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Cotto's Perfect Exit Strategy: Offer Mayweather Shot At Middleweight Title

BY Frank Lotierzo ON June 09, 2014
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This past weekend former junior welterweight, welterweight and junior middleweight title holder Miguel Cotto 39-4 (32) won the WBC middleweight title from Sergio Martinez 51-3-2 (28). When Martinez failed to come out for the 10th round of the scheduled 12-rounder, Cotto became the first Puerto Rican fighter in boxing history to capture a world title in four different weight classes. With that Cotto will surely go down as one of the all-time great Puerto Rican fighters in boxing history. This is something that couldn't have happened to a more decent man and fighter.

Let it be reiterated here once more. I have as much or more respect for Miguel Cotto as a fighter as I do for any other active fighter in any combat sport. If you're human and have warm blood running through your veins, I can't fathom how anyone could root against him. Cotto completely dominated the favored Martinez and did whatever he wanted to during the bout whenever he wanted to. He was in control from the opening bell and had Sergio down three times in the first round. Actually, Cotto's easiest gym sparring session in preparing for the bout was probably tougher than the fight itself. In what was truly a rare occasion, Cotto was unmarked when the fight concluded. There's not one fan or boxing observer alive who predicted that Martinez would be Miguel's easiest title winning bout. But it was.

Here's where the cold water being poured onto the outcome comes in. Yes, Cotto fought brilliantly. However, I haven't seen a championship caliber fighter come into the ring with legs so weak and unsteady like Martinez's since 40 year old Sugar Ray Leonard was punched from pillar to post by the feather fisted Hector Camacho 18 years ago. Cotto was credited with four official knockdowns of Martinez, but in reality, Sergio was close to going down at least 10 times after being grazed and not hit flush on the chin. Martinez's balance, timing and distance were terrible. He actually missed Cotto a few times with body punches without Miguel even moving or trying to avoid them. Does Cotto get credit for that or was Martinez that bad? I say it's the latter.

Now ask yourself, did Cotto all of the sudden become Thomas Hearns as a puncher or is it more plausible to believe that Martinez has no legs and his punch resistance is totally gone at age 39? Cotto didn't even land his Sunday left-hook on Martinez, at least not with any regularity, yet he was falling all over the place and looked as if he was steadying himself on roller skates almost every time Miguel touched him. I'm sorry, there's no way Martinez is that bad nor is Cotto that great. I really believe that many are over-reacting to the result of the fight on Cotto's part. I think Miguel's effort was no more than the really good work of a first class professional and nothing spectacular, being that he had a breathing corpse of a fighter in front of him. No, Martinez was never a great fighter, but he was borderline outstanding. It was Toney-Holyfield all over again. No way Toney could hang with or beat a vintage Holyfield and the same applies to Cotto-Martinez.

Does anyone fathom that Cotto would've had Floyd Mayweather or Canelo Alvarez falling all over the ring with the punches he hit Martinez with? I certainly can't. I believe Cotto was at the right place at the right time against Martinez this past weekend. Yes, he looked great, but he didn't rediscover himself nor was he re-invented by trainer Freddie Roach. Had Mayweather or Alvarez been in the ring with Martinez this past weekend, they would've taken him apart as easy or easier than Cotto did.

So here's Cotto's perfect exit strategy. He should offer up his title to Floyd Mayweather. We all know Mayweather wants that 160 pound title so he can claim six titles in six different weight classes. And we know Floyd will never go near Gennady Golovkin unless he agrees to fight him with one arm in a cast. Also, Cotto has the lineal title from the man who beat the man who beat the man. Cotto has secured his legacy and is now fighting for his family's financial future. There are really only two logical opponents for Cotto to defend his title against next - Mayweather or Alvarez if he gets by Erislandy Lara in July. Fighting Mayweather would not only be for the most money by far, but it is a fight that he is capable of scoring the upset. Cotto has already given Floyd one of his three toughest career bouts and maybe Mayweather is on the decline based on his last outing against Marcos Maidana. And even if he lost, he wouldn't get stopped by Mayweather and he certainly wouldn't lose any credibility by losing to him.

