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Thread: Question about body punches

  1. #1
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    Question about body punches

    Is there a possibility of long-term internal damage caused by taking too many body shots? Just wondering...

  2. #2
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    Re: Question about body punches

    Quote Originally Posted by spit bucket View Post
    Is there a possibility of long-term internal damage caused by taking too many body shots? Just wondering...
    I'm sure there is, though it depends how and where you take the punishment.

    Besides broken/ fractured ribs, your organs will inevitably take issue with being battered possibly hundreds of times in the course of a fight.

    A single shot placed precisely and powerfully, can rupture certain organs- causing a pretty speedy death. Besides a full on rupture, I'm sure people have had problems from an accumulation of punishment to the body, whether over the course of a fight or a career.

    The human body is remarkably resilient though, and does an excellent job of repairing damaged tissue, and your body has evolved to protect what's inside it- whether the brain or the other internal organs. Nobody's invulnerable though.

    I'm sure there's guys on here who know there boxing history well enough to point to plenty of fighters who have suffered death/ permanent injury through body shots taken in boxing.

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    Re: Question about body punches

    Boxing is the hurt business. And it also has more secrecy than the FBI, NSA, CIA, DIA and ____ _____ combined. It is not good public relation to talk about all the dangers of pugilism.

    There are more fighters suffering eye and internal body damages than are suffering brain damages. The smartness of the game is to inattentionally blind you with concussions from head trauma than to spill the whole nine of internal damages to the noggin and torso -- especially to the torso.

    The body softies are out of the game in a flash. I will guess weekly a fighter somewhere gets a collapsed lung and/or gallbladder, kidney, liver and major artery -- hearts chamber -- damages that you butts in the seats and eyeballs behind the TV and PPV screens will never know about. You hear about the glory or the game, not the gory of it.

    I hate to be the bearer of bad news. But you ask. Ask NOT! Or you will get what you GOT! Between each line of pain and glory in a boxing story, there is untold gory. And you will never know until you ask. Holla!

  4. #4
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    Re: Question about body punches

    During my seven years at the New York State Athletic Commission, we did several studies on the long-term effects of head punches and body shots taken by fighters.

    Not surprisingly, long-term head shots--head trauma--leave residual scarring on the brain, which quite often shows up in later years in rthe form of dementia pugilistica, more commonly know as being "punch drunk." The condition never gets better. If anything, it worsens. Sometimes it takes decades, sometimes it happens fast. It also doesn't happen to every fighter.

    Former heavyweight contender Jerry Quarry, who was known to have a solid chin, passed away in 1999 of Dementia Pugilistica at the age of 53. As much as 22 years earlier--in 1977, when he was just 31--you could already hear Quarry's speech pattern changing for the worse.

    After beating Lorenzo Zanon that year, Quarry knew it was over and hung up his gloves. Unfortunately, they didn't stay nailed to the wall. He came back in 1983. He needed the money. Despite winning both bouts, Quarry couldn't secure the big-money bout he craved--against Larry Holmes--and he retired again.

    After working at different jobs over the next nine years, Quarry launched yet another comeback, this one in 1992. He was 46 and was only a shell of his former self. At the time, I was commissioner in New York and tried to talk Jerry out of the fight. He sounded terrible, slurring words to the point I didn't understand him.

    When he told me he intended to go ahead with a fight in Aurora, Colorado, that he had planned to win this and a few more comeback fights, then go after the likes of Mike Tyson, Riddick Bowe and Evander Holyfield, I knew he was desperate and not thinking straight.

    I called officials in Colorado and tried to get them to deny a boxer's license to Quarry. They refused. They said he had passed his physical and was in remarkable shape for a man his age. The physical he passed was a stethoscope on his chest!

    Quarry lost that fight by decision to a man with a 3-4-1 record named Ron Crammer. Quarry got hit with seemingly every punch Crammer threw, and took it like Jerry Quarry. After the fight. He retired again.

    Deep dementia quickly began to set in. During the last several years of his life, his family took care of him. They fed him. They dressed him. They assisted him in every way. He could see, but saw nothing. He could hear, but heard nothing. On

    January 3, 1999, Jerry Quarry passed away. Seven years later, his kid brother, Mike, a light heavyweight contender who had faced Bob Foster for the light heavyweight title and was knocked cold by the explosive-hitting Foster, also died of dementia pugilistica. He was 55.

    On the other side of the coin is George Chuvalo. The former heavyweight contender who amassed a career record of 73-18-2 with 62 KO's and faced such talent as Muhammad Ali,George Foreman, Joe Frazier, Floyd Patterson, Jerry Quarry and Cleveland Williams, will turn 77 in a few weeks. Despite the longevity of his career and the monstrous punchers he faced, Chuvalo sounds--even today--more like a college professor than he does an ex-fighter who absorbed some hellacious beatings.

    I point these men out, as it is head trauma which is known to do extreme damage over the course of time, but not to all fighters, as seen by the condition of Chuvalo, who had so many fights against such tough opposition but remains unfazed by the punches well into his 70's.

    Our study looked at hundreds of amateur and pro fighters who had at least 20 fights. I threw myself into the study, as I had 39 amateur fights and one professional outing. Head scans and body scans, along with blood work and circulatory testing was done. As for myself, I received a clean bill of health.

    After all the results were in, any damage that was found was found through EEG's and MRI's of the head. Very little damage was shown to ex-fighter's bodies. The liver and kidney damage which did show up was determined to be to those exs-fighters who abused drugs and alcohol throughout their lives.

    Body shots basically hurt and only do their damage at the moment. Any cell damage done to the liver, kidney and spleen--and other internaal organs--is reparable. Those injured cells regenerate. Brain cells do not.

    If only they did.

    And all this was in answer to a two-sentence question about body punches by Spitbucket. Look how I rambled on.

    Hmm. Maybe there is brain damage there, after all!

    What were we talking about?

    -Randy G.

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    Re: Question about body punches

    [QUOTE=The Commish;59760]During my seven years at the New York State Athletic Commission, we did several studies on the long-term effects of head punches and body shots taken by fighters.

    Not surprisingly, long-term head shots--head trauma--leave residual scarring on the brain, which quite often shows up in later years in rthe form of dementia pugilistica, more commonly know as being "punch drunk." The condition never gets better. If anything, it worsens. Sometimes it takes decades, sometimes it happens fast. It also doesn't happen to every fighter.

    Former heavyweight contender Jerry Quarry, who was known to have a solid chin, passed away in 1999 of Dementia Pugilistica at the age of 53. As much as 22 years earlier--in 1977, when he was just 31--you could already hear Quarry's speech pattern changing for the worse.

    After beating Lorenzo Zanon that year, Quarry knew it was over and hung up his gloves. Unfortunately, they didn't stay nailed to the wall. He came back in 1983. He needed the money. Despite winning both bouts, Quarry couldn't secure the big-money bout he craved--against Larry Holmes--and he retired again.

    After working at different jobs over the next nine years, Quarry launched yet another comeback, this one in 1992. He was 46 and was only a shell of his former self. At the time, I was commissioner in New York and tried to talk Jerry out of the fight. He sounded terrible, slurring words to the point I didn't understand him.

    When he told me he intended to go ahead with a fight in Aurora, Colorado, that he had planned to win this and a few more comeback fights, then go after the likes of Mike Tyson, Riddick Bowe and Evander Holyfield, I knew he was desperate and not thinking straight.

    I called officials in Colorado and tried to get them to deny a boxer's license to Quarry. They refused. They said he had passed his physical and was in remarkable shape for a man his age. The physical he passed was a stethoscope on his chest!

    Quarry lost that fight by decision to a man with a 3-4-1 record named Ron Crammer. Quarry got hit with seemingly every punch Crammer threw, and took it like Jerry Quarry. After the fight. He retired again.

    Deep dementia quickly began to set in. During the last several years of his life, his family took care of him. They fed him. They dressed him. They assisted him in every way. He could see, but saw nothing. He could hear, but heard nothing. On

    January 3, 1999, Jerry Quarry passed away. Seven years later, his kid brother, Mike, a light heavyweight contender who had faced Bob Foster for the light heavyweight title and was knocked cold by the explosive-hitting Foster, also died of dementia pugilistica. He was 55.

    On the other side of the coin is George Chuvalo. The former heavyweight contender who amassed a career record of 73-18-2 with 62 KO's and faced such talent as Muhammad Ali,George Foreman, Joe Frazier, Floyd Patterson, Jerry Quarry and Cleveland Williams, will turn 77 in a few weeks. Despite the longevity of his career and the monstrous punchers he faced, Chuvalo sounds--even today--more like a college professor than he does an ex-fighter who absorbed some hellacious beatings.

    I point these men out, as it is head trauma which is known to do extreme damage over the course of time, but not to all fighters, as seen by the condition of Chuvalo, who had so many fights against such tough opposition but remains unfazed by the punches well into his 70's.

    Our study looked at hundreds of amateur and pro fighters who had at least 20 fights. I threw myself into the study, as I had 39 amateur fights and one professional outing. Head scans and body scans, along with blood work and circulatory testing was done. As for myself, I received a clean bill of health.

    After all the results were in, any damage that was found was found through EEG's and MRI's of the head. Very little damage was shown to ex-fighter's bodies. The liver and kidney damage which did show up was determined to be to those exs-fighters who abused drugs and alcohol throughout their lives.

