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Thread: Adrien Broner - A Problem?

  1. #1
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    Adrien Broner - A Problem?

    The self-entitled CEO Adrien Broner divides much opinion amongst boxing fans. To some he is a legitimate 3 time world champion and a justifiable PVP star, walking in the footsteps of his 'big brother' Floyd Mayweather and ready to take over the reigns when Floyd retires from the sport. To others, he is a loud-mouthed and unjustifiably arrogant fighter who doesn't walk the talk he so exuberantly talks.

    The 24 year old Cincinnati native started his professional boxing career fighting at 133lb back in 2008. After only 3 years at that weight, he dropped down to 128 1/2 to fight for the WBO Super featherweight title against Eloy Perez, winning by a 4th round TKO. After failing to make weight in the first defence of his Super Featherweight world title (in which he came in at a bursting 133 1/2 lb) the belt was up for grabs only to his opponent Vicente Escobedo, who The Problem unsurprisingly dispatched by TKO in 5.

    His next fight was for the much coveted WBC Lightweight Title against Antonio Demarco. Broner was slow to start but fought his man out of the ring in the 8th. A string of TKO's in world title fights boosted the renown and acclaim of the young fighter and he was quick to build a fan base.

    After defending his title against the Welshman Gavin Rees, and only 5 years after making his pro debut, Adrien Broner was again leap frogging the weight classes and was now preparing to face off against Paulie Malignaggi for his WBA World Welterweight title. After a controversial Split Decision victory, Broner had become a 3 time world champion. A seemingly elite breed of fighter who could move up and down in weight and conquer his foes.

    His next challenge came in the rugged Argentinian banger, Marcos Maidana. In this fight, Broner made a catalogue of errors and almost failed to appear until the final throws of the bout. He was sent to the canvas in rounds 2 and 8 and left with is tail tucked between his legs before he could be interviewed.

    Broner's latest outing was in a scheduled 10 rounder against Carlos Molina at 140lb. Molina who is not a top grade fighter managed to take the fight the full distance against the 3 time world champion.

    That's the boxing background of The Problem, with his antics outside of the ring left for you guys to evaluate.

    What do you guys think of Adrien? Is he world class? Is he worthy of the belts he holds? Has he been exposed by Maidana, will he be further exposed by high calibre opponents at the top level? There's been a lot of debate on Adrien Broner in other threads... Let's get your opinions!
    Last edited by Skibbz; 06-19-2014 at 05:25 PM.

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    Re: Adrien Broner - A Problem?

    For me, the story of Adrien Broner is one of wasted potential.

    Looking exclusively at the Maidana fight, Broner barely trained, was drinking, eating crap and partying in between fight, as well as wasting his energies on pet projects like 'singing' and all sorts of other petty hobbies that he indulged with his new found (and not particularly substantial) wealth.

    That's the sort of behaviour that will earn you little sympathy in the world of boxing. It's a tough life that requires 100% dedication. You must eat sleep and breath the sport, and Broner got his comeuppance for ignoring that rule. You may live the life of success when you've made it, not before.

    Maybe if he were to dedicate himself fully from now on, he might stand a chance, but lets be honest, that's not going to happen. He's blown it if you ask me. I don't expect much from him in the future. Expect more sub par performances from a fighter who's seen his best days already.

    For what it's worth, he showed some grit and fighting spirit in the Maidana fight- he started fighting back in the later rounds, when he seemed to realise that the posturing was over and he needed to work. But it was too little too late- often the story with those unable to apply themselves consistently.

    Is he world class? No, not by a long shot. He'd get beaten into the ground by any of the light welters in Britain.
    Is he worthy of the belts he holds? Once, yes, but not any more. He's fair game now. He can't cut it against the best. He's a C+ fighter, B- on his best days. The B level fighters will further expose him, and the top fighters will destroy him.

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    Re: Adrien Broner - A Problem?

    B- I'll take greyman. That's one his best day though as you rightly say, he was once alluding to beating Floyd... Come off it!

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    Re: Adrien Broner - A Problem?

    Nice write-up, Skibbz. I actually just posted a response to you in another thread along with my two-year predictions for his career.

    Greyman, he murks any fighter coming out of the UK with shocking ease. You're not being objective in your review of him and you've got him typecast, it seems. His best days are ahead of him.