On the other hand, fighting Alvarez is a much tougher fight for Cotto stylistically and physically. The odds of him being stopped and humiliated are much greater against a puncher like Alvarez. What Miguel did versus Martinez would never work or carry him past Mayweather or Alvarez. Unlike Martinez, they won't be falling all over themselves when they are grazed by his punches. By fighting Mayweather first, a future fight with Alvarez would still be there for him whether or not he won or lost to Mayweather.

And since fighting Mayweather makes the most sense from both a style and financial vantage point, what if he upset him, which isn't a pipe dream. What would that do for his legacy and bank account? The reality is Cotto isn't long for the middleweight division. He could easily lose in his next fight to any of the top five middleweights he'd have to defend the title against, aside from Martinez. That's why Miguel should offer up his newly acquired title to Floyd Mayweather. It makes all the dollars and sense in the world.

And lastly, the fact that Cotto is an HBO fighter and Mayweather is a Showtime fighter won't prevent the fight from becoming a reality. If Floyd says I want to accept Cotto's challenge and fight for the lineal middleweight championship, do you really think either network is going to deprive the fans out of the fight? What a PR disaster that would be. Not to mention all the money that will change hands for both companies via the compromise they'll iron out because it's good business. The biggest obstacle will be Cotto's promoter Bob Arum who will no doubt try and Don King him and force him to fight Alvarez. This way Arum keeps the title regardless of who wins.

If Cotto is smart, and all indications based on how he's managed his career say that he is, he should be campaigning and challenging Mayweather to meet him for the middleweight title. As long as Floyd doesn't try to get over too much regarding the terms and conditions for the fight, and it's not like Cotto doesn't have any leverage because he does. All that it'll take is for Miguel to issue the challenge and for Floyd to accept it. Promotional contracts can be put aside for business. It happens every day.

Mayweather-Cotto for the lineal middleweight championship would be huge. Mayweather can go for his sixth title in a different weight division against a fighter who he already defeated and no doubt is certain that he can do it again and further enhance his legacy. And Cotto can accumulate a fortune while having a great chance to add to his legacy against a fighter who he put up a great fight against and must feel things would turn out differently in his favor if they were to fight again.

I'm not saying the above will happen, but it is in Cotto's best interest. If Cotto fights Alvarez, he can kiss his title goodbye without maximizing his fullest earnings potential, and it could be painful.

Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at GlovedFist@Gmail.comWATCH RELATED VIDEOS ON BOXINGCHANNEL.TV

Comment on this article

amayseng says:

I agree with everything written.

I think Cotto actually has more leverage than Floyd because Cotto has more options. Alvarez always sells and is more exciting than Floyd's pot shot style.

Cotto has looked more exciting and thrilling than Floyd in the ring.

Call me crazy but Cotto could be pulling the strings for Floyd this time.

stormcentre says:

I think, because Cotto jumped on Sergio right from the very start, and successfully so, and because he ensured that the issue (for Martinez) was his face being punched . . . . . .

Even if Martinez’ knee played a factor and Cotto himself was also without equivalent concerns, niggling injuries and/or significant wear/tear from all his years of battling at the coalface and hardly ducking anyone; the fact that the fight didn’t go long enough before the real cause of the loss revealed itself, in my opinion stands loudly as a testimony to not only what the primary reason for the loss was - but also to how, had Martinez’ knee been any better, the outcome would have still been the same - so long as Cotto came in with that game-plan, closed the distance and opened up with left hooks and right crosses.

Sergio Martinez’ knee had sweet FA to do with his punch resistance and if he was getting up at 4.30am and training every morning before the fight (as the promotional videos showed) then it was also OK in round 1 when Cotto started to pound him (and probably a few more rounds after that).

Furthermore, Cotto is by no means a spring chicken in the sport anymore himself.

I am sure he has a few niggling physiological issues to deal with after all the years of training.

In fact if he hasn’t, it will be absolutely remarkable.

As I know personally myself, I started to develop them even in my amateur days.

Boxing training’s constant repetition of running, bag work, skipping and all the subsequent pounding on the legs, hands, back, neck, shoulder and all the associated arm joints and muscles that are involved; ensures it’s almost guaranteed.

