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Hopkins And Jones Were Admonished Yet Golovkin And Kovalev Are Adored

BY Frank Lotierzo ON August 05, 2014
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A week or so ago it was mentioned in this space how much boxing fans love big punchers. Fans not only love watching big punchers fight but they, along with many writers and commentators, are quick to overrate them in the moment and historically. Punchers, on the way up and during their title tenure always look more unbeatable and dangerous than any other style fighters. Fighters who can really hit always get rid of second tier opposition and journeymen much quicker and more impressively than boxers, technicians and counter-punchers do. And in doing that they build up reputations as killers.

During the middleweight and light heavyweight title tenures of Bernard Hopkins and Roy Jones, it was often stated that they didn't face any good or noteworthy challengers during their reigns as middleweight and light heavyweight champs. What's interesting is, has anyone of those critics taken a look at the names and fighters that Gennady Golovkin has faced in his first nine or ten middleweight title defenses, or the fighters that Sergey Kovalev has faced in his first three light heavyweight title defenses? Amazingly, I've seen it written and heard it said that Golovkin and Kovalev are destined for greatness?

In his first ten title defenses as middleweight champ, Hopkins successfully defended the title against Steve Frank, Joe Lipsey, William Bo James, John David Jackson, Glen Johnson, Andrew Council, Simon Brown, Robert Allen twice and Antwun Echols. Based on that line up according to many observers, Hopkins was nothing special and just the benefactor of a weak era at the time.

In Golovkin's ten middleweight title defenses he's defeated Nelson Julio Tapia, Kassim Ouma, Lajuan Simon, Gregorz Proksa, Gabriel Rosado, Nobuhiro Ishida, Matthew Macklin, Curtis Stevens, Osumanu Adama and Danile Geale. Golovkin, based on that resume - is consider by more than some as the second coming and perhaps better than Marvin Hagler and Hopkins were. Really?

Sure, Golovkin scored more knockouts than Hopkins in the above bouts and Hopkins wouldn't have scored as many KO's as Golovkin did had he fought the same fighters as Gennady in title defenses, but that is strictly due to styles. Could anyone envision Hopkins being considered one of the greats had he beat the same fighters that Golovkin has to this point in title bouts? Not a chance in the world! But since Golovkin is a "catch n kill" attacker who can really punch, he's presumed great? Yet Hopkins would've been ripped in the press for fighting Daniel Geale. If Hopkins had stopped Geale in three rounds, you know what you'd hear? Geale stunk and was just a bum! On the other hand Golovkin destroys him and all we hear is Gennady is the hardest hitting middleweight ever. Give me a break!

The same thing holds true for Kovalev.

In Roy Jones first three light heavyweight title defenses he beat Virgil Hill, Lou DeValle and Otis Grant. And you know what was being said after those defenses; Roy hadn't fought anyone good. DeValle and Grant were manufactured contenders.

In Sergey Kovalev's first three light heavyweight title defenses he's defeated Ismayl Sillah, Cedric Agnew and Blake Caparello. And based on that line up Kovalev is a certified life-taker and destined for light heavyweight greatness. I wonder how many would've said that about Jones had he made his first three title defenses against Sillah, Agnew and Caparello? How about nobody! And the reason for that is Sergey is a big hitter and looks unbeatable at the moment. Had Jones demolished Capparello the way Kovalev did this past weekend, everybody would be saying this week how terrible he (Caparello) is and how Roy doesn't fight anybody.

I'm not bashing Golovkin or Kovalev at all, just examining their records. Nobody talks about who they've fought, only that they've won by impressive knockouts in all of their title bouts. I think they're both outstanding fighters and two of the more exciting boxers in the sport today. However, neither of them has beaten anybody that is/was a somebody and that's not conjecture. And because they're big punchers - they look unstoppable versus second tier opposition. But that is not a testament to their greatness. Yes, they are skilled and more than just big hitters, but they haven't proven themselves yet against one special fighter, and that's not their fault because they certainly haven't ducked anybody. They both fight in sub-par middleweight and light heavyweight divisions. But at least Kovalev will get his first test in November against Bernard Hopkins and then will know a little better just how good or great he might be. As for Golovkin, his division is so sub-par that he'll have to move up in weight.....or wait for a smaller fighter to move up and challenge him before he's tested by another outstanding fighter.

