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Thread: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

  1. #11
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    Re: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

    Quote Originally Posted by Kid Blast View Post
    Where is Westbury? NYC area?
    Uncle Blast, Westbury is out in the Nassau County area of New York, near Hempstead. And ANOTHER great article that points out much of the goings on in our sport that makes me wanna scream with anger and hate. And then... our sport's "love bug" bites me on the butt and all is "well" again... temporarily. Like a bad marriage that that I refuse to divorce. Oh well..

  2. #12
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    Re: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

    Quote Originally Posted by EZEGINO View Post
    Uncle Blast, Westbury is out in the Nassau County area of New York, near Hempstead. And ANOTHER great article that points out much of the goings on in our sport that makes me wanna scream with anger and hate. And then... our sport's "love bug" bites me on the butt and all is "well" again... temporarily. Like a bad marriage that that I refuse to divorce. Oh well..
    "Like a bad marriage that that I refuse to divorce." I'll be using that line in the future. Count on it.

  3. #13
    Senior Member stormcentre's Avatar
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    Re: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

    Wicked stuff KB.


    An for dat - coz it so good - ear, bee luw, iz wun of my berry fav choones . . . . . .

    "Slide"



    Cheers,

    Storm





    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDUJMehVRE4

  4. #14
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    Re: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

    Quote Originally Posted by stormcentre View Post
    Wicked stuff KB.


    An for dat - coz it so good - ear, bee luw, iz wun of my berry fav choones . . . . . .

    "Slide"



    Cheers,

    Storm





    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDUJMehVRE4

    Thanks Storm. My issue was that Max should never have interviewed him. Guy was still in a serious daze and almost concussed. Same as Jim Gray-ugh- interviewing Junama after hew was iced by Salido. That stuff needs to be stopped.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDUJMehVRE4 = awesome stuff
    Last edited by Kid Blast; 01-09-2017 at 11:02 PM.

  5. #15

    Re: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

    Quote Originally Posted by The Sweet Science View Post
    *

    BOXING COGITATIONS: It seems that periodically—maybe every five years or so-- I reach a point where my guilty pleasure intersects with my revulsion of this thing called boxing. Like a moral pendulum, I go back and forth and, ever so slightly, I begin to look at boxing with just a tad more cynicism, but just a tad.

    Usually something specific happens that triggers the pendulum to tilt. In the recent past, the precipitator was a split decision that allowed Timothy Bradley to steal in plain sight a victory from Manny Pacquiao in 2012. In this connection, I have been repelled by state boxing commissions composed of political hacks that provide a platform for the subjectivity of unqualified judges. "Can you believe that? Unbelievable," Bob Arum said. "I went over to Bradley before the decision and he said, `I tried hard but I couldn’t beat the guy.’ "

    I also have been taken aback by a sport that enables too many fatalities and horrific injuries to occur; that provides the structure for someone to spar with an already grievously damaged Nick Blackwell. And there will be more Mike Towell’s and the familiar scenario of brain bleeds that create blood clots that often lead to death. It seems the more things change in boxing, the more they are alike—and that’s just plain wrong.

    The Trigger

    This time the trigger was watching a fifty-two-year-old, one-time legend fight a young and hungry monster after a 25-month layoff. Witnessing Bernard Hopkins get knocked clear out of the ring and fall on the back of his head was stunning, but listening to a starry eyed announcer interview him despite his being badly dazed was sickening.

    “I might have got hit with a right hook?“Next thing I know he [Joe Smith Jr.] shoved me out of the ring. I hit my head first and my ankle got hurt when I hit the ground?. .”- --Bernard Hopkins (to Max Kellerman)

    Notwithstanding this, I clearly am nowhere near ready to embrace the damning indictment from Pete Hamill’s classic 1996 article “Blood on Their Hands: The Corrupt and Brutal World of Professional Boxing,” in which he states, “Old loves are a long time dying. They can survive deceptions and separations, petty cruelties and fleeting passions. But, eventually, they give way to the grinding erosions of time. And suddenly, one cold morning, they are dead. For too long a time, I loved the brutal sport of prize fighting. But I’ve arrived at last at that cold morning. You cannot love anything that lives in a sewer. And the world of boxing is more fetid and repugnant now than any other time in its squalid history.”

    Nor am I prepared to agree with the words of the late Jack Newfield from his compelling 2001 article, “The Shame of Boxing”: “My conscience won’t let me remain a passive spectator to scandal any longer. I think too much about Bee Scottland being strapped onto a stretcher. I dream about Ali’s tremor. I am haunted by the Alzheimer’s stare in Ray Robinson’s eyes?”

    I’d rather embrace the following words of the late sports journalist Ralph Wiley from his book “Serenity, A Boxing Memoir”: “Boxing was on the one hand barbaric, unconscionable, out of place in modern society. But then, so are war, racism, poverty, and pro football. Men died boxing, yet there was nobility in defending oneself.”

    Maybe I’m in denial, but my love for boxing remains strong if somewhat strained (especially by the seeming epidemic of PEDs issues). The thrills garnered by the sport simply outweigh the negatives. Watching a Freddie Roach-trained Manny Pacquiao take apart Timothy Bradley “three” times, or a Vasily Lomachenko twirl like a figure skater and do things in the ring that make me stand up and say “did you see that?” or a Chisora and Whyte wail away at each other in a UK blood and guts affair, or a Gennady Golovkin knock out Mathew Macklin with a body shot that could be heard throughout Foxwoods are surely akin to watching George Foreman fight an aroused Ron Lyle in a 1976 classic, or Juan “Kid” Meza knock out Jaime Garza in a furious exchange, or watching a gassed Earnie Shavers come back from certain defeat to take out a scary Roy “Tiger” Williams with seconds remaining. These thrills cannot be dismissed.

    In the Chicago of the late 40’s and the 50’s, boxing was a part of my heritage. It was glamour and noir. Marigold Gardens, Rainbow Arena, and the Coliseum (they are all gone now) became places where I bonded with my father; they became our stomping grounds. Guys like Tony Zale, Anton Raadik, Chuck Davey, Bob Satterfield, Beau Jack, and Johnny Bratton thrilled us. With the advent of television, I was enthralled by Kid Gavilan, Bobby Chacon, Danny Lopez, Wilfred Benitez, and the great Salvador Sanchez. Later, I saw Hagler, Duran, Hearns and Leonard and their UK counterparts, Watson, Eubanks and Benn. There have been others too numerous to mention.

    I witnessed the shootouts between Hearns-Hagler, Martin-Gogarty, Brooks-Curry, Ruelas-Gatti, Letterlough-Gonzales, Moorer-Cooper, Kirkland-Angulo, Vazquez-Marquez and the big boppers, Cobb-Shavers-Norton at the end of their careers. I also witnessed Corrales-Castillo, Rios-Alvarado, Crawford-Gamboa, Thurman-Porter, Salido-Vargas, Holm-Mathis, Luna-Luna, and Salido-Kokietgym.

    These days, bearing witness to the skills of Errol Spence Jr. and Terrence Crawford and their propensity to fight “mean” is equaled by watching a disciplined Irishman named Frampton stick to a game plan and win a world championship. Waiting for Anthony Joshua to become the next Lennox Lewis is equaled by wondering how Tyson Fury will look in his comeback. Moreover, the prospect of watching a humble construction worker—heretofore considered fodder-- step up on boxing’s world stage and offer a Long Island brand of shock and awe is just too good to miss. And will Cinnamon finally square off with GGG? “I fear no one,” Canelo*said. “I was born for this, and even though many people may not like it, I am the best fighter right now.* I’m ready.” How can I possibly relinquish what’s to come?

    While the paradigm continues to change and the unheard of might become the “new norm” along with a changing business model of more bangs for the buck with fewer fights, the essence of the thing won’t change anytime soon.

    In the ring boxing is genuine, but outside it can be harsh, for it has never been all that stringent in its application of scruples or morality. Still, it will continue to be my safe place--a place where I don’t have to worry about what I say. Boxing is hardcore and not for the politically correct—and that’s especially important going into 2017 and beyond.

    My love for boxing, while sorely strained at times, will endure. Hell, finding Jake’s wife Vickie, with her sexy New York accent, is still on my bucket list.

    Ted Sares is one of the world’s oldest active power lifters and holds several records. He enjoys writing about boxing and is a member of Ring 4’s Boxing Hall of Fame.

    Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel.
    Another wild emotional roller coaster Ted. You know how to keep me riveted.

  6. #16

    Re: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

    Boxing, the sport not the business, is alive and well in 2017. There are some very good boxers out there from all over the world.
    Only problem remains the alphabet boys and the promoters. Would anyone have complained about 2016 if GGG and Canelo
    had had a great fight? Of if Fury and Wlad rematched in an ATG bout? (ok maybe I'm dreaming on that one). Surely seeing
    BHop hit the concrete outside of the ring makes 2016 a year to remember. And personally I'm happy to report that Rousey
    is really lousy.

    Basically nothing has changed about the business and probably never will. But we can still admire two men that have the courage
    to get into the ring to fight each other.

  7. #17
    Senior Member deepwater2's Avatar
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    Re: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

    Hope I'm wrong on this prediction for 2017.

    Ward dismisses the contractual rematch with Kovalev.

    Let me get this rant out of the way now, so when Ward ditches the fight I can just say I knew it all along.

    Come on Ward!!! Lil Floyd got raspberries for some easy match ups but the man gives a rematch when he has too. See Castillo- Maidana. Ward's legacy will be tainted and forgotten about.

    PS: chad Dawson was very overrated by the way.

  8. #18
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    Re: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

    I’d rather embrace the following words of the late sports journalist Ralph Wiley from his book “Serenity, A Boxing Memoir”: “Boxing was on the one hand barbaric, unconscionable, out of place in modern society. But then, so are war, racism, poverty, and pro football. Men died boxing, yet there was nobility in defending oneself.”

    Great quote.

    And Ted, while I hate to be the bearer of bad news, Vicki passed away back in early 2005.

  9. #19
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    Re: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

    Quote Originally Posted by dino da vinci View Post
    I’d rather embrace the following words of the late sports journalist Ralph Wiley from his book “Serenity, A Boxing Memoir”: “Boxing was on the one hand barbaric, unconscionable, out of place in modern society. But then, so are war, racism, poverty, and pro football. Men died boxing, yet there was nobility in defending oneself.”

    Great quote.

    And Ted, while I hate to be the bearer of bad news, Vicki passed away back in early 2005.


    I know but I refuse to believe it
    Last edited by Kid Blast; 01-10-2017 at 10:38 PM.

  10. #20
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    Re: Boxing: Love, Hate, 2017 and Beyond

    Quote Originally Posted by deepwater2 View Post
    Hope I'm wrong on this prediction for 2017.

    Ward dismisses the contractual rematch with Kovalev.

    Let me get this rant out of the way now, so when Ward ditches the fight I can just say I knew it all along.

    Come on Ward!!! Lil Floyd got raspberries for some easy match ups but the man gives a rematch when he has too. See Castillo- Maidana. Ward's legacy will be tainted and forgotten about.

    PS: chad Dawson was very overrated by the way.
    I think you may have the beat

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