Mayweather’s Win was Pacquiao’s Gain

BY Phil Woolever ON May 15, 2014
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WHAT A DIFFERENCE A NIGHT MAKES – Manny Pacquiao regained some of the ground he’d lost to Floyd Mayweather, Jr, in what now, yet again, seems like the eternally unrequited speculation on each boxer’s comparative merits.

A bit of that upside came when Pacquiao earned a convincing win in his rematch with Tim Bradley, but there was a lot more positive spin for Pac-man after Mayweather took some lumps from the relatively unheralded Marcos Maidana three weeks later.

For many mauling moons it appeared, short of winning an actual fight, there was little likelihood Pacquiao could regain any of the status he’d ceded to Mayweather after back to back losses, one crushing (Juan Manuel Marquez), one controversial (Bradley).

In terms of relative top dog status in everything from pound for pound rankings, star power marketability or fan perceptions, as of May 1st, 2014, Mayweather had left Pacquiao behind in the dust of the public domain.

Then, a couple days later at the MGM Grand, Maidana came ducking in, came blasting in, came in with the kitchen sink - overhand bolo to the back of the noggin all night long method in, and shoved his way onto global headlines by giving Mayweather a tough bout, one many observers felt should have resulted in victory for Maidana.

Somewhere along the way, Pacquiao re-acquired precious points with the pugilistic public. Somehow, Pacquaio’s perceived chances got better overnight, or maybe a few hours before that, every time Maidana landed a conker behind Floyd’s cranium.

As the reviews came in, so did many positive Pacman comments, more than there had been recently, about Pacquiao having the tools to thwart Mayweather’s defenses. Major media outlets mentioned how Mayweather might be losing a step. Suddenly, Mayweather was supposedly vulnerable. The potential Pacquiao fight was mentioned in numerous post fight reports. You can guess how many other foes were listed, anywhere.

Even Muhammad Ali was attributed with a tweet requesting the Mayweather – Pacquiao showdown. While even “The Greatest” might hope for the contest, not that many people say the fight will happen soon, if ever.

Actually, the mega-bout could be more possible in 2015 than it has been for many years.

Everybody’s ultimate business sense, and drive, may prevail with a perspective that if there’s ever a last chance to milk the match for all it’s worth, that window is closing.

Gossip about Mayweather- Maidana doing approximately the same pay-per-view numbers as Pacquiao – Bradley is misleading, even considering just basics like price and available broadcast locations or public viewing on a worldwide level. That said, in the rare case of what an event like Mayweather and Pacquiao would be, public perception of the principals is a significant factor.

Mayweather is still saying something different, that Pacquiao had his chance and missed it, but Floyd is a bottom line guy and the bottom line is that Pacquiao represents a far bigger profit than any other opponent.

Whether or not one thinks Maidana pulled off the upset, he definitely made an impression on the viewing audience. His surprising performance will help him command a substantially larger paycheck for a Mayweather rematch and paydays against other high profile contenders.

While Maidana and Pacquiao gained more in the court of public opinion, Mayweather was no loser either, huge paycheck aside. He still has the priceless “0”.

Also, Maidana helped solve a pending issue of future opponents for Floyd’s Showtime contract by at least one more, and provided a viable marquee name for another pay-per-view. Maidana might also offer Mayweather a safer opponent than advertised. Mayweather probably knows Maidana can’t really hurt him, and by the time they fight again, Mayweather should have effective answers to the problems Maidana presents.

Under the unlikely circumstances Maidana actually beats Mayweather this year, there is not much that could postpone a trifecta, even if Pacquiao agreed on a 25% purse split and promised to pee in an empty strip club champagne bottle every other Monday.

If Mayweather beats Maidana again, which is even more of a probability than it was the first time but still means nothing, there’s almost a guarantee he’d face Pacquiao in the final fight of his current Showtime contract. That fight would be the first large scale, single show pay per view at $100 a pop and it will do over 1,500,000 buys, though many viewers could be at movie theatres.