    Trust me -- he's learned his lesson. And let's not forget, he lost to Marcos Maidana by fighting an arrogant fight while acting like a complete pussycat and trying to steal a DQ W like a chump. Even then, he almost stopped him in the last round.

    He routinely puts it on big dudes. He was handling J'Leon Love at the Mayweather gym in Vegas.

    Any light welter from Britain would beat him?! This may disqualify me from placing (though it shouldn't) but I gotta say this: that's hogwash. That's complete insanity. None of those light welter bums out of Britain stands a damn chance. That's laughable.

    I can't believe you would say that. Who? The feared "Troll Killa" Curtis Woodhouse, the No. 1 ranked 140 out of Great Britain? Or perhaps the distinguished British champion Darren Hamilton?!?

    The mere thought is so preposterous I struggle to find words to express it. I'm feeling like Simon Cowell in the manner in which I want to articulate my utter disdain for the notion of Tyrone Nurse even surviving five rounds Broner or even John Molina!

    These bums wouldn't see the final bell and you know it.

    Broner is on the Bradley level. Ask Bradley himself.

    That said, you're absolutely right that boxing is something you must dedicate yourself to fully. And he's learned that the hard way. This is why he will be better in the future.

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    Re: Adrien Broner - A Problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by The Shadow View Post
    Nice write-up, Skibbz. I actually just posted a response to you in another thread along with my two-year predictions for his career.

    Greyman, he murks any fighter coming out of the UK with shocking ease. You're not being objective in your review of him and you've got him typecast, it seems. His best days are ahead of him.

    Trust me -- he's learned his lesson. And let's not forget, he lost to Marcos Maidana by fighting an arrogant fight while acting like a complete pussycat and trying to steal a DQ W like a chump. Even then, he almost stopped him in the last round.

    He routinely puts it on big dudes. He was handling J'Leon Love at the Mayweather gym in Vegas.

    Any light welter from Britain would beat him?! This may disqualify me from placing (though it shouldn't) but I gotta say this: that's hogwash. That's complete insanity. None of those light welter bums out of Britain stands a damn chance. That's laughable.

    I can't believe you would say that. Who? The feared "Troll Killa" Curtis Woodhouse, the No. 1 ranked 140 out of Great Britain? Or perhaps the distinguished British champion Darren Hamilton?!?

    The mere thought is so preposterous I struggle to find words to express it. I'm feeling like Simon Cowell in the manner in which I want to articulate my utter disdain for the notion of Tyrone Nurse even surviving five rounds Broner or even John Molina!

    These bums wouldn't see the final bell and you know it.

    Broner is on the Bradley level. Ask Bradley himself.

    That said, you're absolutely right that boxing is something you must dedicate yourself to fully. And he's learned that the hard way. This is why he will be better in the future.
    Haha, don't think I take it personally Shadow, it's nothing to me whether AB floats or sinks. I'm a fight fan and I want to see good fights.

    And yes, he may hold his own against similar weights in Britain- to call British light welters 'bums' is a little strong though. We'll likely never know.

    I don't remember Broner ever hurting Maidana either, though it's been a while since I watched the fight. Are you sure on that one? I'm certain I'd remember that...

    What makes you so sure he's learned his lessons? He still eats junk food, still drinks, and still wastes his time on pet projects. Maybe if you're Manny then you're good enough to be a part time Congressman, but if you're just scraping into the top 10's... He's proud of his flaws and it's embarrassing- he posts pictures of himself eating pizza at night on twitter. What kind of elite athlete is that?

    And the only similarity that I see between Broner and Bradley is that they both have a tendency to slap their punches. Please show me how they're similar, because I just don't see it.

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    Re: Adrien Broner - A Problem?

    Broner has talent and skills but in my opinion the jury is still out on him despite the three belts he won in separate weight classes.

    He fought a lot of carefully matched opponents. His people put him in with Ponce De Leon early in his career and Broner nearly lost (I am of the strong opinion Ponce won that fight by the way). After that fight, the opponents went down a notch. They were often smaller than Broner, couldn't punch and pressed the fight. I must say Al Haymon did a masterful job plotting his course over the last few years as many of these opponents made Broner would brilliant in the ring.

    Some opponents on that list: Jason Litzau, Vicente Rodriguez, Eloy Perez, Vicente Escobedo and Gavin Rees.

    Broner performed well against Antonio DeMarco. But then again, DeMarco fared against Broner much like he did against Edwin Valero. And that is, showed toughness but little else.

    Broner struggled against Paulie Malignaggi. Why? First, Malignaggi is very skilled despite the lack of punching power. Broner has a lot of dead spots when he fights and Malignaggi took advantage of that and controlled the dead spots. Malignaggi stood up to Broner's best and kept coming back himself which was something Broner was not used to. In the end, Broner got the nod but it was close. And we all saw what Shawn Porter later did to Malignaggi.

    And then the Maidana fight. Maidana also took advantage of Broner's weaknesses but had one thing different than other Broner foes. Maidana can punch and he hurt Broner several times. Broner became even more hesitant fearing what could come back from Maidana if he opened up.

    One other point I will make about Broner's career. Since he moved up, the power has not carried like it did when he was at the smaller weights. I think a lot of that has to do with him being so much bigger than the opponents chosen at those smaller weights. His power looked better than it actually is.

    Broner does not jab his way in. Instead he tries to walk down his opponents. That works against overmatched foes but not against better fighters particularly those that are the same size.

    He also holds his hands low often inviting his opponents to lead. Again against smaller and overmatched opponents, that works because it creates openings. But that does not work against skilled and seasoned fighters.

    Finally, Broner has way too many dead spots. He can be out hustled plain and simple and Malignaggi nearly did that in their fight. Watch Broner fight and watch how much he goes inactive. Its happens frequently.

    Broner is good but his success has more in my opinion to do with how his career has been managed to this point and less of what he has done inside and outside the ring. I don't think he is a big puncher particularly at Jr. Welterweight and Welterweight. He is going to have to take his career much more seriously and start making major adjustments if he wants to progress in his career. If he doesn't, his career may have peaked and could be on a downhill slope.

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    Re: Adrien Broner - A Problem?

    I am somewhere in the middle of the feelings of thegreyman and The Shadow. I also totally agree with oubobcat.

    Thegreyman feels Adrien Broner is a story of wasted potential.

    Wasting, perhaps, but not wasted. It's not over for him. Not by a long shot.

    Nor do I agree with Greyman's statement that Broner is "a C+ fighter, B- on his best days." I think that's totally underrating him.

    Many fans, who have immense dislike for Broner--and there are a lot of them!--tend to downgrade his ability and performances. For them, watching Marcos Maidana knock Broner on his keister (I think that's how you spell it!) delighted so many of Broner's detractors (I can't tell you I was teary-eyed when Broner got thrashed!).

    Inside word tells me Broner is still being Broner. He's only in his mid-20's. To him, life is one big party, paid for by his boxing earnings. His braintrust will pick his opponents carefully, especially with the images of Maidana laying leather all over him.

    Although he is flawed, what fighter isn't? Nor is Broner a "shot" fighter. Nor is he wasted talent. "Wasted" means thrown away, never to be retrieved. "Wasting" is more like it. If he keeps partying and living in the fast lane, he'll turn into Prince Naseem Hamed--one day he'll wake up 100 pounds over his fighting weight and realize it's over, the promise of greatness gone forever. At that point, he'll be wasted talent. To me, guys like Riddick Bowe, Tony Ayala and John Wesley Meekins were wasted talent. I'll even throw Mitch "Blood" Green and perhaps even Shannon Briggs into that mix. All guys who could have done more--so much more--with different attitudes and more dedication. Adrien Broner may one day join them on the "Wasted Talent" list. But right now, while wasting, he still is an awesome presence.

    Yes, Broner will eat up the talent pool in the U.K. Who at 140 or 147 over the pond is going to beat him? Curtis Woodhouse? Stop! Leo Zappavinga? Come on...that would be target practice for Broner. Same for Frankie Gavin. There are two U.K. guys who could probably hold their own against Broner: that's Kell Brook and Amir Khan. Both would make it interesting, but both would take the "L" against Broner.

    About one year ago, when asked by Showtime's Steve Farhood, "Where do you see yourself in five years?" Broner replied, "I see me being recognized as the greatest fighter of all time." In itself, that statement deserves a thread. Broner now has four years to go to fulfill that prediction. How's he doing?

    We will just have to watch the exploits of this once-promising and perhaps still-promising man/child, who knows not how to deal with the worldwide attention which comes from being an athletic star. There's still time for him to learn and straighten out.

    But will he? Can he? Only time will tell.

