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Thread: Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?

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    Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?



    Cuban southpaw Guillermo Rigondeaux took the starch out Thailand’s veteran Sod Kokietgym and taught him a valuable lesson in defending himself at all times.
    Kokietgym must have blinked because a half second after attempting to touch gloves with Rigondeaux he was met with a crisp right and left that floored him for the count on Saturday at Macau, China.
    Rigondeaux (14-0, 9 Kos) retains the WBO and WBA junior featherweight world titles and proved to his Cuban brethren, fans and others that you don’t need to run around to be exciting. Timing, defense and rattlesnake quickness can serve just as well.
    One boxing expert likens Rigondeaux to Mexico’s great Ricardo “Finito” Lopez. That’s a great comparison. Lopez was a flyweight who was conservative with his punches but seldom if ever ran away. One of his greatest wins came against another prizefighter from Thailand, Ratanapol Sor Vorapin, who he met in Las Vegas in 2000. Things were going smoothly for the Thai fighter when suddenly Lopez struck and Vorapin was counted out.
    Later that week, I met with Sugar Shane Mosley, who was at the height of his power after defeating Oscar De La Hoya in a battle of Los Angeles-based welterweights a few months earlier. When we analyzed Lopez’s knockout the Pomona speedster said his assumption after watching it over and over was that Vorapin blinked and Lopez fired an uppercut in that instant.
    It was amazing stuff.
    Rigondeaux does have that kind of quickness and astuteness.
    When Rigondeaux met Rico Ramos for his WBO world title at the Palms Casino in Las Vegas in January 2012, many expected a chess match filled with moves and counter moves. Rigondeaux sliced through any apprehensions with the precision of a neurosurgeon. After six rounds the fight was over.
    Too bad Rigondeaux is already 33 years old. But what a fighter. I’m sold on Rigondeaux.
    Middleweight stew
    Gennady Golovkin defends the IBO and WBA belts against former champion Daniel Geale but already there’s mention of a possible showdown with WBC champion Miguel Cotto. Before any analysis it should be mentioned that Cotto stayed at Golovkin’s camp in Big Bear Lake recently. Another who stayed in the mountain training camp a few years earlier was Saul “Canelo” Alvarez. Both sparred a little with Golovkin but not much. Cotto and Alvarez know what they would be getting into. Maybe that’s one of the reasons Canelo refuses to move into the middleweight division. Smart thinking.
    Win or Leave
    Frankie Gomez headlines a fight card on Friday at Fantasy Springs Casino. The once heralded junior welterweight has failed to live up to the expectations Golden Boy Promotions once had for the East L.A. bred boxer. Though he’s undefeated Gomez has had problems with managers and the long arm of the law. This might be Gomez’s last hurrah should he lose to the very capable Vernon Paris.
    In Ontario, two Thompson Boxing Promotions prizefighters could be cut by the Orange County-based promoters. Efrain Esquivias (17-3-1) meets Chris Martin (27-3-3) in a featherweight clash at the Doubletree Hotel. Esquivias had people delirious with excitement after he knocked out legendary Mexican Rafael Marquez last summer. Martin never has delivered since signing with Thompson. The loser will probably be cut.
    San Diego
    A female boxing star has blossomed in San Diego with Tijuana’s Kenia Enriquez proving she’s not hype with several victories. If you get a chance check out the junior flyweight. She has skills and tenacity. Enriquez will be the main event at Crowne Plaza Hotel.
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    Re: Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?

    Finito was a super-superbad mofu! But Cuban Willie Rigo is better. Holla!

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    Re: Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?

    I always enjoy David Avila's updates. I think the comparison between Rigondeaux and Finito Lopez is a good one, but I'm inclined to agree with Radam based upon something that Freddie Roach reportedly said -- that Rigondeaux has the best natural talent of any boxer that he has ever coached.

    In his updated Top 100, the late Bert Sugar had Finito Lopez ranked #53. I would have placed him higher.

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    Re: Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?

    Quote Originally Posted by ArneK. View Post
    I always enjoy David Avila's updates. I think the comparison between Rigondeaux and Finito Lopez is a good one, but I'm inclined to agree with Radam based upon something that Freddie Roach reportedly said -- that Rigondeaux has the best natural talent of any boxer that he has ever coached.

