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Thread: The GOAT Ali Would've Done A Slam Dunk On This Giant B-Baller

  1. #1
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    The GOAT Ali Would've Done A Slam Dunk On This Giant B-Baller

    GOAT would've kayoed Wilt Chamberlain. Luckily WC's pops talked his son outta an arse whuppin.'

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuX7FlddCRg.Holla!

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    Re: The GOAT Ali Would've Done A Slam Dunk On This Giant B-Baller

    Great article by a great writer.

    I remember hoping that a Muhammad Ali v Wilt Chamberlain fight would happen. In my mind, Wilt was quite possibly the greatest athlete ever seen. Go check his stats, not just in basketball, but in other sports, as well. If there ever was a physical phenomenon in sports, it was Wilt. He could run faster, jump higher and was stronger than even the strongest weight-lifters.

    "Chamberlain would have been a tremendous fighter," basketball star Dave DeBusshere once told me. Big Dave was, along with Bert Sugar, an owner of The Ring, and I got to know him well between 1979-1984. We often talked about the physical prowess of Wilt.

    "I never saw anything like him," said DeBusschere, himself a tremendous athlete, both a star in the NBA and a pitcher for the Chicago White Sox.

    "Rebounding against Chamberlain was impossible," said DeBusschere. "One on one, nobody could move him. Nobody! So, you couldn't move him and you couldn't outjump him. When he went for a rebound, he got it. The only time he didn't is when the ball hit the rim and flew in a direction away from Wilt. I have never seen anybody so big and strong and agile."

    When I asked DeBusschere if talk of an Ali-Chamberlain fight was ridiculous, DeBusschere replied, "The fight was one that Wilt wanted badly. I'd sometimes see him shadowboxing in the hallway before the game. He knew what he was doing. He would have been a helluva fighter. He was no joke. He was nobody to mess with, to get physical with. If he and Ali fought, and he beat Ali, I would not have been surprised."

    In 1994, I sat next to Wilt at the U.S. Open Tennis Tournament. I told him I always wanted to see him challenge Ali for the title.

    "Had I fought Ali," said Chamberlain, "we would have had a second fight, a rematch." Then, he added, "In that fight, Ali would have been the challenger." He was certain of it.

    Muhammad Ali vs Wilt Chamberlain. I often think about what would have happened had they fought and if Wilt had become a fighter and not one of the greatest NBA stars ever.

    Wilt Chamberlain in boxing. The course of the heavyweight division in the 1960's may have been entirely different.

    Thanks to Bernard Fernandez for bringing that memory back.

    -Randy G.

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    Re: The GOAT Ali Would've Done A Slam Dunk On This Giant B-Baller

    Quote Originally Posted by The Commish View Post
    Great article by a great writer.

    I remember hoping that a Muhammad Ali v Wilt Chamberlain fight would happen. In my mind, Wilt was quite possibly the greatest athlete ever seen. Go check his stats, not just in basketball, but in other sports, as well. If there ever was a physical phenomenon in sports, it was Wilt. He could run faster, jump higher and was stronger than even the strongest weight-lifters.

    "Chamberlain would have been a tremendous fighter," basketball star Dave DeBusshere once told me. Big Dave was, along with Bert Sugar, an owner of The Ring, and I got to know him well between 1979-1984. We often talked about the physical prowess of Wilt.

    "I never saw anything like him," said DeBusschere, himself a tremendous athlete, both a star in the NBA and a pitcher for the Chicago White Sox.

    "Rebounding against Chamberlain was impossible," said DeBusschere. "One on one, nobody could move him. Nobody! So, you couldn't move him and you couldn't outjump him. When he went for a rebound, he got it. The only time he didn't is when the ball hit the rim and flew in a direction away from Wilt. I have never seen anybody so big and strong and agile."

    When I asked DeBusschere if talk of an Ali-Chamberlain fight was ridiculous, DeBusschere replied, "The fight was one that Wilt wanted badly. I'd sometimes see him shadowboxing in the hallway before the game. He knew what he was doing. He would have been a helluva fighter. He was no joke. He was nobody to mess with, to get physical with. If he and Ali fought, and he beat Ali, I would not have been surprised."

    In 1994, I sat next to Wilt at the U.S. Open Tennis Tournament. I told him I always wanted to see him challenge Ali for the title.

    "Had I fought Ali," said Chamberlain, "we would have had a second fight, a rematch." Then, he added, "In that fight, Ali would have been the challenger." He was certain of it.

    Muhammad Ali vs Wilt Chamberlain. I often think about what would have happened had they fought and if Wilt had become a fighter and not one of the greatest NBA stars ever.

    Wilt Chamberlain in boxing. The course of the heavyweight division in the 1960's may have been entirely different.

    Thanks to Bernard Fernandez for bringing that memory back.

    -Randy G.
    WOW! You guys were crazy in the 1960s. Wilt Chamberlain would have gotten KTFO by GOAT Ali. It doesn't matter how talented an athlete WC was. He was no boxer and would've gotten slaughtered. His pops saved his arse. Fairy tales believing was sky high in the 1960s.

    How much weed was Dave DeBusschere smoking in the 60s? Holla!

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    Re: The GOAT Ali Would've Done A Slam Dunk On This Giant B-Baller

    The video Radam posted is a great companion piece to the article by Bernard Fernandez.

    I too have a Wilt Chamberlain "brush with fame" anecdote.

    There was a brief time in my life when I drove a taxi in Las Vegas. One night it was slow and I decided to play the airport and see if I could cop one more fare before my shift was over. The late plane from LA -- the last plane of the day, coming or going -- disgorged its passengers shortly after midnight.

    It looked like I was going to get shut out when, lo and behold, Wilt Chamberlain ambled out of the airport. No luggage; just him.

    The company I worked for, Checker Cab, had two sizes of cabs. That night I was stuck with a small one. I forget the model, but the taxicab authority should have never approved a car this small.

    I rushed to the passenger side to push the front seat back. "Don't bother," said Wilt, "I'll be fine." I swear that his head and his knees touched the roof, but yet he didn't seem uncomfortable at all. Over the years, like a magician's helper, he had mastered the art of squeezing his body into tight places.

    We made small talk on the way to his destination, the Tropicana. He was very personable. As we pulled into the hotel he said, "aw shucks, I forgot to bring my wallet. Wait here. I'll be right back."

    I'd heard that routine before. The previous week some prick had run out on me and I had a flashback that it was going to happen again. Then I realized the absurdity of that thought. Where's this guy gonna hide? Unlike Elvis, there were no Wilt Chamberlain impersonators.

    He went inside the hotel, returned in a few minutes and, with a sheepish grin, gave me my money. And yes, I got a decent tip.

    If all of your experience with air travel is post-9/11, you don't know how easy it used to be to fly somewhere on the spur of the moment. There were no security checks en route to the gate and no need to provide identification, not that Wilt would need any to prove who he was.

    And a man who was famous could easily walk into a Las Vegas hotel with empty pockets and withdraw some money from the cashiers cage with only his signature.

    Years later, I learned that Wilt was an insomniac. This came from Doug Krikorian, the longtime southern California sportswriter who was tight with Wilt when he was the Lakers beat writer for the LA Herald-Examiner. Krikorian said he spent many nights shooting the breeze with Chamberlain into the wee hours of the morning in quiet corners of empty hotel coffee shops. Many nights Wilt couldn't fall asleep until it was almost dawn.

    So what apparently happened was that Wilt was bored, went for a drive, and then, on the spur-of-the-moment, decided he would catch that one-hour flight to Vegas and hang out there until the next morning. Forgetting his wallet was no deal.

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