years later he wants Duran to explain to him why he quit so Leonard can have closure?!!! Sugar Ray has always tried to control things. He humiliated Hagler by making him come to his announcement party just to say he's not fighting, he calls a press conference years after he's done fighting to say he had a cocaine problem, he beat his wife, blamed it on alcohol. He says a coach sexually assaulted him (just before his book came out assuring every news network will want an interview to discuss) but never says who the coach was...now he wants Duran, who paid a greater price than any athlete could imagine for that one night in New Orleans, to explain to him why he quit. To Leonard. During a film. I'm glad Duran gave him his standard line of bs. Leonard doesn't deserve anything else.

Matthew says:

I say that Duran had trouble with Buchanan because Duran himself said that Buchanan was the toughest opponent he ever faced. If you don't believe me, look it up. Yes, Duran was comfortably ahead before he landed a hellacious low blow at (or after) the bell to end the 13th round, but that doesn't mean that Buchanan was an easy opponent. He was anything but. You also notice that Duran never gave Buchanan a rematch.

Brad says:

Rarely do you see rematches in one sided fights. What's the point? I think Duran's people did the "humane thing" to Buchanan by NOT giving him a rematch.

Brad says:

Please attach ANY link where Duran call Buchanan his "toughest opponent he ever faced."

Matthew says:

Yes, Leonard was a control freak (though not nearly as much as our current pound-for-pound king) and usually wanted things his way. I'm not denying it. And yes, what he did to Hagler at his retirement announcement was cold-blooded and wrong. Most reasonable people would agree. However, he held a press conference to discuss his cocaine use and his abuse of his former wife only because the details (which were supposed to be sealed) had been leaked. I think most people would have done the same. He did not make any excuses for his behavior. As far as his announcement about being sexually abused, I can't say why he felt the need to announce that it happened, unless it had to do with his ongoing sobriety and recovery. I guess he didn't name names because he didn't want to hurt his alleged abuser's family; after all, they didn't do anything wrong. Brad, it's obvious that you're not a Leonard fan, and that's fine with me. Just try to be a little more rational with your criticism; it makes for a better debate.

Brad says:

Well, if you say one of the coaches on the Olympic Team sexually assaulted me, then I guess it makes all the coaches on that team suspects Doesn't it? Is that fair. If someone one "really" did that to you, you have a responsibility to name him!!!

Matthew says:

I cannot recall exactly where I read that Duran said it, however if you do a Google search for "Roberto Duran Ken Buchanan" the second listing that comes up does contain a quote that says that Duran "did mention that it was one of the toughest fights of his career." While this quote doesn't exactly support my thesis that Duran called Buchanan the toughest opponent of his career, it also doesn't exactly sound like Duran thought it was a one-sided fight. I never said I agreed with Leonard announcing his abuse claim and not naming his abuser; I merely tried to provide a sound and rational view of what he may have been thinking. Pure speculation, but rational speculation.

amayseng says:

Leonard was a stud, had all the gifts to be an elite fighter but he was quite the narcissistic primadonna, and arrogant showboating fool he was, which Duran detested, and so did a lot of fans.

Some of the things he did showed how classless as a human he could be. I like him as a fighter but i like duran whooping his butt in the first fight better.


Most people who are sexually abused don't come out and tell the world for no reason at all, and most don't tell the world ever. I am not saying it did not happen but what was the point of it? it almost seems he did it for attention.

Matthew says:

While I certainly don't agree with all of Leonard's actions, can we not also say that many of Duran's actions could also be classified as "classless"? Giving Leonard the finger, using vulgar language, cursing out Leonard's wife, shoving Leonard in the back and screaming at him after the final bell in Montreal, sucker-punching Leonard's brother Roger, and pointing at his crotch while taunting Wilfredo Benitez at ringside are all the very definition of the word "classless." This doesn't even take into account some of Duran's previous behavior. While Leonard's taunting and showboating in the rematch were a bit over the top, I don't have the least bit of sympathy for Duran for the humiliation that he suffered in New Orleans.

amayseng says:

right on Matthew, completely agree.

Brad says:

Yeah, I agree Matthew. But I guess the difference is Duran never even attempted to represent himself as anything other than what he is...a poor street kid from Panama. Leonard talked all the time about how he needs to carry himself in a "classy" way. He talks about it in the film. He was/is corporate. His image had to have commercial appeal. Duran never really seemed cared and in the film still looks like he doesn't care. Drinking beer, shooting pool with his buddies. Dancing with his wife, the same woman he's been with for decades and hasn't abused (sorry, that was a bit of cheap shot), riding around on his scooter just loving life. I don't have sympathy for Duran quitting either. But like I said earlier, he's more than done his time for that crime. He doesn't owe anyone anything. Least of all Sugar Ray Leonard.

Hop says:

right on Matthew, completely agree.


X2

The Shadow says:

Classless is OK. This ain't tennis. Who are the most popular sports entertainers?

The Rock, Stone Cold Steve Austin, John Cena, DX, Floyd Mayweather, Mike Tyson and Prince Naseem. These guys get it.

There's the rare exception of Pacquiao but people like him because he violently knocks people out, down, unconscious and everything in between. As his violent performances have decreased, so has his drawing power.