Look at the names that Golovkin and Kovalev have defeated, especially in title bouts. Then ask yourself if anyone would be proclaiming Hopkins or Jones greatness if they fought and defeated the same fighters? I say no way in the world because fans and writers are blinded by big punchers. That is until they finally run into a truly special and tough opponent who stands up to their power and punches them back. And that happens to every big hitter somewhere along the way before they retire. History is replete with that scenario playing out.

During the 1990s Hopkins and Jones were admonished because of their opposition. Today Golovkin and Kovalev are lauded based on how they've looked beating the fighters they've faced. Yet in reality, Hopkins and Jones actually beat better fighters in title bouts than either Golovkin or Kovalev have to this point. Looking back at the names Hopkins and Jones fought during their prime now looks like a list of killers next to the guys Golovkin and Kovalev have faced. A lot of the fighters Bernard defended his title against could be a title holder today.

I'm not saying Golovkin and Kovalev aren't on a path to the hall of fame or greatness, but they first have to beat a few somebodies and earn a few notches on their belts. Hopkins and Jones both had to before they were accepted as all-time greats. The rules don't change for Golovkin and Kovalev because they've built up a great knockout percentage fighting lesser fighters than Hopkins and Jones fought at the same time in their careers and were mutilated by the media and fans for fighting.

Hopefully, for the sake of professional boxing, both Gennady and Sergey will go onto achieve half as much as Hopkins and Jones did. Because if they do, boxing advocates are in for a nice ride for the next few years. But until then, let us stop with how they're both the greatest punchers ever at their weight or how greatness is theirs for the taking. Only time will prove that one way or the other. The truth is, Golovkin and Kovalev have yet to face an one outstanding opponent, where beating them signifies you just may be the next coming. What they've done is gotten rid of their limited opposition quickly, and that's caused boxing guys to over react.

Frank Lotierzo can be reached at GlovedFist@Gmail.com

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Comment on this article

deepwater2 says:

GGG and Kovalev are not anywhere near the prime RJ and Hopkins but they might be on their way.

Roy Jones was always one of my favorites, very exciting, some of the fastest combos I have ever witnessed. His style was very exciting especially when the persona RJ came out. Roy fought the best but he had some weak opposition in there like the mailman, Eric Lucas , and del Valle who only got the fight because Roy was dating his sister Melissa so he gave Lou del Valle a nice payday. That said Roy had an all time great career

What can you say about Hopkins, the man is a living legend . He fought almost everyone. His style is not as exciting as Roy Jones's but he gets the win most of the time. Bernard came up the hard way and never got any gift opponents.

GGG and Kovalev have nowhere near the resume the two old school guys do but fans including me are exciting about the way they are dispatching these opponents. Time will tell all we need to know about these two and I look forward to them being tested.

brownsugar says:

GGG and Kovalev are not anywhere near the prime RJ and Hopkins but they might be on their way.

Roy Jones was always one of my favorites, very exciting, some of the fastest combos I have ever witnessed. His style was very exciting especially when the persona RJ came out. Roy fought the best but he had some weak opposition in there like the mailman, Eric Lucas , and del Valle who only got the fight because Roy was dating his sister Melissa so he gave Lou del Valle a nice payday. That said Roy had an all time great career. I don't remember ripping Roy's opposition too much because he make it fun to watch. I don't think he threw a punch in one round against Paz but he won on defense alone.

What can you say about Hopkins, the man is a living legend . He fought almost everyone. His style is not as exciting as Roy Jones's but he gets the win most of the time. Bernard came up the hard way and never got any gift opponents.Hopkins just didn't bring the excitement to the general public in most fights. I love boxing so I enjoyed Hopkins tricks and toughness.

GGG and Kovalev have nowhere near the resume that the two old school guys do but fans including me are excited about the way they are dispatching these opponents. Time will tell all we need to know about these two and I look forward to them being tested.Hopkins vs Kovalev is a big test.


KK and Golovkin are veddy good boys who can box.
These guys box very well and just happen to hit hard.

Not to be confused with Pawel Wollack or James Kirkland.

BFF says:

so what happens when 3g and the krusher cleans out their divisions? would they be be creatiqued as having the worse "sub-par fighters" divisions of all time?
i think we need to stop trying to compare past generation with current ones because i feel that todays fighters deserve more credit than to say old school guys would have beaten them.... the promoters, networks, and "advisors" are the ones whom should be taking most of the heat from writers and fans for not pitting the best of the best in todays boxing world. i personally despise the promotional/"adivisor" wars, that put up thes total miss matches, makes me sick thinking about it...