    In his updated Top 100, the late Bert Sugar had Finito Lopez ranked #53. I would have placed him higher.
    Not just coached, Arne, but the best he has ever seen. For someone who trained Manny Pacquiao, Mike Tyson, Bernard Hopkins and James Toney, that speaks volumes.

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    Re: Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?

    As good as Rigo is... He isn't known for his punch resistance. He is dependant on his insect like reflexes and agility ...or is he reptilian or mmongoose-like?

    Either way ... If he ever gets caught slippin' its all over. Which is why he has to stay so sharp.

    But his window of opportunity isn't big.

    Rigo needs to align himself with a power house promoter to kick-start his title unification run.
    I wonder if he has All Haymans' phone number?

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    Re: Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?

    Yes Guillermo Rigondeaux is an interesting boxer.

    I am just trying to think of when I last saw a boxer whose skills are so beautifully and effectively packaged together as Guillermo Rigondeaux's.

    For me, what tops it off, is that (unlike most pure technicians) Guillermo Rigondeaux has KO power, but he doesn't pass up on his absolute "A" game (skills wise) to deliver the power.

    So far, like Roach, I don't think I can (yet) think of a previous boxer/fighter I have seen either live or taped whose skills are as beautifully, brilliantly, ruthlessly and effectively packaged together as Guillermo Rigondeaux's.

    He would be an interesting technical-boxing case study.

    Aside from all the blatantly obvious fundamentals he has; his foot work, calmness, economy of motion, timing, balance, instincts and reflexes are simply freakishly exceptional.

    Aside from all that, if the guy was any cooler he would still be in the freezer . . . I mean he basically exploded onto the scene (after a few fights) and took out Nonito Donaire; whom is very capable and the year previous to his Guillermo Rigondeaux fight won fighter or KO of the year!

    Guillermo Rigondeaux's won't (or shouldn't) have any trouble finding a new promoter.
    Last edited by stormcentre; 07-21-2014 at 10:12 PM.

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    Re: Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?

    Quote Originally Posted by stormcentre View Post
    Yes Guillermo Rigondeaux is an interesting boxer.

    I am just trying to think of when I last saw a boxer whose skills are so beautifully and effectively packaged together as Guillermo Rigondeaux's.

    For me, what tops it off, is that (unlike most pure technicians) Guillermo Rigondeaux has KO power, but he doesn't pass up on hiDs absolute "A" game (skills wise) to deliver the power.
    So far, like Roach, I don't think I can (yet) think of a previous boxer/fighter I have seen either live or taped whose skills are as beautifully, brilliantly, ruthlessly and effectively packaged together as Guillermo Rigondeaux's.

    He would be an interesting technical-boxing case study.

    Aside from all the blatantly obvious fundamentals he has; his foot work, calmness, economy of motion, timing, balance, instincts and reflexes are simply freakishly exceptional.

    Aside from all that, if the guy was any cooler he would still be in the freezer . . . I mean he basically exploded onto the scene (after a few fights) and took out Nonito Donaire; whom is very capable and the year previous to his Guillermo Rigondeaux fight won fighter or KO of the year!

    Guillermo Rigondeaux's won't (or shouldn't) have any trouble finding a new promoter.
    Great breakdown/scouting report. Couldn't have said it any better. I can't think of anyone either.

    Like Big George Foreman used to say about Mayweather, he's a "natural" fighter. He doesn't have to think, get in stance and so forth; it's as natural to him as walking or as swimming is to a fish.

    Even top fighters like Andre Ward and Erislandy Lara aren't natural; they're well-schooled but you can see that they're in fight mode, if that makes sense. Then you have some guys like Cotto who have to find their rhythm by bouncing before they can fight.

    I've only really gotten that "natural" sense from Mayweather, Rigo and, to a lesser extent, James Toney.

    And guess what, Rigondeaux may be even more natural than Floyd! His motions, movements, everything Storm said. It's like he was made for it. Or like astute said, he's like a mongoose, insect, all that.

    And I am not sure his chin is as bad as people say. Dude had 500 amateur fights and vs was never floored. He got caught in one fight fighting outside of himself by following Ronnie Shields' instructions. Then he promptly replaced him.

    Then he got floored by Donaire when he was in a position he wasn't used to coming out of a clinch; he didn't think that was fighting time. But it's the pros here, not the amateurs. So I'm not totally sold on that bad chin rep.

    (Unlike that fart he just blitzed, he dusted himself off and got right back up and continued the Escuelita.)

    When you consider that he didn't start boing till he was 13, you know there's some freakish talent within him naturally.

    B-Suge, Alan has his number already. Better believe it.

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    Re: Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?

    Shadow i don't think he's weak ...but he definitely is not a Caesar Chavez senior in the chin dept.... He's already small for junior featherweight... doesn't rehydrate over 126ish. And even though he recovers exceptionally well, his chin is no better than Gamboas'. Thank God he doesn't fight like Gambia.

    Just saying ... Fighters such as Ward, Klitschko and Rigo are sensational on defense. But all those guys are very vulnerable.

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    Re: Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?

    Quote Originally Posted by brownsugar View Post
    Shadow i don't think he's weak ...but he definitely is not a Caesar Chavez senior in the chin dept.... He's already small for junior featherweight... doesn't rehydrate over 126ish. And even though he recovers exceptionally well, his chin is no better than Gamboas'. Thank God he doesn't fight like Gambia.

    Just saying ... Fighters such as Ward, Klitschko and Rigo are sensational on defense. But all those guys are very vulnerable.
    Good point, he's very small for the weight.

    He may very well have a Gamboa beard but I just haven't seen the evidence of his "weak" chin yet.

    Same with Ward. I've seen him eat flush shots from Al Green and Carl Froch. I don't think you can read much into the Darnell Boone debacle.

    Wlad on the other hand is vulnerable whereas his brother has a jaw of titanium.

    Random aside: I don't get the argument for Wlad on the P4P list. If you take away his dimensions - height, reach etc - is he skill-for-skill among the 10 best fighters in the world?

    I doubt it.

    Now imagine Rigo, B-Hop, Ward or Floyd as 6-7 heavyweights with the exact same attributes they have now.

    The mere thought should be illegal.

  10. #10
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    Re: Is Guillermo Rigondeaux The Next Finito Lopez?

    Quote Originally Posted by The Shadow View Post
    Good point, he's very small for the weight.

    He may very well have a Gamboa beard but I just haven't seen the evidence of his "weak" chin yet.

    Same with Ward. I've seen him eat flush shots from Al Green and Carl Froch. But you can read much into the Darnell Boone debacle.

    Wlad on the other hand is vulnerable whereas his brother has a jaw of titanium.

    Random aside: I don't get the argument for Wlad on the P4P list. If you take away his dimensions - height, reach etc - is he skill-for-skill among the 10 best fighters in the world?

    I doubt it.

    Now imagine Rigo, B-Hop, Ward or Floyd as 6-7 heavyweights with the exact same attributes they have now.

    The mere thought should be illegal.
    If Ward ever accepts a fight with GGG or Kovalev you will witness exactly what I'm talking about.
    I would include Stevenson but I think Ward could neutralize Stevenson. And he has been dazed on few occasions. ( Edison Miradanda hurt him but Ward kept his composure)

    Its not a crime to have an average chin.
    Few men are put together like Marvin Hagler or Julio Caesar Chavez.

    If you hit most guys on the point of their chins ... They will drop. Sometimes a fighter is in such tremendous shape the can recuperate extremely fast. If a fighter is clipped ....but not hard enough to induce a state of instant unconsciousness.... The subsequent Adrenalin surge can make him temporarily invincible.

    I'm just going by my personal experience. And what Ive seen. I had an average chin during my boxing days. But if the adrenaline was flowing I could take a sledge hammer to the face and keep on going. Sometimes getting dropped can be a good thing ... But sometimes the fighter can't get back up...... The adrenalin rush can't always be relied upon.

    Regarding Klitschko's pound for pound status. I once heard a locally renound Karate instructer say when he was being praised for his ability....." If only l was born a big dude ".

    And while I've always said that Wlad's success was due to his size he has also incorporated some new wrinkles to his game. He's learned how to pace himself so that he can stay mobile for twelve rounds while keeping his punch rate up...and he's learned how to relax when he gets hit , hold on, and just ride out the storm.
    And he's no longer the one dimensional one-two fighter he used to be. Its almost scary that he's still head and shoulders above the rest of the heavyweights He's 37 years old and hasn't been tested since his early years.

    Well I got off topic a bit...I'll catch up tomorrow.

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