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Thread: Three Punch Combo: Notes on Thursday’s ESPN Event, Julius Indongo and More

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    Three Punch Combo: Notes on Thursday’s ESPN Event, Julius Indongo and More

    [img]http://www.thesweetscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/michael-perez.jpg[/img]

    by Matt Andrzejewski

    THREE PUNCH COMBO -- It’s a point I keep harping on but good matchmaking makes good fights. And good fights bring back buzz to the sport which brings back the fans. Though the participants on Thursday’s Golden Boy show on ESPN are not the biggest names, they are solid fighters who are well matched and should provide excellent action in competitive fights.

    The main event is a super lightweight affair between Michael Perez (24-2-2, 11 KO’s) of Newark, NJ and Argentina’s Marcelino Lopez (32-1-1, 17 KO’s). Perez is known for making action fights. He is a natural boxer puncher but when he gets hit his instinct is to throw back immediately. He is coming off a tough loss to Petr Petrov in a title elimination fight and needs a win to still be considered a relative contender.

    Lopez is unknown to US fight fans as he has fought most of his career in Argentina. He is also a boxer puncher like Perez and likes to work behind a very solid jab. Lopez’s best punch is his left hook and he likes to throw that punch to the head as well as body working behind the jab. Though he does not possess one punch power, Lopez can be described as having heavy hands and his punches tend to have a cumulative effect as a fight progresses.

    This fight is very evenly matched. They both have similar styles and very similar skill sets. Neither has blazing speed and neither can count defense as a strong suit. Both are willing to take a few punches to get in their own shots. In particular, Lopez has a tendency of allowing opponents to throw while he covers up looking to counter with the left. I think we will see a solid competitive fight with plenty of action and probably in spots a slugfest will ensue.

    The co-feature is an interesting fight between welterweights Rashidi Ellis (17-0, 12 KO’s) and John Karl Sosa (13-2, 6 KO’s). Ellis is coming off an explosive one round knockout of Eddie Gomez in a fight where many felt Gomez would rise to the occasion. Instead, it was Ellis flashing both speed and power in destroying Gomez. The win put Ellis on the map as a welterweight to watch and his opponent on Thursday was himself once on that map before suffering back to back losses his last two times out. Still, Sosa is no pushover. This is an interesting test for Ellis coming off such a scintillating performance. If he can look impressive again, Ellis will certainly be in line for something much bigger later this year.

    Golden Boy has put together a very nice card on Thursday and we should be in store for a good night of boxing. For fans of the sport, it should not be missed.

    Julius Indongo’s Options

    Julius Indongo scored a mild upset with a dominant twelve round unanimous decision win against Ricky Burns to unify the IBF, IBO and WBA super lightweight titles. Indongo, a total mystery entering this fight, positioned himself for some lucrative options.

    The most likely option appears to be a fight with former lightweight belt holder Anthony Crolla. Crolla has expressed an interest in moving up a weight class following his two losses to Jorge Linares. He is a big name as well as a big draw in the UK. From a financial perspective, there is no other opponent for Indongo that could be as lucrative. In addition, Crolla is very beatable by a skilled boxer. Linares had an easy time with him in the rematch. Indongo is excellent at navigating range with his long reach and sharp jab. He would make it very difficult for Crolla to work his way inside where Crolla would need to be to have any success. So from a financial as well as matchmaking point of view, Crolla makes sense next for Indongo.

    If Indongo decides he does not want to head back to Europe, he has plenty of other options. The IBF number one ranked contender is Sergey Lipinets and his team is pushing for a fight with Indongo. It would be a fight that would most likely take place in the United States and though maybe not as lucrative as a Crolla fight would get Indongo exposure in the US. Such a fight would likely find a bigger US television platform than a Crolla fight given the fact that Lipinets is associated with PBC.