The widely talented welterweight scenario is good for Mayweather and Pacquiao, and very good because of them. Pacquiao is almost back at the center of that scene, where all rumbling roads, hopefully, lead to the real Money.

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Comment on this article

brownsugar says:

The constantly changing matrix of public opinion is a mixed bag of swirling perspectives subject to chance at a moments notice.
I read somewhere that if Pac were to see Floyd on the street he'd pimp slap the sunglasses of his face and take his Bugatti for an unauthorized spin.
I had mentioned earlier on several occasions that the Maidana fight was going to be a very physical challenge while the majority of media outlets were predicting a Klitschko-esque blowout.

But Floyd fed Maidana tons of high octane motivation by telling the world he would spank MM for abusing his little bro.
Without knowing it Floyd injected MM with more motivation with that statement than he could have with a thousand personal insults.

You just don't tell a fighter who possesses the potential of MM that your going to teach him a lesson for doing what he's supposed to do. (Win fights)

MM would have regarded that seemingly harmless statment as an extreme attempt at intimidation.

If Pac's stock has risen due to Floyd's tough challenge... its a good thing..... It only brings us that much closer to the fight of the century

El Dude says:

Floyd Mayweather vs Manny Pacquiao is the # 1 fight that the entire world wants to see and the announcement itself would drive the fans in pandemonium. The only way that Floyd Mayweather could get away with not giving Marcos Maidana a rematch is if he goes after Manny Pacquiao next. The fans could forget about Maidana quick like if Floyd announces a fight vs Manny because No one would ever care about a rematch vs Maidana if the history of Boxing tells the story of Floyd defeating Manny. The question is can Manny finish of Maidana's plate? Maidana was only outscored by 9 jabs from Floyd but it was Maidana doing all the whooping in the ring. Does Manny have the same capabilities of producing such high volume of punches through out 12 rounds, yes he does and Manny is also faster than Marcos when it comes to foot skill so technically speaking who really has the edge being that Floyd's code has been exposed.
by El Dude.

amayseng says:

Really, if Floyd is truly saying Pac had his chance, well then he is just finding a way out of the fight.


That is beyond sad.


You get one life Floyd, why not live it to its fullest potential?

oubobcat says:

I gave up on this fight happening some time ago. Its just not going to happen. There are just too many political factors to overcome. It couldn't get made a few years ago when it would have been absolutely huge and everyone would have made piles of money. If it couldn't happen then, it won't happen now or in the future.

stormcentre says:

One things is for sure, if Floyd was waiting for Pacquiao to get old and/or slow down before fighting him, then . . unless Floyd can vastly improve on his last performance and really close Maidana down or KO him in their next fight (of which the latter is probably quite likely); he better be careful how long he waits for Pacquiao to get old.

Because Floyd, when he fought Maidana, was looking like he wasn’t too comfortable with the pace and relentless attack; Maidana brought early on.

Sure Pacquiao is probably a little more susceptible to the straight right down the pipe that Floyd loves to throw, but he’s also a lot faster, busier and just as tenacious.

Just a thought.

stormcentre says:

I'm not holding my breath for the Pacquiao V Mayweather fight though, and I actually think it’s less likely now after Floyd has fought Maidana.

amayseng says:

Storm I completely agree.

And who knows, maybe Pac has the proper style to never be caught with that straight right. Hell Chino only got caught with it a few times really.

Look what chinos work rate did to floyd early on, he nearly swept the first 6 rounds on hustle alone.

Pac is far busier than Chino. faster, more agile, more powerful, 10x the footwork.

Another thing people are ignoring is that after some good early shots Floyds activity and mobility went to crap and become static, no legs till about round 7ish..

Carmine Cas says:

Time will tell, 147 possesses a plethora of talent but there only 2, maybe 3 fights the public wants to see for Floyd.