    Body shots basically hurt and only do their damage at the moment. Any cell damage done to the liver, kidney and spleen--and other internaal organs--is reparable. Those injured cells regenerate. Brain cells do not.

    If only they did.

    And all this was in answer to a two-sentence question about body punches by Spitbucket. Look how I rambled on.

    Hmm. Maybe there is brain damage there, after all!

    What were we talking about?

    -Randy G.[/QU OTE]

    {Hey, Commish! How many pugs had collapsed lungs on your watch? How many had damaged voice boxes? BTW umpteen studies show that brain cells do regenerate and injuried brains repair themselves and/or make new path ways. You are apparently focusing on the many focused, damaged brains that don't. There is no one brain that fixes all. And, as always, it all begins and ends with diet. Plus blown-up myths are everywhere.

    Several fighters have quit the game on the flash after suffering internal body damages. Any of you pugs out there reading this -- and haven't recovered from boxing kidney, liver, heart-chambers and busted blood vessels -- STEP FORWARD! Don't be shy. Everything is cool here. Holla!}

  6. #6
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    Re: Question about body punches

    I am sure there are many fighters who have suffered injuries to body parts other than their brains, Radam. However, in our study, the majority of the injuries were head/brain related and the most severe injuries were found to be brain related. I do not recall any voice box/larynx injuries, nor do I recall any collapsed lungs.

    As far as brain cell injuries, I'd like to know a diet which can repair a punch-mangled brain.

    -Randy G.

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    Re: Question about body punches

    Commish, I'm sure the answer is no since there aren't enough guinea pigs to constitute a useful sample, but I'm wondering if any studies have been done on female boxers?

    I've heard it said that women are more likely to suffer long-term damage as a result of punches received in the stomach, but for all I know this is an old wives tale.

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    Re: Question about body punches

    Quote Originally Posted by The Commish View Post
    I am sure there are many fighters who have suffered injuries to body parts other than their brains, Radam. However, in our study, the majority of the injuries were head/brain related and the most severe injuries were found to be brain related. I do not recall any voice box/larynx injuries, nor do I recall any collapsed lungs.

    As far as brain cell injuries, I'd like to know a diet which can repair a punch-mangled brain.

    -Randy G.
    I will let somebody else in da know holla. Many of us posters/readers discussed brain regeneration on "Random Topics" awhile back. In additional, the "Father of modern medicine" is quite clear on saying "let (proper) foods be your medicine." There is a lot of things going on that the typical everyday man would have no clues until years down the road.

    FYI, and I hope that some of these people holla to this Universe, the U.S. Veteran Administration has studies going on with ex-boxers and other athlete with mild-to-severe brain damage. I know that you have hook ups everywhere, so you should have no problem in verifying or slam dumping what I've posted above. Holla!

  9. #9

    Re: Question about body punches

    There is an interesting relationship between boxers that actively use their brains for complex purposes and those that would otherwise be considered candidates for pugilistic dementia.

    I wouldn't be surprised to find out that George Chuvalo played chess or something like that and/or other than sitting around surfing porn sites all day like a dead head - not that I am suggesting Quarry was.

    The tissue that builds up on the brain (from repeated smacks) doesn't repair itself, but as we get older (I believe) that the neurological pathways only rejuvenate when stimulated.

    Last time I checked the neurological pathways don't find it too stimulating to have their outer enclosure clocked hard, to the point where it doesn't usually trigger any rejuvenation process.

    Not like a few hours studying Kirchoff's law or something like that anyway.

  10. #10
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    Re: Question about body punches

    Quote Originally Posted by stormcentre View Post
    There is an interesting relationship between boxers that actively use their brains for complex purposes and those that would otherwise be considered candidates for pugilistic dementia.

    I wouldn't be surprised to find out that George Chuvalo played chess or something like that and/or other than sitting around surfing porn sites all day like a dead head - not that I am suggesting Quarry was.

    The tissue that builds up on the brain (from repeated smacks) doesn't repair itself, but as we get older (I believe) that the neurological pathways only rejuvenate when stimulated.

    Last time I checked the neurological pathways don't find it too stimulating to have their outer enclosure clocked hard, to the point where it doesn't usually trigger any rejuvenation process.

    Not like a few hours studying Kirchoff's law or something like that anyway.
    I personally have been knowing GC near my whole life. And you are right. He plays chess. Does crossword puzzles. Play cards. He is sharp with electronics. He's well read. He's quick witted. He eats a lot cold-watered fish, nut, seeds. He's musical. As you have hinted, he's brainy. And all the pugs who I know, and who are not punchy are brainy. Holla!

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