    Finally, Indongo could pursue a fight with Terence Crawford. If he were to go this route, most likely he would be looking at a fight with Viktor Postol to position him for a Crawford showdown. Top Rank, Crawford’s promoter, is a master at building big fights and knows that a Crawford-Indongo fight is right now too high a risk for Crawford with too little of a reward. But if Indongo is built up some by beating a name opponent on HBO, then a showdown with Crawford becomes more feasible. Indongo would be undefeated with a few solid wins including one big one on HBO (assuming he gets past Postol) and fans will begin clamoring for Crawford to fight him. The risk now becomes worth it for Crawford and his team as this would pit the two top super lightweights against each other in a huge unification fight.

    Julius Indongo is sitting in a very good position following his decisive victory against Ricky Burns. With options aplenty, it will be very interesting to see which direction he ultimately heads.

    Remembering the Strangest Fight I’ve Ever Seen

    April 12th, 1997 featured the long anticipated fight between Oscar De La Hoya and Pernell Whitaker. It was a true super fight but oddly the fight most remembered by hardcore fans on that night took place on the pay-per-view undercard. Alfonso Sanchez was being built by promoter Top Rank as a future star and was being showcased against veteran journeyman Micky Ward. Those of us that tuned in early will never forget this bizarre bout with an ending that reminded many of us why boxing has been called the theater of the unexpected.

    In 1996, Ward had finally been given a big fight and big payday that came with it. He was scheduled to face Julio Cesar Chavez in December of that year. But the fight would not happen for Ward as Chavez withdrew from the match citing a hand injury.

    To somewhat make up for the lost opportunity, promoter Top Rank offered Ward a slot in the undercard of the Whitaker-De La Hoya fight. It would only be for a fraction of what was offered for the Chavez fight but Ward really had no other options at this point to try to move his career forward. Of course, he was not being brought in to win as the match was designed as a showcase for Alfonso Sanchez.

    For six rounds, Sanchez totally dominated Ward. This was not totally unexpected but what was unexpected was that Ward was virtually showing no effort. He was throwing very little and basically just covering up taking a beating. Sanchez, for his part, just took what he was given round after round and even dropped Ward in the fifth.

    The outcome seemed all but decided entering the seventh. The announcers questioned why the fight should continue with Ward seemingly not willing to provide any sort of effort. Boxing was entertainment and one boxer not willing to compete is not entertainment they argued.

    The seventh started out much the same as the previous six with Sanchez picking his spots with Ward covering up and not throwing anything back. About halfway through the round, something strange happened. Ward threw a punch. It was his patented left hook to the body. Sanchez felt it but Ward quickly went back into a shell. However, Ward saw something and seconds later tapped the head of Sanchez with the left before digging it again to the body. This time Sanchez collapsed to the canvas and was in obvious pain. He would not beat the count leading to one of the most unusual finishes to a prizefight that most of us had ever witnessed.

    Like most watching the fight, I was shocked. Ward was not even remotely in this fight and seemed to have no path to possibly winning. If the fight had been stopped after round six, it would have been more than justified. But this is a lesson that in boxing anything can happen at any time. It is why I never turn away from a bout even if the outcome seems inevitable, as nothing is certain in this sport until it is over as evidenced by what happened 20 years ago in the Micky Ward-Alfonso Sanchez fight.

    Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel.
    Last edited by AcidArne; 04-17-2017 at 11:29 AM.

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    Senior Member oubobcat's Avatar
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    Re: Three Punch Combo: Notes on Thursday’s ESPN Event, Julius Indongo and More

    In leading up to the show on Thursday, I have been watching some video of Marcellino Lopez. He is not a bad fighter, type of a B level guy who could test young prospects and beat a certain level fighter but not that world class level fighter.

    Perez took a beating last time out against Petrov. Perez has been in his fair share of wars and I think is a bit shopworn. Fights with Figueroa, Maldonado, Acosta and lastly Petrov may have taken their toll. As far as the matchup goes, Perez will give his all as always and make for an action packed fight. But Lopez is more skilled than meets the eye and does possess an excellent left hook. I see him wearing down Perez and getting a late stoppage in an action packed fight.

    My brother is in Vegas and is watching the books for me. I told him my gut says Perez will be favored since he is the more known commodity. And if he is, I have a sizable wager ready to go down on Lopez.

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    Re: Three Punch Combo: Notes on Thursday’s ESPN Event, Julius Indongo and More

    Regarding the Micky Ward vs. Alfonso Sanchez fight, I was there. If memory serves, the arena wasn’t even half full when the fight was in progress – a typically late-arriving Las Vegas crowd.

    It was a ho-hum fight for the first six rounds, the sort of fight where one’s mind wanders unless he is carrying on a conversation with his neighbor. However, it so happened that I was paying attention when Ward delivered the punch, a body shot that came completely out of the blue.

    As Sanchez was crumbling to the canvas, he let out a silent scream. It was as if the punch carried an electrical charge.

    I remember thinking that I had just seen the reincarnation of Bob Fitzsimmons famous solar plexus punch, the punch that Fitz used to knock out James J. Corbett back in 1897. “He drew back his left with his forearm rigid and ripped it into the pit of Jim’s stomach a little under the heart,” wrote the ringside reporter of the punch that came out of the blue and left Corbett writhing on the canvas.

    This was Micky Ward’s signature punch. Without it he would have been less than a journeyman; he would have been a trial horse. However, I have come to believe that some boxers have a vulnerable spot on their body and that if an opponent hits it with the proper force, its lights out.

    Now I’m going to say something that will strike many people as ignorant. I suspect that this spot is only vulnerable at certain times, perhaps when the moon is in a certain phase. And yes, I wasn’t schooled to think this way and I know how dumb this sounds. But I believe that for Micky Ward this wasn’t simply the right punch, but the right punch that landed at the right moment in time -- when his opponent was most vulnerable.

    Isn’t it strange how one punch can dramatically alter the trajectory of a boxer’s career? Alfonso Sanchez was 16-0 going in with 15 knockouts, but Micky Ward would go on to have the more storied career.

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    Re: Three Punch Combo: Notes on Thursday’s ESPN Event, Julius Indongo and More

    Regarding the Micky Ward vs. Alfonso Sanchez fight, I was there. If memory serves, the arena wasn’t even half full when the fight was in progress – a typically late-arriving Las Vegas crowd.

    It was a ho-hum fight for the first six rounds, the sort of fight where one’s mind wanders unless he is carrying on a conversation with his neighbor. However, it so happened that I was paying attention when Ward delivered the punch, a body shot that came completely out of the blue.

    As Sanchez was crumbling to the canvas, he let out a silent scream. It was as if the punch carried an electrical charge.

    I remember thinking that I had just seen the reincarnation of Bob Fitzsimmons famous solar plexus punch, the punch that Fitz used to knock out James J. Corbett back in 1897. “He drew back his left with his forearm rigid and ripped it into the pit of Jim’s stomach a little under the heart,” wrote the ringside reporter of the punch that came out of the blue and left Corbett writhing on the canvas.

    This was Micky Ward’s signature punch. Without it he would have been less than a journeyman; he would have been a trial horse. However, I have come to believe that some boxers have a vulnerable spot on their body and that if an opponent hits it with the proper force, its lights out.

    Now I’m going to say something that will strike many people as ignorant. I suspect that this spot is only vulnerable at certain times, perhaps when the moon is in a certain phase. And yes, I wasn’t schooled to think this way and I know how dumb this sounds. But I believe that for Micky Ward this wasn’t simply the right punch, but the right punch that landed at the right moment in time -- when his opponent was most vulnerable.

    Isn’t it strange how one punch can dramatically alter the trajectory of a boxer’s career? Alfonso Sanchez was 16-0 going in with 15 knockouts, but Micky Ward would go on to have the more storied career.

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    Senior Member deepwater2's Avatar
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    Re: Three Punch Combo: Notes on Thursday’s ESPN Event, Julius Indongo and More

    The old medicine ball works wonders for the belly but if you're breathing in or breathing out and not prepared for the strike, the liver gets smashed up then hits the diaphragm and it's time for your body to collapse.
    liver -diaphragm mri.jpg

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    Re: Three Punch Combo: Notes on Thursday’s ESPN Event, Julius Indongo and More

    Quote Originally Posted by ArneK. View Post
    Regarding the Micky Ward vs. Alfonso Sanchez fight, I was there. If memory serves, the arena wasn’t even half full when the fight was in progress – a typically late-arriving Las Vegas crowd.

    It was a ho-hum fight for the first six rounds, the sort of fight where one’s mind wanders unless he is carrying on a conversation with his neighbor. However, it so happened that I was paying attention when Ward delivered the punch, a body shot that came completely out of the blue.

    As Sanchez was crumbling to the canvas, he let out a silent scream. It was as if the punch carried an electrical charge.

    I remember thinking that I had just seen the reincarnation of Bob Fitzsimmons famous solar plexus punch, the punch that Fitz used to knock out James J. Corbett back in 1897. “He drew back his left with his forearm rigid and ripped it into the pit of Jim’s stomach a little under the heart,” wrote the ringside reporter of the punch that came out of the blue and left Corbett writhing on the canvas.

    This was Micky Ward’s signature punch. Without it he would have been less than a journeyman; he would have been a trial horse. However, I have come to believe that some boxers have a vulnerable spot on their body and that if an opponent hits it with the proper force, its lights out.

    Now I’m going to say something that will strike many people as ignorant. I suspect that this spot is only vulnerable at certain times, perhaps when the moon is in a certain phase. And yes, I wasn’t schooled to think this way and I know how dumb this sounds. But I believe that for Micky Ward this wasn’t simply the right punch, but the right punch that landed at the right moment in time -- when his opponent was most vulnerable.

    Isn’t it strange how one punch can dramatically alter the trajectory of a boxer’s career? Alfonso Sanchez was 16-0 going in with 15 knockouts, but Micky Ward would go on to have the more storied career.
    It is something how the career's of Ward and Sanchez went in totally opposite directions following that fight.

    With the win, Ward received what would be his only shot at a world title against Vince Phillips. The fight was broadcast on ABC and took place in a small quaint venue in Boston. Phillips out worked Ward in the first two rounds and started to really pour it one in the third particularly working Ward to the body which was of course supposed to be Ward's specialty. Ward was once again not very active but more so then the Sanchez fight. With about a minute left in the round, a right from Phillips opened a bad cut over the eye of Ward. The blood spurred Ward on who now began to open up. The fight was on or so it seemed. Just before the round closed, the referee had the doctor look at Ward's cut and the doctor ruled Ward could not continue. Ward begged for a chance but the doctor advised the bout to be stopped despite Ward's pleading. With the fight in Boston, the fans began throwing beer cups and other debris into the ring upon the announcement. Ward showed the ultimate class in yelling and motioning to the crowd to stop and Ward's manager actually shielded Phillips. Ward even began yelling at a fan who he saw throw something and instructed all in the crowd to calm down. In suffering such a heart breaking loss, Ward showed his real class as a person that night.

    Sanchez did bounce back with an ESPN fight against Charles Murray following the Ward loss and looked pretty darn good in stopping the veteran Murray in 3 rds. He had one more fight then challenged Vince Phillips himself. That was an HBO fight and many in the sport by then had written the Ward fight off as a possible fluke. Sanchez was again thought to possibly be the goods but similar to the Ward fight but in much quicker order Sanchez was stopped by Phillips by a body shot in round one.

    Ward's career actually gained based off the heart and class he showed in the Phillips fight. He showed he could still make entertaining fights. And looking beatable which helped him continue to get the fights and because of his style television, whether it be ESPN, USA or HBO wanted to show him against whomever.

    And Sanchez was done after the Phillips defeat. He continued on but as an opponent and not a promising fighter. Late in his career, he would lose by ko to both Paul Williams and Tim Bradley.

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    Senior Member oubobcat's Avatar
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    Re: Three Punch Combo: Notes on Thursday’s ESPN Event, Julius Indongo and More

    Quote Originally Posted by ArneK. View Post
    Regarding the Micky Ward vs. Alfonso Sanchez fight, I was there. If memory serves, the arena wasn’t even half full when the fight was in progress – a typically late-arriving Las Vegas crowd.

    It was a ho-hum fight for the first six rounds, the sort of fight where one’s mind wanders unless he is carrying on a conversation with his neighbor. However, it so happened that I was paying attention when Ward delivered the punch, a body shot that came completely out of the blue.

    As Sanchez was crumbling to the canvas, he let out a silent scream. It was as if the punch carried an electrical charge.

    I remember thinking that I had just seen the reincarnation of Bob Fitzsimmons famous solar plexus punch, the punch that Fitz used to knock out James J. Corbett back in 1897. “He drew back his left with his forearm rigid and ripped it into the pit of Jim’s stomach a little under the heart,” wrote the ringside reporter of the punch that came out of the blue and left Corbett writhing on the canvas.

    This was Micky Ward’s signature punch. Without it he would have been less than a journeyman; he would have been a trial horse. However, I have come to believe that some boxers have a vulnerable spot on their body and that if an opponent hits it with the proper force, its lights out.

    Now I’m going to say something that will strike many people as ignorant. I suspect that this spot is only vulnerable at certain times, perhaps when the moon is in a certain phase. And yes, I wasn’t schooled to think this way and I know how dumb this sounds. But I believe that for Micky Ward this wasn’t simply the right punch, but the right punch that landed at the right moment in time -- when his opponent was most vulnerable.

    Isn’t it strange how one punch can dramatically alter the trajectory of a boxer’s career? Alfonso Sanchez was 16-0 going in with 15 knockouts, but Micky Ward would go on to have the more storied career.
    It is something how the career's of Ward and Sanchez went in totally opposite directions following that fight.

    With the win, Ward received what would be his only shot at a world title against Vince Phillips. The fight was broadcast on ABC and took place in a small quaint venue in Boston. Phillips out worked Ward in the first two rounds and started to really pour it one in the third particularly working Ward to the body which was of course supposed to be Ward's specialty. Ward was once again not very active but more so then the Sanchez fight. With about a minute left in the round, a right from Phillips opened a bad cut over the eye of Ward. The blood spurred Ward on who now began to open up. The fight was on or so it seemed. Just before the round closed, the referee had the doctor look at Ward's cut and the doctor ruled Ward could not continue. Ward begged for a chance but the doctor advised the bout to be stopped despite Ward's pleading. With the fight in Boston, the fans began throwing beer cups and other debris into the ring upon the announcement. Ward showed the ultimate class in yelling and motioning to the crowd to stop and Ward's manager actually shielded Phillips. Ward even began yelling at a fan who he saw throw something and instructed all in the crowd to calm down. In suffering such a heart breaking loss, Ward showed his real class as a person that night.

    Sanchez did bounce back with an ESPN fight against Charles Murray following the Ward loss and looked pretty darn good in stopping the veteran Murray in 3 rds. He had one more fight then challenged Vince Phillips himself. That was an HBO fight and many in the sport by then had written the Ward fight off as a possible fluke. Sanchez was again thought to possibly be the goods but similar to the Ward fight but in much quicker order Sanchez was stopped by Phillips by a body shot in round one.

    Ward's career actually gained based off the heart and class he showed in the Phillips fight. He showed he could still make entertaining fights. And looking beatable which helped him continue to get the fights and because of his style television, whether it be ESPN, USA or HBO wanted to show him against whomever.

    And Sanchez was done after the Phillips defeat. He continued on but as an opponent and not a promising fighter. Late in his career, he would lose by ko to both Paul Williams and Tim Bradley.

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