English Español
Advertisement
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Chris Algieri and other college boys

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    259

    Chris Algieri and other college boys

    Chris Algieri doesn't fit the stereotype of a prizefighter. He graduated from Stony Brook University near his Long Island home and earned a second degree in healthcare science from the New York Institute of Technology. By way of comparison, most professional boxers graduated from the School of Hard Knocks.

    According to the oddsmakers, Algieri will be out of his league when he takes on Manny Pacquaio. If the odds are any indication, the bout will echo the 1953 welterweight title tiff between defending champion Kid Gavilan and Chuck Davey. In that bout, the college boy was taken to school by the Cuban Hawk who spent part of his youth working in the sugarcane fields.

    Chuck Davey earned a bachelors degree and a master's degree in school administration from Michigan State University. During his tenure there, he won four NCAA boxing titles -- the only man to hold this distinction. He won the first as a 17-year old freshman and the others after returning to school on the G.I. bill.

    A southpaw, Davey was boxing's first big TV star. This was back in the day when a 13-inch black-and-white TV was a big-ticket item if purchased new and a prized household appliance.

    The white knight in a field of hard-boiled characters, Chuck Davey was brought along carefully. He took a 37-0-2 record into his match with Kid Gavilan. The Cuban was the same age, but vastly more experienced.

    Davey fought gamely, but was in over his head. The bout was stopped after the 9th round. At that point, Davey trailed badly, by 14 points (52-38) on the most lopsided card.

    Chuck Davey went on the head the Michigan Athletic Commission and became one of the most respected administrators in boxing. But that loss to Gavilan became his signature fight and forever clouded his other achievements.

    Of course, Chris Algieri has better role models to choose from among the college boy crop. The Klitschko brothers have doctorates in sports science. Talk about breaking the mold!

    Here are some other notable boxers who were college boys:

    Steve Hamas, a multi-sport star at Penn State, defeated Max Schmeling in the first of their two bouts and concluded his career with a 35-4-2 mark.

    Billy Soose, another Penn State man, failed to win an NCAA title but went on to win the New York version of the world middleweight title.

    The under-appreciated Freddie Little graduated from Dillard University in New Orleans and juggled his boxing career with his job as a schoolteacher. On the wrong end of several strange decisions, Little won a share of the junior middleweight title and retired with a record of 51-6.

    The first bout between intra-city rivals Carlos Palomino and Armando Muniz (the bout was a scorcher) is thought to be the first title fight in history where both men were college graduates. Palomino earned his degree at Long Beach State; Muniz at Cal State Los Angeles.

    Two North Carolina heavyweights of recent vintage -- Bonecrusher Smith (Shaw University) and Calvin Brock (NC Charlotte) -- had college degrees. A finance major, Brock left boxing with a 31-2 record. His only losses were to Wladimir Klitschko and then-undefeated Eddie Chambers.

    Juan "Baby Bull" Diaz, who returned to boxing last year after a three-year absence, graduated from the University of Houston in a pre-law program after reportedly finishing third in his high school graduating class.

    Among active fighters, Welsh cruiserweight Nathan Cleverly jumps to mind. Cleverly's degree is in mathematics; no soft major for this guy. At last look, he was 28-1 with his only defeat coming at the hands of undefeated Sergey Kovalev.

    I'm sure there are many other examples of boxers who earned their degrees before or during their fighting days. And lest I forget, thanks to British boxing writer Matt Goddard for filling in some of the blanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    100

    Re: Chris Algieri and other college boys

    I believe Darrin Van Horn, who was bombed out by Iran Barkley in the early 90's, was a college graduate. Pretty sure he held an alphabet strap once upon a time.

  3. #3
    Advanced Users
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    9,517

    Re: Chris Algieri and other college boys

    Wow! There are a lot of college graduates missing here. I'm shocked that they are not known. Just about everybody on the U.S. O-Games boxing team starting 2000 were in college or college graduates. ESPN, HBO and Showtime have conducted some of the most college educated boxing card known.

    BTW, C-Al is not fighting a dummy or somebody who is not also a college graduate with a master degree. Holla!

