Stevenson Pulls A Mayweather-Like Move On Kovalev

BY Frank Lotierzo ON April 02, 2014
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Let's assume for argument sake that everything we've heard and read is true. And that WBC light heavyweight title holder Adonis Stevenson 23-1 (20), really did agree to meet WBO title-holder Sergey Kovalev 24-0-1 (22) later this year. Let us also accept the fact that Stevenson has jumped the HBO ship to come aboard Showtime and instead of fighting Kovalev, he's going to fight IBF title holder 49 year old Bernard Hopkins 54-6-2 (32), who now fights exclusively on Showtime. With that Stevenson has in essence reneged on fighting Kovalev in what would surely have been one of the more anticipated light heavyweight title clashes since the Roy Jones vs. Antonio Tarver rematch back in 2004.    

If by chance you are a true died in the wool boxing fan and observer, that really stinks. Because a showdown between Stevenson and Kovalev would've been something to get excited about and look forward to. Mainly because a very strong case can be made supporting either fighter to win since both guys seem to be fighting at their best.

In addition to that, both fighters are heavy handed and would be looking to win by knockout, which of course would insure that boxing fans would be treated to a thrilling and action packed fight, while it lasted.

Oh well, so much for that, at least for the immediate future.

Stevenson, 36, made a business decision that is smart on his part, but not really ethical. Which in itself is funny because Floyd Mayweather has been making business decisions like that, which hurt the fans and boxing on one hand, but enhance his wallet and prolong his career, for the last decade. Yet there's a faction of boxing/Mayweather advocates around who insist at every turn that Floyd has never walked away from one fight so he can make another one that is less compelling, but the better business decision for him.

Sure, we don't like what Stevenson did, but that's boxing. It's the dirtiest business around aside from partisan politics. However, if you can be intellectually honest, it was the smartest move Stevenson could have made. What he's done is probably set himself up for two fights/paydays instead of taking on Kovalev, where he was at least 50-50 to lose. At this stage Stevenson would get more credit and attention for beating Hopkins (although not by much) than he would beating Kovalev and he'd make more money for it too. If that weren't enough, he's also less likely to be knocked out or embarrassed if he lost to Hopkins, as opposed to Kovalev. And if he happens to get lucky enough to win by kayo, he calls the shots in the Kovalev fight. Granted, he's not a lock to beat Hopkins; at worst Hopkins makes him look like a novice, but he won't get hurt at all. And one of these days Grandpa Hopkins is going to come up empty, and it could just as well be against Stevenson as against anyone else.

For Stevenson, fighting Hopkins before fighting Kovalev makes perfect sense every way you look at it and plus, it takes Hopkins off the table as far as Kovalev fighting him. Had Stevenson gone ahead and fought Kovalev first and lost, obviously Sergey would've most likely fought Hopkins in his next bout thus leaving Stevenson with no legend to fight along his road back to redemption. Now, it's Kovalev who has to wait for Stevenson and Hopkins to take care of their business, and under the best case scenario Kovalev only gets to fight the winner. And if by chance Stevenson-Hopkins is really close or ends controversially like the first Dawson-Hopkins bout, Stevenson and Hopkins would probably fight each other again immediately, thus leaving Kovalev out in the wilderness a little longer.

In a perfect world Stevenson would go ahead and fight Kovalev, who is more than willing to face him, but boxing is perfectly imperfect and what the fans want never is the first order of business. Think of it like this, if Floyd Mayweather were managing Adonis Stevenson and calling the shots regarding who he fights and when, what do you think he would advise Stevenson to do? Ya damn right...Floyd would nudge Adonis to fight the nearly 50 year old legend Hopkins for more money and then call the shots against the young Lion Kovalev afterwards, when Stevenson's profile and marketability is at it's pinnacle. Yes, that's exactly what Mayweather would advise Stevenson to do. So if you're a Mayweather fan and think that he can do no wrong, you better tip your hat to Stevenson for pulling a Mayweather-esque type move and robbing the fans of the most anticipated fight in the light heavyweight division in years, one that even quasi boxing fans would look forward to watching.

Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at GlovedFist@gmail.com

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Comment on this article

The Shadow says:

Methinks Frank Lotierzo pulled a Mayweather-Like move. Very clever commercial guile hehehehe....

