This Was A Boxing Clinic From Martinez

BY Lee Wylie ON September 17, 2012
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Martinez Chavez Jr 120915 006aA rematch would likely go to Martinez, possibly in even more dominant fashion, the writer says. What say you, readers? (Chris Farina-Top Rank)

Essentially, on Saturday night for eleven and a half rounds, we witnessed a cruiserweight being thoroughly outthought, outfought and outclassed by a super-middleweight, in as one-sided a contest for the middleweight championship of the world as you're ever likely to see. Despite the theatrical nature of the last minute and a half of the fight, which saw Sergio Martinez dropped from a manifold of left hooks up on the ropes shortly after being wobbled by a right hand as he was backing away, the fight wasn't the least bit competitive. Even upon rising to his feet, Martinez probably did enough to win the remaining moments of that round too, catching and hurting Chavez during an exchange with rights and lefts. As a result, Sergio Martinez now takes his record to 50-2-2 {28} while Chavez Jr, suffering the first loss of his career, is now at 46-1-1{32}.

It was said here before the fight that Sergio Martinez's superior hand and foot speed --and Chavez's lack of-- would be the main difference between the two fighters and it was. Chavez, reduced to following his man around the ring for round after round,found it almost impossible to set himself in order to let his hands go, such was Martinez's quickness at redirecting his movement and in launching his offense. Constantly playing catch-up, Chavez was beaten to the punch throughout the night. You see, the problem for Chavez, as was also previously mentioned here, is that Chavez's style doesn't bode well on the score cards. In other words, unless he actually stops his opponent, he's always going to find it difficult to avoid being outworked across twelve rounds. Because Chavez doesn't throw punches until he's planted his feet once he's found his way inside, he allowed Sergio Martinez, who can throw punches on the move, to throw 908 punches, most of which came at him with Martinez on the back foot. With Martinez moving laterally, side to side and in and out, Chavez, a lineal attacker, couldn't get Martinez in front of him for long enough to put anything together. Hence, the notion of Chavez walking forward without punching and losing rounds. Of course there was a real deficit in hand speed, but the real difference maker in the fight was the gulf in foot speed. I lost track of the amount of times Chavez finally appeared to have his man pinned in the corner only for Martinez to turn him and start the process of walking Chavez onto shots all over again. Martinez's better footwork allowed him to always remain one step ahead of Chavez.

It wasn't just Martinez's superb foot work that gave Chavez problems either. Martinez is an extremely intelligent fighter, which is something that often gets lost when discussing his best attributes. Sergio's physical gifts would count for nothing if he didn't know how to apply them intelligently during a fight. That night, as early as the first round, Martinez made a conscious decision to throw a straight left lead to Chavez's body. While the British commentators correctly assumed that it was thrown to slow Chavez down as he would likely be applying more and more pressure as the fight progressed, they never mentioned it's main purpose. If you look at Chavez's guard in the first round, as both fighters were assessing one another, you'll notice that it was extremely high and tight. By throwing a fast, straight left lead into the pit of Chavez's stomach, Martinez forced him into slightly adjusting his guard to compensate. Once a fighter is unaware of what punch is coming next, it becomes increasingly difficult for them to concentrate on anything else. Once Martinez knew he had forced this sensation upon Chavez, we saw a carefully though out, well rounded attack consisting of straight lefts, right hooks and uppercuts. With Chavez's guard now slightly lowered, we saw the same straight left hand thrown up top and threaded through the guard. We also saw him setting traps with it too. Martinez often drifts left, gravitating towards his opponent's right hand, looking to draw it out so that he can simultaneously shift his weight back across to his right and land a straight left hand. Freddie Roach could be heard in the corner during the rounds, describing the direction of Martinez's movement. I wasn't, however, convinced that he was aware of the counter attacking intentions that were linked to it.