    -Randy G.

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    Re: Adrien Broner - A Problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skibbz View Post
    The self-entitled CEO Adrien Broner divides much opinion amongst boxing fans. To some he is a legitimate 3 time world champion and a justifiable PVP star, walking in the footsteps of his 'big brother' Floyd Mayweather and ready to take over the reigns when Floyd retires from the sport. To others, he is a loud-mouthed and unjustifiably arrogant fighter who doesn't walk the talk he so exuberantly talks.

    The 24 year old Cincinnati native started his professional boxing career fighting at 133lb back in 2008. After only 3 years at that weight, he dropped down to 128 1/2 to fight for the WBO Super featherweight title against Eloy Perez, winning by a 4th round TKO. After failing to make weight in the first defence of his Super Featherweight world title (in which he came in at a bursting 133 1/2 lb) the belt was up for grabs only to his opponent Vicente Escobedo, who The Problem unsurprisingly dispatched by TKO in 5.

    His next fight was for the much coveted WBC Lightweight Title against Antonio Demarco. Broner was slow to start but fought his man out of the ring in the 8th. A string of TKO's in world title fights boosted the renown and acclaim of the young fighter and he was quick to build a fan base.

    After defending his title against the Welshman Gavin Rees, and only 5 years after making his pro debut, Adrien Broner was again leap frogging the weight classes and was now preparing to face off against Paulie Malignaggi for his WBA World Welterweight title. After a controversial Split Decision victory, Broner had become a 3 time world champion. A seemingly elite breed of fighter who could move up and down in weight and conquer his foes.

    His next challenge came in the rugged Argentinian banger, Marcos Maidana. In this fight, Broner made a catalogue of errors and almost failed to appear until the final throws of the bout. He was sent to the canvas in rounds 2 and 8 and left with is tail tucked between his legs before he could be interviewed.

    Broner's latest outing was in a scheduled 10 rounder against Carlos Molina at 140lb. Molina who is not a top grade fighter managed to take the fight the full distance against the 3 time world champion.

    That's the boxing background of The Problem, with his antics outside of the ring left for you guys to evaluate.

    What do you guys think of Adrien? Is he world class? Is he worthy of the belts he holds? Has he been exposed by Maidana, will he be further exposed by high calibre opponents at the top level? There's been a lot of debate on Adrien Broner in other threads... Let's get your opinions!
    Broner is the thing you scrape off the bottom of your shoe. Remember the slug was already under contract and the victim was a granny. An apple is an apple,an orange is an orange and Broner is what he is.

    Cincinnati boxer Adrien Broner, 20, scheduled to fight next weekend, is facing a robbery charge stemming from an alleged March 9 purse snatching. According to court documents, Broner and an accomplice punched the victim in the face and stole $40 from her purse.

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    Re: Adrien Broner - A Problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by oubobcat View Post
    Broner has talent and skills but in my opinion the jury is still out on him despite the three belts he won in separate weight classes.

    He fought a lot of carefully matched opponents. His people put him in with Ponce De Leon early in his career and Broner nearly lost (I am of the strong opinion Ponce won that fight by the way). After that fight, the opponents went down a notch. They were often smaller than Broner, couldn't punch and pressed the fight. I must say Al Haymon did a masterful job plotting his course over the last few years as many of these opponents made Broner would brilliant in the ring.

    Some opponents on that list: Jason Litzau, Vicente Rodriguez, Eloy Perez, Vicente Escobedo and Gavin Rees.

    Broner performed well against Antonio DeMarco. But then again, DeMarco fared against Broner much like he did against Edwin Valero. And that is, showed toughness but little else.

    Broner struggled against Paulie Malignaggi. Why? First, Malignaggi is very skilled despite the lack of punching power. Broner has a lot of dead spots when he fights and Malignaggi took advantage of that and controlled the dead spots. Malignaggi stood up to Broner's best and kept coming back himself which was something Broner was not used to. In the end, Broner got the nod but it was close. And we all saw what Shawn Porter later did to Malignaggi.

    And then the Maidana fight. Maidana also took advantage of Broner's weaknesses but had one thing different than other Broner foes. Maidana can punch and he hurt Broner several times. Broner became even more hesitant fearing what could come back from Maidana if he opened up.

