Nope, he didn't lose anything, from a layoff, or jail, or harsh press or taunts from his foe's dad; Floyd Mayweather looked every bit the best pugilist on the planet against Robert Guerrero in the main event at the MGM in Las Vegas on Saturday night.
The judges scored 117-111, 117-111, 117-111 for Floyd, whose best asset on this night might have been his legs, which looked peppy as heck. Not that his hand speed has slipped; his jab, his lead rights, everything was on target. He landed 60% of his power shots, an incredible stat.
After, Floyd said being back with his dad helped his defense. He hurt his right hand, he said to Jim Gray. He said he felt no rust from the layoff. "I feel bad I didn't give fans the knockout, I was looking for it," he said. Midway through the fight, he said, he felt the pain. Was he ever concerned? No; he was pressing the attack, he said, but good sparring helped him. He said Showtime is a positive network, and is happy to be working with them. Asked if he was a changed man, he said being locked up is no fun, but he is ready to party. Is Canelo next? He isn't sure, he will rest and decide. He ended up with props to Ghost.
Guerrero said to Gray that Floyd is the best for a reason. He praised God, and said, "Praise Jesus" loudly. "He was barely slipping by the punches," Ghost said. Floyd was a little better than he thought he'd be, he admitted. Ghost said he had no regrets with the direction of the promotion. He'd like another shot at Floyd before he retires, he said. There will be no one pushing for that, sir.
The 36-year-old Mayweather (43-0 entering; from Grand Rapids, Michigan, lives in Las Vegas) was 146 pounds, while the 30-year-old Guerrero (31-1-1 entering; from Gilroy, CA) was 147 pounds on Friday.
We wondered going in if the WBC welter champion Floyd would get old overnight, if a yearlong layoff would make him rusty, if jail and a solo cell drained him mentally. He came to the ring with L'il Wayne, who rapped a song.
We pondered whether the interim welter champ Guerrero could be strong enough to hang with Floyd at 147, if the bigfight atmosphere had drained him, if the gun charge hung over his head, if his faith would propel him to fight over his head. He came to the ring in a "God is Great" t-shirt.
Duane Ford, Julie Lederman and Jerry Roth were the judges.
In the first, lead rights landed for Floyd. Ghost was aggressive, and he looked to counter quickly.
After the round, Floyd Jr. heard from trainer Floyd Sr.
In the second, a left clipped Floyd. The two clinched in the first and second, felt each others' strength. Floyd made Ghost miss badly a few times. Ghost was being measured and patient.
In the third, Floyd moved a lot. His legs looked fresh and the right kept working.
In the the fourth, a left hit Floyd but he countered and the crowd loved it. The lead right popped Floyd, as he moved a bunch, picked his spots and used his hand speed edge.
In the fifth, we saw Floyd keep using a conventional stance not bothering to do that shoulder roll defense. The right was so on target in the sixth. Floyd moved to his right, set, popped, and moved.
In the seventh, Floyd moved less and threw less. He took a round off but still might have won it. Blood formed on Ghost's face and he landed few jabs in round eight but Floyd threw harder in this round. In the ninth, we saw low blows from Floyd and Robert throwing rabbit punches. Floyd landed jab or lead rights, whatever he wanted, in the tenth,
In the 11th, Floyd stayed smart. He moved, jabbed to keep Ghost at bay, threw a nasty left hook late, slid out of harm's way..he did it all.
In the 12th, they embraced to start the last round. Ghost forged ahead, wanted to land a home run left but Floyd's D wouldn't allow it. We went to the cards.