It wasn't just the straight left that worked a treat for Martinez either as he also had a lot of success using his jab, doubling and tripling up on it with great effect, even forcing his far bigger opponent onto the back foot as a result of it. Again, because Martinez wasn't just looking to maintain distance with it --he was also looking to hook off of it-- the jab kept Chavez guessing and from getting comfortable with what Martinez was doing. As the fight wore on, Chavez had no answer for the speed and precision --not to mention the unpredictability-- of Martinez's combinations neither. Martinez often ended his combinations with the right hook, as he was sliding off to his right and on the blindside of Chavez. Again, Chavez found himself constantly being turned and having to reset his feet.

Here's what I didn't see coming; Martinez spent far longer in the pocket than I could ever have imagined. And what's even more impressive is the fact that he was there on his own terms. Before the fight, many thought --myself included-- that if any in-fighting were to take place, it would be Chavez who would have the better of it. Time after time, Martinez rewrote the script as he allowed the fight to take place at close quarters. Demoralizingly for Chavez, Martinez actually got the better of it. As Chavez looked to land his vaunted left hook, Martinez found a way to blunt it by pressing his right shoulder into Chavez's chest. By doing this, Chavez's left hook was landing around and away from Martinez's lower body. With the left hook to the body taken away, Martinez found a way to land his left uppercut to Chavez's head in close. Beforehand, nobody gave Martinez a chance on the inside and here he was, with his back to the ropes, actually getting the better of the in-fighting.

This really was a boxing clinic from Martinez. A display of inside/outside, offensive/defensive, back foot/front foot mastery {albeit against an overmatched opponent}. Martinez looked just as comfortable in taking the fight to Chavez as he was in countering him. His versatility on offense ranks among the best in professional boxing. I honestly don't think I've ever seen a 37 year-old fighter whose stamina levels are as high, nor have I seen anyone at that age who's as fast or as mobile as Sergio Martinez is. Going one step further, I believe Martinez may be the best offensive fighter in the sport or at least, the most aesthetically pleasing. Martinez varies the rhythm of his offense --punching and movement-- in subtle ways that are difficult for opponents to track and time. He's so seamless when he does it, that his opponents don't know when or how he's doing it. His constant feinting, twitching, circling, trap setting style will continue to be a nightmare for any fighter in or around the middleweight division.

I'm sure most observers would welcome a rematch between the two, with the PR teams possibly playing on the famous Julio Cesar Chavez-Meldrick Taylor theme to spice things up. Ultimately, these two fights were night and day. Chavez Sr was hurting Taylor throughout the fight even though he was losing most of the rounds, whereas Martinez was dominating Chavez Jr in winning just about every second of every round without getting hurt or worn down in the process. Personally, I saw enough Saturday night that suggests to me that a rematch wouldn't look any different. Yes, Chavez hurt Martinez right at the end, but Martinez was obliging Chavez and giving the crowd what they wanted. My gut feeling here is that if he really wanted to, Martinez could have made the fight a lot easier--and a lot less exciting-- on himself by staying on the outside. It wasn't necessary for him to do so, but I believe Martinez wanted to make a statement by choosing to go toe-to-toe with Chavez at times.

Unquestionably, this was a great night for boxing. We saw a great performance from Martinez {as well as resiliency}and a great final round. Chavez, who must be commended for his gutsy effort in almost turning things around late on, must be given credit for his chin, which is clearly as good as he said it was. All in all though, could Chavez really go one better next time? By allowing his hands to move more and by applying more intense pressure early on, Chavez could inadvertently give Martinez more counter-punching opportunities than he did last night. It's not beyond the realms of possibility to suggest that Martinez could go one better next time and actually stop Chavez. At the least, Martinez could make it a lot less compelling, which translates to him sticking and moving and avoiding the inside exchanges at all costs, something that wasn't at the top of his agenda Saturday night.

I can see why many would want to see it again, but for me, I saw all I needed to see. Sergio Martinez will always have the style and speed to trump Chavez Jr's size and strength.

As a thought experiment, ask yourself this. If Martinez was dropped in the first round instead of the last, would the calls for a rematch still be as strong? Using that train of thought then, you could say last night was a lot like the Joe Calzaghe-Roy Jones Jr fight in reverse.