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    South Beach
    Posts
    3,317

    Re: Chris Algieri and other college boys

    I don't get why Algieri is such a big dog. That looks like an intriguing bet to me.

    Several things speak for him:

    For one, dude beat the guy -- Taylor -- who just beat Karim Mayfield. Then he outboxed Provodnikov, showing that he's at the very least on the world level.

    He also has the style that troubles Pacquiao. He's HIGHLY active for a slick boxer with a big-time work rate.

    Pacquiao's strength is not as a counter puncher but overwhelming a stationary target. While he did beat him handily, he also struggled to land cleanly on Tom Bradley.

    Lastly, Pacquiao has admitted to underperforming when taking guys likely. I personally think this is BS and post-fight rationalization but, hey, there may be some truth to it.

    Right now, the early odds have Pacquiao as a -1400 favorite while Algieri is a +800 DAWG. In other words, if you drop a Curtis ($50), you get $400 in hard, Cobra cash (as Carl Froch likes to call moolah).

    That is a tremendous bet. He was a +450 underdog vs. Provodnikov and we saw what happened there...

    Now do I think Algieri wins? Not quite. But I don't see it as a mismatch, either.

    All in all, if the odds are overwhelmingly in Pacquiao's favor come fight night, I would definitely take that bet and possibly make some extra hard, Chris A. cash.

    As far as the education aspect is concerned, I absolutely love that about him. And yes, it's big misconception that fighters are dumb, uncouth savages just plucked off the street in the middle of a drug deal that changed their lives.

    If you look at the UFC/MMA, you'll find that the overwhelming majority of them, from America, anyway, are college graduates.

    I've heard of many fighters who never went to college because they devoted their time to boxing, turned pro, what have you.

    If boxing was high-profile, scholarship sport on the level with wrestling, I'm quite sure we'd see more college graduates duke it out in the squared circle as well.

  5. #5
    Advanced Users
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    9,517

    Re: Chris Algieri and other college boys

    Quote Originally Posted by The Shadow View Post
    If boxing was high-profile, scholarship sport on the level with wrestling, I'm quite sure we'd see more college graduates duke it out in the squared circle as well.
    That already existed. From the 1930$ to 1960$ almost as many boxers received scholarships for boxers as they did for football. Several colleges still give boxing scholarships. Referee Mills Lane was a collegiate national boxing champion.

    I watch the collegiate national boxing championship every year on the collegiate sport channel.

    BTW, Da Manny doesn't have trouble with movers. He had/has trouble with counter-punching Marquez/Hulkquez.

    He beat Bradley 21 out 24 rounds. I wouldn't called that trouble. He lost to Corrales once and kayoed him twice.

    I don't know what running-away bytch gave Da Manny trouble. He is going potshot C-Al, beat him like a drum and KHTFO early to mid-late rounds. Holla!
    Last edited by Radam G; 07-29-2014 at 02:07 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    259

    Re: Chris Algieri and other college boys

    To set the record straight, college boxing as a full-ride scholarship sport died in 1960 following the death of University of Wisconsin boxer Charlie Mohr. Several western colleges stayed the course, forming their own league, but their tournaments lacked NCAA oversight. And please Radam, there were never as many scholarships offered for boxing as for football.

    The sport of college boxing was gaining traction when the plug was pulled. I found this commentary in an old newspaper: "The filth, fixes, fakes and fantastic finishes in many pro televised bouts have started to turn the public against professional boxing and many fans will be looking for college boxing with its high moral standards to take its place."

    I'm not sure big-time college sports is the best place to look for high moral standards. Critics of college boxing pointed to recruiting abuses. Coaches were allegedly trolling amateur tournaments for talent and offering improper benefits to land hot prospects. Sound familiar?

    College boxing has returned as a club (i.e. non-scholarship) sport. National tournaments have been held for several years now. In conformity with Title 9, there are men's and ladies divisions. In recent years, the service academies, particularly the Air Force Academy, have dominated these competitions. Service academy boxers are on a full ride, as are all of their classmates.

    The late San Francisco boxing scribe Jack Fiske attended the University of Alabama circa 1940 when boxing at that school drew larger crowds than basketball games. The star of the Crimson Tide boxing team was George Wallace, a crowd-pleasing featherweight. Fiske told me that he would have made a good pro.

    Many people wish that Wallace had taken that route. Instead, he became a four-term governor and one of the most polarizing figures in American politics.

  7. #7
    Advanced Users
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    9,517

    Re: Chris Algieri and other college boys

    Quote Originally Posted by ArneK. View Post
    To set the record straight, college boxing as a full-ride scholarship sport died in 1960 following the death of University of Wisconsin boxer Charlie Mohr. Several western colleges stayed the course, forming their own league, but their tournaments lacked NCAA oversight. And please Radam, there were never as many scholarships offered for boxing as for football.

    The sport of college boxing was gaining traction when the plug was pulled. I found this commentary in an old newspaper: "The filth, fixes, fakes and fantastic finishes in many pro televised bouts have started to turn the public against professional boxing and many fans will be looking for college boxing with its high moral standards to take its place."

    I'm not sure big-time college sports is the best place to look for high moral standards. Critics of college boxing pointed to recruiting abuses. Coaches were allegedly trolling amateur tournaments for talent and offering improper benefits to land hot prospects. Sound familiar?

    College boxing has returned as a club (i.e. non-scholarship) sport. National tournaments have been held for several years now. In conformity with Title 9, there are men's and ladies divisions. In recent years, the service academies, particularly the Air Force Academy, have dominated these competitions. Service academy boxers are on a full ride, as are all of their classmates.

    The late San Francisco boxing scribe Jack Fiske attended the University of Alabama circa 1940 when boxing at that school drew larger crowds than basketball games. The star of the Crimson Tide boxing team was George Wallace, a crowd-pleasing featherweight. Fiske told me that he would have made a good pro.

    Many people wish that Wallace had taken that route. Instead, he became a four-term governor and one of the most polarizing figures in American politics.
    AmeK, you took the "almost" out of my piece. I didn't literally mean "as many scholarships offered (yearly) for boxing as for football," but "almost as many." Meaning allotment allowed for a particular sports based on the team size and playing positions.

    At that time, boxing had nine or 10 weight classes/divisions like basketball has five positions. Baseball has nine, etc., etc. Danggit! American football has over 30 positions with offense, defense and special teams. Hopefully, you get the points I was making in comparison to the yearly allotment of scholarships -- not exact same number -- for a particular sport. Holla!

  8. #8
    Advanced Users
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    9,517

    Re: Chris Algieri and other college boys

    Quote Originally Posted by ArneK. View Post
    To set the record straight, college boxing as a full-ride scholarship sport died in 1960 following the death of University of Wisconsin boxer Charlie Mohr. Several western colleges stayed the course, forming their own league, but their tournaments lacked NCAA oversight. And please Radam, there were never as many scholarships offered for boxing as for football.

    The sport of college boxing was gaining traction when the plug was pulled. I found this commentary in an old newspaper: "The filth, fixes, fakes and fantastic finishes in many pro televised bouts have started to turn the public against professional boxing and many fans will be looking for college boxing with its high moral standards to take its place."

    I'm not sure big-time college sports is the best place to look for high moral standards. Critics of college boxing pointed to recruiting abuses. Coaches were allegedly trolling amateur tournaments for talent and offering improper benefits to land hot prospects. Sound familiar?

    College boxing has returned as a club (i.e. non-scholarship) sport. National tournaments have been held for several years now. In conformity with Title 9, there are men's and ladies divisions. In recent years, the service academies, particularly the Air Force Academy, have dominated these competitions. Service academy boxers are on a full ride, as are all of their classmates.

    The late San Francisco boxing scribe Jack Fiske attended the University of Alabama circa 1940 when boxing at that school drew larger crowds than basketball games. The star of the Crimson Tide boxing team was George Wallace, a crowd-pleasing featherweight. Fiske told me that he would have made a good pro.

    Many people wish that Wallace had taken that route. Instead, he became a four-term governor and one of the most polarizing figures in American politics.
    My bad! I meant the 1930$ to 1960$. Holla!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •