English Español
Page 3 of 13 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 123

Thread: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

  1. #21
    Advanced Users brownsugar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Home of the Buckeyes
    Posts
    6,597

    Re: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

    This a very interesting thread with a multitude of excellent comments so I'm just going to sit on the sidelines and take it all in.

    But I did want to say this. Did anyone see the sports special about the surviving Chicago Bears championship team...former quarterback Jim McMahon said that football messed him up so bad he takes a hand full of pills everyday and frequently has to call his wife for directions to get back home when he drives around the corner to the local carry out.

    I don't know anything about rock fishing but lobster boats reportedly have a high mortality rate and in one year over two dozen people fell to their deaths trying to climb mount Everett.
    And I'd rather box than ride a motorcycle any day.

  2. #22
    Advanced Users
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    14,756

    Re: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

    Quote Originally Posted by Kid Blast View Post
    Some say CTE is a sub-derivative of Pugilistica Dementia. Parkinson's is different as there are different kinds.


    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a deterioration of the brain. It is caused by the buildup of a protein called tau. The brain damage caused by CTE can lead to severe mental and physical disabilities. The condition gets worse over time.

    Researchers have a found a link between repetitive head injuries and CTE. The head injury may involve:
    A blow or jolt to the head
    Severe jarring or shaking
    Abruptly coming to a stop

    Over time, these injuries can lead to abnormal groups of tau proteins. These proteins can create tangled masses in the brain. The tangles can block normal brain function. Similar tangles are seen in people with Alzheimer’s disease.


    Having a history of head injuries puts you at risk for CTE later in life. People who may be at the highest risk include those who:
    Participate in contact sports, especially professional boxers, football players, hockey players, wrestlers, and soccer players
    Have been in combat military service
    Have been physically abused
    Have severe seizures
    Have a developmental disability and engage in self-abusive behavior (head banging)


    Bottom Line: CTE is a very controversial condition that is still not well-understood. Researchers do not yet know the frequency of CTE in the population and do not understand the causes. There is no cure for CTE.

    RESOURCES:



    Boston University Center for Traumatic Brain Injury
    http://www.bu.edu/cste/

    Sports Legacy Institute
    http://www.sportslegacy.org/

    CANADIAN RESOURCES:
    Brain Injury Association of Alberta
    http://www.biaa.ca/

    Ontario Brain Injury Association
    http://www.obia.on.ca/

    References:


    Blast anatomy—chronic traumatic encephalopathy in military vets. Alzheimer Research Forum website. Available at:
    ...(Click grey area to select URL)
    Published May 18, 2012. Accessed May 29, 2012.

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Sports Legacy Institute website. Available at:
    ...(Click grey area to select URL)
    Accessed May 29, 2012.

    Kowall N. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and its connection with ALS. US Department of Veterans Affairs website. Available at:
    ...(Click grey area to select URL)
    Published November 2010. Accessed May 29, 2012.

    LaVecchia F. Traumatic brain injury. Indian Health Service website. Available at:
    ...(Click grey area to select URL)
    Accessed May 29, 2012.

    McKee A, Cantu R, Nowinski C, et al. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in athletes: progressive tauopathy following repetitive head injury. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol. 2009; 68(7):709-735.

    Moderate to severe traumatic head injury. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at:
    ...(Click grey area to select URL)
    Updated April 5, 2010. Accessed May 29, 2012.

    Navarro R. Protective equipment and prevention of concussion—what is the evidence. Sports Physical Therapy Section website. Available at:
    ...(Click grey area to select URL)
    Published 2011. Accessed May 29, 2012.

    NINDS Encephalopathy information page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke website. Available at:
    ...(Click grey area to select URL)
    Updated November 9, 2010. Accessed May 29, 2012.

    Prevention: What Can I do to Help Prevent Concussion and other forms of TBI? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Available at:
    ...(Click grey area to select URL)
    Updated May 16, 2012. Accessed May 29, 2012.

    Traumatic brain injury: hope through research. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke website. Available at:
    ...(Click grey area to select URL)
    Updated May 14, 2012. Accessed May 29, 2012.

    What is CTE? Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy website. Available at:
    ...(Click grey area to select URL)
    Accessed May 29, 2012.
    Great stuff! Thanks! Holla!

  3. #23
    Senior Member stormcentre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    4,170

    Re: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

    Quote Originally Posted by brownsugar View Post
    This a very interesting thread with a multitude of excellent comments so I'm just going to sit on the sidelines and take it all in.

    But I did want to say this. Did anyone see the sports special about the surviving Chicago Bears championship team...former quarterback Jim McMahon said that football messed him up so bad he takes a hand full of pills everyday and frequently has to call his wife for directions to get back home when he drives around the corner to the local carry out.

    I don't know anything about rock fishing but lobster boats reportedly have a high mortality rate and in one year over two dozen people fell to their deaths trying to climb mount Everett.

    And I'd rather box than ride a motorcycle any day.

    You should learn to do both.

    You'd have a much more exciting life.



    Ha ha ha . . . . .

    Just digging ya in the ribs.




    Storm.


  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    586

    Re: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

    Quote Originally Posted by brownsugar View Post
    This a very interesting thread with a multitude of excellent comments so I'm just going to sit on the sidelines and take it all in.

    But I did want to say this. Did anyone see the sports special about the surviving Chicago Bears championship team...former quarterback Jim McMahon said that football messed him up so bad he takes a hand full of pills everyday and frequently has to call his wife for directions to get back home when he drives around the corner to the local carry out.

    I don't know anything about rock fishing but lobster boats reportedly have a high mortality rate and in one year over two dozen people fell to their deaths trying to climb mount Everett.
    And I'd rather box than ride a motorcycle any day.
    I remember that. It was on HBO's Real Sports series. Not long ago, they didn't even have a concussion protocol. A guy would incur a concussion and if he wasn't completely KO'd like Tua-Ruiz, he'd trot right back out there and play through it. CTE is a touchy, super sensitive subject for the NFL. Junior Seau and Jovan Belcher both met violent ends potentially due to this. Many more too. I read where a doctor --perhaps a quack but there could be something to this-- suggested that OJ Simpson very likely has CTE, which in part would explain his erratic, violent behavior. The same for Aaron Hernandez. Remember the wrestler Chris Benoit? He strangled his wife and young son then hanged himself. After a posthumous examination, they concluded he had the brain of a 2nd grader, or 80 year old man with severe Alzheimer's. On top of loading up on every steroid in the book, those guys beat the hell out of their bodies, which might explain why the average lifespan of a wrestler is about 40.

    Definitely stay tuned to this subject, especially from the perspective of the NFL. You can bet the principal matter for the league's attorneys is this topic, and they're not willingly admitting such. It's the proverbial elephant in the room, a topic that is discussed with whispers. The NFL is big, BIG business and has never been bigger. Calling it a cash cow is an understatement. They can't soften the game; flag football won't sell. So every time a guy goes off the rails and blows his brains out or kills someone else, they're cringing. Because boxing has slid so outside the mainstream in the US (the UFC has surpassed it, sadly, in the eyes of the casual fan), it's not hugely on the radar, yet. But we're in the nanny state like never before, so scrutiny is likely coming.
    Last edited by Domenic; 08-18-2016 at 07:07 AM.

  5. #25
    joebruno999
    Guest

    Re: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

    Quote Originally Posted by The Sweet Science View Post
    [img]http://www.thesweetscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/sares-150x150.jpg[/img] Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn - “("Iron Mike" Webster was) a formidable man, at 6-foot-2 and 250 pounds, who sometimes forgot to eat for days -- sleeping in his battered, black Chevy S-10 pickup truck, a garbage bag duct-taped over the missing window. ?Sometimes he didn’t seem to care,’ said Sunny Jani, the primary caregiver the last six years of his life.” – Greg Garber, ESPN.com

    They said he had died of a heart attack, but when I first saw photos of former NFL football legend Mike Webster with his forehead protruding grotesquely and a shelf of scar tissue over his eyebrows, I was pretty certain his issues were more frontal lobe than heart condition. Cardiac arrest may be how he died but not why. You could see it plainly during this interview toward the end. It’s difficult to witness, particularly for those familiar with why Mike was called “Iron” Mike and this was long before the NFL and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) would be connected through Mike’s death and legacy:” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzc0Lrxw3KY