And nobody ever wanted to see a sequel to that one-sided showing, did they?

Comment on this article

mortcola says:

Yes, Martinez shut him down. And, no, Chavez did not TRY anything other than following around - no new angles, no change of pace - didn't even throw to the body much, even though he was effective the few times he did. A combination of effort and programming is the issue - Chavez has matured into a tough, hard hitting fighter, but he has one gear and no imagination at all. Other guys pushed it with the speedy Martinez, took chances, let themselves look foolish. Chavez could have done in the earlier rounds what he did in the 12th. It wouldn't have been as effective when Martinez was still fresh, but that would still have been the FIGHT PLAN. Maybe Jr really was undertrained, underfocused. I don't know. But that was a non-effort for 11 rounds. A rematch might be called for because a single moment of drama actually means something in boxing, and because if they fight again Chavez will know that a hungry and varied attack is exactly what he needs, and he'll have more time to do it. But does he "deserve" it? I say he took his lumps, but he didn't fight like a champion defending his title or his honor. He fought like a journeyman who had a single moment of inspiration. That ain't enough.

mortcola says:

Nice analysis, by the way. Yes, technically a fighter who has to set up and re-load will always struggle against someone with great movement and balance, the capacity to punch from anywhere. But it comes down to rigidity and flexibility, a willingness to leave the comfort zone. Larry Holmes had the same problem against Michael Spinks - old Larry couldn't let his hands go if he couldn't plant and start off the jab. He TRIED, and found his tactical boxing genius nullified. There are other examples. But many fighters of Chavez' bread and butter style would throw and throw and be UNCOMFORTABLE doing so, feeling uncertain and foolish, not saying, unconsciously, "I'm not allowed to throw until he's in my sights and my feet and torso are lined up just so". Pavlik is a true lunch pail, conventional-technique fighter, and, blind, bloody, and possibly hungover, he kept pushing against Martinez. Gatti tried against Mayweather, Pazienza tried against RJonesJr. Chavez followed, and followed, and followed, and couldn't get out of his programming - even though he had the tools in the kit. No one mentions that he landed at a 50 percent rate overall, VERY HIGH connect percentage, meaning that the effort worked when he TRIED. So, the argument that he "couldn't" is bogus. He was uncomfortable, and not angry or flexible enough to go there and stay there.

mortcola says:

Highlighting this: No one mentions that Chavez landed at a 50 percent rate overall, VERY HIGH connect percentage, meaning that the effort worked when he TRIED. So, the argument that he "couldn't" is bogus. He was uncomfortable, and not angry or flexible enough to go there and stay there.

Radam G says:

Truth DAT! No doubt "a boxing clinic" for 99 percent of the bout. But in that one percent, Sergio got double fudged UP! He got beat down like a terrorist, because he was indeed terrorizing the SOAL JCCJ. But it is ALL good.

SM won 99 percent of the bout for the 99 percenters -- bunch of poor fudgers terrorizing the one percent. Hehehe! Stop protesting! And like your hero SM, start contesting! Get in da game and quit da blame.

The SOAL JCCJ did it UP in that one percent of the bout that he WON, though. He whipped @SS! He showed the 99 percenters how the born-with-a-silver-spoon-in-their-mouths one percenters can do da d@mn thing. We fight to da END. And sometimes we start at da END! Hahaha! Danggit!

If the kid woulda only went to the body in da END, though, he coulda and shoulda got a KAYO! I luv me some woulda, coulda and shoulda. Hahaha! Holla!