Froggy says:

I agree that the promoters /advisers should take the heat for most of the mismatchs, but their are also some fighters, and we all know who they are, who always weigh risk vs reward ! When it comes to comparing fighters from different eras, that will never stop, it might sometimes be unfair when boxers through no fault of their own have weaker opposition than boxers from other eras, but it is great fun to compare them and get a discussion going !

SouthPawFlo says:

In my Opinion:

A Prime Kovalev and a Prime Golovkin wouldn't win more than 2 rounds against RJJR & B-Hop...


Roy Had outta this world speed and his movement & laser sharp counters would Frustrate Kovalev..

And B-Hop was (& still is) a defensive Wizard would've nullified GGG's power and tied him up on the inside while constantly exploiting GGG's Average (at best) defense, footwork & hand speed...

Froggy says:

Don't forget my favorite, MMH !

amayseng says:

I think most on this forum are agreeable that both GGG and KK are not superior to RJJ or Bhop, and especially no where near the great Hagler.

What we do most conceed here is that these buys can box, and have destroying power.
There is something special about them and their paths have the ability (it is yet to be seen if they have the physical ability) to show they are in the same category as these legends.

We understand that their opposition has left a lot to be desired, but we SEE that they are both going for and asking for better fights.

Neither are ducking anyone.

KK just signed with the living legend Bhop after chasing the lineal champ AD away and GGG would be willing to come down to 154 to fight Floyd who is a reigning champion there for a few years now. He has yet to even mention GGG.

Die hard boxing fans are built on passion and emotion for the sport and for fighters, we are excited and passionate about these two guys who can carry the sport at least in the near future.

cabreezy says:

I'm not sure what kind of bubble you're existing in, but Kovalev and Golovkin's resumes are certainly being called out, by the fans at the very least. Also, it's not as if Roy Jones was skirting his way to calculated and technical decision wins during the 90s, the majority of his victories were via stoppage during that period. But doesn't the fact that RJJ & Hopkins (maybe moreso Hopkins) being "admonished" during their initial runs make you not want to **** on fighters that find themselves in similar situations? As in being talent-light divisions where their gifts are able to shine through, but obviously having elite-level skills?

brownsugar says:

Jones was criticized for fighting cab drivers and never considering to fight the legendary boxers overseas
Bhop was criticized for getting his best wins at middleweight against smaller fighters and losing to Jermain Taylor.

The Shadow says:

Weak opposition? Hmm. Let's see.

After beating Bernard Hopkins to claim the IBF middleweight title, Roy Jones moved to 168 and fought the undefeated super middleweight champion James Toney, also the No.1 pound-for-pound boxer in the game at the time.

Jones wiped out the iron-jawed Toney and won a shutout decision while scoring a one-punch knockdown for good measure.

I think that says it all.

The Shadow says:

Jones was criticized for fighting cab drivers and never considering to fight the legendary boxers overseas
Bhop was criticized for getting his best wins at middleweight against smaller fighters and losing to Jermain Taylor.


There weren't any legendary fighters over there that I can remember, there was one jabroni named Dariusz.

(Those fringe WBO Brits were pretty insignificant and admitted to not wanting to fight him. Each and every single one of them. Until later, of course.)

Considering what happened in Seoul, I understand why he didn't want to go. He made that clear, actually.

He invited Dariusz the Jabroni to America but he elected not to accept Roy's southern hospitality. He probably knew that Pensacola hospitality would send him straight to the Pensacola Hospital!

The reason Jones and Hopkins get this ridiculous rep is because they actually fought their mandatories in between their big fights so they could stay undisputed champions and hang on to their 4-9 trinkets.

Just see my past post for reference.

Now Hopkins' middleweight run seemed subpar but he sure proved his point once he wiped out Tito Trinidad, reducing him to a Tito Jackson stand-in in the boxing landscape.

Soul. Snatched. Thank you very much, Felix. Off to obscurity you go.

Of course, he's done more to secure his legacy in the last decade than he did in his first. And that's his legacy right there.

Which just strengthens Roy's inaugural title victory, and thus his legacy, that much more.

brownsugar says:

There weren't any legendary fighters over there that I can remember, there was one jabroni named Dariusz.

(Those fringe WBO Brits were pretty insignificant and admitted to not wanting to fight him. Each and every single one of them. Until later, of course.)

Considering what happened in Seoul, I understand why he didn't want to go. He made that clear, actually.

He invited Dariusz the Jabroni to America but he elected not to accept Roy's southern hospitality. He probably knew that Pensacola hospitality would send him straight to the Pensacola Hospital!

The reason Jones and Hopkins get this ridiculous rep is because they actually fought their mandatories in between their big fights so they could stay undisputed champions and hang on to their 4-9 trinkets.

Just see my past post for reference.

Now Hopkins' middleweight run seemed subpar but he sure proved his point once he wiped out Tito Trinidad, reducing him to a Tito Jackson stand-in in the boxing landscape.

Soul. Snatched. Thank you very much, Felix. Off to obscurity you go.

Of course, he's done more to secure his legacy in the last decade than he did in his first. And that's his legacy right there.

Which just strengthens Roy's inaugural title victory, and thus his legacy, that much more.


Dariusz Benn Calzaghe and Eubanks...Jones refused to travel due to his Olympic experience or so he claimed...now overseas is the only place he can fight.

Just saying every generation gets criticized.

The Shadow says:

Dariusz Benn Calzaghe and Eubanks...Jones refused to travel due to his Olympic experience or so he claimed...now overseas is the only place he can fight.

Just saying every generation gets criticized.


Isn't that ironic how that works? He never wanted to go but a few losses later and he's quick to pack his bags.

Form what I hear, he also has some financial issues. His promotional outfit in particular is in total shambles.

BFF says:

3G and the krusher are not even fighting in their own backyards. These guys have basically steam rolled all opposition that would and did face them in Europe, now their conquest is in the u.s, and sadly even guys here are somewhat ducking behind what it seems like the advisors and networks... I love the no fear and fight anybody mentality these 2 bring to the combat sport of boxing, even if some of their fights are just stay busy, they entertain and deliver the needs of a big fight fan like myself, and they add more to the buildup of wanting to see them fight and call out the best fighters...

brownsugar says:

3G and the krusher are not even fighting in their own backyards. These guys have basically steam rolled all opposition that would and did face them in Europe, now their conquest is in the u.s, and sadly even guys here are somewhat ducking behind what it seems like the advisors and networks... I love the no fear and fight anybody mentality these 2 bring to the combat sport of boxing, even if some of their fights are just stay busy, they entertain and deliver the needs of a big fight fan like myself, and they add more to the buildup of wanting to see them fight and call out the best fighters...


Well said... That's rare these days

The Shadow says:

OK, apropos Roy, something just surfaced that I'm struggling with.

I can't figure out whether this is incredibly epic or just outright sad.

In this video below, he pulls an impromptu rap performance for a non-English speaking crowd who most likely listen to something else in their spare time. (With the possible exception of Eminem.)

Wearing his phony belt proudly, a no-longer-so-buff Roy is dropping iconic -- and ironic -- lyrical gems such as:Can't be dropped, can't be stopped, can't be shook ... while his opponent -- to whom Roy gives dap -- stands there with a look of something in between admiration and disbelief.

Not unlike the look I'm sporting right now.

Meanwhile, as those iconic/ironic lyrics blast, you can't help but have flashbacks to him being dropped, stopped and shook by everyone from Antonio Tarver to that Polish last-minute stand-in with 4 KOs who knocked him on his keister.

Anyway, perhaps best of all is this woman, who I think might be Roy's battered opponent's wife, is standing in the ring with an infant, presumably her child, dancing along to Roy's sudden singing.

Perhaps inspired by mama with her baby in tow, something like two people are doing the up-and-down hand motion -- you know the thing they do in Eminem's "8 Mile," I guess that's the thing to do at a Euro rap concert? -- while an out-of-breath Roy happily struggles to finish his song.

I don't know, I'm still on the fence. LOL. Check it out:[video=youtube;OpfPsUDDB2I]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpfPsUDDB2I[/video]

amayseng says:

OK, apropos Roy, something just surfaced that I'm struggling with.

I can't figure out whether this is incredibly epic or just outright sad.

In this video below, he pulls an impromptu rap performance for a non-English speaking crowd who most likely listen to something else in their spare time. (With the possible exception of Eminem.)

Wearing his phony belt proudly, a no-longer-so-buff Roy is dropping iconic -- and ironic -- lyrical gems such as: Can't be dropped, can't be stopped, can't be shook ...

Meanwhile his opponent -- whom Roy gives dap -- stands there with a look of something in between admiration and disbelief.

Not unlike the look I'm sporting right now.

As those iconic/ironic lyrics blast, you can't help but have flashbacks to him being dropped, stopped and shook by everyone from Antonio Tarver to that Polish last-minute stand-in with 4 KOs who knocked him on his keister.

Anyway, perhaps best of all is this woman, who I think might be Roy's battered opponent's wife, is standing in the ring with an infant, presumably her child, dancing along to Roy's sudden singing.

Perhaps inspired by mama with her baby in tow, something like two people are doing the up-and-down hand motion -- you know the thing they do in Eminem's "8 Mile," I guess that's the thing to do at a Euro rap concert? -- while an out-of-breath Roy happily struggles to finish his song.

I don't know, I'm still on the fence. LOL. Check it out:[video=youtube;OpfPsUDDB2I]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpfPsUDDB2I[/video]


I am at a loss for words.

I honestly do not know what to say or think about RJJ rapping in the ring, at the age of 45, after beating a past prime tomato can.

I just don't know.

brownsugar says:

OK, apropos Roy, something just surfaced that I'm struggling with.

I can't figure out whether this is incredibly epic or just outright sad.

In this video below, he pulls an impromptu rap performance for a non-English speaking crowd who most likely listen to something else in their spare time. (With the possible exception of Eminem.)

Wearing his phony belt proudly, a no-longer-so-buff Roy is dropping iconic -- and ironic -- lyrical gems such as: Can't be dropped, can't be stopped, can't be shook ...

Meanwhile his opponent -- whom Roy gives dap -- stands there with a look of something in between admiration and disbelief.

Not unlike the look I'm sporting right now.

As those iconic/ironic lyrics blast, you can't help but have flashbacks to him being dropped, stopped and shook by everyone from Antonio Tarver to that Polish last-minute stand-in with 4 KOs who knocked him on his keister.

Anyway, perhaps best of all is this woman, who I think might be Roy's battered opponent's wife, is standing in the ring with an infant, presumably her child, dancing along to Roy's sudden singing.

Perhaps inspired by mama with her baby in tow, something like two people are doing the up-and-down hand motion -- you know the thing they do in Eminem's "8 Mile," I guess that's the thing to do at a Euro rap concert? -- while an out-of-breath Roy happily struggles to finish his song.

I don't know, I'm still on the fence. LOL. Check it out:[video=youtube;OpfPsUDDB2I]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpfPsUDDB2I[/video]



Roy's not shy at all. But like Mayweather he's totally tone deaf. Where's Tyson Fury when you need a good piano playing vocalist. Lol... Very interesting but slightly creepy view into Roy's World.
Thanks for the vid Shadow.

The Shadow says:

Roy's not shy at all. But like Mayweather he's totally tone deaf. Where's Tyson Fury when you need a good piano playing vocalist. Lol... Very interesting but slightly creepy view into Roy's World.
Thanks for the vid Shadow.


You're welcome!

btw, did you notice me kinda take a page out of your book with the vivid prose in which it was written??

I'm trying to be as expressive as you!

The Good Doctor says:

Part of the lauding of GGG and the Krusher comes from this new thing in society to rush to find "the next.......".

I am sure we all remember how the NBA was in a rush to find the next Michael Jordan. They trotted out quite a few guys, some flat out bums, that were touted as the next Jordan. Anybody remember Harold Miner?..............Baby Jordan...............ehhh not so much.

Golf is continually asking, could this guy be the next Tiger Woods. There are now rumblings that it could be Rory Mcilroy. Let me answer that for everyone, he's not.

I heard a stock analyst on TV the other day talking about an IPO of El Pollo Loco, a ethnic grilled chicken chain of restaurants primarily based out of the western US. He said that they could be the next Chipotle after only being in the market a week. I know the inner workings of El Pollo Loco pretty well...........They are not the next Chipotle on the stock market nor in terms of chain growth.

Heck, even I am guilty of it. After I saw Andre Berto beat Juan Urango, I thought for sure he was the next guy in line to take Mayweather's throne. Missed the mark on that one didn't I?

I am saying all this to show that it is symptomatic of society to laud people's talents way before they have really proven anything. This situation is no different. GGG and Kovalev have looked great against guys that were at best C+, B- fighters. This does not mean that they will not be great but it does not make them great either. I think both of them have the goods but I am still on the I like them don't love them train right now.

The Shadow says:

I am at a loss for words.

I honestly do not know what to say or think about RJJ rapping in the ring, at the age of 45, after beating a past prime tomato can.

I just don't know.


I think the greatest part of it all is him punctuating his performance by exclaiming:

"I'm back!!"

That almost had me in tears.

the Roast says:

OMG I wish I could un see that! That was begging for some type of Y2J run in. "Why don't you shut the hell up Roy!"

Bernie Campbell says:

Whuts Raul Caiez chopped liver? talk about ignored!

brownsugar says:

You're welcome!

btw, did you notice me kinda take a page out of your book with the vivid prose in which it was written??

I'm trying to be as expressive as you!


I can't lay a glove on you sir... You are truly one of a kind.
Just don't get on the wrong side of a bet involving GGG or Kovalev.
I'd hate to hear that you lost the kids college fund.

stormcentre says:

Part of the lauding of GGG and the Krusher comes from this new thing in society to rush to find "the next.......".

I am sure we all remember how the NBA was in a rush to find the next Michael Jordan. They trotted out quite a few guys, some flat out bums, that were touted as the next Jordan. Anybody remember Harold Miner?..............Baby Jordan...............ehhh not so much.

Golf is continually asking, could this guy be the next Tiger Woods. There are now rumblings that it could be Rory Mcilroy. Let me answer that for everyone, he's not.

I heard a stock analyst on TV the other day talking about an IPO of El Pollo Loco, a ethnic grilled chicken chain of restaurants primarily based out of the western US. He said that they could be the next Chipotle after only being in the market a week. I know the inner workings of El Pollo Loco pretty well...........They are not the next Chipotle on the stock market nor in terms of chain growth.

Heck, even I am guilty of it. After I saw Andre Berto beat Juan Urango, I thought for sure he was the next guy in line to take Mayweather's throne. Missed the mark on that one didn't I?

I am saying all this to show that it is symptomatic of society to laud people's talents way before they have really proven anything. This situation is no different. GGG and Kovalev have looked great against guys that were at best C+, B- fighters. This does not mean that they will not be great but it does not make them great either. I think both of them have the goods but I am still on the I like them don't love them train right now.


Yes, exactly.

Its the same (or similar) psychology at work that makes people buy unhealthy food and drinks in conjunction with events and happenings they enjoy; which is, itself, association by consumption.

In Boxing when people (particularly those without rigid principles that drive their consumption and psychology) see someone that appears to be invincible and or the next big thing they subscribe to and associate with it; as they "subliminally project".

This is why - despite all we know about how well managed many fighters are in this industry (and let's face it, the most powerful part of professional boxing is by no means the recycled and expendable stars) - when someone comes along that people see qualities in that they themselves aspire to and/or appreciate, they will (time and time again, almost as if it is programmed into our limbic system) overlook all they know about why things may not be as they seem in order to scream they have spotted the next legend first.

It's very similar to children (or adults) buying the latest Mc Donalds offering because they provide a movie related toy or other event related experience.

The fact that fighting for survival is also hardwired into our system assists with the charade - and I say charade because if any other industry sector served up as much planned deception and offered it as a quality feed there would be so many arms in the air that it would probably be a revolution.

This is why, as soon as most fighters get exposed, many jump on the bandwagon to describe how the guy was hype; as by that stage the personal psychology is in self preservation mode "I wasn't easily fooled like the rest".

After all, with more than 10 years invested in any interest very few are ready to admit how easily advertised to, that they may be.

King Beef says:

Its safe to say GGG and Kovalev are well on their way to stardom on their own merit, I think there is a big rush to find the next "it guys" because of the impending hole that is going to be left when Floyd and Pac leave, so their legend is being fluffed alittle extra. RJJ was given a hard time for his opposition because of the way he was beating them; everyone figured they had to be bums or was it that Roy was that good. Granted he probably had some "soft touches" in there, but some of the stuff he did was incredible....never seen anybody ring off triple hooks to the body with the speed guys throw fast jabs. As far as not going overseas to fight; why should the pound for pound champ at the time have to chase anybody, they should come to the champ if they want it.
Like someone already mentioned, BHOP is just a still fighting legend; just hope father time doesn't come knocking along with Kovalev.

thegreyman says:

Part of the lauding of GGG and the Krusher comes from this new thing in society to rush to find "the next.......".

I am sure we all remember how the NBA was in a rush to find the next Michael Jordan. They trotted out quite a few guys, some flat out bums, that were touted as the next Jordan. Anybody remember Harold Miner?..............Baby Jordan...............ehhh not so much.

Golf is continually asking, could this guy be the next Tiger Woods. There are now rumblings that it could be Rory Mcilroy. Let me answer that for everyone, he's not.

I heard a stock analyst on TV the other day talking about an IPO of El Pollo Loco, a ethnic grilled chicken chain of restaurants primarily based out of the western US. He said that they could be the next Chipotle after only being in the market a week. I know the inner workings of El Pollo Loco pretty well...........They are not the next Chipotle on the stock market nor in terms of chain growth.

Heck, even I am guilty of it. After I saw Andre Berto beat Juan Urango, I thought for sure he was the next guy in line to take Mayweather's throne. Missed the mark on that one didn't I?

I am saying all this to show that it is symptomatic of society to laud people's talents way before they have really proven anything. This situation is no different. GGG and Kovalev have looked great against guys that were at best C+, B- fighters. This does not mean that they will not be great but it does not make them great either. I think both of them have the goods but I am still on the I like them don't love them train right now.


Nobody can replace Chipotle

thegreyman says:

Part of the lauding of GGG and the Krusher comes from this new thing in society to rush to find "the next.......".

I am sure we all remember how the NBA was in a rush to find the next Michael Jordan. They trotted out quite a few guys, some flat out bums, that were touted as the next Jordan. Anybody remember Harold Miner?..............Baby Jordan...............ehhh not so much.

Golf is continually asking, could this guy be the next Tiger Woods. There are now rumblings that it could be Rory Mcilroy. Let me answer that for everyone, he's not.

I heard a stock analyst on TV the other day talking about an IPO of El Pollo Loco, a ethnic grilled chicken chain of restaurants primarily based out of the western US. He said that they could be the next Chipotle after only being in the market a week. I know the inner workings of El Pollo Loco pretty well...........They are not the next Chipotle on the stock market nor in terms of chain growth.

Heck, even I am guilty of it. After I saw Andre Berto beat Juan Urango, I thought for sure he was the next guy in line to take Mayweather's throne. Missed the mark on that one didn't I?

I am saying all this to show that it is symptomatic of society to laud people's talents way before they have really proven anything. This situation is no different. GGG and Kovalev have looked great against guys that were at best C+, B- fighters. This does not mean that they will not be great but it does not make them great either. I think both of them have the goods but I am still on the I like them don't love them train right now.


Nobody can replace Chipotle

thegreyman says:

OK, apropos Roy, something just surfaced that I'm struggling with.

I can't figure out whether this is incredibly epic or just outright sad.

In this video below, he pulls an impromptu rap performance for a non-English speaking crowd who most likely listen to something else in their spare time. (With the possible exception of Eminem.)

Wearing his phony belt proudly, a no-longer-so-buff Roy is dropping iconic -- and ironic -- lyrical gems such as: Can't be dropped, can't be stopped, can't be shook ...

Meanwhile his opponent -- whom Roy gives dap -- stands there with a look of something in between admiration and disbelief.

Not unlike the look I'm sporting right now.

As those iconic/ironic lyrics blast, you can't help but have flashbacks to him being dropped, stopped and shook by everyone from Antonio Tarver to that Polish last-minute stand-in with 4 KOs who knocked him on his keister.

Anyway, perhaps best of all is this woman, who I think might be Roy's battered opponent's wife, is standing in the ring with an infant, presumably her child, dancing along to Roy's sudden singing.

Perhaps inspired by mama with her baby in tow, something like two people are doing the up-and-down hand motion -- you know the thing they do in Eminem's "8 Mile," I guess that's the thing to do at a Euro rap concert? -- while an out-of-breath Roy happily struggles to finish his song.

I don't know, I'm still on the fence. LOL. Check it out:[video=youtube;OpfPsUDDB2I]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpfPsUDDB2I[/video]


hahahaha thanks for posting Shadow, I honestly didn't even know Roy had fought AGAIN.

The knockout was prime Jones. The rapping was... not his best

deepwater2 says:

hahahaha thanks for posting Shadow, I honestly didn't even know Roy had fought AGAIN.

The knockout was prime Jones. The rapping was... not his best


I guess , you must of forgot.

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