Martinez was not precisely 100% due to all the factors being discussed, but he lost due to the guy in front of him and (all other factors being the same) that would not have changed even if Martinez was injury free; in my opinion.

Chavez almost had him in the final stages of their fight and that was without properly training and preparing.

A few other guys had Martinez down in previous fights also, and Kelly Pavlik as well showed up Sergio’s lack of a plan “B” and some other vulnerabilities associated with his lack of fundamentals and formal amateur experience.

Cotto is, pound for pound, a better all round boxer and fighter than all the above-mentioned guys.

That’s just my 2 cents worth.

Skibbz says:

I don't think there's really a need to keep debating about Martinez' knee but I still see some people almost ignoring the facts before their eyes..

We know fighters will fight on in the ring for 15 rounds with all manner of bones broken in their bodies. We know the strength of heart some champions possess and how they will fight on through anything and never give in to their opponents. Martinez was doing just that. If you watch the fight again, and I implore you all who doubt Martinez' injuries do, then you will see clearly from the first round that his knee was buckling and not working with him. Yet he got up time and time again and mounted a fight back.

What's even more surprising is that people say Martinez had no answer for Cotto's left hook. Well of course he didn't, his lead foot was planted because he found it so hard to move his right knee. Every time Cotto came in Martinez could only hope to time him because he certainly couldn't get out of the way with his handicapped knee. When you can't throw a serious left or right against an 3 time world champ then you're going to have some issues undoubtedly.

Cotto couldn't even manage a white wash, Cotto was still getting caught by punches, Cotto could not put an injured and aging champion away - Martinez can walk with his head held firmly high after his performance through his adversity. Cotto in my opinion under performed.

The Shadow says:

Good post Shadow.

Can you please elaborate on what you mean and/or an example (simplified of course) of "rehydration clauses"

Cheers.


Thanks, Storm. Really admire you, bro. Great post below also. I certainly value your input and your boxing expertise much higher than my own so I'm not going to disagree with your analysis.

As for the clauses, simply how much you can rehydrate. As I'm sure you know, the IBF has a 10-pound rehydration limit. (And as a fighter you're no stranger to the battle of the scales either.)

Mayweather tried to negotiate one on Canelo unsuccessfully. They said he could weigh in at 154 but only rehydrate to certain weight and to keep quiet about it; they refused.

Of course, it was no accident Oscar De La Hoya came in the ring vs. Pacquiao weighing only 147 and being lethargic, pale, yellow and completely ineffective; basically a dead man as Floyd put it.

(Please, if you've ever come into the ring dehydrated, I'd love to hear how the experience feels. I can only imagine.)

Now I don't know this for certain, but I THINK the reason Oscar went along with IMO is because he had done so before at a much, much lighter weight while remaining effective.

Back when he won his first title against Denmark's Jimmi Bredahl -- (which should really be dismissed as a divisional title because it was a fringe strap that then had less legitimacy than the IBO today, but that's a different story altogether...) -- on the day of the fight or before, can't remember which, Bredahl threatened not to fight if De La Hoya rehydrated.

Of course, we all know he was drying down tremendously to make that weight so he could dominate lighter weight classes.

Anyway, he came into the ring at 128, I believe, malnourished, hungry and pi$$ed off. Proceeded to batter that scrub Bredahl, overwhelm him with fast, crisp and powerful combinations and snatch the featherweight strap from the Dane.

Then of course there are rehydration clauses that get made public when a guy misses weight. Al kinds of nonsense get negotiated into contracts, as I'm sure you know.

I've seen the Mayweather-Pacquiao bout contract; Pacquiao managed to negotiate some incredible things in there. Like $10m per pound Mayweather would be overweight, which is unbelievable and quite frankly seemed like a way to get out of the fight.

(Also, contrary to popular belief, the blood testing thing was there from Day 1.)

He also managed a to get a complete 50-50 split even though Floyd said that was a non-starter. Big Al must have talked him into it.

Also, Pacquiao-Cotto looked like it could've had a rehydration clause. There were no unofficial weights from what I saw and Cotto's punch resistance was ridiculously low, getting knocked senseless from a Manny Pacquiao right hook (?!) while not being able to hurt Manny at all (that fight just looked odd all around, tbh). I've seen parts of that bout contract, too, and there was no mention of it, from what I saw, so I'm not sure.

Anyway, so based on certain things, I wouldn't be at all surprised if the Cotto side had negotiated some sort of "no-excuse" clause.

Because DBE & Co. kept on complaining about certain demands that would annoy them even though it turned out things they complain about were lies. They made it sound like Cotto demanded to come out on roses last while wearing Martinez' belt which wasn't the case at all.

They seemed just too adamant that it wasn't the knee. But who knows, maybe they're trying to bamboozle the commission to clear him to fight so they can squeeze out another under the contract HBO owes them...

Who the hell knows.

The Shadow says:

On a totally different, yet related, note, check out what was said back in 2011 after the first stint in rehab, using Twitter as the platform:

"Dear bob arum first I would like to humbly apologize for any pain I have caused to you and or your family.I also want to apologize....

To manny paquiao for any wrong doing in my part.you are a great champion.I have realized that by accepting my mistakes everyone around me...

Will hopefully forgive me.with great humility I ask we work together for the good of the sport we dearly love.It is not fair to the fans...

And to the fighters.so today let's move forward and put on the best fights possible and show the world what we are capable of doing.

Thank you bob.your friend oscar"


Sounds familiar?

However I do think this was sincere. I also think Schaefer's expressing joy about doing business with Top Rank again was sincere.

But the legally enforced apology -- eerily similar, almost identical, to the Mayweathers' apology -- certainly was not.

So that makes me wonder about the sincerity of the DiBella side dismissing the possibility that the old man's poor wheels had anything to do with Martinez' lack of mobility, attributing it instead from "concussive symptoms" from the first left hook. It just seemed so contrived.

oubobcat says:

I don't think we are going to see Mayweather-Cotto II. The reason, Bob Arum.

I understand Cotto is technically a promotional free agent. But I am guessing he sticks with Top Rank and works with them on a plan to move forward defending the Middleweight title. Arum sounded very confident after the Cotto-Martinez fight as a matter of fact that he would be working with Top Rank on a defense for December at Madison Square Garden.

Why would Cotto stick with Arum? Cotto made a lot of money with Arum in the past. He also made a lot of money with Arum fighting guys he could easily handle many times.

Look back at 2011...Cotto fought against Ricardo Mayorga and Antonio Margarito. Cotto was handsomely paid in those fights against name fighters who had each seen their better days. These were relatively easy fights for Cotto.

In 2012, he veers away from Top Rank and takes the Mayweather fight. Okay understandable. But then works again with Golden Boy and they come up with Austin Trout at the Garden. Its was lower level opponent as far as name recognition and a very dangerous fight stylistically for Cotto. In the ring, it turned out to be a nightmarish evening.

So Cotto goes back to work with Top Rank and gets Delvin Rodriguez. A perfect opponent for Cotto to shine against.

Following Rodriguez, agrees once again to work with Top Rank for Martinez. It turns out to be a brilliant move as Martinez was clearly hobbled by his knees. Cotto was able to take the lineal Middleweight Championship in a fight he looked great against on the big stage at Madison Square Garden.

I believe Cotto has learned from the past and will once again look to work with Top Rank. So that crosses out a Mayweather rematch.

The commish interviewed Arum on the radio show that aired yesterday. There was talk about Cotto-Canelo but it seemed like Arum was aiming for that fight next May from his comments.

Arum also sounded confident he'd be working with Cotto on a December defense at the Garden. No opponents were mentioned but I'll throw a name out there. Matthew Macklin.

Its a makeable fight and a very marketable fight. Its also a fight Cotto should be able to handle.

Stylistically, Macklin is well suited for Cotto. Macklin is not a mover and will come forward to make the fight. He is tough and willing to exchange. He will be right in front of you and can be hit. Its a perfect fight for Cotto at this stage of his career.

Then, we will get Cotto-Canelo next spring regardless of whether Canelo defeats Lara or not in July.

The Shadow says:

I don't think we are going to see Mayweather-Cotto II. The reason, Bob Arum.

I understand Cotto is technically a promotional free agent. But I am guessing he sticks with Top Rank and works with them on a plan to move forward defending the Middleweight title. Arum sounded very confident after the Cotto-Martinez fight as a matter of fact that he would be working with Top Rank on a defense for December at Madison Square Garden.

Why would Cotto stick with Arum? Cotto made a lot of money with Arum in the past. He also made a lot of money with Arum fighting guys he could easily handle many times.

Look back at 2011...Cotto fought against Ricardo Mayorga and Antonio Margarito. Cotto was handsomely paid in those fights against name fighters who had each seen their better days. These were relatively easy fights for Cotto.

In 2012, he veers away from Top Rank and takes the Mayweather fight. Okay understandable. But then works again with Golden Boy and they come up with Austin Trout at the Garden. Its was lower level opponent as far as name recognition and a very dangerous fight stylistically for Cotto. In the ring, it turned out to be a nightmarish evening.

So Cotto goes back to work with Top Rank and gets Delvin Rodriguez. A perfect opponent for Cotto to shine against.

Following Rodriguez, agrees once again to work with Top Rank for Martinez. It turns out to be a brilliant move as Martinez was clearly hobbled by his knees. Cotto was able to take the lineal Middleweight Championship in a fight he looked great against on the big stage at Madison Square Garden.

I believe Cotto has learned from the past and will once again look to work with Top Rank. So that crosses out a Mayweather rematch.

The commish interviewed Arum on the radio show that aired yesterday. There was talk about Cotto-Canelo but it seemed like Arum was aiming for that fight next May from his comments.

Arum also sounded confident he'd be working with Cotto on a December defense at the Garden. No opponents were mentioned but I'll throw a name out there. Matthew Macklin.

Its a makeable fight and a very marketable fight. Its also a fight Cotto should be able to handle.

Stylistically, Macklin is well suited for Cotto. Macklin is not a mover and will come forward to make the fight. He is tough and willing to exchange. He will be right in front of you and can be hit. Its a perfect fight for Cotto at this stage of his career.

Then, we will get Cotto-Canelo next spring regardless of whether Canelo defeats Lara or not in July.


Arum was saying similar stuff after the Margarito fight. Then Cotto took center stage, hugged Bob Arum and proclaimed "this is my promoter."

Trout was his choice. He had the option of going for K9 Bundrage, whom GBP had acquired for that purpose, actually, the better stylistic matchup. But he chose Trout.

After that, he pledged his allegiance to GBP. Then we see him with TR. So things can change quickly. I understand what you 're saying and I really appreciate your knowledge and that you always do your homework, but I don't I hunk we should put too much into that...

Remember, money talks. If they offer him $12-$15m, which I think will be available, I'm sure his adviser will break bread with Leonard and Al very, very quickly. I think he made that anyway when everything was accounted for.

I actually did some number crunching. The appeal with Canelo-Cotto is that Cotto gets about half of a smaller pie. Of course he won't get half with Floyd. Therefore the Mayweather side will have to come up with a bigger pie -- which they can -- to make sure his piece surpasses his half of the smaller Canelo pie.

And based on the crunching, it is not unreasonable to give Cotto a guarantee of $12m with additional upside.

stormcentre says:

Thanks, Storm. Really admire you, bro. Great post below also. I certainly value your input and your boxing expertise much higher than my own so I'm not going to disagree with your analysis.

As for the clauses, simply how much you can rehydrate. As I'm sure you know, the IBF has a 10-pound rehydration limit. (And as a fighter you're no stranger to the battle of the scales either.)

Mayweather tried to negotiate one on Canelo unsuccessfully. They said he could weigh in at 154 but only rehydrate to certain weight and to keep quiet about it; they refused.

Of course, it was no accident Oscar De La Hoya came in the ring vs. Pacquiao weighing only 147 and being lethargic, pale, yellow and completely ineffective; basically a dead man as Floyd put it.

(Please, if you've ever come into the ring dehydrated, I'd love to hear how the experience feels. I can only imagine.)

Now I don't know this for certain, but I THINK the reason Oscar went along with IMO is because he had done so before at a much, much lighter weight while remaining effective.

Back when he won his first title against Denmark's Jimmi Bredahl -- (which should really be dismissed as a divisional title because it was a fringe strap that then had less legitimacy than the IBO today, but that's a different story altogether...) -- on the day of the fight or before, can't remember which, Bredahl threatened not to fight if De La Hoya rehydrated.

Of course, we all know he was drying down tremendously to make that weight so he could dominate lighter weight classes.

Anyway, he came into the ring at 128, I believe, malnourished, hungry and pi$$ed off. Proceeded to batter that scrub Bredahl, overwhelm him with fast, crisp and powerful combinations and snatch the featherweight strap from the Dane.

Then of course there are rehydration clauses that get made public when a guy misses weight. All kinds of nonsense get negotiated into contracts, as I'm sure you know.

I've seen the Mayweather-Pacquiao bout contract; Pacquiao managed to negotiate some incredible things in there. Like $10m per pound Mayweather would be overweight, which is unbelievable and quite frankly seemed like a way to get out of the fight.

(Also, contrary to popular belief, the blood testing thing was there from Day 1.)

He also managed to get a complete 50-50 split even though Floyd said that was a non-starter. Big Al must have talked him into it.

Also, Pacquiao-Cotto looked like it could've had a rehydration clause. There were no unofficial weights from what I saw and Cotto's punch resistance was ridiculously low, getting knocked senseless from a Manny Pacquiao right hook (?!) while not being able to hurt Manny at all (that fight just looked odd all around, tbh). I've seen parts of that bout contract, too, and there was no mention of it, from what I saw, so I'm not sure.

Anyway, so based on certain things and the way certain things were being spoken off, I wouldn't be at all surprised if the Cotto side had negotiated some sort of "no-excuse" clause.

DBE & Co. kept on complaining about certain demands that would annoy them even though it turned out things they complain about were lies. They made it sound like Cotto demanded to come out to the ring on roses last while wearing Martinez' belt, which wasn't the case at all.

They seemed just too adamant that it wasn't the knee. Lou DiBella, a lawyer from Harvard, came up and made that unnecessary statement, almost as if obligated, and then took off.

It looked like one of those contrived, legally-enforced apologies you're forced to make as part of settlement terms.

(Think the Mayweather's statement as part of the Pacquiao case or Top Rank-enforced public apology from GBP as a provision to make any future fights with them. That libel lsuit was nothing but a divide-and-conquer strategy executed by an incredibly clever man. Sure enough, just one month after the humiliating "apology," the "Cold War thawed" as TR and GBP made their first fight together in years.

"I think this clears the way for future fights with one of their fighters with Manny, all other things being equal," Arum told ESPN.com. "Prior to the apology we would not have not considered it. This (PED accusation) was something directed at Manny. He's accepted this apology and indicated that he has accepted it by settling the lawsuit, so we move on."

Oscar didn't mean that; he's CONVINCED Pacquiao was juicing. Believes it in his heart of hearts. And kept alluding to it after this apology.)

But who knows, maybe DiBella and his shysty partner are trying to bamboozle the commission or whoever to clear Martinez to fight so they can squeeze out another seven-figure payday under the contract HBO owes them...

Who the hell knows.


OK thanks for that clarification.

To answer your question about rehydrating/dehydrating; it can be very hard coming into a big fight after not eating and/or drinking; regardless of what you - if you can - rehydrate back to.

For instance, your game-plan may require you to be 100% fit for all 12 rounds - most do.

But you may actually find out, whilst someone like Vince Philips is wailing on you in the 8th round, that you only had enough for 8 and 3 months was not enough time to lose all that weight.

stormcentre says:

On a totally different, yet related, note, check out what was said back in 2011 after the first stint in rehab, using Twitter as the platform:

"Dear bob arum first I would like to humbly apologize for any pain I have caused to you and or your family.I also want to apologize....

To manny paquiao for any wrong doing in my part.you are a great champion.I have realized that by accepting my mistakes everyone around me...