Buzz Murdock says:

Viva El Chavez...

ultimoshogun says:

Unless Martinez intends to fight the Europeans, I say why the hell not to a rematch. This is some more woulda, coulda, shoulda, but I just don't believe that was the best effort from Junior. To me he looked too apprehensive the entire fight, not letting his hands go when Martinez attacked, and like brownsugar mentioned, sacrificed his own offense for defense. Once he threw caution to the wind and just went for it he rattled Martinez enough to score a knockdown. Maybe he wasn't in shape to fight with that kind of urgency throughout the fight, if that was the case then lesson learned, and he should take his traing camps seriously.

amayseng says:

mortcola is right, as usual, i think we can add into the fact that cutting and gaining 25 or more pounds, in fact does anyone know what he weighed in right before the fight?

but cutting that weight and drying out up to the fight prob took something out of him.

also, jr may have landed a great % of punches but he threw somewhere in the 300s

because sm controlled jr's output by moving, using angles and punching in combinations.

sm's speed, laser shots and ring generalship was just too much for jr, who is too heavy

and slow to be fighting an elite mw with great agility..

amayseng says:

Unless Martinez intends to fight the Europeans, I say why the hell not to a rematch. This is some more woulda, coulda, shoulda, but I just don't believe that was the best effort from Junior. To me he looked too apprehensive the entire fight, not letting his hands go when Martinez attacked, and like brownsugar mentioned, sacrificed his own offense for defense. Once he threw caution to the wind and just went for it he rattled Martinez enough to score a knockdown. Maybe he wasn't in shape to fight with that kind of urgency throughout the fight, if that was the case then lesson learned, and he should take his traing camps seriously.


good points, but the best way to keep from someone punching you is to punch them and make them hesitant to go from defense to offense...sm's speed but sharp punching kept jr from opening up unless he felt safe, look at jr's face, he was beat up all night, he took a lot of shots....he def has some power, good body work and a great chin but he was out classed. a rematch really isnt necessary as he got schooled ten rounds, jr had a good 6th round but lost it, but not schooled.

ultimoshogun says:

good points, but the best way to keep from someone punching you is to punch them and make them hesitant to go from defense to offense...sm's speed but sharp punching kept jr from opening up unless he felt safe, look at jr's face, he was beat up all night, he took a lot of shots....he def has some power, good body work and a great chin but he was out classed. a rematch really isnt necessary as he got schooled ten rounds, jr had a good 6th round but lost it, but not schooled.


Thats exactly my point, his face at the end showed he was getting tagged anyway, so might as well let your hands go and inflict some damage of your own. Better to go out in a blaze of glory than to get owned for 11 rounds.

ali says:

Thats exactly my point, his face at the end showed he was getting tagged anyway, so might as well let your hands go and inflict some damage of your own. Better to go out in a blaze of glory than to get owned for 11 rounds.

Go out in a blaze of glory is all i kept say watching this fight.

amayseng says:

Thats exactly my point, his face at the end showed he was getting tagged anyway, so might as well let your hands go and inflict some damage of your own. Better to go out in a blaze of glory than to get owned for 11 rounds.


i completely agree, if your gonna get beat up might as well try to go down swinging or inflict some damage of your own, i think he had a lot in his head, with a whole country

behind him he didnt want to get ko'd

brownsugar says:

Great hyposthesis from everyone,...very interesting stuff,...and I respect all the opinions but I think ameseng said it best with the following comment.

Originally Posted by amayseng[URL="http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?p=20042#post20042">
"see i just dont understand how you can see or think that jr didnt start pressure until late in the fight....it makes no sense....jr was attempting to pressure martinez from the beginning but was unsuccessful...at times sm was walking jr down and back because jr was getting hit and hurt...

jr was not capable of doing what he wanted because of sm, not because of jr.."


Personally I have to agree, and I respecfully submit my take:

1. Why was Chavez standing around and not rushing in on Martinez?

answer) because he couldn't catch Martinez with a fishnet.... and he was getting punched in the face whenever he tried (hard and often).

2. Why wasn't Chavez attempting to crowd Martinez and break him up like Andy Lee?

answer) because he couldn't,..... every time he tried he was getting punched in the face again... on the inside and the outside(while bleeding from the nose and mouth) .....Martinez is not even known for his inside boxing skills. But he does punch well at all ranges and was savvy enough to turn his right side into Chavez's hip where his torso became untouchable by Juniors body attack.

3. Punch stats.......Chavez obviously had good punch selection and nice stats saturday.. but what does it mean when while he's being hit more than twice as much. ....it's a moot point.

Chavez was only able to connect solidly on Martinez in the last round because a hurt and exhausted Martinez stood right in from of him on tired legs with a bullseye pasted on his chin...What Jr did was take advantage of an opportunity this wasn't Chavez channeling the spirit of Chavez Sr.....Jr still wasn't able to keep Martinez down even though Sergio was gasping for air and his knees were quivering like jello,.....But When Martinez found his legs and began fighting back with all the fierce pride he could muster.... Chavez didn't have enough power left to put a dent in Martinez's chin,.... even though Martinez should have been ready to go..

This was not Bute vs Andradae by any standards.

In my view, Chavez gets credit for an exciting finish, but he gets no glory for losing the fight...The would've, could've argument is dead... The rematch happens only because the fight will still gross millions... inspite of the first fight being a one sided thrashing.

To say that Chavez would have made a better fight had he "tried harder" in my opinion subtracts from the masterful and gutty performance by Maravella.

If Chavez would have "tried harder" he would have only gassed more quickly and taken a worse beating. Chavez resorted to fighting a survivalist fight after he saw how hopeless his efforts were in the earlier rounds (neither boxing or brawing was working)but he sprung a pretty good ambush on Martinez in the late rounds. (good try,.. but no cigar) ....

Chavez may be a rookie but he's also a babyfaced killer and he does not let his opponent go unmolested if he has the ability to crush them early.
When Chavez started clowning....
Martinez showed the youngster that he should protect himself at all times.

Chavez will get better because of it.

And while he's proven his worth as far as being a "good" middleweight contender,.. he still lags behind the better groomed and more polished middleweights like N'Dam, Golovkin, Pirog, Martinez, Geale and possibly Quillin. (he might beat Sturm)

It's a shame for Chavez because at Middleweight there's no more cherries for Junior to pick at the elite level... and at supermiddleweight ALL the competition hits harder and are better schooled in the fundamentals of Boxing. (Pavlik, Stevenson, Oothiesein, Bute, Frock, Rodriguez, Ward, the list goes on).

unfortunately,.. as much as I admire the work of Martinez, this is also true for Argentine as well.

Wish them both well, because the European middleweights will finally get their chance to rule the middleweight division and will gradually overtake the Center Stage...... I say this with a heavy heart but does anyone wonder why Martinez welcomes a rematch with Chavez so much?? More money,.. less competiton.... Even Maravella knows that he won't keep his title long if he mixes in with the rest of the field(at his age). And those guys have been calling on Martinez for quite a while now.

It just gets more interesting from here.

comments welcome.

dino da vinci says:

Great hyposthesis from everyone,...very interesting stuff,...and I respect all the opinions but I think ameseng said it best with the following comment.

Originally Posted by amayseng[URL="http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?p=20042#post20042">
"see i just dont understand how you can see or think that jr didnt start pressure until late in the fight....it makes no sense....jr was attempting to pressure martinez from the beginning but was unsuccessful...at times sm was walking jr down and back because jr was getting hit and hurt...

jr was not capable of doing what he wanted because of sm, not because of jr.."


Personally I have to agree, and I respecfully submit my take:

1. Why was Chavez standing around and not rushing in on Martinez?

answer) because he couldn't catch Martinez with a fishnet.... and he was getting punched in the face whenever he tried (hard and often).

2. Why wasn't Chavez attempting to crowd Martinez and break him up like Andy Lee?

answer) because he couldn't,..... every time he tried he was getting punched in the face again... on the inside and the outside(while bleeding from the nose and mouth) .....Martinez is not even known for his inside boxing skills. But he does punch well at all ranges and was savvy enough to turn his right side into Chavez's hip where his torso became untouchable by Juniors body attack.

3. Punch stats.......Chavez obviously had good punch selection and nice stats saturday.. but what does it mean when while he's being hit more than twice as much. ....it's a moot point.

Chavez was only able to connect solidly on Martinez in the last round because a hurt and exhausted Martinez stood right in from of him on tired legs with a bullseye pasted on his chin...What Jr did was take advantage of an opportunity this wasn't Chavez channeling the spirit of Chavez Sr.....Jr still wasn't able to keep Martinez down even though Sergio was gasping for air and his knees were quivering like jello,.....But When Martinez found his legs and began fighting back with all the fierce pride he could muster.... Chavez didn't have enough power left to put a dent in Martinez's chin,.... even though Martinez should have been ready to go..

This was not Bute vs Andradae by any standards.

In my view, Chavez gets credit for an exciting finish, but he gets no glory for losing the fight...The would've, could've argument is dead... The rematch happens only because the fight will still gross millions... inspite of the first fight being a one sided thrashing.

To say that Chavez would have made a better fight had he "tried harder" in my opinion subtracts from the masterful and gutty performance by Maravella.

If Chavez would have "tried harder" he would have only gassed more quickly and taken a worse beating. Chavez resorted to fighting a survivalist fight after he saw how hopeless his efforts were in the earlier rounds (neither boxing or brawing was working)but he sprung a pretty good ambush on Martinez in the late rounds. (good try,.. but no cigar) ....

Chavez may be a rookie but he's also a babyfaced killer and he does not let his opponent go unmolested if he has the ability to crush them early.
When Chavez started clowning....
Martinez showed the youngster that he should protect himself at all times.

Chavez will get better because of it.

And while he's proven his worth as far as being a "good" middleweight contender,.. he still lags behind the better groomed and more polished middleweights like N'Dam, Golovkin, Pirog, Martinez, Geale and possibly Quillin. (he might beat Sturm)

It's a shame for Chavez because at Middleweight there's no more cherries for Junior to pick at the elite level... and at supermiddleweight ALL the competition hits harder and are better schooled in the fundamentals of Boxing. (Pavlik, Stevenson, Oothiesein, Bute, Frock, Rodriguez, Ward, the list goes on).

unfortunately,.. as much as I admire the work of Martinez, this is also true for Argentine as well.

Wish them both well, because the European middleweights will finally get their chance to rule the middleweight division and will gradually overtake the Center Stage...... I say this with a heavy heart but does anyone wonder why Martinez welcomes a rematch with Chavez so much?? More money,.. less competiton.... Even Maravella knows that he won't keep his title long if he mixes in with the rest of the field(at his age). And those guys have been calling on Martinez for quite a while now.

It just gets more interesting from here.

comments welcome.


Radam, you know I love you, but when the new TSS P-4-P List comes out, a new name will grace the top slot. Your ascent, peak and regression mirror that of the PacMan, and as you know, I'm still not 100% certain the two are not one and the same.

Brown Sugar, you are the absolute standard, and I can't begin to tell you how much I enjoy reading your insights.

...my battery is going dead, I'm going to charge it, and finish this later.

brownsugar says:

Hey Dino I can't wait to see how fast public perception changes about the middle weight division in the next two years. I'm thinking Triple G emerges on top with a Hagler-like grip on the division.... and Sugar Ray Leonard-like popularity... just my 2cents

gibola says:

It's easy for me to say this, I'm not the one getting hit with the punches, but...
To have a better chance of winning Chavez has to up the tempo, be aggressive from bell to bell, punch when Martinez punches and risk getting beat up worse, with the ultimate payoff being he gives himself a better chance of winning. In the middle rounds JCCJ frequently backed off, as he did in the first couple of rounds. I understand why, but if he wants to win it has to be bell-to-bell pressure, tire Martinez out earlier and hopefully have the 12th round happen in the 10th of a rematch. Of course, JCCJ might get knocked out but he has to do something different if he wants to improve on Saturday night's showing. I would have him fitter and more fired up for the first round in the rematch, let Martinez know from the start he's not going to dominate as easily and see where it leads. It could lead to JCCJs downfall but Martinez was the guy on the floor, who knows he was hurt so JCCJ should be confident of being more competitive if he can only start pressuring from the first bell with no letup. I do question whether JCCJ can get in good enough shape to do that, but if he can't then he shouldn't consider a rematch because he won't improve on the performance.

MisterLee says:

A rematch would be pointless. I agree EM! Sergio besides all that showed he was in a different class than Chavez! Chavez was outsmarted, outboxed, and outfought on the outside and the inside. Those last blows in round 12 was pure luck. Martinez fought on chicken legs for about 30 secs, but got his bearings back and fought like a champ JuanMa-esque but with more intelligence. Chavez should not get credit for ONE lucky rally. Holler!

MisterLee says:

Andre Ward 2013!

puncher says:

Hey Dino I can't wait to see how fast public perception changes about the middle weight division in the next two years. I'm thinking Triple G emerges on top with a Hagler-like grip on the division.... and Sugar Ray Leonard-like popularity... just my 2cents


Isn't Sergio doing the Hagler thing right now. He wins the respect of people when he is older and chops them down one at a time despite what any critic would say.

MisterLee says:

Or Hopkins

The Voicebox says:

I don't think there are any adjustments that Chavez can make to have the rematch be more competitive. Sergio will go back to training camp, analyze what few mistakes he made while isolating the several hundred Junior made, and he'll do exactly what he did to Paul Williams in their rematch; devastating early KO. Martinez did not fight in that last round like Bute, whose wobbly legs and bemused expression said he was ready for the fight to be over. When he got hurt, Maravilla dug in and fired back and actually stunned his opponent. I've heard talk about "if only this had been 15 rounds, Chavez could've knocked him out" and I call hogwash. Sergio would've come back out with the cobwebs shaken away while Julio is still gasping at air with his eyes swelling shut and blood drooling from his mouth, having shot his wad in a last desperate attempt for a KO. Then we would've certainly gotten a KO, but it'd have been Chavez stretched out on the canvas and all this talk of a rematch would be silly. That being said, I'll gladly pay for a rematch as it was a highly entertaining fight and there's always a chance lightning could strike twice. I say let's have a rematch or bring on the best fight to be made in boxing today - Mayweather-Martinez for the middleweight championship, with a reasonable catchweight if necessary. I think it'd be vastly more competitive and entertaining than any fight Mayweather could make with anyone else, and the perfect capstone to both men's careers.

mortcola says:

News flash: Martinez can be hit and hurt. His footwork does NOT negate offense, as evident in the fact that everyone he has fought has had good connect stats against him, and has hurt or dropped him. His movement makes it technically challenging, and challenging of courage, because of what a quick counterpuncher he is. But his movement lacks subtlety - it does not nullify like Mayweather's does, for example. Throwing at Martinez requires that one not wait till one is comfortable, feet just where you want them, but to throw between his shots, as Roach told Chavez to do. Hell, WILLIAMS, MACKLIN, DZINDZURUK and BARKER - good fighters but not maestros, and guys who couldn't take the counters the way big Julio could, were able and willing to do it effectively until they got chopped down. If Julio can handle the emotional stress of that hyperspeed whack-a-mole of Martinez' movement, and move his hands, he can duplicate that 12th round whenever he wants to. At a risk, of course - but that's boxing. And I'm a Martinez fan. Boosh.

DaveB says:

I don't think Chavez can have as much luck as he had in the 12th round, with his slow hand and foot speed without Sergio's accommodating him by getting caught on the ropes. I do think Sergio uses a lot of waste motion that contributes to his legs getting tired. Had Chavez pressed more aside from a worse beating he would have been spent too. I know Martinez learned from this. He could have easily coasted in the 12th and all people would have talked about was how badly Chavez was beaten. Those punches in the 12th were thrown in pure desperation. A desperate fighter, especially a big one that can punch, always has a chance. I don't know where Chavez goes from here because 168 is waiting for him and he'll have no choice but to go there soon. His height and weight advantages fly out the window. I notice he doesn't like it to the body (who does?) but fighters were watching. Sergio impressed me that when he got up he was able to do a stretch, not hold on but fire back. I was thinking that was the wrong thing to do but he was successful some how. Luckily he didn't get caught but he gets a lot of credit for that too. What was really lucky for him was that he was able to hold it together when it certainly didn't appear that he could. I was going bananas as I'm sure everyone else was. And he was really, really lucky that he didn't have a sorry a$$ referee like Richard Steele who would have waved the fight off and not given him a chance. Great job by Mr. Tony Weaks or Weeks.

amayseng says:

thanks brownsugar, and excellent breakdown in every aspect...

one thing some people dont realize is that for chavez to pressure sm balls out from the beginning he himself would fatigue and exert quickly and leave little for the middle to end of the fight...jr carrying 185 takes a lot more energy than sm carrying 165. so not only did sm's movement but more importantly, razor shots deter jr, but jr had to pace himself as well which i felt he did early on....and like i mentioned earlier, jr had a whole country depending on him, i think he got hurt numerous times that sent him into survival mode the last thing he wants in life is to be knocked out on ppv and in front of 19,000 fellow mexicans.

it has been reported that sm had a meniscus tear prior to the fight, which was most likely exacerbated during the fight, also sm fought with a broken left hand in the fight, which i caught past midway i just saw him tossing that left hand out and not shooting it through like he was earlier.......

with these injuries it makes sm's performance more admirable, also, man, he was hurt bad in the 12th, i really cant believe he fought out of it and didnt run...

sm deserves his props, he is a true warrior, an excellent boxer and most importantly a positive influence for the fight game....

Radam G says:

Wow, amayseng! Fighters fighting with injuries come with the terrority. Nothing "admirable" about that. Let's not get carry away with with regularities of da game. It was a SM night. He held on and won the bout. The only excitement was when he was getting his arse torch. A spade is a spade. For eleven rounds for SM, the SOAL JCCJ was homemade.

Let's do it again. Holla!

amayseng says:

i disagree to an extent RADam g, yes injuries are a part of all sports, but for sm whos fighting sytle relies on his legs , movement and agility, i ADMIRE him for not cancelling or postponing the bout due to a meniscal tear...which would have been understandable and unacceptable...

amayseng says:

i disagree to an extent RADam g, yes injuries are a part of all sports, but for sm whos fighting sytle relies on his legs , movement and agility, i ADMIRE him for not cancelling or postponing the bout due to a meniscal tear...which would have been understandable and unacceptable...

Radam G says:

No! No! No! Back in da day, Larry Holmes went into the bout with a separated shoulder and won WBC titlebelt from Kenny Norton. Smokin Joe Frazier, after he replaced Buster Mathis, who broke his hand and couldn't go to the O-Games, Frazier broke his own hand in the semi-finals and fought and won in the finals against a giant communist block fighter. Rocky Mariciano got his nose splitted in two early in the bout against Ezzard Charles but kept going. As a 15-year-old hotshot, I broke my finger on one hand and the thumb on the other hand in a regional tournament but I went to the US Nationals as a underaged kid lying about being 16 a week later and WON. I could go forever telling you about fighters fighting hurt.

Again, when it come to pugilism, SM did what was natural, not special. The game is a natural unforgivable hurt bitnezz (sic). Holla!

Grimm says:

Quite right, Radam, but we should still appreciate these warriors that make up this very special sport. Instead of taking it for granted, be grateful they - still - exist...at least a few of them.

puncher says:

Quite right, Radam, but we should still appreciate these warriors that make up this very special sport. Instead of taking it for granted, be grateful they - still - exist...at least a few of them.


Yeap and Sergio treats the sport with respect while the primadona of Jr does not...now even caught with some weed in his system. Was that to be better...who knows...did not seem like it. SM is the true champ and does not need to fight this bum again until the bum proves it other wise. Let him fight the top of the middle weight division to get a shot again.

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