People can take all that gentleman sh*t and shove it up their a$$. If I want to see two guys kiss a$$, I'll watch the damn Wimbledon or the US open. GTFOH

Give me a crotch-chopping, sh*t-talking, vulgar, nasty, POS any day. Ricardo Mayorga's bat s*** crazy and I LOVE IT!

It's the hurt business. It's a fight. Be focking nasty!!!! Then you can make up and be friends after, knowing you both made a boat load of money.

Most boxers are nice guys outside the ring. But in entertainment, nice guys finish last.

Duran is the man. Plus every good rivalry needs a bad guy.

Hop says:

Classless is OK. This ain't tennis. Who are the most popular sports entertainers?

The Rock, Stone Cold Steve Austin, John Cena, DX, Floyd Mayweather, Mike Tyson and Prince Naseem. These guys get it.

People can take all that gentleman sh*t and shove it up their a$$. If I want to see two guys kiss a$$, I'll watch the damn Wimbledon or the US open. GTFOH

Give me a crotch-chopping, sh*t-talking, vulgar, nasty, POS any day. Ricardo Mayorga's bat s*** crazy and I LOVE IT!

It's the hurt business. It's a fight. Be focking nasty!!!! Then you can make up and be friends after, knowing you both made a boat load of money.

But in entertainment, nice guys finish last.


Wow. I can't imagine reading a clearer antithesis of my own philosophy. If you're able to grab adulation and wealth, who cares how you do it? Money obliterates morality then. Justify it by calling it the nature of the business (b/c apparently decency of character no longer applies). This is ethical bankruptcy at its saddest.

Radam G says:

Passivity is for the delusional and weak. One has to be like Jesus, and not take any softy stuff. You have to huff and buff and violently beat arse. March into h€ll, and beat down the devil in his own domain. Go into Your Big Poppa's House and whup up on gamblers. Cuss out a fig tree for slow growing. And chump down punks, who wanna stone a ho when they had committed more sins than she.

Wow! Holla at Moses! He was straight gangsta on Pharoah and Egypt.

There is always a time to fight. And you play for keeps. We live in a violent world. And violence is expected. Holla!

Radam G says:

Talking smack and acting classless is different from being rude and disrespectful and controlling. Holla!

jzzy says:

Duran's great victory in the first fight went to his head. Never a disciplined fighter between fights, with new found fame and fortune,
he partied like a rock star for months. His then greedy manager, Eleta, agreed to a quick rematch and Duran's fait was sealed. Leonard was
more motivated and better prepared for the 2nd fight. Duran struggled mightily to make weight and had nothing on fight night. He was too proud
to let Leonard mock him and impulsively quit the fight. Roberto didn't learn the lesson and entered the fight against Hearns in similar shape and was
blasted out in 2 rounds. We've witnessed numerous fighters succumb to debauchery and it has tarnished their ring careers. Case Closed.

The Shadow says:

Wow. I can't imagine reading a clearer antithesis of my own philosophy. If you're able to grab adulation and wealth, who cares how you do it? Money obliterates morality then. Justify it by calling it the nature of the business (b/c apparently decency of character no longer applies). This is ethical bankruptcy at its saddest.


It's entertainment. I'm sure you watch action movies, don't you?

The Shadow says:

In fact, Victor Ortiz messed up when he was trying to be nice after being a mean SOB.

In order to win against Mayweather, he kinda did the right thing, even if it was disgusting.

That cut he gave Floyd might have bothered him down the stretch or offset his rhythm for a few rounds.

But Vic made a mistake and snapped out of his fight persona and turned into his normal jolly Vic self, totally forgetting that Floyd was still in mean fight mode.

And he paid for it.

Some of the nicest God-fearing guys out of the ring -- Muhammad Ali, George Foreman, Evander Holyfield, Mike Tyson, Andre Ward -- are some of the meanest, dirtiest, most evil, vile and sinister men you could ever find inside the ring.

Especially Ali and Foreman. Those two guys were the personification of evil inside that squared circle.

When asked if he could beat Ali, Mike Tyson said, "Hell no! Ali fools you. He looks like a model, he doesn't look like a fighter. But he's evil. He's a Tyrannosaurus Rex with a pretty face. He's killer, he's mean. He will take you into deep waters and drown you."

Emanuel Steward said -- I heard this myself -- that George Foreman is one of the meanest men to ever live. "Forget the grills, forget all that grandpa, big smiles bullshit. Don't let it fool you. Inside the ring, he's one of the meanest motherf*ckers in history."

You can be nice when the time is right. But when the time is right, you better fight. You start to kiss? Then it's left-right-GOOD NIGHT!

Just ask Hang Loose/Jaw Loose Victor Ortiz.

Radam G says:

Ditto, The Shadow! One needs a pure, nasty meanest to succeed. Jesus Was One MEAN Son of Mary. Holla at his fight record. Not even grim reaper could keep him down. Holla!

teaser says:

Duran was no angel ...inside the ring or when confronting a future opponent...outside a different story ...his heart is on his sleeve....Roberto was more a FIGHTER than boxer....and the first fight with Leonard is what made Leonard a fighter ....he went thru hell as only Duran can give in the ring ....I think no way would have Ray beaten the Hitman if not for that trial by fire

jzzy says:

Duran was truly a great fighter when motivated, a pretty bad one when not. In my mind, his shameful surrender against Leonard was overshadowed by his stirring
comeback, career longevity, and the decades of thrills he provided fight fans.

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