Will hopefully forgive me.with great humility I ask we work together for the good of the sport we dearly love.It is not fair to the fans...

And to the fighters.so today let's move forward and put on the best fights possible and show the world what we are capable of doing.

Thank you bob.your friend oscar"


Sounds familiar?

However I do think this was sincere. I also think Schaefer's expressing joy about doing business with Top Rank again was sincere.

But the legally enforced apology -- eerily similar, almost identical, to the Mayweathers' apology -- certainly was not.

So that makes me wonder about the sincerity of the DiBella side dismissing the possibility that the old man's poor wheels had anything to do with Martinez' lack of mobility, attributing it instead from "concussive symptoms" from the first left hook. It just seemed so contrived.


I see what you're saying and you may be right too.

As far as those (typed) words from Oscar are concerned he was probably detoxifying and feeling all emotional and honest.

Have you seen that show that runs on TV about a Hollywood addiction clinic?

They have celebrities and film them in there for all kinds of addiction; sex, coke, oxycontin, smack, ice, you name it.

It’s a real show that I think certain celebrities condone the filming of for the betterment of the world - isn’t that nice?

For coke and most white powder drugs; after a week or so, particularly as their body starts to crave the drug but really sense it absence the emotional response and feelings of accountability and damage can be absolutely overwhelming.

Anyway, I saw an issue with Eric Roberts in there recovering from coke and he was just crying, being really dismayed and seemingly deep, meaningful, personal and honest about his life and how he was not what he or others thought.

It was quite an insight.

Aside from that, a part of rehabilitation is to admit, forgive, forget and move on.

I remember Oscar’s twitter outpourings and still think they're genuine but mostly due to the above.

deepwater2 says:

The reality is Oscar and Arum are cordial again and open to doing business . That is a good thing . Time to move on from Oscar's past mistakes . Floyd has made mistakes . The summer boxing schedule is fantastic.

deepwater2 says:

The reality is Oscar and Arum are cordial again and open to doing business . That is a good thing . Time to move on from Oscar's past mistakes . Floyd has made mistakes . The summer boxing schedule is fantastic.

Radam G says:

The reality is Oscar and Arum are cordial again and open to doing business . That is a good thing . Time to move on from Oscar's past mistakes . Floyd has made mistakes . The summer boxing schedule is fantastic.


Ditto-DITTO DAT! Open for business and gettin' on down the road. Holla!

SouthPaul says:

Good reading by most everyone. The Shadow, thank you for reminding folks that Miguel Cotto is a free agent and isn't contractually obligated to any one certain promoter, network. The man is positioned very well. War Cotto vs Mayweather 2 in September for the undisputed middleweight championship! Im all booked for Vegas so that's partly why I'm hoping for that match up. Otherwise, I'd want Canelo vs Cotto. It is about the best match up in all of boxing to be made. It'll have hype and guaranteed fireworks. Can't miss! If I am advising Cotto I'd have him do the Floyd rematch. If he loses he'll still have the option to fight Canelo, maybe even moreso. If he loses to Canelo in his next go... He'll never ever be invited to step foot into the ring with PBF again. That's how I see it. Holla!

The Shadow says:

Good reading by most everyone. The Shadow, thank you for reminding folks that Miguel Cotto is a free agent and isn't contractually obligated to any one certain promoter, network. The man is positioned very well. War Cotto vs Mayweather 2 in September for the undisputed middleweight championship! Im all booked for Vegas so that's partly why I'm hoping for that match up. Otherwise, I'd want Canelo vs Cotto. It is about the best match up in all of boxing to be made. It'll have hype and guaranteed fireworks. Can't miss! If I am advising Cotto I'd have him do the Floyd rematch. If he loses he'll still have the option to fight Canelo, maybe even moreso. If he loses to Canelo in his next go... He'll never ever be invited to step foot into the ring with PBF again. That's how I see it. Holla!


Nice analysis! And I think you're right! If he loses to Canelo the Mayweather fight is likely gone. And I think he gives Floyd a good fight so his value won't go down. Good points, I like it. Vegas should be fun too!

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