    *“Dementia footballistica. This is crazy. This has never been identified before.” --Ronald Hamilton, neuropathologist

    “[Like dementia pugilistica], it doesn’t get better?’You get more and more demented. It’s sad.’’-- Dr. Fred Jay Krieg,

    Fast Forward

    The 2015 Sony Pictures movie “Concussion,” based on an article by Jeanne Marie Lascars titled “Bennet Omalu, Concussions, and the NFL: How One Doctor Changed Football Forever,” was not about boxing, at least not directly. It was about football which has gained more attention thanks to pioneering forensic pathologist Dr. Bennet Omalu who discovered neurological deterioration similar to Alzheimer’s disease while conducting an autopsy on Mike Webster. Omalu described Webster’s brain as one of “a boxer, a sufferer of Alzheimer’s...or someone who had suffered a severe head wound."

    The doctor found that Mike’s brain contained the buildup of an abnormal form of a protein called tau. This buildup, which is also an Alzheimer’s hallmark, leads to brain cell death. Tau was kind of like sludge, clogging up the works, killing cells in regions responsible for mood, emotions, and executive functioning,” he said.

    There is no treatment and no cure for CTE. The only known way to prevent it is to avoid repeated head injuries. However, several major research initiatives are underway. Omalu has set out to cure CTE. "You pop a pill before you play, a medicine that prevents the buildup of tau,...like you take an aspirin to prevent heart disease. Why not?,” he says.

    Thus, and to make a very long story short, there was no other explanation for Webster’s deterioration; the repeated banging of his brain against his skull had damaged the brain’s nerve cells. Amidst controversy (and denial and pushback from the NFL), Omalu named the disorder Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and published his findings in a medical journal. The NFL called his findings flawed.

    That was then and this is now, and now, as other athletes face the same diagnosis, the crusading doctor has raised public awareness about the dangers of football-related head trauma.* No more denials; no more pushback. The doctor has studied too many brains for any pushback.

    The film spread the story of CTE’s discovery in football players—and the NFL’s years of alleged inaction. Unable to change the past, the NFL is now focusing on the future, but over the last decade, the league has repeatedly avoided tying football to brain damage, even as it has given disability payments to former players with dementia-related conditions—including Mike Webster (but that’s another shameful story for another day). Yet, in all fairness, the league has clearly taken extra measures in recent years to make the game safer.

    Boxing

    Aside from a few high-profile doctors like John Stiller, Margaret Goodman, Ray Monsell, Joel Kleinman and others from the Association of Ring Physicians (ARP), no one has really come out in the manner of Bennet Omalu to dramatize the fact that if football produces CTE, what precisely does boxing produce?

    Tom Moyer, the filmmaker of the riveting (and frightening) documentary “After the Last Round” says he made the movie because he was so tormented by the head injuries that stripped his boxing cousins of their memories. His goal is to increase awareness so more people will care. The documentary has had minimal distribution, which is a shame. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waJTKs_Uv-8

    Writer Steve Buffery of the Toronto Sun touches the tip of the iceberg when he says, “They [boxers] have no pension; in fact, most walk away with less than nothing, because they leave boxing with less than what they had going in.”

    Compared to professional football players and with a very few exceptions, boxers have just about nothing. Thus, for those who suffer chronic traumatic encephalopathy or pugilistic Parkinson’s syndrome, Parkinson’s tremors (which is not as deadly}, or dementia pugilistica (aka boxer’s syndrome), matters won’t improve. Dementia pugilistica is a one-way ticket to Palookaville. While other injuries such as cuts and fractures can be repaired, brain tissue, once damaged, remains irreversibly damaged. The plain fact is Dementia Pugilistica is a variant of CTE.

    Football, soccer, rugby, and hockey teams and wrestlers are, for the most part, represented by unions. Boxers have no such collective strength. Unless promoters (see postscript below) and state commissions do something, no one else will. It simply is what it is. But all the hoopla these days is about catch weight, doping, PPV counts, and other things that mask the darker side of boxing—the one in which the thousands of rounds and blows in the gym eventually offset any possible feeling of hope.

    Except for the elite few who enjoy their place at the tip of the pyramid, most boxers do, in fact, leave the sport with less than what they had going in.

    Now this is not about Rocky Balboa who was named the seventh greatest movie hero, and who solved the Cold War with Russia by beating the evil Ivan Drago and who, as a 60-year-old, even overcame suspected brain damage to go the distance with Mason Dixon. This is about reality. What happened to Iron Mike Webster was every bit as horrible as what happened to boxing’s Moyer brothers and to the Quarrys.

    This is about former boxer, sparring partner, and highly respected trainer John Bray who has now been clinically diagnosed with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy at the Cleveland Clinic in Las Vegas. (Pugilistic Dementia is considered a sub-type of CTE.) John also has Alzheimer’s and Cavum Septum Pellucidum as a result of his boxing career. He is 46.

    This is a subject that no longer can be ignored by those who essentially run boxing, or by those who write about it, or by those who comment about it.

    Postscript: The Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas is in the midst of a multiyear study of professional boxers and their brains to determine just what happens to them, and when, and why, and how and if it can be prevented. The study, which unites Golden Boy, Top Rank, MMA, and U.S. Senators, has enrolled nearly 400 active and retired fighters with the goal of evaluating 625 by its completion. Participation is completely voluntary, and fighters in the study receive free, ongoing assessments of their brain health and brain function, including MRI scans. Individual tests will be repeated annually for at least four years. It’s a great, great start!

    Ted Sares is one of the world’s oldest active power lifters and holds several records. He enjoys writing about boxing.

    Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn / Check out more boxing news and videos at The Boxing Channel.

    They've been talking about health insurance for boxers for years now and nothing's been done. Very simply, take a percentage out of each promoter's take, (not the boxer's take) for each fight card and apply to to the premiums for a universal insurance plan that covers all licensed boxers who fight in the United States. To do this, we need a Federal Boxing Commission. The concept has been tossed around for decades, but no one, as of yet, has the balls to do anything about it.

  6. #26
    joebruno999
    Guest

    Re: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

    They've been talking about health insurance for boxers for years now and nothing's been done. Very simply, take a percentage out of each promoter's take, (not the boxer's take) for each fight card and apply to to the premiums for a universal insurance plan that covers all licensed boxers who fight in the United States. To do this, we need a Federal Boxing Commission. The concept has been tossed around for decades, but no one, as of yet, has the balls to do anything about it.

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    103

    Re: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

    Wow!! Great research. I'm going to watch that one on Red Box based on your description. Thanks for an enjoyable read but that photo of Webster is troubling. The protruding forehead and scar tissue is very noticeable and frightening.

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,117

    Re: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

    There is a more frightening photo but it's no longer available. It put the willies in me. This great man from the heartland reduced to a tormented soul who lived in car and was in terrible pain and who used a Taser to put himself to sleep. Horrendous end to a great career and great person.

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,117

    Re: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

    Quote Originally Posted by Domenic View Post
    I remember that. It was on HBO's Real Sports series. Not long ago, they didn't even have a concussion protocol. A guy would incur a concussion and if he wasn't completely KO'd like Tua-Ruiz, he'd trot right back out there and play through it. CTE is a touchy, super sensitive subject for the NFL. Junior Seau and Jovan Belcher both met violent ends potentially due to this. Many more too. I read where a doctor --perhaps a quack but there could be something to this-- suggested that OJ Simpson very likely has CTE, which in part would explain his erratic, violent behavior. The same for Aaron Hernandez. Remember the wrestler Chris Benoit? He strangled his wife and young son then hanged himself. After a posthumous examination, they concluded he had the brain of a 2nd grader, or 80 year old man with severe Alzheimer's. On top of loading up on every steroid in the book, those guys beat the hell out of their bodies, which might explain why the average lifespan of a wrestler is about 40.

