Lampley Says Reckless Spontaneity Helped Maidana Test Mayweather’s Mettle

BY Kelsey McCarson ON May 07, 2014
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jim-lampley 338d4Jim Lampley, host of HBO Boxing telecasts, knows as much about Floyd Mayweather as anyone. Until Mayweather signed his six-fight deal with rival network Showtime last year, Lampley and his ringside cohorts over at HBO called Mayweather’s biggest and most historically significant fights to date, including wins over Miguel Cotto, Ricky Hatton, Oscar De La Hoya and Juan Manuel Marquez.

Lampley told TSS he was surprised as anyone to see Mayweather struggle so mightily with Maidana.

“I said on ‘The Fight Game’ I thought Floyd would win 10 or 11 rounds in a one-sided, unanimous decision…I thought Maidana had the kind of straight-forward, unsophisticated style that Floyd could easily take apart, and it didn’t happen.”

Lampley said it was Maidana’s unorthodox approach and reckless aggression that led him closer to victory over Mayweather than any other fighter had since Jose Luis Castillo fought Mayweather the first time back in 2002.

“The one thing I come away with, and it’s something I’ve observed several times…is that when a guy is a conventional fighter and has a technically sound and conventional approach, he’s trained in the gym to deal with everything that’s right in front of him. He spars, typically, with guys with similar skills and similar conventional approaches. But when somebody comes in and throws punches from all kinds of odd angles, over the top as if they are coming off a tall building, uppercuts from the floor, etc., etc., sometimes the very sophisticated and conventional defender has trouble with the sheer reckless spontaneity of all that.”

Mayweather won a majority decision over Maidana. Judge Michael Pernick called it a draw at 114-114. But Burt Clements had Mayweather the winner, 117-111, while Dave Moretti scored the fight 116-112 for the same.

Pernick and Moretti were probably closer to the correct call than Clements. The fight was close, and Maidana deserved to win at least four or five rounds.

“Now, I scored it 115-113, or seven rounds to five,” said Lampley. “That’s pretty close. But I also thought it was pretty clear that Floyd had reeled in the situation, particularly in the second half of the fight, and won it. But I thought that Maidana got the jump on him, particularly early on, by throwing many punches from odd angles.”

Lampley likened what Maidana was able to accomplish against Mayweather to what Luis Carlos Abregu was able to do against Thomas Dulorme, when the two junior welterweights met in 2012. Abregu was the underdog but Dulorme’s conventional approach wasn’t capable of dealing with Abregu’s aggressive unorthodoxy. Lampley said it wasn’t a one-to-one comparison, of course. After all, Dulorme is nowhere near the boxer Mayweather is, and Abregu knocked Dulorme out in Round 7.

Still, the condition of what happened in the fight seemed similar.

“An extremely determined Marcos Maidana was throwing wild punches from all angles, and the punches he gave Floyd trouble with particularly were the right hand that was coming way over the top and the uppercuts that were coming from down under. And Floyd can handle everything that is right in front of him. But sometimes you just don’t see that other stuff.”

I asked Lampley if he thought Mayweather’s effort against Maidana was any indication that the 37-year-old might be slowing down somewhat. Did this version of Floyd appear to be sliding down the slope a bit?

“No, because his hands were still tremendously fast, and he landed with great accuracy when he threw. As the fight progressed, he gained more and more control of the situation because he got a clearer picture in his head as to what was going on. He just got jumped in the first round by a guy who threw three times as many punches as he was throwing from all sorts of angles…it almost doesn’t even matter if they’re landing, your eye is on them.”

Lampley said the boos from the crowd afterward, a signal they thought the wrong man was given the nod, was something he’s seen before. He likened it to what Antonio Tarver did to Roy Jones in their first fight back in 2003 and what Oscar De La Hoya did to Mayweather back in 2007. Both Tarver and De La Hoya were able to pin their opponents up against the ropes at times, making it perhaps appear to those in attendance they were landing more punches than they actually were.

Maidana, he said, did the same.

“A great defender like Floyd doesn’t feel the need to counter every shot. He’s going to hang back on the ropes in a lot of instances, duck, dive, slip and stay away, but the crowd in the arena has the naked eye disadvantage of trying to decide which punches landed and which ones didn’t, all they see is the guy throwing and throwing and throwing and they’re assuming he’s winning the fight. I think that’s what happened to Floyd the other night.”

I couldn’t help myself in asking Lampley if he thought, as I did, that seeing Mayweather struggle with an oddball like Maidana would mean he might also be more vulnerable to a fighter like Manny Pacquiao. Pacquiao, I reasoned, is the master of creating good punching angles, and he throws punches fast and furiously.

Lampley shut me down.

“It has nothing to do with what happened the other day, because Pacquiao is very conventional in his offensive approach. He throws punches from the same kinds of angles that most great fighters do. He doesn’t throw them up in the air or from the floor.”

Lampley implied Mayweather would have his way with Pacquiao should the two ever finally meet in the ring.

“What Manny throws, Floyd would see coming. And I also think the way Manny squares his shoulders to attack, combined geometrically with Floyd’s best punch, the right hand counter over the top, I think that Manny would be a sitting duck to that punch.”

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Comment on this article

El Dude says:

Floyd Mayweather was an easy job for Marcos Maidana and Team Garcia who showed the world what The School of Robert can do. The only way that Floyd could get away with not giving Maidana a rematch is if he goes after Manny Pacquiao next. The fans could forget about Maidana quick like if Floyd announces a fight vs Manny because No one would ever care about a rematch vs Maidana if the history of Boxing tells the story of Floyd defeating Manny. The question is can Manny finish of Maidana's plate? Maidana was only outscored by 9 jabs from Floyd but it was Maidana doing all the whooping in the ring. Does Manny have the same capabilities of producing such high volume of punches through out 12 rounds, yes he does and Manny is also faster than Marcos when it comes to foot skill so technically speaking who really has the edge being that Floyd's code has been exposed.
By El Dude.

stormcentre says:

A few words (besides the obvious) on why Maidana was a little bit more problematic for Floyd than Floyd or even I thought he may be . . . .

a) Robert Garcia.
b) Marcos’ punch resistance.

And . . . .

c) Stevie Johnson.

Stevie was to a great extent responsible for getting Maidana ready for Broner and out of all the really good paid sparring partners out there right now, he probably approximates Mayweather better than anyone.
Got to admit, I didn’t think Marcos would bother Floyd as much he did.

The Commish says:

I wouldn't call what we saw Marcos Maidana do against Floyd Mayweather "reckless spontaneity."

First of all, "reckless" is fighting without regard for your own safety. Taking three or four shots to land one can be called "reckless." I never saw Maidana as "reckless." Also, aren't all fighters "spontaneous?" They see a punch coming and they block it...they parry it...they slip it...they duck it...they avoid it. A fighter's reaction is spontaneous, born from hours and hours of gym work, pad work, sparring, working with a trainer and watching video of your opponent. To say Maidana fought $$$May with "reckless spontaneity" doesn't agree with my thinking.

Maidana was trained by Robert Garcia to fight $$$May the way he did. He fought him at a brutal pace (at least for half the fight, he did) and he fought him rough. He fought him and he mauled him. Maidana knew what he was doing. He planned and trained to do it that way.

If anything, it was "Planned Aggression," not "Reckless Spontaneity."

-Randy G.

amayseng says:

I wouldn't call what we saw Marcos Maidana do against Floyd Mayweather "reckless spontaneity."

First of all, "reckless" is fighting without regard for your own safety. Taking three or four shots to land one can be called "reckless." I never saw Maidana as "reckless." Also, aren't all fighters "spontaneous?" They see a punch coming and they block it...they parry it...they slip it...they duck it...they avoid it. A fighter's reaction is spontaneous, born from hours and hours of gym work, pad work, sparring, working with a trainer and watching video of your opponent. To say Maidana fought $$$May with "reckless spontaneity" doesn't agree with my thinking.

Maidana was trained by Robert Garcia to fight $$$May the way he did. He fought him at a brutal pace (at least for half the fight, he did) and he fought him rough. He fought him and he mauled him. Maidana knew what he was doing. He planned and trained to do it that way.

If anything, it was "Planned Aggression," not "Reckless Spontaneity."

-Randy G.


I could not agree more. Like I mentioned in another thread I had said years ago the way to get to Floyd was to hit him in the back, back of the head and rough him up. Now I am not saying to foul illegally but if you think about it is it fair that once you engage Floyd he turns exactly sideways and bends over leaving his side and back as your main target? Hence, should a boxer be able to turn near around so that you can't hit him?

I say no.

It was no accident that Chino went to the body hard and also brought that overhand right down at almost a 90 degree angle, hey if Floyd puts himself in that vulnerable position then he should deal with be hit in those areas.

Madaina's mindset was that if Floyd fouled, used his elbow, excessively held then he would retaliate every single time and it worked.


I have Chino winning the fight. Rounds 1,2,3,4,6,8, possibly 11 and 12.

But call me crazy.

amayseng says:

The problem is people get romantic about Floyds awesome straight right counter or lead...

However, if Chino lands 12 hard body shots while controlling the pace and Floyd lands 2 fantastic razor right hands, well I still have Chino winning the round.

brownsugar says:

Chino fought a tough fight... Floyd was for forced to absorb the damage without withering and eventually shifted into a higher gear.
But much of what he was doing won't be allowed in a properly officiated rematch. Some of that stuff isn't even legal in the MMA.
chino doesn't need to resort to foul play to be competitive.... If he brings the same intensity in the potential rematch we'll still be treated to a good fight.
I agree with Lampley that although Chino had a goal and a purpose... his methods were somewhat random and spastic...
I also agree in part with what all the previous posters said.
I think we all agree that we'd like to see it again.

Radam G says:

I wouldn't call what we saw Marcos Maidana do against Floyd Mayweather "reckless spontaneity."

First of all, "reckless" is fighting without regard for your own safety. Taking three or four shots to land one can be called "reckless." I never saw Maidana as "reckless." Also, aren't all fighters "spontaneous?" They see a punch coming and they block it...they parry it...they slip it...they duck it...they avoid it. A fighter's reaction is spontaneous, born from hours and hours of gym work, pad work, sparring, working with a trainer and watching video of your opponent. To say Maidana fought $$$May with "reckless spontaneity" doesn't agree with my thinking.

Maidana was trained by Robert Garcia to fight $$$May the way he did. He fought him at a brutal pace (at least for half the fight, he did) and he fought him rough. He fought him and he mauled him. Maidana knew what he was doing. He planned and trained to do it that way.

If anything, it was "Planned Aggression," not "Reckless Spontaneity."

-Randy G.


No doubt that it was "Planned Aggression."

J-Lamp's BEAMING-TOO-BRIGHT lamp has blinded him on this one.

Bottomline, Money May could not handle or time the shift punching, feinting and jabbing of Chino. Money May is very lucky that he (Money May) did not two-step stroll and shoulder roll off many of Chino's shots, or Chino would have constantly caught him with wide side hooks off those over-handed rights followed by killa' uppercuts and overcuts -- krpytonite and goodnight mud-sludge joker.

Team Chino broke the Mayvinci code BIG TIME. And it is so simple to crack. For years, Team and Fam May have been able to hide and disguise it in talking much, MUCH double SMACK! Now Chino ran right through dat flophouse shack. Hehehe!

For years, I've been saying BIG TIME that the Pops Joy May's bootlegged, front-yard taught shoulder roll can be BEAT super BIG TIME with shift punching, feinting and hooking off a jab$ -- especially if you are a $outhpaw -- followed by an uppercut.

Now Da Manny would have KAYOED Money May on the night in que$tion.

Now the whole TSS Universe and the world see what I've been posting from the jump about PJM's shoulder roll.

Don't forget that Superman Stevenson kayoed Superbad Chad Dawson who was a PJM's shoulder roller. And don't forget how Micky Bey was KAYOed by a shift right-hook follow by a left hook. And PJM-trained shoulder-rolling Big-Money Oscar de la Hoya was terrible during the time of PJM's reign with him.

For the record: PJM's shoulder rolling is like cocking your back hand before throwing a punch. This is why that PJM's shoulder roll requires near-perfect timing and conning of the opponent. And ev'ybodee and dey momma in da loop and poop of boksing know that dat hand cocking is a big NO, NO! Holla!

Radam G says:

Chino fought a tough fight... Floyd was for forced to absorb the damage without withering and eventually shifted into a higher gear.
But much of what he was doing won't be allowed in a properly officiated rematch. Some of that stuff isn't even legal in the MMA.
chino doesn't need to resort to foul play to be competitive.... If he brings the same intensity in the potential rematch we'll still be treated to a good fight.
I agree with Lampley that although Chino had a goal and a purpose... his methods were somewhat random and spastic...
I also agree in part with what all the previous posters said.
I think we all agree that we'd like to see it again.


OMFG! HEHEHEHEHEHE! Now they are blaming it on referee TONY. Wow! Deal with it! The Mayvinci Code was EXPOSED! REVEALED! BROKEN! And Money May was busted up.

I'm reminded of how the mummies of the pharoahs were revealed -- straight-up EXPOSED.

For thousands of years, poor peasants, brain-washed know nothings, groupies, fanboys and faithful fanfaronades not in da loop or poop thought that the sun beams and rays plucked up the mummies outta those pyramids and zoom them up into the heavens to the great afterlife beyond the stars, or with the stars, or however da double-fudge jive it was back then. Hahaha!

Maybe Fam May and Money May and their flunkies and groupies are from the lineage of the conroahs -- I mean pharoahs -- and servants. Dude's got his faithful followers buggin!' I think that they need a huggin!' HAHAHAHAHAHAHAhehehehehehehehehe! BIG, BIG GRIN! Holla!

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