A rematch with Chino, Pacquiao, and maybe the revamped china chin Khan.

Swiss Banks looked ecstatic after the Maidana fight; the public will be clamoring for a rematch and not a Pacquiao fight. And as El Dude pointed out, the only way Floyd gets out of a Maidana rematch is if he fights Manny. Khan, eh maybe but American fans would prefer Maidana or Pacquiao I think at least.

I mean we can blame Floyd all we want for the fight not happening, and rightfully so but it takes two to tango. But Uncle Bobby hasn't always wiling to play ball, let's see him meaningfully call out Floyd. Enough politicking and name calling. Forget the winner of the Marquez-Alvarado, announce to the public that they want to fight Floyd and no one else. Let it be known clearly that you want the Mayweather fight, the public will stand behind. And if Floyd is truly a man of his word he will give the fans what they want.

stormcentre says:

Storm I completely agree.

And who knows, maybe Pac has the proper style to never be caught with that straight right. Hell Chino only got caught with it a few times really.

Look what chinos work rate did to floyd early on, he nearly swept the first 6 rounds on hustle alone.

Pac is far busier than Chino. faster, more agile, more powerful, 10x the footwork.

Another thing people are ignoring is that after some good early shots Floyds activity and mobility went to crap and become static, no legs till about round 7ish..



Yes, it revealed a lot about how to fight someone with Floyd's style, his age, his matchmaking, his preference/reasons for controlling the pace of the fight, his camps understanding that Floyd relies on opponents to slow down (they were almost frantically hoping and assuring him would happen), and also how his punch resistance in big fights may not be really well practiced (as he likes to boast "I made not taking shots cool"); which, the latter, may actually be both a blessing and vulnerability as I think it dictates when Floyd exchanges a little too much . . . to the point where it became a little obvious to Chino that he had no significant need to respect Floyd.

And that lack, very obvious, lack of respect and the fact that it was publicly obvious, probably hurt Floyd more than anything.

Did anyone notice how Marcos didn't really feed Floyd a lot of committed jabs, and also how he stepped over to Floyd's right side - not the left as Cotto did - and how this worked for him?

I had mentioned in earlier posts

http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?12265-One-Significant-Technical-Origin-Of-GGG-s-Power/page9 (Not necessarily page 9)

[url]http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?14587-Robert-Garcia-Shares-On-How-Maidana-Will-Aim-To-Beat-Floyd/page9
(Not necessarily page 9, and yes I know my assumption that Maidana would be easier than he was not entirely correct).

That the way to beat Floyd was not with the jab, and what I meant was not with the predictably committed jab most guys throw. For a guy like Floyd, if his opponent is not going to do anything behind their jab then they're just given Floyd "gifts" and "openings" to work with, that are just really good opportunities for a guy like Floyd.

This is the real reason Oscar stopped throwing the jab later in the fight and when he slowed down. The way Floyd feeds his right hand off of his opponent's (orthodox) left jab (as it's coming out, or retracting) there's just too many right hand counters and other opportunities that offer you no retaliation move; to make the (conventional) jab a good risk for reward punch.

Even Floyd knows this, and this is why he don't throw too many when his opponent is fresh - particularly if his opponent is fast.

If you have a look at how Floyd struggled with Zab for the first 4 rounds, that gives you an idea of what I am talking about and why he is hesitant to fight a southpaw that will be that fast for 12; Pacquaio.

Also, when you're around on Floyd's right side, he can't get you with anything, you can throw the right hook (unconventional but effective), plus you can paw down his right and then left hook in safety. When he resets, you can throw again.

Another punch Floyd is vulnerable to is counter rights, and you can milk it out with a lazy jab the way he does when he makes guys miss a lot, frustrates them, and then gives them a shot they think they can get, like a jab . . . . only to find they took the bait and were set up - the discovery of which comes with the realization you have just been hit with a Floyd Mayweather counter right.

