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Thread: How Many Ex-boxers Have You Met That Were Imposters ?

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    How Many Ex-boxers Have You Met That Were Imposters ?

    In another thread, Radam mentioned that there were three guys hanging around San Diego in 2005 who claimed to be former IBF super featherweight champion Roberto Garcia. None were who they pretended to be.

    That reminded me of a piece by Bill Schutte in an old IBRO newsletter that dealt with what he called "the phoney boxer phenomenon." He had personally met several imposters and culled other examples from newspaper obituaries where a person identified as having been a prominent boxer died several years or several decades after the real McCoy.

    Perhaps the most famous imposter was the homeless man in Orange County who took on the identity of former heavyweight contender Bob Satterfield. He could rattle off every tidbit of Satterfield's career. The LA Times Sunday Magazine story about him was turned into a movie starring Samuel L. Jackson.

    It's been my experience that ex-boxers tend to exaggerate the number of fights they had and their lifetime winning percentage. I don't hold this against them. It's sort of like exaggerating the score we got on the SAT exam. I wouldn't call this being a phoney.

    But pretending to have been a prominent boxer is a different story. It's stolen valor in my mind, akin to claiming to have been a war hero.

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    Re: How Many Ex-boxers Have You Met That Were Imposters ?

    Quote Originally Posted by ArneK. View Post
    In another thread, Radam mentioned that there were three guys hanging around San Diego in 2005 who claimed to be former IBF super featherweight champion Roberto Garcia. None were who they pretended to be.

    That reminded me of a piece by Bill Schutte in an old IBRO newsletter that dealt with what he called "the phoney boxer phenomenon." He had personally met several imposters and culled other examples from newspaper obituaries where a person identified as having been a prominent boxer died several years or several decades after the real McCoy.

    Perhaps the most famous imposter was the homeless man in Orange County who took on the identity of former heavyweight contender Bob Satterfield. He could rattle off every tidbit of Satterfield's career. The LA Times Sunday Magazine story about him was turned into a movie starring Samuel L. Jackson.

    It's been my experience that ex-boxers tend to exaggerate the number of fights they had and their lifetime winning percentage. I don't hold this against them. It's sort of like exaggerating the score we got on the SAT exam. I wouldn't call this being a phoney.

    But pretending to have been a prominent boxer is a different story. It's stolen valor in my mind, akin to claiming to have been a o owar hero.
    I had forgotten about that flick by Samuel L. Jackson. Imma going to have to holla at it. The game is infested with posers. Many of who never fought in their lives, but claim to have been world champs. This is why oftentimes, gyms can be dangerous like a mofu.

    These posers come to boxing gyms hallucinating about being great ex-boxers and wanting to spar with and/or to coach and train pugs. Tell the trifling posers: "NO!" They will get flexed and try to take your head off. So you better mean business. And bust 'em up nicely. There are tons of stories where these slumbag wannabes came back and shot up the gym and/or even killed some peeps.

    Sometimes even fighters go whacky crazy. Holla at the history of ex-world champ Bruce Curry -- big bro of Donald Curry. BC was going to straight shoot trainer Jesse Reid dead as a door nail.

    BC was hallucinating that Jesse was in on da (alleged) fix of BC losing his world title belt to the late Billy Costello.

    The game is indeed the "theatre of the unexpected," and can be dangerous inside and outside that squared jungle. I bullsyet you not. Check it out at ur "theatre of the unexpected" near you. Holla!

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    Re: How Many Ex-boxers Have You Met That Were Imposters ?

    There used to be a scruffy, unshaven drunk who would tramp along the high streets of East London, spending what money he had in the bookies and off licenses, drinking discount lager from early morning in parks where he'd often pass out late afternoon.

    He would often tell people who would listen that he was formerly a world famous boxer, who could have went on and been one of the greatest had he not grown a fondness for cannabis, drink and women. He would be able to recite countless memories of fights, in vivid detail as if he was almost reliving the moment. He could rattle off the career details of so many fighters in the 70's, 80's and 90's you would think he was a boxing historian turned scruff.

    He even claimed to have beaten Roberto Duran in his prime and earned his respect through fighting him long and hard, out boxing him with his whip like jab and rapier right hand, bouncing on his toes all night and exchanging when the time was right.

    Haven't heard of him for a while but I'm sure he's still around.. Although he is no imposter, all his tales were true.
    Last edited by Skibbz; 07-27-2014 at 05:11 PM.

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    Re: How Many Ex-boxers Have You Met That Were Imposters ?

    I knew a guy who appeared on ESPN twice more than twenty five years ago who pretended to be a boxer. Technically the guy visited the gym and fooled around on the bag a little and might have done some sit ups. The trainers knew his name ... But he rarely showed up for practice and might have sparred once in six months.

    I can't think of the guys name but he migrated to different gyms in the city and could always be found talking up his fake history.

    I don't know the procedure for submitting an application to fight on ESPN but I saw the guy being introduced as a contestant on one of the Wednesday weekly cards as a late notice replacement.

    The guys trunks looked like real baggy cut-off shorts...but they definitely were not boxing trunks and I'm not sure how this was allowed.

    As soon as the punches started flying the imposter put on the earmuffs and ducked below his opponents knees and stayed there.

    After his knees touched the canvas several times in two rounds out of fear of getting hit the ref waved it off.

    It was an off night that featured at least three substitutions and was the shabbiest card I've ever witnessed on ESPN.

    The fellow I'm speaking of was a known drunk and a drug abuser .... I never saw him again in the gym after that day ..

    ESPN must have had a policy change after that fiasco because I never saw that level of unprofessionalism from the sports magnate again.

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    Re: How Many Ex-boxers Have You Met That Were Imposters ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skibbz View Post
    There used to be a scruffy, unshaven drunk who would tramp along the high streets of East London, spending what money he had in the bookies and off licenses, drinking discount lager from early morning in parks where he'd often pass out late afternoon.

    He would often tell people who would listen that he was formerly a world famous boxer, who could have went on and been one of the greatest had he not grown a fondness for cannabis, drink and women. He would be able to recite countless memories of fights, in vivid detail as if he was almost reliving the moment. He could rattle off the career details of so many fighters in the 70's, 80's and 90's you would think he was a boxing historian turned scruff.

    He even claimed to have beaten Roberto Duran in his prime and earned his respect through fighting him long and hard, out boxing him with his whip like jab and rapier right hand, bouncing on his toes all night and exchanging when the time was right.

    Haven't heard of him for a while but I'm sure he's still around.. Although he is no imposter, all his tales were true.
    "Ring Magazine Upset of the Year" 1982 -- Kirkland Laing-Roberto Duran. K-La became a humble drunk. I think you or someone post his nowadays demise on another Thread a bit ago.

    None of the elite and true souls, who fall on how times, are violent or phony. (Bruce Curry was an exception to the rule. He was found mentally ill and institutionalize until he got better.) Used-to-be great and good boxers tend to hide out from the gyms and circles of the game when they fall on super hard times. They have a prime factor or sumptin' [$¡¢]. More of the times, you have to chase them down to get and/or give 'em a helping hand.

    The late Ernie "Indian Red" Lopez comes to my mind. How times flies. Years ago, I alerted some people that cared, a reporter and the boxing community that the famous Ernie Lopez was in a homeless shelter in Fort Worth, Texas, USA. He got flown back to Cali to be introduced into the Cali HOF and to live with his daughter until the day he died from bad health.

    I find the violence and meanness coming, not from ex-pugs but, from the posers and busters who have never fought or were never worth 2¢. But one day, their brain chemicals become wack, and these perpetrators of boksing frauds are locked, loaded and ready to attack. The only thing that calm 'em down is a severe -- and sometimes crippling -- arse thrashing counter attack. Holla!
    Last edited by Radam G; 07-27-2014 at 06:10 PM.

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    Re: How Many Ex-boxers Have You Met That Were Imposters ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Radam G View Post
    "Ring Magazine Upset of the Year" 1982 -- Kirkland Laing-Roberto Duran. K-La became a humble drunk. I think you or someone post his nowadays demise on another Thread a bit ago.

    None of the elite and true souls, who fall on how times, are violent or phony. (Bruce Curry was an exception to the rule. He was found mentally I'll and institutionalize until he got better.)

    I find the violence and meanness coming from the posers and busters who have never fought or were never worth 2¢. But one day, their brain chemicals become wack, and these perpetrators of Boksing frauds are locked, loaded and ready to attack. The only thing that calm 'em down is a severe -- and sometimes crippling -- arse thrashing. Holla!
    Hole in one RG. I wonder what he's doing these days, I would hope that he's teaching the next generation what he's learned about boxing, his insights from the ring and in life in general.

    Too many phoneys around, people are quick to claim they're this and that but it would take one flurry in the ring to provide the proof in the pudding against the fakes.

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    Re: How Many Ex-boxers Have You Met That Were Imposters ?

    I had forgotten about Kirkland Laing. Just got done "googling" him. It's sad the way his life unraveled, but he was no imposter. He actually did beat Roberto Duran in a nationally televised fight. Who knows how far he would have gone if he had been more disciplined?

    The imposters that Bill Schutte cited had, by all accounts, no boxing experience whatsoever. One fellow that patronized the bowling alley in his neighborhood claimed to be Irish Bob Murphy, a light heavyweight who developed a strong following in California during the middle years of the 20th century.

    People addressed this phony as "champ," a common method of greeting an ex-boxer: "What's up, champ?" He did nothing to deserve this token of respect and Schutte was happy to "out" him.

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