Let it commence. I'll be watching.

deepwater2 says:

Now that article I agree with.

riverside says:

yup, read the whole article from start to finish, picturing Al Haymon as the director /producer. AHP productions

brownsugar says:

In a perfect world Mayweather the named of Adonis Stevenson shouldn't be spoken of in the same breath. The gulf in skill, acheivements and ability is wider than the pacific ocean. Stevenson had a great run for 1 year. While Mayweather has been confounding the critics for as nearly as long as . BHop... We do know Adonis has peaked late in his athletic life and may have a good year or too left ..but lets not use Mayweather as an adjective to describe Superman.. The comparison is insulting to Floyd and and far too flattering for Stevenson.

I understand his position... But I like this one better:
"I want to fight all the champions... I don't care if I lose.... Its only boxing...only sport" (quote by Sergei Kovalev)

BFF says:

bsug, you always know what to say. i like the nice little quote from the krusher too. I just wonder what the late Great Emanuel Stewart would say about all this, id love to hear his thoughts...

Skibbz says:

In a perfect world the names of Adonis Stevenson and Mayweather shouldn't be spoken of in the same breath. The gulf in skill, acheivements and ability is wider than the pacific ocean. Stevenson had a great run for 1 year. While Mayweather has been confounding the critics for as nearly as long as . BHop... We do know Adonis has peaked late in his athletic life and may have a good year or too left ..but lets not use Mayweather as an adjective to describe Superman.. The comparison is insulting to Floyd and and far too flattering for Stevenson.

I understand his position... But I like this one better:
"I want to fight all the champions... I don't care if I lose.... Its only boxing...only sport" (quote by Sergei Kovalev)


The gulf is indeed too great, they're on different stratospheres when it comes down to it.

@BFF I was invited down to his boxing clinic in the Hotel Hilton in London 3 years ago by my former trainer so as to get proper lecture from the man who knows more than almost anybody else about the sport.

He started with the basics, the importance of footwork, speed, power, the ability to adapt in the ring and finally the value of strong relationships. I had never met him prior to that but visiting Kronk and training under him was always my biggest ambition as an amateur. I got the opportunity to speak with him alongside my former trainer and we hit it off. Emanuel was one of the nicest people I had met associated with the sport. Some people you meet they're heads are in the clouds with their greatness, but Emanuel was in another league. He was a gentlemen, he could crack a joke, he was sincere and he was very honest. He cherished boxing for what it gave him and what it allowed him to do, the way it can help those who society doesn't offer a hand to.

How would he think about Stevenson? I think he would want the best for his fighter who loved his trainer very much, but I think he would have reminded him on the importance of the maintenance of strong bonds and relationships within the sport.

As I'm writing this, i'm wearing my yellow Kronk T-shirt. Got a day off so I'm going to hit my knuckle gym.. May Emanuel Steward forever be remembered for the great man he was, a true icon in the sport.

The Commish says:

Mike Tyson's late, great co-manager, Jimmy Jacobs, once explained to me the job of a manager. That jopb, he told me, "Is to maximize proft and minimize risk." I bought it when he sold it to me and I still hang onto that belief.

If his fighter is offered a two fights, and both are for close to the same money, you take the safer one, the easier fight, , the fight your guy is more likely to win. From there you can take the second fight, in which your guy may earn even more because of his recent victory.

In the case of Adonis Stevenson, it makes perfect business sense to first face Bernard Hopkins, then perhaps go after Sergey Kovalev. A fight against B-Hop, while certainly no walk in the park, is safer to Stevenson's health (on paper, anyway) than a fight against Krusher Kovalev. Plus, if Stevenson should beat the near-half-century old relic, he would enhance his earning power greatly when he steps into the ring against The Krusher.

These guys are in boxing to entertain us, but it's a new world. Fighters realize that they can make a lot of money, and by taking certain roads in their careers, they can enhance their earning power. By taking other roads, they can lessen it.

Stevenson chose a road which carried his career to the doorstep of the busiest, most successful advisor in the game today--perhaps ever. He's allowing Haymon to call his career moves. All he has to do is train, show up and fight.

We may not like the fact that boxing's most attractive light heavyweight unification fight is on hold and may never happen.

But then, how long have we waited for Floyd Mayweather to face Manny Pacquiao?

I want to see Sergey Kovalev v Adonis Stevenson as much as you do. We'll just have to get used to it and try to understand.

It's nothing personal. It's just business.

-Randy G.

Skibbz says:

You're right Commissioner but Adonis is on the wrong side of 30. Won't be until this time in 2015 that we could see that fight happen if not later or at all.

With Haymon pulling the strings, fighters get main event money for second rate fights. It's not a good thing in my opinion. In other sports which have taken this turn, ego's expand and things become very nasty.

So long as the networks keep the masses buying, and they can keep lining up de facto victories for their fighters... Then the business man and his team win. Good for them, bad for the sport.

Getting used to is isn't an option for me when I want to see the most exciting and thrilling fights where the best take on the best.

BFF says:

@ skibbz I envy you so much and I can only imagine how awesome it was to have met and been lectured by the KRONK GODFATHER, and im pretty jealous about the cool yellow KRONK shirt you are rocking right now. I agree with you on the waiting part not being an option, Im a boxing fan and i think i would speak for most of the sweet science followers out there when i say we as fans of this sport deserve to see the best of the best fight each other..

Skibbz says:

@ skibbz I envy you so much and I can only imagine how awesome it was to have met and been lectured by the KRONK GODFATHER, and im pretty jealous about the cool yellow KRONK shirt you are rocking right now. I agree with you on the waiting part not being an option, Im a boxing fan and i think i would speak for most of the sweet science followers out there when i say we as fans of this sport deserve to see the best of the best fight each other..


It was an unforgettable night that will stay with all those that were there for the rest of their lives. The aim of the lecture was to pass on his knowledge to the next generation of trainers in the game. It was initially put forward that the lecture would tour many countries and cities so as to reach as many trainers as possible. It was an incredible lesson taught by a master.

What was really special about him was that he would listen, and listen intently so as to absorb everything that was being said. When questions were asked he would do his best to make sure the answer was fully understand how he understood. He really wanted to do his best to impart his knowledge as best he could. He was an incredible teacher and that was evident to see that night.

gibola says:

That Ray Leonard sure didn't understand business decisions. He could have done with PBF at his shoulder to advise him. Back in 1981 he was at the top of the game like PBF is today. Sugar Ray had to have learned a lesson from the needless risks he took in going through with the Duran fights in 1980 (they should never have been made - terrible business decisions, Ray even got a loss!). At least now he had an infinite number of ways of making money against opponents who were not huge threats to him and his star power will guarantee huge purses. He should jump between welter and lightmiddle fighting a rematch against Benitez, then beating Colin Jones, Cuevas, Stafford, Davey Moore, and a young Don Curry. That tall guy from Detroit is a real threat, he's unbeaten, fast, skillfull, punches like a ton of bricks - but he's got his own title, so Ray can easily avoid him and why shouldn't he? It would be madness to fight the Hitman and risk a golden future - even for a decent payday. Maximum reward, minimum risk. It's a business decision and we all understand Leonard-Hearns is a fight that will never happen. Or shouldn't have....what an idiot Leonard was, he doesn't understand business decisions at all, he signed to fight the only guy who had a chance of beating him to prove he was the best in the division. Boxing was mad back then nobody understood business decisions. That Leonard-Hearns fight should never have been made and I bet both guys regret it now. Yeah, they're in the Hall Of Fame and a some people remember the fight as a classic and even the loser gained in defeat, but was it really good business for either to take the fight? Of course not.
Tommy Hearns sure didn't understand the business of boxing, he could have done with PBF advising him. Back in 1981 he was an unbeaten champion and there was only one guy with a chance of beating him at 147, he could have fought, etc....

dino da vinci says:

@gibola. I like what you did with this! Boxing fans will be talking about that fight for as long as there are boxing fans. Which begs the question, what fight to date will Money best be remembered for?

A) Corrales
B) Castillo
C) De La Hoya
D) non-fight with Manny

deepwater2 says:

@gibola. I like what you did with this! Boxing fans will be talking about that fight for as long as there are boxing fans.

Which begs the question, what fight to date will Money best be remembered for?

A) Corrales
B) Castillo
C) De La Hoya
D) non-fight with Manny


Good posts you two . The answer is........
D!!!! Of course it is d. But he made the most money they will say! May the best man win is replaced by if it makes dollars it makes cents . Looking forward to the heavyweight fight for free on NBC tomorrow . No pick in the fights for me . My picks for the 19th are
Porter wins.
Kid wins .
Hopkins loses .

gibola says:

@dino da vinci - DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD! and once more D! Glad you liked my rant. Was either going to do it on Ali-Frazier1 or Leonard-Hearns1. Went with 81 rather than 71. The point is that going by modern thinking no pick'em superfights should ever be made, ever again. Ever. That's ever. Cos there's always a reason not to make a fight if you want to find one and the argument seems to be you should never risk your potential future earnings by risking getting KO'd. Even if you tried to prove you were the best and got well paid it's still a wrong business decision. I disagree. PS - Malignaggi on pts. Hopkins on pts. Kell Brook then beats Paulie. Stevenson then beats Hopkins.

Domenic says:

I think superfights should absolutely be made. When Hearns lost to Leonard, his stature within the game was elevated. It was a loss on paper, on boxrec, but that's it. He won everywhere else, evidenced by the fact that we're talking about that great, historic event 33 years later. He won, resoundingly. The undefeated record business is completely overblown, to an almost comical extent. Hand-picking guys, dodging the dangerous, etc, ugh ... I understand that it's in a fighter's best interest to tread carefully, from a business sense (Rock Newman all but admitted in the Legendary Nights episode that he wanted no part of LL), but the great fights, where both guys are great, are worth the risk. Ali? The Frazier loss is a footnote to that night. He took the fight on the heels of a bruising war with Bonavena. Imagine if we hadn't had that night? Where would the sport be?

the Roast says:

That Ray Leonard sure didn't understand business decisions. He could have done with PBF at his shoulder to advise him. Back in 1981 he was at the top of the game like PBF is today. Sugar Ray had to have learned a lesson from the needless risks he took in going through with the Duran fights in 1980 (they should never have been made - terrible business decisions, Ray even got a loss!). At least now he had an infinite number of ways of making money against opponents who were not huge threats to him and his star power will guarantee huge purses. He should jump between welter and lightmiddle fighting a rematch against Benitez, then beating Colin Jones, Cuevas, Stafford, Davey Moore, and a young Don Curry. That tall guy from Detroit is a real threat, he's unbeaten, fast, skillfull, punches like a ton of bricks - but he's got his own title, so Ray can easily avoid him and why shouldn't he? It would be madness to fight the Hitman and risk a golden future - even for a decent payday. Maximum reward, minimum risk. It's a business decision and we all understand Leonard-Hearns is a fight that will never happen. Or shouldn't have....what an idiot Leonard was, he doesn't understand business decisions at all, he signed to fight the only guy who had a chance of beating him to prove he was the best in the division. Boxing was mad back then nobody understood business decisions. That Leonard-Hearns fight should never have been made and I bet both guys regret it now. Yeah, they're in the Hall Of Fame and a some people remember the fight as a classic and even the loser gained in defeat, but was it really good business for either to take the fight? Of course not.
Tommy Hearns sure didn't understand the business of boxing, he could have done with PBF advising him. Back in 1981 he was an unbeaten champion and there was only one guy with a chance of beating him at 147, he could have fought, etc....


Great post. I think we have a new leader in the club house. And by a vet no less.

Radam G says:

@Domenic, the sport would have been where it is. Great fights don't make boxing. Boxing makes great fights. One needs a reason to fight that is more important than victory.

GOAT Ali and the late, great Smokin' Joe Frazier had many reasons. And the thoughts of the fans were the late thing on their mind.

GOAT Ali and SJF fought for something that they believed in, not for fans and fanfaronades.

People who duck and dodge to stay undefeated are fighting for something that they apparently believe in -- undefeatedness. And nobody should knock it. To each his own. And it is the fighters do the scrapping, not the fans and fanfaronades. Holla!

the Roast says:

@gibola. I like what you did with this! Boxing fans will be talking about that fight for as long as there are boxing fans.

Which begs the question, what fight to date will Money best be remembered for?

A) Corrales
B) Castillo
C) De La Hoya
D) non-fight with Manny


Yep, it's D. I do think the fight with Da Manny will happen. It has to. Too much money to not do it. It could still be a great fight. Everyone thought it was too late for Holyfield-Tyson. Holyfield is gonna get killed, Holyfield is gonna die in the ring. It was still a great night and a very good fight. Too much money for Floyd vs Manny not to happen. Next fight for both men or 2015.

dino da vinci says:

I think superfights should absolutely be made. When Hearns lost to Leonard, his stature within the game was elevated. It was a loss on paper, on boxrec, but that's it. He won everywhere else, evidenced by the fact that we're talking about that great, historic event 33 years later. He won, resoundingly. The undefeated record business is completely overblown, to an almost comical extent. Hand-picking guys, dodging the dangerous, etc, ugh ... I understand that it's in a fighter's best interest to tread carefully, from a business sense (Rock Newman all but admitted in the Legendary Nights episode that he wanted no part of LL), but the great fights, where both guys are great, are worth the risk. Ali? The Frazier loss is a footnote to that night. He took the fight on the heels of a bruising war with Bonavena. Imagine if we hadn't had that night? Where would the sport be?


Rock Newman wanted no part, Riddick Bowe wanted no part...

Domenic says:

@Domenic, the sport would have been where it is. Great fights don't make boxing. Boxing makes great fights. One needs a reason to fight that is more important than victory.

GOAT Ali and the late, great Smokin' Joe Frazier had many reasons. And the thoughts of the fans were the late thing on their mind.

GOAT Ali and SJF fought for something that they believed in, not for fans and fanfaronades.

People who duck and dodge to stay undefeated are fighting for something that they apparently believe in -- undefeatedness. And nobody should knock it. To each his own. And it is the fighters do the scrapping, not the fans and fanfaronades. Holla!


Undefeatedness is great. I'm all for it, and I definitely don't knock it. But I'll take a one-loss Ali over an undefeated Nicolai Valuev in 2005 all day long. Had Valuev retired prior to losing to Chagaev, does he rocket to history's elite? Not in my book. My point is if boxing is just a chess match of matchmaking, always taking the path of least resistance, we'd never have the Ali-Frazier 1 fights, or the Duran-Leonard 1 fights. Leonard and Hearns both benefited, largely, and do to this day, from their epic showdown that was fraught with risk for both at the time. Sure, they could've avoided it, but would they be better off? I don't think so.

Radam G says:

That Ray Leonard sure didn't understand business decisions. He could have done with PBF at his shoulder to advise him. Back in 1981 he was at the top of the game like PBF is today. Sugar Ray had to have learned a lesson from the needless risks he took in going through with the Duran fights in 1980 (they should never have been made - terrible business decisions, Ray even got a loss!). At least now he had an infinite number of ways of making money against opponents who were not huge threats to him and his star power will guarantee huge purses. He should jump between welter and lightmiddle fighting a rematch against Benitez, then beating Colin Jones, Cuevas, Stafford, Davey Moore, and a young Don Curry. That tall guy from Detroit is a real threat, he's unbeaten, fast, skillfull, punches like a ton of bricks - but he's got his own title, so Ray can easily avoid him and why shouldn't he? It would be madness to fight the Hitman and risk a golden future - even for a decent payday. Maximum reward, minimum risk. It's a business decision and we all understand Leonard-Hearns is a fight that will never happen. Or shouldn't have....what an idiot Leonard was, he doesn't understand business decisions at all, he signed to fight the only guy who had a chance of beating him to prove he was the best in the division. Boxing was mad back then nobody understood business decisions. That Leonard-Hearns fight should never have been made and I bet both guys regret it now. Yeah, they're in the Hall Of Fame and a some people remember the fight as a classic and even the loser gained in defeat, but was it really good business for either to take the fight? Of course not.
Tommy Hearns sure didn't understand the business of boxing, he could have done with PBF advising him. Back in 1981 he was an unbeaten champion and there was only one guy with a chance of beating him at 147, he could have fought, etc....
WOW! I think somebody is using trap doors and mirrors.

Tommy Hearns and Ray Leonard fought for the best money around at that time just Pretty Boy Floyd Mayweather and the late, great Diego Corrales did. They didn't have to fight one another either, but they did because of the bucks. And they were both young and C*cksure. Y & C makes you rumble, tumble and stumble!

C'mon, MAN! Middle-aged-for-boxing Sugar Ray Leonard and Tommy Hearn were like Money May is TODAY -- nowadays. They ducked too! And didn't give the fight crowd what it wanted.

It is the hurt bitnezz when you are on the young, c*cksure, excited and full of _____ _____ ____.

When you become middle aged for boxing, you pick and sure BIG money and sure SMALL risk.

The GOAT Ali did it too. He ducked dangerous Kenny Norton to dance with young, green Leon "Neon" Spinks. And the GOAT Ali paid for it because he didn't train properly.

And the young Smokin' Joe Frazier did da duck to the old, dangerous Sonny "Night Train" Liston.

The first priority of a great fighter, is doing it his way. No matter what anybody and dey big-nose, nine-toed, auntie say. Holla!

Radam G says:

Money May is undefeated because he is a bad mofu, just as "Slappy" Joe Calzaghe, "Finto" Lopez and Rocky Marciano were. No fan, critic, scribe or ___ ___ ____ tell an elite, intelligent fighter what to do, or who to fight, or when to fight them. That has always been boksing.

Money May has a ton of greats standing behind him.

Fans can STFU and take what they get. Hehehe! Holla!

brownsugar says:

Good posts you two . The answer is........
D!!!! Of course it is d. But he made the most money they will say! May the best man win is replaced by if it makes dollars it makes cents . Looking forward to the heavyweight fight for free on NBC tomorrow . No pick in the fights for me . My picks for the 19th are
Porter wins.
Kid wins .
Hopkins loses .


I'm looking forward to seeing if this Treano Johnson can put up a decent scrap against Curtis Stevens. It would be nice to see a tough battle between a vet and a new face on the block. Johnson fights like Kirkland... a dangerous strategy against a puncher like the chin checker, this is going to be fun to watch.

Mansour looks as basic as they come but he just keeps barreling forward until he connects with something....Cunningham should be able to out box him if he can resist the urge to stand his ground... Yes ..im looking forward to both of these fights as well.

the Roast says:

I'm looking forward to seeing if this Treano Johnson can put up a decent scrap against Curtis Stevens. It would be nice to see a tough battle between a vet and a new face on the block. Johnson fights like Kirkland... a dangerous strategy against a puncher like the chin checker, this is going to be fun to watch.

Mansour looks as basic as they come but he just keeps barreling forward until he connects with something....Cunningham should be able to out box him if he can resist the urge to stand his ground... Yes ..im looking forward to both of these fights as well.


Johnson put up one helluva fight, he was winning until Stevens pulled a rabbit out of his hat. The fight was stopped too soon but Johnson was in trouble. It took a second after the ref stopped the fight for Johnson to snap out of it and protest. A quick second. Very tough loss for Treano Johnson and a stunning comeback for Curtis Stevens. Very good fight.

brownsugar says:

Johnson put up one helluva fight, he was winning until Stevens pulled a rabbit out of his hat. The fight was stopped too soon but Johnson was in trouble. It took a second after the ref stopped the fight for Johnson to snap out of it and protest. A quick second. tough loss for Treano Johnson and a stunning comeback for Curtis Stevens. Very good fight.


@Roast ...wow you saw it too?......Whooooooo!!! That fight was CRAZY....OLD SKOOL CRAZY in a good way. Johnson was taking some Scarry hard punches in the 3rd round...but put the pressure on until the tenth..ou t working and stifling Stevens power all night long.
Very entertaining
Johnson fought like he was under the influence of a zombie voo doo spell as he ate Stevens power punches like Reese's Pieces and kept coming forward to dominate much of the action.
Dude was in hard denial afterwards....protesting as if he could change the final verdict. Hopefully hJohnson learned not to hang his chin out in front of a NY chin checker and will come back better.
HOLLYWOOD could not write a better script if the had the help of Sylvester Stallone , Mickey Rourke and Charlie Sheen.

the Roast says:

@Roast ...wow you saw it too?......Whooooooo!!! That fight was CRAZY....OLD SKOOL CRAZY in a good way. Johnson was taking some Scarry hard punches in the 3rd round...but put the pressure on until the tenth..ou t working and stifling Stevens power all night long.
Very entertaining
Johnson fought like he was under the influence of a zombie voo doo spell as he ate Stevens power punches like Reese's Pieces and kept coming forward to dominate much of the action.
Dude was in hard denial afterwards....protesting as if he could change the final verdict. Hopefully hJohnson learned not to hang his chin out in front of a NY chin checker and will come back better.
HOLLYWOOD could not write a better script if the had the help of Sylvester Stallone , Mickey Rourke and Charlie Sheen.


That was a tough loss indeed for Johnson. He didn't know what to do with himself after it was over. I felt his pain. He fought well enough to win, I thought he had it, and just like that it was going horribly wrong. He'll be back. Very tough fight. Stevens was getting blasted alot too. Two excellent fights tonight!

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