Once a few of these or similar techniques started to work for Maidana, Floyd (and his camp) then knew some of their main advantages were taken away - this is why they then started to consider how many more rounds it would take Maidana to slow down so that Floyd's speed advantage could be relied on.

Everyone is susceptible to feints, but Cotto, Oscar, Guerrero, Alvarez and most other guys don't use them at Floyd's level.

Once Floyd found himself reading the wrong messages from Chino his reliance on his defence betrayed a little bit about what's required to decipher the MayVinci code.

And some of those things are . . .

1) Effective Speed.

2) Pressure, the kind that comes from disrespect - Maidana knew he was safe with this attitude when Floyd became concerned about the gloves.

3) Feints. Mayweather's ability to read a fight and fighter - even without his corner - is almost unparalleled. With his corner, it's brilliant. However, it's still his opponent that gives him the data to read. Why make it easy for him? Feints don't use much energy and they allow you to close distance and be more accurate.

4) Countering. Once Floyd is on the ropes he wants to throw that right hand counter, so give it to him - but not with a committed jab or right cross, with a Trojan horse . . . then (if you threw the lazy right to do this) deliver the left hook counter with the confidence that you know it will land. This is how and why Floyd has the confidence and power in his close quarters in-fighting shots; he knows your open when he fires them.

5) Not simply standing in front of Floyd when he's on the ropes. Move to the side where he has no power and must telegraph his intentions.

6) Don't over commit in centre ring. Instead, walk up to him and a safe punching distance with your hands up and not over-committing at distance as Floyd likes his opponents to do.

7) Don't rely on your jab in a conventional sense. Floyd as a wide range of attacks that all rely on most guys just jabbing. This is one reason why he just easts conventionally styled fighters - like Mexicans - for breakfast; as all those styles believe that the jab is the most important punch - which it can be - but not when your opponent wants it to be. Use the jab to confuse and feint - not necessarily jab. Remember, how did Barerra beat Hamed (aside from Hamed not training for the fight), he didn't feed him the jab and then Naseem was forced to come out of the comfortable counter-punching style he was used to.

Well Floyd likes to rely on the fact that he can always counter guys too. It makes up quite a large component of that percentage and amount that he can usually rely on to pull through a points win in each round.

You see most guys have to accept that they're going to probably be behind on points for the first few rounds with Floyd anyway, particularly if they're not as fast as him. So, why give him a "gift" that will almost always have a greater downside for you?

When was the last time anyone saw Floyd regularly get hit flush with jabs from an opponent within the early stages of a fight? But then, conversely, how many times does Floyd pull one of the above-mentioned counter moves off his opponent's jab?

Anyway, that's enough for now.

Radam G says:

[QUOTE=stormcentre;52720]Yes, it revealed a lot about how to fight someone with Floyd's style, his age, his matchmaking, his preference/reasons for controlling the pace of the fight, his camps understanding that Floyd relies on opponents to slow down (they were almost frantically hoping and assuring him would happen), and also how his punch resistance in big fights may not be really well practiced (as he likes to boast "I made not taking shots cool"); which, the latter, may actually be both a blessing and vulnerability as I think it dictates when Floyd exchanges a little too much . . . to the point where it became a little obvious to Chino that he had no significant need to respect Floyd.

And that lack, very obvious, lack of respect and the fact that it was publicly obvious, probably hurt Floyd more than anything.

Did anyone notice how Marcos didn't really feed Floyd a lot of committed jabs, and also how he stepped over to Floyd's right side - not the left as Cotto did - and how this worked for him?

I had mentioned in earlier posts

[url]http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?12265-One-Significant-Technical-Origin-Of-GGG-s-Power/page9 (Not necessarily page 9)

[url]http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?14587-Robert-Garcia-Shares-On-How-Maidana-Will-Aim-To-Beat-Floyd/page9
(Not necessarily page 9, and yes I know my assumption that Maidana would be easier than he was not entirely correct).

That the way to beat Floyd was not with the jab, and what I meant was not with the predictably committed jab most guys throw. For a guy like Floyd, if his opponent is not going to do anything behind their jab then they're just given Floyd "gifts" and "openings" to work with, that are just really good opportunities for a guy like Floyd.

This is the real reason Oscar stopped throwing the jab later in the fight and when he slowed down. The way Floyd feeds his right hand off of his opponent's (orthodox) left jab (as it's coming out, or retracting) there's just too many right hand counters and other opportunities that offer you no retaliation move; to make the (conventional) jab a good risk for reward punch.

Even Floyd knows this, and this is why he don't throw too many when his opponent is fresh - particularly if his opponent is fast.

If you have a look at how Floyd struggled with Zab for the first 4 rounds, that gives you an idea of what I am talking about and why he is hesitant to fight a southpaw that will be that fast for 12; Pacquaio.

Also, when you're around on Floyd's right side, he can't get you with anything, you can throw the right hook (unconventional but effective), plus you can paw down his right and then left hook in safety. When he resets, you can throw again.

Another punch Floyd is vulnerable to is counter rights, and you can milk it out with a lazy jab the way he does when he makes guys miss a lot, frustrates them, and then gives them a shot they think they can get, like a jab . . . . only to find they took the bait and were set up - the discovery of which comes with the realization you have just been hit with a Floyd Mayweather counter right.

Once a few of these or similar techniques started to work for Maidana, Floyd (and his camp) then knew some of their main advantages were taken away - this is why they then started to consider how many more rounds it would take Maidana to slow down so that Floyd's speed advantage could be relied on.

Everyone is susceptible to feints, but Cotto, Oscar, Guerrero, Alvarez and most other guys don't use them at Floyd's level.

Once Floyd found himself reading the wrong messages from Chino his reliance on his defence betrayed a little bit about what's required to decipher the MayVinci code.

And some of those things are . . .

1) Effective Speed.

2) Pressure, the kind that comes from disrespect - Maidana knew he was safe with this attitude when Floyd became concerned about the gloves.

3) Feints. Mayweather's ability to read a fight and fighter - even without his corner - is almost unparalleled. With his corner, it's brilliant. However, it's still his opponent that gives him the data to read. Why make it easy for him? Feints don't use much energy and they allow you to close distance and be more accurate.

4) Countering. Once Floyd is on the ropes he wants to throw that right hand counter, so give it to him - but not with a committed jab or right cross, with a Trojan horse . . . then (if you threw the lazy right to do this) deliver the left hook counter with the confidence that you know it will land. This is how and why Floyd has the confidence and power in his close quarters in-fighting shots; he knows your open when he fires them.

5) Not simply standing in front of Floyd when he's on the ropes. Move to the side where he has no power and must telegraph his intentions.

6) Don't over commit in centre ring. Instead, walk up to him and a safe punching distance with your hands up and not over-committing at distance as Floyd likes his opponents to do.

7) Don't rely on your jab in a conventional sense. Floyd as a wide range of attacks that all rely on most guys just jabbing. This is one reason why he just easts conventionally styled fighters - like Mexicans - for breakfast; as all those styles believe that the jab is the most important punch - which it can be - but not when your opponent wants it to be. Use the jab to confuse and feint - not necessarily jab. Remember, how did Barerra beat Hamed (aside from Hamed not training for the fight), he didn't feed him the jab and then Naseem was forced to come out of the comfortable counter-punching style he was used to.

Well Floyd likes to rely on the fact that he can always counter guys too. It makes up quite a large component of that percentage and amount that he can usually rely on to pull through a points win in each round.

You see most guys have to accept that they're going to probably be behind on points for the first few rounds with Floyd anyway, particularly if they're not as fast as him. So, why give him a "gift" that will almost always have a greater downside for you?

When was the last time anyone saw Floyd regularly get hit flush with jabs from an opponent within the early stages of a fight? But then, conversely, how many times does Floyd pull one of the above-mentioned counter moves off his opponent's jab?

Anyway, that's enough for now.[/QUOTE]
As plainly as I can get. And you have said it in so many words. The Mayvinci mode -- I mean code -- can be broken by shift punching of a conventional fighter, which is what Maidana did a lot of, and right hooking by a southpaw, which Judah did a lot in the beginning of his bout with Money May. Holla!

Radam G says:

[QUOTE=stormcentre;52720]Yes, it revealed a lot about how to fight someone with Floyd's style, his age, his matchmaking, his preference/reasons for controlling the pace of the fight, his camps understanding that Floyd relies on opponents to slow down (they were almost frantically hoping and assuring him would happen), and also how his punch resistance in big fights may not be really well practiced (as he likes to boast "I made not taking shots cool"); which, the latter, may actually be both a blessing and vulnerability as I think it dictates when Floyd exchanges a little too much . . . to the point where it became a little obvious to Chino that he had no significant need to respect Floyd.

And that lack, very obvious, lack of respect and the fact that it was publicly obvious, probably hurt Floyd more than anything.

Did anyone notice how Marcos didn't really feed Floyd a lot of committed jabs, and also how he stepped over to Floyd's right side - not the left as Cotto did - and how this worked for him?

I had mentioned in earlier posts

[url]http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?12265-One-Significant-Technical-Origin-Of-GGG-s-Power/page9 (Not necessarily page 9)

[url]http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?14587-Robert-Garcia-Shares-On-How-Maidana-Will-Aim-To-Beat-Floyd/page9
(Not necessarily page 9, and yes I know my assumption that Maidana would be easier than he was not entirely correct).

That the way to beat Floyd was not with the jab, and what I meant was not with the predictably committed jab most guys throw. For a guy like Floyd, if his opponent is not going to do anything behind their jab then they're just given Floyd "gifts" and "openings" to work with, that are just really good opportunities for a guy like Floyd.

This is the real reason Oscar stopped throwing the jab later in the fight and when he slowed down. The way Floyd feeds his right hand off of his opponent's (orthodox) left jab (as it's coming out, or retracting) there's just too many right hand counters and other opportunities that offer you no retaliation move; to make the (conventional) jab a good risk for reward punch.

Even Floyd knows this, and this is why he don't throw too many when his opponent is fresh - particularly if his opponent is fast.

If you have a look at how Floyd struggled with Zab for the first 4 rounds, that gives you an idea of what I am talking about and why he is hesitant to fight a southpaw that will be that fast for 12; Pacquaio.

Also, when you're around on Floyd's right side, he can't get you with anything, you can throw the right hook (unconventional but effective), plus you can paw down his right and then left hook in safety. When he resets, you can throw again.

Another punch Floyd is vulnerable to is counter rights, and you can milk it out with a lazy jab the way he does when he makes guys miss a lot, frustrates them, and then gives them a shot they think they can get, like a jab . . . . only to find they took the bait and were set up - the discovery of which comes with the realization you have just been hit with a Floyd Mayweather counter right.

Once a few of these or similar techniques started to work for Maidana, Floyd (and his camp) then knew some of their main advantages were taken away - this is why they then started to consider how many more rounds it would take Maidana to slow down so that Floyd's speed advantage could be relied on.

Everyone is susceptible to feints, but Cotto, Oscar, Guerrero, Alvarez and most other guys don't use them at Floyd's level.

Once Floyd found himself reading the wrong messages from Chino his reliance on his defence betrayed a little bit about what's required to decipher the MayVinci code.

And some of those things are . . .

1) Effective Speed.

2) Pressure, the kind that comes from disrespect - Maidana knew he was safe with this attitude when Floyd became concerned about the gloves.

3) Feints. Mayweather's ability to read a fight and fighter - even without his corner - is almost unparalleled. With his corner, it's brilliant. However, it's still his opponent that gives him the data to read. Why make it easy for him? Feints don't use much energy and they allow you to close distance and be more accurate.

4) Countering. Once Floyd is on the ropes he wants to throw that right hand counter, so give it to him - but not with a committed jab or right cross, with a Trojan horse . . . then (if you threw the lazy right to do this) deliver the left hook counter with the confidence that you know it will land. This is how and why Floyd has the confidence and power in his close quarters in-fighting shots; he knows your open when he fires them.

5) Not simply standing in front of Floyd when he's on the ropes. Move to the side where he has no power and must telegraph his intentions.

6) Don't over commit in centre ring. Instead, walk up to him and a safe punching distance with your hands up and not over-committing at distance as Floyd likes his opponents to do.

7) Don't rely on your jab in a conventional sense. Floyd as a wide range of attacks that all rely on most guys just jabbing. This is one reason why he just easts conventionally styled fighters - like Mexicans - for breakfast; as all those styles believe that the jab is the most important punch - which it can be - but not when your opponent wants it to be. Use the jab to confuse and feint - not necessarily jab. Remember, how did Barerra beat Hamed (aside from Hamed not training for the fight), he didn't feed him the jab and then Naseem was forced to come out of the comfortable counter-punching style he was used to.

Well Floyd likes to rely on the fact that he can always counter guys too. It makes up quite a large component of that percentage and amount that he can usually rely on to pull through a points win in each round.

You see most guys have to accept that they're going to probably be behind on points for the first few rounds with Floyd anyway, particularly if they're not as fast as him. So, why give him a "gift" that will almost always have a greater downside for you?

When was the last time anyone saw Floyd regularly get hit flush with jabs from an opponent within the early stages of a fight? But then, conversely, how many times does Floyd pull one of the above-mentioned counter moves off his opponent's jab?

Anyway, that's enough for now.[/QUOTE]
As plainly as I can get. And you have said it in so many words. The Mayvinci mode -- I mean code -- can be broken by shift punching of a conventional fighter, which is what Maidana did a lot of, and right hooking by a southpaw, which Judah did a lot in the beginning of his bout with Money May. Holla!

stormcentre says:

Yes, of course I write with the ease and comfort of sitting behind my keyboard and not having to duck and dive from any of Floyd’s punches.

The Commish says:

[QUOTE=stormcentre;52720]Yes, it revealed a lot about how to fight someone with Floyd's style, his age, his matchmaking, his preference/reasons for controlling the pace of the fight, his camps understanding that Floyd relies on opponents to slow down (they were almost frantically hoping and assuring him would happen), and also how his punch resistance in big fights may not be really well practiced (as he likes to boast "I made not taking shots cool"); which, the latter, may actually be both a blessing and vulnerability as I think it dictates when Floyd exchanges a little too much . . . to the point where it became a little obvious to Chino that he had no significant need to respect Floyd.

And that lack, very obvious, lack of respect and the fact that it was publicly obvious, probably hurt Floyd more than anything.

Did anyone notice how Marcos didn't really feed Floyd a lot of committed jabs, and also how he stepped over to Floyd's right side - not the left as Cotto did - and how this worked for him?

I had mentioned in earlier posts

[url]http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?12265-One-Significant-Technical-Origin-Of-GGG-s-Power/page9 (Not necessarily page 9)

[url]http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?14587-Robert-Garcia-Shares-On-How-Maidana-Will-Aim-To-Beat-Floyd/page9
(Not necessarily page 9, and yes I know my assumption that Maidana would be easier than he was not entirely correct).

That the way to beat Floyd was not with the jab, and what I meant was not with the predictably committed jab most guys throw. For a guy like Floyd, if his opponent is not going to do anything behind their jab then they're just given Floyd "gifts" and "openings" to work with, that are just really good opportunities for a guy like Floyd.

This is the real reason Oscar stopped throwing the jab later in the fight and when he slowed down. The way Floyd feeds his right hand off of his opponent's (orthodox) left jab (as it's coming out, or retracting) there's just too many right hand counters and other opportunities that offer you no retaliation move; to make the (conventional) jab a good risk for reward punch.

Even Floyd knows this, and this is why he don't throw too many when his opponent is fresh - particularly if his opponent is fast.

If you have a look at how Floyd struggled with Zab for the first 4 rounds, that gives you an idea of what I am talking about and why he is hesitant to fight a southpaw that will be that fast for 12; Pacquaio.

Also, when you're around on Floyd's right side, he can't get you with anything, you can throw the right hook (unconventional but effective), plus you can paw down his right and then left hook in safety. When he resets, you can throw again.

Another punch Floyd is vulnerable to is counter rights, and you can milk it out with a lazy jab the way he does when he makes guys miss a lot, frustrates them, and then gives them a shot they think they can get, like a jab . . . . only to find they took the bait and were set up - the discovery of which comes with the realization you have just been hit with a Floyd Mayweather counter right.

Once a few of these or similar techniques started to work for Maidana, Floyd (and his camp) then knew some of their main advantages were taken away - this is why they then started to consider how many more rounds it would take Maidana to slow down so that Floyd's speed advantage could be relied on.

Everyone is susceptible to feints, but Cotto, Oscar, Guerrero, Alvarez and most other guys don't use them at Floyd's level.

Once Floyd found himself reading the wrong messages from Chino his reliance on his defence betrayed a little bit about what's required to decipher the MayVinci code.

And some of those things are . . .

1) Effective Speed.

2) Pressure, the kind that comes from disrespect - Maidana knew he was safe with this attitude when Floyd became concerned about the gloves.

3) Feints. Mayweather's ability to read a fight and fighter - even without his corner - is almost unparalleled. With his corner, it's brilliant. However, it's still his opponent that gives him the data to read. Why make it easy for him? Feints don't use much energy and they allow you to close distance and be more accurate.

4) Countering. Once Floyd is on the ropes he wants to throw that right hand counter, so give it to him - but not with a committed jab or right cross, with a Trojan horse . . . then (if you threw the lazy right to do this) deliver the left hook counter with the confidence that you know it will land. This is how and why Floyd has the confidence and power in his close quarters in-fighting shots; he knows your open when he fires them.

5) Not simply standing in front of Floyd when he's on the ropes. Move to the side where he has no power and must telegraph his intentions.

6) Don't over commit in centre ring. Instead, walk up to him and a safe punching distance with your hands up and not over-committing at distance as Floyd likes his opponents to do.

7) Don't rely on your jab in a conventional sense. Floyd as a wide range of attacks that all rely on most guys just jabbing. This is one reason why he just easts conventionally styled fighters - like Mexicans - for breakfast; as all those styles believe that the jab is the most important punch - which it can be - but not when your opponent wants it to be. Use the jab to confuse and feint - not necessarily jab. Remember, how did Barerra beat Hamed (aside from Hamed not training for the fight), he didn't feed him the jab and then Naseem was forced to come out of the comfortable counter-punching style he was used to.

Well Floyd likes to rely on the fact that he can always counter guys too. It makes up quite a large component of that percentage and amount that he can usually rely on to pull through a points win in each round.

You see most guys have to accept that they're going to probably be behind on points for the first few rounds with Floyd anyway, particularly if they're not as fast as him. So, why give him a "gift" that will almost always have a greater downside for you?

When was the last time anyone saw Floyd regularly get hit flush with jabs from an opponent within the early stages of a fight? But then, conversely, how many times does Floyd pull one of the above-mentioned counter moves off his opponent's jab?

Anyway, that's enough for now.[/QUOTE]

Great post! I love the analysis!

-Randy G.

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