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Jermain Taylor Knocked Down in 9th, But Wins UD

BY The Sweet Science ON April 21, 2012
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Taylor Truax04JERMAIN TAYLOR SURVIVES LATE KNOCKDOWN TO DEFEAT CALEB TRUAX BY UNANIMOUS DECISION

Erislandy Lara Annihilates Ronald Hearns in First Round

Catch the Replay of Tonight’s Telecast on Thursday, April 26 at

10 p.m. ET/PT on SHOWTIME EXTREME®

BILOXI, Miss. (April 21, 2012) – Jermain Taylor found himself in a very familiar place late in his fight – the canvas – but unlike in the past, Taylor returned to his feet and took home the victory. Taylor controlled a large majority of the 10-round middleweight bout before Caleb Truax floored him with a right hand early in the ninth. Taylor won the second straight fight of his comeback campaign via unanimous decision by the scores of 98-91, 97-92 and 97-94 in the main event of tonight’s ShoBox: The New Generation doubleheader. In the SHOWTIME®-televised co-feature, Erislandy Lara demolished Ronald Hearns via TKO at 1:34 of round one in a scheduled 10-round junior middleweight bout from Beau Rivage Resort & Casino in Biloxi, Miss.

Fighting for only the second time in the last thirty months, Taylor (30-4-1, 18 KO’s), of Little Rock, Ark., started slowly, using his signature jab to dictate an effective tempo and put rounds in the bank early. Truax (18-1-1, 10 KO’s), of Osseo, Minn., fought tentatively throughout the fight before gaining some confidence by engaging Taylor on the inside in the eighth round. The two met in the middle of the ring to start the ninth and, after Taylor lazily returned his left after throwing a jab, Truax landed a perfect right hand to Taylor’s chin that sent him to the floor.

Instead of suffering another knockout loss, a well-conditioned, resilient Taylor returned to his feet and kept the fight – and his career – alive through rounds nine and 10 with heart, hope and holding. The defeat was Truax’ first as a professional.

Following the bout, an ecstatic Taylor was unfazed by the knockdown. “I got back up and did my thing,” said the former undisputed middleweight world champ. “I’ve been knocked out a few times. This is what I’ve been thinking about. This is what I’ve worked for. This is what I planned. Now I’m in shape so I can get back up from a knockdown.”

The co-feature ended almost as quickly as it began when Lara (16-1-1, 11 KO’s), of Houston by way of Cuba, steamrolled through Hearns inside the first round. Hearns (26-3, 20 KO’s), of Detroit, Mich., attempted to use his long jab to keep away his shorter opponent but Lara’s lefts shattered Hearns in short order.

After a clean left to the head sent Hearns flat on the canvas, Hearns was able to rise off the floor – if not to the occasion. Following the knockdown, the 29-year-old Lara had Hearns in trouble with an attack against the ropes. Referee Keith Hughes gave Hearns a standing eight count but allowed the bout continue. Lara had other plans. The former Cuban amateur standout landed two more flush lefts to Hearns’ head before Hughes halted the bout.

CompuBox recorded that Lara connected on 10 of 13 power punches compared to Hearns’ performance of 0 for 9.

The special edition of ShoBox: The New Generation was promoted by DiBella Entertainment in association with Golden Boy Promotions.

Barry Tompkins called the action from ringside with Steve Farhood serving as expert analyst. The telecast will replay this Thursday, April 26 at 10 p.m. ET/PT on SHOWTIME EXTREME®.

Comment on this article

the Roast says:

The Hearns stoppage was a little late, Ronald did not answer when questioned by the ref. I had no problem with the ref letting it go though. Its a brutal sport, everybody knows what they are getting in to. Lara on the rise. JT is a disaster waiting to happen. He went down hard from that right hand. The first time he gets in with a good fighter he's gonna get stretched.

Radam G says:

You kind of touchy, there, the Roast. It must be that Italian air.

Being from the old school, myself, stopping a bout late is better than stopping it too soon. I know! I KNOW! All the soft-touch muthasuckas are going to be all up in my grill and going for the kill. Well, the instuction is to protect yourself at all times. Not ask a darn question about "are you all right?" No fighter with cojones will say NO!

The referee did the proper thing. He got no answer, the "Chosen One['s]" eyes were clear, so the ref had no choice but to let him fight onward. The Chosen One gettin' his arse immediately kayoed afterward comes with the whup-a$$ squared jungle of the hurt bitnezz.