    One other point I will make about Broner's career. Since he moved up, the power has not carried like it did when he was at the smaller weights. I think a lot of that has to do with him being so much bigger than the opponents chosen at those smaller weights. His power looked better than it actually is.

    Broner does not jab his way in. Instead he tries to walk down his opponents. That works against overmatched foes but not against better fighters particularly those that are the same size.

    He also holds his hands low often inviting his opponents to lead. Again against smaller and overmatched opponents, that works because it creates openings. But that does not work against skilled and seasoned fighters.

    Finally, Broner has way too many dead spots. He can be out hustled plain and simple and Malignaggi nearly did that in their fight. Watch Broner fight and watch how much he goes inactive. Its happens frequently.

    Broner is good but his success has more in my opinion to do with how his career has been managed to this point and less of what he has done inside and outside the ring. I don't think he is a big puncher particularly at Jr. Welterweight and Welterweight. He is going to have to take his career much more seriously and start making major adjustments if he wants to progress in his career. If he doesn't, his career may have peaked and could be on a downhill slope.

    Very well reasoned judgement Oubob, liked it.

    Broner has indeed been masterfully managed my Al Haymon, but I think he's hustled his way as far as he can now- sooner or later you have to put some solid work in and beat some real names if you want to be one of the best.

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    Re: Adrien Broner - A Problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by The Commish View Post
    I am somewhere in the middle of the feelings of thegreyman and The Shadow. I also totally agree with oubobcat.

    Thegreyman feels Adrien Broner is a story of wasted potential.

    Wasting, perhaps, but not wasted. It's not over for him. Not by a long shot.

    Nor do I agree with Greyman's statement that Broner is "a C+ fighter, B- on his best days." I think that's totally underrating him.

    Many fans, who have immense dislike for Broner--and there are a lot of them!--tend to downgrade his ability and performances. For them, watching Marcos Maidana knock Broner on his keister (I think that's how you spell it!) delighted so many of Broner's detractors (I can't tell you I was teary-eyed when Broner got thrashed!).

    Inside word tells me Broner is still being Broner. He's only in his mid-20's. To him, life is one big party, paid for by his boxing earnings. His braintrust will pick his opponents carefully, especially with the images of Maidana laying leather all over him.

    Although he is flawed, what fighter isn't? Nor is Broner a "shot" fighter. Nor is he wasted talent. "Wasted" means thrown away, never to be retrieved. "Wasting" is more like it. If he keeps partying and living in the fast lane, he'll turn into Prince Naseem Hamed--one day he'll wake up 100 pounds over his fighting weight and realize it's over, the promise of greatness gone forever. At that point, he'll be wasted talent. To me, guys like Riddick Bowe, Tony Ayala and John Wesley Meekins were wasted talent. I'll even throw Mitch "Blood" Green and perhaps even Shannon Briggs into that mix. All guys who could have done more--so much more--with different attitudes and more dedication. Adrien Broner may one day join them on the "Wasted Talent" list. But right now, while wasting, he still is an awesome presence.

    Yes, Broner will eat up the talent pool in the U.K. Who at 140 or 147 over the pond is going to beat him? Curtis Woodhouse? Stop! Leo Zappavinga? Come on...that would be target practice for Broner. Same for Frankie Gavin. There are two U.K. guys who could probably hold their own against Broner: that's Kell Brook and Amir Khan. Both would make it interesting, but both would take the "L" against Broner.

    About one year ago, when asked by Showtime's Steve Farhood, "Where do you see yourself in five years?" Broner replied, "I see me being recognized as the greatest fighter of all time." In itself, that statement deserves a thread. Broner now has four years to go to fulfill that prediction. How's he doing?

    We will just have to watch the exploits of this once-promising and perhaps still-promising man/child, who knows not how to deal with the worldwide attention which comes from being an athletic star. There's still time for him to learn and straighten out.

    But will he? Can he? Only time will tell.

    -Randy G.
    I'm riding the Commish's yacht on this one. The pugilistic seas are too stormy for my dragon canoe.

    Only time will tell if Bonehead -- I mean Broner -- keep hopping down the long trail of wasted talent. This Ohio cat really needs to switch shrinks. The one he has is not getting through to him.

    Maybe tsAH needs to intervene a bit more, or all is lost. Broner has issues. And those suppose-to-be protectors of him are failing. Instead of combing his son's hair, B-Pops needs to sweep away the human trash around his boy. Holla!

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