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Thread: The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

  1. #1
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    The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

    This law, championed by John McCain, was passed by Congress in May of 2000. Characterized in a nutshell, the law, which has seven somewhat vague provisions, was designed to protect boxers at the bargaining table. It was meant to put an end to such things as double-dipping, the practice whereby promoters had hidden managerial ties to boxers they promoted. It also required sanctioning organizations to be more transparent in their ratings so that a fighter's placement in the Top 10 was not open to "negotiation."

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    Re: The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

    The act has accomplished nothing. Things are going as usual. Holla!

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    Re: The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

    It's there to protect fighters, yes. Yet people are suing one guy for violating the act -- the same guy notorious for cutting into promoters' margin for the benefit of fighters.

    Am I the only one confused here?

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    Re: The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

    I'm not aware of the case that you reference, Mr. Shadow.

    This was a rhetorical question, at least in my mind, and Radam answered it perfectly. No elaboration was necessary.

    The history of this bill is interesting. It gained traction when Muhammad Ali insisted following the first Lewis-Holyfield fight that "boxing had reached its lowest point." It was endorsed by the influential The Ring magazine. Publisher Stanley Weston (or one of his writers) wrote that it would "get rid of all the bandits and parasites." Congressman Billy Tauzin from that great banana republic of Louisiana was one of the most vocal supporters. Tauzin -- who grew up in the day when Frankie Carbo and Blinky Palermo exerted considerable sway over boxing -- promised his colleagues that if they passed the bill "it would reestablish boxing as the honest and clean sport that so many of us grew up admiring and appreciating in our lives."

    After starting this thread, I stumbled on an article written by Thomas Hauser for ESPN. It appeared in September of 2007, a little more than seven years after the bill was enacted. "What's the point in having a law if nobody enforces it?," he wrote.

    One could have seen this coming. And while I can't put words in Mr. Hauser's mouth, I'm thinking that he wouldn't change a word of that article if he were writing it today.

    Perhaps the Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act was well-intentioned, but it was poorly designed and the efforts that went into getting it passed into law were a colossal waste of time.

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    Re: The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

    That is the case with many laws Arne. Laws aren't in place for everybody, and they surely aren't enforced or adhered to vigorously anywhere on the planet, never have they been and never will they be.

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    Re: The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

    The Ali act was supposed to separate promoters from managers. Al Haymon functions as both and skirts the toothless law by calling himself an advisor. I think that Haymon is being sued for violating the act.

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    Re: The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

    Quote Originally Posted by ArneK. View Post
    I'm not aware of the case that you reference, Mr. Shadow.

    This was a rhetorical question, at least in my mind, and Radam answered it perfectly. No elaboration was necessary.

    The history of this bill is interesting. It gained traction when Muhammad Ali insisted following the first Lewis-Holyfield fight that "boxing had reached its lowest point." It was endorsed by the influential The Ring magazine. Publisher Stanley Weston (or one of his writers) wrote that it would "get rid of all the bandits and parasites." Congressman Billy Tauzin from that great banana republic of Louisiana was one of the most vocal supporters. Tauzin -- who grew up in the day when Frankie Carbo and Blinky Palermo exerted considerable sway over boxing -- promised his colleagues that if they passed the bill "it would reestablish boxing as the honest and clean sport that so many of us grew up admiring and appreciating in our lives."

    After starting this thread, I stumbled on an article written by Thomas Hauser for ESPN. It appeared in September of 2007, a little more than seven years after the bill was enacted. "What's the point in having a law if nobody enforces it?," he wrote.

    One could have seen this coming. And while I can't put words in Mr. Hauser's mouth, I'm thinking that he wouldn't change a word of that article if he were writing it today.

    Perhaps the Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act was well-intentioned, but it was poorly designed and the efforts that went into getting it passed into law were a colossal waste of time.
    Arne, my fellow Dane, I'm sorry if I was unclear. I wasn't questioning your question. I was referring to the impending lawsuit against a manager who's notoriously for the fighters, yet gets sued for violating the act designed to protect fighters in the first place.

    Sorry if it came across another way, didn't mean that. I think it is a valid question and an excellent discussion topic.

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    Re: The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

    Quote Originally Posted by deepwater2 View Post
    The Ali act was supposed to separate promoters from managers. Al Haymon functions as both and skirts the toothless law by calling himself an advisor. I think that Haymon is being sued for violating the act.
    He is but it's worthless because he's the one who protects fighters more than any other guy in boxing at the moment. Promoters hate him because he takes money out of their pockets and gives it to fighters. They're essentially suing because he's cutting into their margins. Sour grapes, really.

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    Re: The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

    Quote Originally Posted by deepwater2 View Post
    The Ali act was supposed to separate promoters from managers. Al Haymon functions as both and skirts the toothless law by calling himself an advisor. I think that Haymon is being sued for violating the act.
    True Da! True Da! But tsAH is a Harvard-graduate lawyer. He knows every trick of the trade. He rope-a-dopes the Muhammad Ali Act and then flow on it like a butterfly and string like a bee. He's going to end up with the victory. Holla!

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    Re: The Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act. What has it accomplished?

    Is the shadow al Haymon a promoter, an advisor, a manager or all 3? The Ali act would like to know.

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