I luv referees who ain't punks. And don't dig chumps. Let a pugilist go out on his fudging shield. Later for letting a boxing match yield. That it is weak-arse MMA/UFC tap-out syet! Holla!

mortcola says:

Poor JT is reduced to a game imitation of his former self, manically celebrating the fact that this time he beat the count. I wish him well. But he must know that he is nothing but a trial-horse waiting to happen, to be followed shortly after by slurred speech, loss of emotional control, and poverty. Back to school, JT - I mean community college, get a business degree or auto mechanic certificate, train some promising youngsters in a local gym, and have a life. Now is the turning point, JT - you're a decent guy with a family to support. Be smart.

dino da vinci says:

You kind of touchy, there, the Roast. It must be that Italian air.

Being from the old school, myself, stopping a bout late is better than stopping it too soon. I know! I KNOW! All the soft-touch muthasuckas are going to be all up in my grill and going for the kill. Well, the instuction is to protect yourself at all times. Not ask a darn question about "are you all right?" No fighter with cojones will say NO!

The referee did the proper thing. He got no answer, the "Chosen One['s]" eyes were clear, so the ref had no choice but to let him fight onward. The Chosen One gettin' his arse immediately kayoed afterward comes with the whup-a$$ squared jungle of the hurt bitnezz.

I luv referees who ain't punks. And don't dig chumps. Let a pugilist go out on his fudging shield. Later for letting a boxing match yield. That it is weak-arse MMA/UFC tap-out syet! Holla!



Being from the old school, myself, stopping a bout late is better than stopping it too soon.

Absolutely.

However...Yes, better to err long than short. But why is it that referees like Pat Russell and Steve Smoger have almost impeccable timing, while most others just can't figure out the job. It really isn't that difficult. As a referee, this is your job in a nutshell:

1. When giving instructions in the locker room, be sure to give the exact same instructions to both camps. Do NOT tailor your monologue to any of your perceived biases pertaining to who is the bigger puncher or dirtier fighter. That should have long been addressed by the organization, taking the referee out of a perceived bias and/or potential conflict of interest.

2. Be in the mist of the action only when you are required to be. (Sounds easy, no? So where does this ever growing problem with professional referees stem from? Their farm system, the amateurs.) A great referee is virtually invisible. At the end of the fight, the fans know the referee did a great job if they didn't think about him...if they didn't find themselves questioning his decisions or actions throughout the bout. Fans pay to see the fight, not the referee.

3. Make sure neither fighter creates an unfair advantage. (Obviously, the key word here is "unfair".)

4. ALL fighters know the risks. Jean-Jacques Rousseau stated: “Every man has the right to risk his own life in order to preserve it. Has it ever been said that a man who throws himself out the window to escape from a fire is guilty of suicide?” Every man has the right to risk his own life in order to save it....It sounds as though this quote was tailor-made for the fight game. A fighter trains and sacrifices for potential glory. He doesn't need it undone by you, just because you feel like he's having a bad run. You must be certain that he cannot continue when you pull the plug. Don't be afraid to count to ten. Once you stop the fight, you cannot restart it. An early stoppage jeopardizes not only the fighter's career, but his entire life. And yes, a late stoppage can also result in horrific consequences. However, note the quote above.

5. Points 5 - 20 will be reserved for their own dedicated post.


"Let a pugilist go out on his fudging shield"

Yes, Radam, agreed.

brownsugar says:

JT isn't broke he's always lived in a very modest sized home and has invested his winnings wisely in real estate holdings and other ventures..JT doesn't live beyond his means and never had to ask for a bailout. Question is ...... what is he doing back in the ring? Claming he'll never taste the canvas again? It was a little morbid watching JT grow a third arm so he could pat himself on the back just because was able to continue after hitting the canvas. I'm glad he found a measure of self confidence...but he's a long way from being ready for Primetime. JT therapy is over...please return to your home... go on a fishing trip and decide what you enjoy doing out side the ring son.

casual fan says:

Hey hey hey! The SS gods are letting us little people on here now! Sweet! I like to see a timely stoppage where I don't have to worry too much about the brains of these awesome athletes. If a brother clearly isn't going to win pull out a stunning upset and doesn't have the cognitive awareness to respond to the ref, then hopefully his corner will save their man to fight another day. You may call me a soft touch and I very well might be, but I've seen plenty of guys take beatings they never came back from and that is a damn shame. Peace y'all!

dino da vinci says:

@CF. If you experienced a problem creating an account or posting a comment, we'd like to know about it. Also, one major problem with not letting guys fight through troublesome spots is it then favors certain styles. Same as if you reduced baseball to six innings or moved the bases to 80 or 100 feet. Strategies would have to change completely. In boxing, the only way to beat some fighters is to take them out to deep waters and drown 'em. Now, if it gets a little dicey in the process and refs become quick to stop it, you'd be putting the Carmen Basilio's at a huge disadvantage, and boxing would suffer greatly. No one (I would hope) ever wants to see an athlete suffer an injury, let alone permanent damage. That said, referees must allow fighters to fight; and when necessary, stoppages must be timely. Two referees that understand this and get it right virtually every time are Pat Russell and Steve Smoger.

deepwater says:

lou dibella swore on his moma that he would never promote taylor again. hows your moma lou?

brownsugar says:

I can't believed Tommy Hearns sacrificed his own flesh and blood to Lara,... nobody in their right mind could have possibly believed that a community college basketball player and part-time boxing hobbyist (Ronald Hearns) could have possibly had any chance to be competitive with a former Cuban amateur standout (with around 200 amateur fights and world titles) Like Lara.

Lara's been calling out Williams, Pirog, Martinez, Kirkland, Alvarez,... and Vanes... those guys won't go near anywhere near him. even after they saw the unheralded Molina hang tough with him.

How much courage does it take for man to feed his son to the wolves... or is it even called courage.

the Roast says:

Well B-Sug, I don't know how much involvement Thomas has with Ronald's career but I admire Ronald for taking the fight. Any athlete has to seek out a tough challenge. Better to roll the dice and lose than never find out. I knew Lara would win but I did not expect a blowout like that. I had no problem with the ref letting the fight go, better to no for sure than leave any doubt. It was kind of like when Tommy got KOed by the Blade. He was out on his feet and that ref could have stopped it but I'm sure the Hitman prefered to go out on his shield the way he did. If Lara continues to be avoided by the top guys a rematch with hard luck Molina seems a natural fit.

brownsugar says:

Roast,.. you must be kidding,... even you windy city/Italian/boxing/women's-tennis fans can't be that cold hearted. Lara grew up fighting in a Cuban sports camps his whole life and has the pedigree of an international amateur background with hundreds of fights and years of schooling under the Cuban school of pugilism,...... R. Hearns just has some basketball experience, 10 amateur fights, and his Daddy's name.

He got crushed by a C- Level Journeyman by the name of Harry Joe Yorgey, (who got crushed by Kirkland soon aferward), and his fathers name got him an inivite to a German Beatdown in Sturms back yard,... complete with a side order of sauerkraught.
It's one of he most unconscionable and merciless mismatches ever made. I Don't think there was anything honorable or inspiring about it.
Especially when you factor in that his dad is a HOFmer and is involved on an intimate level with his sons career, the whole situation becomes that much more perplexing.
It's just sad.... really sad.

Radam G says:

B-Sug, boksing is full of strangeness and appear-to-be confused or non-caring fathers. Perplexing is a grand word to use. This type of stuff happening on the regular. Just to name one incident, don't forget how the late, great Smokin' Joe Frazier hog served his son Marvin to the "Easton Assassin" and the "Iron One." Holla!

brownsugar says:

AT least Marvis Frazier was a Silver Medalist and won a sliver of the Heavyweight championship RG,.. Ronald has never come close to either of those accomplishments. It's a merciless sport I know but I'm still searching for some understanding,... no way Tommy could have thought "The Chosen One" was anywhere near ready for his kind of challenge.

Radam G says:

What was Marvis a silver medalist at? Maybe you are speaking about the 1980 U.S. Olympic Boxing Trials. He got kayoed by an Army sarge nicknamed "Broad-a$$." Dude was big. He became a decent pro. He is now deceased.

You'd be surprised, B-Sug, about boxing fathers. Tommy did indeed believe that his son could fight. Though, his son didn't officially fight until his 20s, he was around the game all his whole life, and occasionally worked out and trained with active boxers. Remember the game is full of optical illusions. Don't believe nothing [sic] you hear, and half of what you see.

Even Aaron "The Hawk" Pryor's sons were always hanging out around and working out and training at the gyms their whole lives. They just didn't actively fight. Bottomline, there are many types of boxers -- gym ones, competition ones, protected ones, etc., etc. The list goes on. Another nowadays son of a fighter is Dyan Davis. He was always around the gyms with his Howard Davis. Even the GOAT Ali's son MJ -- Muhammad Ali Jr -- knows how to fight and was often in and around the gyms. But he knows that he ain't his pops. Now Hisham Rahman's Junior can straight-up fight. He will be a fine pro and probably heavyweight champion of the world. Antonio Tarver's basketball-playing son sometimes gets the boxing fever. But he ain't his pops and should stay with the B-ball. Danggit! Now that I think of it, all the sons of legends were/are nice basketball players. Even Julio Cesar Chavez Jr can get down with the B-ball. All these suckas outgrew their fathers by a few inches, except for Cory Spinks and Tim Witherspoon Jr. Holla!

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