    Definitely stay tuned to this subject, especially from the perspective of the NFL. You can bet the principal matter for the league's attorneys is this topic, and they're not willingly admitting such. It's the proverbial elephant in the room, a topic that is discussed with whispers. The NFL is big, BIG business and has never been bigger. Calling it a cash cow is an understatement. They can't soften the game; flag football won't sell. So every time a guy goes off the rails and blows his brains out or kills someone else, they're cringing. Because boxing has slid so outside the mainstream in the US (the UFC has surpassed it, sadly, in the eyes of the casual fan), it's not hugely on the radar, yet. But we're in the nanny state like never before, so scrutiny is likely coming.
    Great stuff.

    Some names that have pooped up are: Willie Wood, Tony Dorsett, and deceased (many by suicide) Chris Henry, Andre Water, Junior Sea, Dave Duerson, Ken Stabler. Michael keck, Justin Strzelzyk, Terry Long, John Grimsley, Ralph Wenzel, and many others.

    And I quote:


    "▪ A postmortem analysis of the brain of Jovan Belcher, the Chiefs linebacker who killed his girlfriend in December 2012 in a murder-suicide, found that the 25-year-old linebacker probably was suffering from CTE. He is among the youngest known players to have the disease. (Read more here.)

    ▪ New York Giants safety Tyler Sash, 27, died of an accidental overdose of medications in September. His mother, who had seen his irregular behavior and periods of confusion and memory loss, said her son knew something was wrong. It was CTE, which had advanced to a stage rarely seen in someone his age.

    ▪ Former New York Giants running back and broadcaster Frank Gifford, who died last August, had CTE, as his family had suspected.

    ▪ Ray Easterling, a former safety for the Atlanta Falcons, was depressed and suffering from apparent dementia when he shot himself in 2012. An autopsy found CTE in his brain. “It amazed me to think about what he dealt with every day inside his head,” said his widow, Mary Ann."

    Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/sports/nfl...#storylink=cpy

  10. #30
    Advanced Users brownsugar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Home of the Buckeyes
    Posts
    6,597

    Re: Concussion: Now It’s Boxing’s Turn

    Quote Originally Posted by Domenic View Post
    I remember that. It was on HBO's Real Sports series. Not long ago, they didn't even have a concussion protocol. A guy would incur a concussion and if he wasn't completely KO'd like Tua-Ruiz, he'd trot right back out there and play through it. CTE is a touchy, super sensitive subject for the NFL. Junior Seau and Jovan Belcher both met violent ends potentially due to this. Many more too. I read where a doctor --perhaps a quack but there could be something to this-- suggested that OJ Simpson very likely has CTE, which in part would explain his erratic, violent behavior. The same for Aaron Hernandez. Remember the wrestler Chris Benoit? He strangled his wife and young son then hanged himself. After a posthumous examination, they concluded he had the brain of a 2nd grader, or 80 year old man with severe Alzheimer's. On top of loading up on every steroid in the book, those guys beat the hell out of their bodies, which might explain why the average lifespan of a wrestler is about 40.

    Definitely stay tuned to this subject, especially from the perspective of the NFL. You can bet the principal matter for the league's attorneys is this topic, and they're not willingly admitting such. It's the proverbial elephant in the room, a topic that is discussed with whispers. The NFL is big, BIG business and has never been bigger. Calling it a cash cow is an understatement. They can't soften the game; flag football won't sell. So every time a guy goes off the rails and blows his brains out or kills someone else, they're cringing. Because boxing has slid so outside the mainstream in the US (the UFC has surpassed it, sadly, in the eyes of the casual fan), it's not hugely on the radar, yet. But we're in the nanny state like never before, so scrutiny is likely coming.
    That's an impressively articulated post Domenic. You hit the nail on the dead center. I wish I could remember the channel I saw that on....maybe HBO or Showtime. But the entire remaining Championship Series Chicago Bears players (even the Fridge) were hobbling around in a half-way incoherent fog like shell-shocked WWII Vets. ...nobody who saw that show, nobody who ever fantasized about making it to the NFL could possibly have any remaining sense of envy after seeing those guys. I'd much rather have been an NFL Janitor than trade places with any of those guys.

    I saw a report where the NFL was in the process of training players to tackle like Rugby players, who place their head on the outside of the legs and use the shoulder when they tackle like a wrestler would instead of using their heads like torpedoes. Many schools have supposedly adopted the technique. Great post.

Page 3 of 13 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •