Three Punch Combo: Thoughts on Garcia vs. Broner, Brandon Rios, and More

THREE PUNCH COMBO: This week it was announced that Adrien Broner would face Mikey Garcia (pictured following his smashing knockout of Dejan Zlaticanin) in late July in what is a significant fight for both men. The match-up has raised a lot of eyebrows in the boxing community as Garcia is not the type of opponent that Broner has typically faced. Could it be that for a variety of reasons Broner is being cashed out by his longtime advisor Al Haymon to help build the budding career of a potential star in Garcia?

In his current three fight winning streak, Broner opposed Khabib Allakhverdiev, Ashley Theophane and Adrian Granados. All three are solid fighters but all had weaknesses that were easily exploited by Broner. They were slower than Broner and not big punchers so Broner could work when he wanted without fear of what would come back from these fighters. Broner has built his persona throughout his career on these types of carefully selected opponents.

Broner has also run into trouble with the law and has been doing so on a more frequent basis of late. This has to be very concerning to those around him. Al Haymon has been credited with carefully building Broner, but Haymon is a businessman and may sense the time is ripe to cash out Broner to build the career of another. Mikey Garcia is just that type of fighter that needs a big name on his resume to bolster his own future in the sport.

Garcia is the type of opponent that Broner and his team have avoided throughout his career. Garcia is a skilled fighter with a deep boxing background and knows how to fight. He is a very sharp puncher with fast hands and one punch power. Garcia is the type of fighter that can easily expose Broner’s many flaws. Broner, for example, often carries his hands low daring his opponents to lead. He can get away with this tactic facing slower opponents or opponents who are not big punchers. Garcia will not be afraid to take the lead with an opponent who has his hands at his hips and find that to be easy target practice. Broner also typically fights in spurts and when he is done fighting in a spurt often admires his work by posing in front of his opponents. If he does this against Garcia, Broner will get countered with hard power shots.

Of all the possible opponents on the radar for Adrien Broner, Mikey Garcia would have probably been the least likely to get the call to face him. But Broner’s act may have finally grown old with Haymon. This appears to be a classic case of one fighter being cashed out to build the career of another.

The Return of Brandon Rios

After nearly a two year absence from the ring, Brandon Rios returns next Sunday to face veteran Aaron Herrera. The fight will headline a PBC on FS1 show and a win by Rios could put him in line for one of the many welterweights under the PBC banner by year’s end.

When we last saw Rios in the ring in November of 2015, he was dominated and stopped by Timothy Bradley. It was a performance that Rios would certainly like to forget and one in which he frankly looked like a shopworn fighter. His decision to retire after that bout seemed like a wise one as he had been involved in his share of wars, but after some time away the itch to give the sport another try was too much to resist.

Herrera is the perfect opponent for Rios in this comeback bid. Herrera is a tough aggressive fighter but very limited. He will be right in front of Rios and there will not be any issues with Rios finding him. Herrera has a somewhat questionable chin too, having been stopped on three occasions. This is the type of opponent that Rios can look somewhat decent against to build momentum toward fighting a name at welterweight later this year.

And who could that name be? Well, as stated above, this fight with Herrera is being fought under the PBC banner. PBC has a lot of welterweights and many are looking for fights at the moment. But one name stands out from the rest of potential opponents. That name is Victor Ortiz. Rios and Ortiz were rumored to be close to agreeing to terms earlier this year and the fight seems a natural. Both are at the point in their respective careers where they now need each other. The fight would draw a lot of interest. This couldn’t be anything but a war with the winner moving on to something bigger at welterweight or possibly even a rematch.

If Ortiz is not interested in restarting his career, another name to watch for Rios is Lamont Peterson. I wrote last week that Peterson will certainly be in play as an opponent for Errol Spence. But if a Spence fight does not happen for Peterson, a bout with Rios makes sense. It was Rios that handed Lamont’s brother Anthony his first professional loss in 2010. So there is a revenge factor in the equation. Plus, it’s a low risk crossroads fight for Peterson in that he’d be heavily favored, would be making a decent paycheck, and a win would make him more marketable down the road. As for Rios, Peterson would be a less risky fight than say someone like Shawn Porter or Danny Garcia.

Brandon Rios is returning to the ring this week and a decent performance should set him up for a more significant fight down the road. With the many names available at welterweight, the temptation to come back and get a big fight was too much to keep Rios retired.

Remembering a Forgotten Ali Fight

With the first anniversary of Muhammad Ali’s death upon us, there have been a lot of remembrances about Ali’s life and times. With such an extensive career, there have been some fights of his that have gone forgotten during the course of time. One such fight took place on February 20th, 1976, when Ali made his lone ring appearance in Puerto Rico to defend his heavyweight title against Jean-Pierre Coopman.

Four months earlier, Ali defeated Joe Frazier in “The Thrilla in Manila.” Following the Frazier fight, Ali was hoping to maximize the earning potential of what remained of his career. Entering 1976, he had an ambitious schedule set out to fight every couple months and make as much money as possible. Coming off the brutal war with Frazier and with a busy schedule planned ahead, his team was looking for what they hoped would be an easy touch to start things off.

Enter Jean-Pierre Coopman. A heavyweight from Belgium, Coopman was molded in a similar manner to that of an earlier Ali opponent in Chuck Wepner. Coopman had a 24-3 record and entered the Ali fight on an 11-fight winning streak. But he had few recognizable names on his resume with almost all his fights having taken place in Belgium and some questionable losses including one by knockout to a fighter with a 5-17-1 record.

CBS purchased the rights and showed the fight live in primetime in the United States. Tickets were pricey but sales went very well with a crowd of around 10,000. All of this despite the fact that the fight was widely viewed as an absurd mismatch.

The opening round showed the wide difference in class between Ali and Coopman. Coopman was aggressive, constantly coming forward, but Ali, using ring movement, showed his class working behind the jab and popping off fast combinations to the head. The challenger held his left hand low and Ali snuck in a few quick straight right hands as well. When Coopman did try to punch, it was one at a time, often missing, or if the shot did get somewhat through it was mostly picked off by Ali. The difference in speed and skill was very evident.

The second followed a similar pattern as the first. About halfway through the round, Ali really opened up, firing off a barrage of punches, one after the other, in the middle of the ring. Coopman’s face was turning beet red and his left eye was damaged as the round came to an end.

It was more the same in the third and fourth rounds. Round five began with Ali using his legs much more, dancing around the ring as Coopman continued to pursue. Towards the end of the round, Ali opened up, landing a combination of punches that showcased his blindingly fast hands. Coopman appeared stunned from the volley which Ali finished off with a short right uppercut that landed flush. Coopman was hurt by the punch and fell towards Ali who gave Coopman a little shove before he collapsed to the canvas. Grasping his left eye while down, Coopman was unable to beat the count, leaving Ali the knockout winner.

Following the Coopman fight, Ali would continue with the plan to fight often in 1976. Two months later, he would decision Jimmy Young in Maryland in a much tougher fight than anticipated and then return to the ring less than a month later to stop Richard Dunn in Germany. Four months later, Ali would earn a much bigger paycheck than his earlier bouts in 1976 in his rubber match against Ken Norton. Ali would of course escape the Norton fight with a controversial decision.

Coopman would return to fighting mostly in Belgium following the Ali fight. In 1977, Coopman reached the high mark of his career winning the European heavyweight title but would lose it in his first defense later that year.

Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel.

potential star

COMMENTS

-Radam G :

A great and entertaining piece.! Especially about Pops Butterfly. The presence of the GOAT is still overwhelming. Holla!


-Kid Blast :

"This appears to be a classic case of one fighter being cashed out to build the career of another" Indeed


-Kid Blast :

"This appears to be a classic case of one fighter being cashed out to build the career of another" Indeed


-oubobcat :

Yeah when analyzing this fight and breaking down the strengths and weaknesses of both it is difficult to envision any scenario in which Broner wins. Garcia is quick handed and such a sharp puncher that he is bound to expose the defensive flaws that Broner has had throughout his entire career. If I were moving Broner, I'd put him in with anyone but Garcia or Crawford at 140 and avoid the heck out of those two. But something tells me Mr. Haymon sees a star in Garcia to add next to the star of Spence and needs Broner's name to build Garcia's reputation. Funny thing watching Ali-Coopman. After round two, Don Dunphy stated "So far I don't think he's (Coopman) hit Ali." I went back again and watched the first two rounds. Dunphy was spot on.


-oubobcat :

Yeah when analyzing this fight and breaking down the strengths and weaknesses of both it is difficult to envision any scenario in which Broner wins. Garcia is quick handed and such a sharp puncher that he is bound to expose the defensive flaws that Broner has had throughout his entire career. If I were moving Broner, I'd put him in with anyone but Garcia or Crawford at 140 and avoid the heck out of those two. But something tells me Mr. Haymon sees a star in Garcia to add next to the star of Spence and needs Broner's name to build Garcia's reputation. Funny thing watching Ali-Coopman. After round two, Don Dunphy stated "So far I don't think he's (Coopman) hit Ali." I went back again and watched the first two rounds. Dunphy was spot on.


-Radam G :

Yeah when analyzing this fight and breaking down the strengths and weaknesses of both it is difficult to envision any scenario in which Broner wins. Garcia is quick handed and such a sharp puncher that he is bound to expose the defensive flaws that Broner has had throughout his entire career. If I were moving Broner, I'd put him in with anyone but Garcia or Crawford at 140 and avoid the heck out of those two. But something tells me Mr. Haymon sees a star in Garcia to add next to the star of Spence and needs Broner's name to build Garcia's reputation. Funny thing watching Ali-Coopman. After round two, Don Dunphy stated "So far I don't think he's (Coopman) hit Ali." I went back again and watched the first two rounds. Dunphy was spot on.
As hit less as Pops Butterfly was, there is a jive book out fibbing about how often he was hit. GTFOH! The GOAT was poisoned by a black Muslim quack who gave him a load of thyroid pills with all type of syet in them. YUP! I calling out a conspiracy perpetrated on Pops Buterfly by the U.S. Govt and double agents of the Nation of Islam. Nuff said! Holla!


-Radam G :

Yeah when analyzing this fight and breaking down the strengths and weaknesses of both it is difficult to envision any scenario in which Broner wins. Garcia is quick handed and such a sharp puncher that he is bound to expose the defensive flaws that Broner has had throughout his entire career. If I were moving Broner, I'd put him in with anyone but Garcia or Crawford at 140 and avoid the heck out of those two. But something tells me Mr. Haymon sees a star in Garcia to add next to the star of Spence and needs Broner's name to build Garcia's reputation. Funny thing watching Ali-Coopman. After round two, Don Dunphy stated "So far I don't think he's (Coopman) hit Ali." I went back again and watched the first two rounds. Dunphy was spot on.
As hit less as Pops Butterfly was, there is a jive book out fibbing about how often he was hit. GTFOH! The GOAT was poisoned by a black Muslim quack who gave him a load of thyroid pills with all type of syet in them. YUP! I calling out a conspiracy perpetrated on Pops Buterfly by the U.S. Govt and double agents of the Nation of Islam. Nuff said! Holla!


-brownsugar :

Tale of the tape. Garcia has a 70" reach vs Broner's 69.5" reach. To put that into perspective Floyd has a 72" reach while Canelo Alvarez posses a 70.5" reach. Garcia is 5',7" Broner is 5',6" in height. But despite the numbers Broner is a natural full weight class (of raw muscle) heavier than Garcia. He struggled to make 143.5lbs in his 2015 catchweight bout against Porter. Porter made 144lbs with ease while Broner's weight was in doubt until he finally hit the scales. Against Granados recently Broner made 146.5lbs during their competitive welterweight clash. Mikey last fought at lightweight. Mikey Garcia looks smooth without much definition but just beneath the surface Mikey is literally rippling with pure muscle. Broner who is much more defined visually is equally powerful (if not more so). Since Broner's XIII personal episode outside of the ring which may have involed police intervention, embarassing social media videos, strippers, alchohol, an altercation, and possibly all of the above **** Broner has again announced he's had a "Come to Jesus" style awakening where he claims to have had yet another epiphany regarding his turbulent boxing career and vows to avoid all distractions, and move his training camp to a calmer, more isolated surrounding while he dedicates himself like a Shoalin Monk during his preparation for Garcia. I usually go with the bigger guy if both fighters have similar physical attributes and their skill levels are close. But I'll have to wait and see where Broner's head is at halfway through training camp to make an educated guess. For the present, Mikey has to be the prohibitive favorite based on his history.


-larueboenig :

By Matt Andrzejewski THREE PUNCH COMBO: This week it was announced that Adrien Broner would face Mikey Garcia (pictured following his smashing knockout of Dejan Zlaticanin) in late July in what is a significant fight for both men. The match-up has raised a lot of eyebrows in the boxing community as Garcia is not the type of opponent that Broner has typically faced. Could it be that for a variety of reasons Broner is being cashed out by his longtime advisor Al Haymon to help build the budding career of a potential star in Garcia? In his current three fight winning streak, Broner opposed Khabib Allakhverdiev, Ashley Theophane and Adrian Granados. All three are solid fighters but all had weaknesses that were easily exploited by Broner. They were slower than Broner and not big punchers so Broner could work when he wanted without fear of what would come back from these fighters. Broner has built his persona throughout his career on these types of carefully selected opponents. Broner has also run into trouble with the law and has been doing so on a more frequent basis of late. This has to be very concerning to those around him. Al Haymon has been credited with carefully building Broner, but Haymon is a businessman and may sense the time is ripe to cash out Broner to build the career of another. Mikey Garcia is just that type of fighter that needs a big name on his resume to bolster his own future in the sport. Garcia is the type of opponent that Broner and his team have avoided throughout his career. Garcia is a skilled fighter with a deep boxing background and knows how to fight. He is a very sharp puncher with fast hands and one punch power. Garcia is the type of fighter that can easily expose Broner’s many flaws. Broner, for example, often carries his hands low daring his opponents to lead. He can get away with this tactic facing slower opponents or opponents who are not big punchers. Garcia will not be afraid to take the lead with an opponent who has his hands at his hips and find that to be easy target practice. Broner also typically fights in spurts and when he is done fighting in a spurt often admires his work by posing in front of his opponents. If he does this against Garcia, Broner will get countered with hard power shots. Of all the possible opponents on the radar for Adrien Broner, Mikey Garcia would have probably been the least likely to get the call to face him. But Broner’s act may have finally grown old with Haymon. This appears to be a classic case of one fighter being cashed out to build the career of another. The Return of Brandon Rios After nearly a two year absence from the ring, Brandon Rios returns next Sunday to face veteran Aaron Herrera. The fight will headline a PBC on FS1 show and a win by Rios could put him in line for one of the many welterweights under the PBC banner by year’s end. When we last saw Rios in the ring in November of 2015, he was dominated and stopped by Timothy Bradley. It was a performance that Rios would certainly like to forget and one in which he frankly looked like a shopworn fighter. His decision to retire after that bout seemed like a wise one as he had been involved in his share of wars, but after some time away the itch to give the sport another try was too much to resist. Herrera is the perfect opponent for Rios in this comeback bid. Herrera is a tough aggressive fighter but very limited. He will be right in front of Rios and there will not be any issues with Rios finding him. Herrera has a somewhat questionable chin too, having been stopped on three occasions. This is the type of opponent that Rios can look somewhat decent against to build momentum toward fighting a name at welterweight later this year. And who could that name be? Well, as stated above, this fight with Herrera is being fought under the PBC banner. PBC has a lot of welterweights and many are looking for fights at the moment. But one name stands out from the rest of potential opponents. That name is Victor Ortiz. Rios and Ortiz were rumored to be close to agreeing to terms earlier this year and the fight seems a natural. Both are at the point in their respective careers where they now need each other. The fight would draw a lot of interest. This couldn’t be anything but a war with the winner moving on to something bigger at welterweight or possibly even a rematch. If Ortiz is not interested in restarting his career, another name to watch for Rios is Lamont Peterson. I wrote last week that Peterson will certainly be in play as an opponent for Errol Spence. But if a Spence fight does not happen for Peterson, a bout with Rios makes sense. It was Rios that handed Lamont’s brother Anthony his first professional loss in 2010. So there is a revenge factor in the equation. Plus, it’s a low risk crossroads fight for Peterson in that he’d be heavily favored, would be making a decent paycheck, and a win would make him more marketable down the road. As for Rios, Peterson would be a less risky fight than say someone like Shawn Porter or Danny Garcia. Brandon Rios is returning to the ring this week and a decent performance should set him up for a more significant fight down the road. With the many names available at welterweight, the temptation to come back and get a big fight was too much to keep Rios retired. Remembering a Forgotten Ali Fight With the first anniversary of Muhammad Ali’s death upon us, there have been a lot of remembrances about Ali’s life and times. With such an extensive career, there have been some fights of his that have gone forgotten during the course of time. One such fight took place on February 20th, 1976, when Ali made his lone ring appearance in Puerto Rico to defend his heavyweight title against Jean-Pierre Coopman. Four months earlier, Ali defeated Joe Frazier in “The Thrilla in Manila.” Following the Frazier fight, Ali was hoping to maximize the earning potential of what remained of his career. Entering 1976, he had an ambitious schedule set out to fight every couple months and make as much money as possible. Coming off the brutal war with Frazier and with a busy schedule planned ahead, his team was looking for what they hoped would be an easy touch to start things off. Enter Jean-Pierre Coopman. A heavyweight from Belgium, Coopman was molded in a similar manner to that of an earlier Ali opponent in Chuck Wepner. Coopman had a 24-3 record and entered the Ali fight on an 11-fight winning streak. But he had few recognizable names on his resume with almost all his fights having taken place in Belgium and some questionable losses including one by knockout to a fighter with a 5-17-1 record. CBS purchased the rights and showed the fight live in primetime in the United States. Tickets were pricey but sales went very well with a crowd of around 10,000. All of this despite the fact that the fight was widely viewed as an absurd mismatch. The opening round showed the wide difference in class between Ali and Coopman. Coopman was aggressive, constantly coming forward, but Ali, using ring movement, showed his class working behind the jab and popping off fast combinations to the head. The challenger held his left hand low and Ali snuck in a few quick straight right hands as well. When Coopman did try to punch, it was one at a time, often missing, or if the shot did get somewhat through it was mostly picked off by Ali. The difference in speed and skill was very evident. The second followed a similar pattern as the first. About halfway through the round, Ali really opened up, firing off a barrage of punches, one after the other, in the middle of the ring. Coopman’s face was turning beet red and his left eye was damaged as the round came to an end. It was more the same in the third and fourth rounds. Round five began with Ali using his legs much more, dancing around the ring as Coopman continued to pursue. Towards the end of the round, Ali opened up, landing a combination of punches that showcased his blindingly fast hands. Coopman appeared stunned from the volley which Ali finished off with a short right uppercut that landed flush. Coopman was hurt by the punch and fell towards Ali who gave Coopman a little shove before he collapsed to the canvas. Grasping his left eye while down, Coopman was unable to beat the count, leaving Ali the knockout winner. Following the Coopman fight, Ali would continue with the plan to fight often in 1976. Two months later, he would decision Jimmy Young in Maryland in a much tougher fight than anticipated and then return to the ring less than a month later to stop Richard Dunn in Germany. Four months later, Ali would earn a much bigger paycheck than his earlier bouts in 1976 in his rubber match against Ken Norton. Ali would of course escape the Norton fight with a controversial decision. Coopman would return to fighting mostly in Belgium following the Ali fight. In 1977, Coopman reached the high mark of his career winning the European heavyweight title but would lose it in his first defense later that year. Check out more boxing news on video at [url=http://theboxingchannel.tv]The Boxing Channel.
Garcia is more fundamentally sound, more powerful, smarter, and excels in every category. Broner gets KO’d early and with one punch.


-larueboenig :

By Matt Andrzejewski THREE PUNCH COMBO: This week it was announced that Adrien Broner would face Mikey Garcia (pictured following his smashing knockout of Dejan Zlaticanin) in late July in what is a significant fight for both men. The match-up has raised a lot of eyebrows in the boxing community as Garcia is not the type of opponent that Broner has typically faced. Could it be that for a variety of reasons Broner is being cashed out by his longtime advisor Al Haymon to help build the budding career of a potential star in Garcia? In his current three fight winning streak, Broner opposed Khabib Allakhverdiev, Ashley Theophane and Adrian Granados. All three are solid fighters but all had weaknesses that were easily exploited by Broner. They were slower than Broner and not big punchers so Broner could work when he wanted without fear of what would come back from these fighters. Broner has built his persona throughout his career on these types of carefully selected opponents. Broner has also run into trouble with the law and has been doing so on a more frequent basis of late. This has to be very concerning to those around him. Al Haymon has been credited with carefully building Broner, but Haymon is a businessman and may sense the time is ripe to cash out Broner to build the career of another. Mikey Garcia is just that type of fighter that needs a big name on his resume to bolster his own future in the sport. Garcia is the type of opponent that Broner and his team have avoided throughout his career. Garcia is a skilled fighter with a deep boxing background and knows how to fight. He is a very sharp puncher with fast hands and one punch power. Garcia is the type of fighter that can easily expose Broner?s many flaws. Broner, for example, often carries his hands low daring his opponents to lead. He can get away with this tactic facing slower opponents or opponents who are not big punchers. Garcia will not be afraid to take the lead with an opponent who has his hands at his hips and find that to be easy target practice. Broner also typically fights in spurts and when he is done fighting in a spurt often admires his work by posing in front of his opponents. If he does this against Garcia, Broner will get countered with hard power shots. Of all the possible opponents on the radar for Adrien Broner, Mikey Garcia would have probably been the least likely to get the call to face him. But Broner?s act may have finally grown old with Haymon. This appears to be a classic case of one fighter being cashed out to build the career of another. The Return of Brandon Rios After nearly a two year absence from the ring, Brandon Rios returns next Sunday to face veteran Aaron Herrera. The fight will headline a PBC on FS1 show and a win by Rios could put him in line for one of the many welterweights under the PBC banner by year?s end. When we last saw Rios in the ring in November of 2015, he was dominated and stopped by Timothy Bradley. It was a performance that Rios would certainly like to forget and one in which he frankly looked like a shopworn fighter. His decision to retire after that bout seemed like a wise one as he had been involved in his share of wars, but after some time away the itch to give the sport another try was too much to resist. Herrera is the perfect opponent for Rios in this comeback bid. Herrera is a tough aggressive fighter but very limited. He will be right in front of Rios and there will not be any issues with Rios finding him. Herrera has a somewhat questionable chin too, having been stopped on three occasions. This is the type of opponent that Rios can look somewhat decent against to build momentum toward fighting a name at welterweight later this year. And who could that name be? Well, as stated above, this fight with Herrera is being fought under the PBC banner. PBC has a lot of welterweights and many are looking for fights at the moment. But one name stands out from the rest of potential opponents. That name is Victor Ortiz. Rios and Ortiz were rumored to be close to agreeing to terms earlier this year and the fight seems a natural. Both are at the point in their respective careers where they now need each other. The fight would draw a lot of interest. This couldn?t be anything but a war with the winner moving on to something bigger at welterweight or possibly even a rematch. If Ortiz is not interested in restarting his career, another name to watch for Rios is Lamont Peterson. I wrote last week that Peterson will certainly be in play as an opponent for Errol Spence. But if a Spence fight does not happen for Peterson, a bout with Rios makes sense. It was Rios that handed Lamont?s brother Anthony his first professional loss in 2010. So there is a revenge factor in the equation. Plus, it?s a low risk crossroads fight for Peterson in that he?d be heavily favored, would be making a decent paycheck, and a win would make him more marketable down the road. As for Rios, Peterson would be a less risky fight than say someone like Shawn Porter or Danny Garcia. Brandon Rios is returning to the ring this week and a decent performance should set him up for a more significant fight down the road. With the many names available at welterweight, the temptation to come back and get a big fight was too much to keep Rios retired. Remembering a Forgotten Ali Fight With the first anniversary of Muhammad Ali?s death upon us, there have been a lot of remembrances about Ali?s life and times. With such an extensive career, there have been some fights of his that have gone forgotten during the course of time. One such fight took place on February 20th, 1976, when Ali made his lone ring appearance in Puerto Rico to defend his heavyweight title against Jean-Pierre Coopman. Four months earlier, Ali defeated Joe Frazier in ?The Thrilla in Manila.? Following the Frazier fight, Ali was hoping to maximize the earning potential of what remained of his career. Entering 1976, he had an ambitious schedule set out to fight every couple months and make as much money as possible. Coming off the brutal war with Frazier and with a busy schedule planned ahead, his team was looking for what they hoped would be an easy touch to start things off. Enter Jean-Pierre Coopman. A heavyweight from Belgium, Coopman was molded in a similar manner to that of an earlier Ali opponent in Chuck Wepner. Coopman had a 24-3 record and entered the Ali fight on an 11-fight winning streak. But he had few recognizable names on his resume with almost all his fights having taken place in Belgium and some questionable losses including one by knockout to a fighter with a 5-17-1 record. CBS purchased the rights and showed the fight live in primetime in the United States. Tickets were pricey but sales went very well with a crowd of around 10,000. All of this despite the fact that the fight was widely viewed as an absurd mismatch. The opening round showed the wide difference in class between Ali and Coopman. Coopman was aggressive, constantly coming forward, but Ali, using ring movement, showed his class working behind the jab and popping off fast combinations to the head. The challenger held his left hand low and Ali snuck in a few quick straight right hands as well. When Coopman did try to punch, it was one at a time, often missing, or if the shot did get somewhat through it was mostly picked off by Ali. The difference in speed and skill was very evident. The second followed a similar pattern as the first. About halfway through the round, Ali really opened up, firing off a barrage of punches, one after the other, in the middle of the ring. Coopman?s face was turning beet red and his left eye was damaged as the round came to an end. It was more the same in the third and fourth rounds. Round five began with Ali using his legs much more, dancing around the ring as Coopman continued to pursue. Towards the end of the round, Ali opened up, landing a combination of punches that showcased his blindingly fast hands. Coopman appeared stunned from the volley which Ali finished off with a short right uppercut that landed flush. Coopman was hurt by the punch and fell towards Ali who gave Coopman a little shove before he collapsed to the canvas. Grasping his left eye while down, Coopman was unable to beat the count, leaving Ali the knockout winner. Following the Coopman fight, Ali would continue with the plan to fight often in 1976. Two months later, he would decision Jimmy Young in Maryland in a much tougher fight than anticipated and then return to the ring less than a month later to stop Richard Dunn in Germany. Four months later, Ali would earn a much bigger paycheck than his earlier bouts in 1976 in his rubber match against Ken Norton. Ali would of course escape the Norton fight with a controversial decision. Coopman would return to fighting mostly in Belgium following the Ali fight. In 1977, Coopman reached the high mark of his career winning the European heavyweight title but would lose it in his first defense later that year. Check out more boxing news on video at [url=http://theboxingchannel.tv]The Boxing Channel.
Garcia is more fundamentally sound, more powerful, smarter, and excels in every category. Broner gets KO?d early and with one punch.


-larueboenig :

Garcia is more fundamentally sound, more powerful, smarter, and excels in every category. Broner gets KO’d early and with one punch.


-larueboenig :

Garcia is more fundamentally sound, more powerful, smarter, and excels in every category. Broner gets KO?d early and with one punch.


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

If Broner doesn't significantly drain himself, a lot of you are going to eat crow. You shouldn't sleep on Broner, he is the naturally bigger (not by much) fighter in regards to stature and is athletically faster than Mikey (hand and foot speed). Mikey has great timing and power, but it is going to be a very competitive fight, trust me. The key to the fight for me is can Broner safely make 140. If he can, Mikey is in trouble. Maidana called Mikey and warned him that Broner is very strong. Broner hasn't ever been stopped, so even if he loses I will almost guarantee that it won't be by KO/TKO. To be fair, this should be viewed as a 50/50 fight. However, if I could predict that AB would be on his "A" game, I would slightly favor him.


-brownsugar :

I think the whole concept of the fight is a stretch. Mikey's moving up from 135, Broner can barely make 147. The conditions are very favorable for Garcia. Broner could be competitive at 144, or 145 perhaps, but 140 is suicide against an assassin like Garcia. Mikey said he would face Thurman at 147. If this wasnt an exaggeration then Mikey should allow Broner an even playing field at 144. I'm not putting the blame for this mismatch on Garcia, because Broner concocted this farce, however the terms are not in his favor. If its only money he wants Broner will succeed. However Broner cannot achieve victory at the specified weight. McGregor vs Mayweather may be more competitive.


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

I think the whole concept of the fight is a stretch. Mikey's moving up from 135, Broner can barely make 147. The conditions are very favorable for Garcia. Broner could be competitive at 144, or 145 perhaps, but 140 is suicide against an assassin like Garcia. Mikey said he would face Thurman at 147. If this wasnt an exaggeration then Mikey should allow Broner an even playing field at 144. I'm not putting the blame for this mismatch on Garcia, because Broner concocted this farce, however the terms are not in his favor. If its only money he wants Broner will succeed. However Broner cannot achieve victory at the specified weight. McGregor vs Mayweather may be more competitive.
Really lol, McGregor vs. Mayweather might be more productive. OG Brownsugar, you know better than that! The last time Broner almost made 140 was when he fought Ashley Theopane, which was two fights ago I believe. He was less than a pound off target during the weigh in but chose not to sweat it off. However, he could have made weight if he wanted to, he only had to lose .8 of a pound. My point is that Broner can make the weight if he is focused and has a dietician in his camp. No joking, he should have hired Algieri. If Broner can make the weight Mikey is in for the fight of his life. He hasn't ever fought someone stylistically similar to Broner, look at his Resume. Mikey is use to feasting off of come straight forward fighters with no slickness. In Broner, he is going to be facing a different animal. Also, the fighters that give Broner the most trouble are pressure fighters, ie, Maidana and Porter. Garcia is a boxer-puncher and if he doesn't fight in a pressure style for this fight, I don't if he can "out box" Broner. I don?t think Mikey can out box Broner. If Broner fights in the same manner stylistically (sick and move) as he did against John Molina, he wins a competitive decision if he lost the weight properly. If Broner misses weight and Mikey still chooses to fight outside of the contracted weight, Broner's odds of winning also significantly improve if this scenario occurs. Let's wait and see. I have a feeling you might be eating crow. Don't be suprised lol!


-Radam G :

If Broner doesn't significantly drain himself, a lot of you are going to eat crow. You shouldn't sleep on Broner, he is the naturally bigger (not by much) fighter in regards to stature and is athletically faster than Mikey (hand and foot speed). Mikey has great timing and power, but it is going to be a very competitive fight, trust me. The key to the fight for me is can Broner safely make 140. If he can, Mikey is in trouble. Maidana called Mikey and warned him that Broner is very strong. Broner hasn't ever been stopped, so even if he loses I will almost guarantee that it won't be by KO/TKO. To be fair, this should be viewed as a 50/50 fight. However, if I could predict that AB would be on his "A" game, I would slightly favor him.
Hehehe! Not this time, my friend! I ain't eating any crow. Broner is going to get destroyed. TsAH is cashing out on him. He is tired of the boneheaded shenanigans of Broner. And even if he were not, Broner is no match for the likes of Mikey G. Broner is an A pug. Mikey is an elite among the elites, which there is but a hand full. Holla!


-Radam G :

If Broner doesn't significantly drain himself, a lot of you are going to eat crow. You shouldn't sleep on Broner, he is the naturally bigger (not by much) fighter in regards to stature and is athletically faster than Mikey (hand and foot speed). Mikey has great timing and power, but it is going to be a very competitive fight, trust me. The key to the fight for me is can Broner safely make 140. If he can, Mikey is in trouble. Maidana called Mikey and warned him that Broner is very strong. Broner hasn't ever been stopped, so even if he loses I will almost guarantee that it won't be by KO/TKO. To be fair, this should be viewed as a 50/50 fight. However, if I could predict that AB would be on his "A" game, I would slightly favor him.
Hehehe! Not this time, my friend! I ain't eating any crow. Broner is going to get destroyed. TsAH is cashing out on him. He is tired of the boneheaded shenanigans of Broner. And even if he were not, Broner is no match for the likes of Mikey G. Broner is an A pug. Mikey is an elite among the elites, which there is but a hand full. Holla!


-amayseng :

Hehehe! Not this time, my friend! I ain't eating any crow. Broner is going to get destroyed. TsAH is cashing out on him. He is tired of the boneheaded shenanigans of Broner. And even if he were not, Broner is no match for the likes of Mikey G. Broner is an A pug. Mikey is an elite among the elites, which there is but a hand full. Holla!
I agree Mikey G is an elite top fighter and would be on the lb4lb list if he had been active. MG is levels above Broner. Broner is lazy and unprofessional, it is his own fault if he cant make 140 safely. He had no problem bringing Porter down to try and drain him and still took an L. I say in 3 years I will be surprised if Broner is still on this earth, but either way he is going to get destroyed ala Floyd vs Corrales .


-amayseng :

Hehehe! Not this time, my friend! I ain't eating any crow. Broner is going to get destroyed. TsAH is cashing out on him. He is tired of the boneheaded shenanigans of Broner. And even if he were not, Broner is no match for the likes of Mikey G. Broner is an A pug. Mikey is an elite among the elites, which there is but a hand full. Holla!
I agree Mikey G is an elite top fighter and would be on the lb4lb list if he had been active. MG is levels above Broner. Broner is lazy and unprofessional, it is his own fault if he cant make 140 safely. He had no problem bringing Porter down to try and drain him and still took an L. I say in 3 years I will be surprised if Broner is still on this earth, but either way he is going to get destroyed ala Floyd vs Corrales .


-oubobcat :

There is no scenario I see Broner winning as I have watched more and more tape of both Broner and Garcia. Beyond the outside the ring stuff, inside the ring Broner is just so flawed. Athletically gifted yes but that along with good (great) matchmaking has got him to where he is now. But watch him against Daniel Ponce De Leon six years ago and then more recently against Porter and Granados. He still makes the same mistakes. He still fights in just spots, with tons of dead spots in which he is out hustled. His left is always held low and he frequently squares up out of position. He still pulls straight back with his hands down and chin exposed. How after six years has none of this been even remotely corrected? Broner loses if this fights goes off. One thing, Broner and his team have to be reading opinions on this fight from those involved in the sport. Opinions are much like most on this forum that Broner gets exposed. Could Broner and team maybe start having second thoughts at some point? Maybe a convenient injury pops up that postpones things...


-oubobcat :

There is no scenario I see Broner winning as I have watched more and more tape of both Broner and Garcia. Beyond the outside the ring stuff, inside the ring Broner is just so flawed. Athletically gifted yes but that along with good (great) matchmaking has got him to where he is now. But watch him against Daniel Ponce De Leon six years ago and then more recently against Porter and Granados. He still makes the same mistakes. He still fights in just spots, with tons of dead spots in which he is out hustled. His left is always held low and he frequently squares up out of position. He still pulls straight back with his hands down and chin exposed. How after six years has none of this been even remotely corrected? Broner loses if this fights goes off. One thing, Broner and his team have to be reading opinions on this fight from those involved in the sport. Opinions are much like most on this forum that Broner gets exposed. Could Broner and team maybe start having second thoughts at some point? Maybe a convenient injury pops up that postpones things...


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

Tale of the tape. Garcia has a 70" reach vs Broner's 69.5" reach. To put that into perspective Floyd has a 72" reach while Canelo Alvarez posses a 70.5" reach. Garcia is 5',7" Broner is 5',6" in height. But despite the numbers Broner is a natural full weight class (of raw muscle) heavier than Garcia. He struggled to make 143.5lbs in his 2015 catchweight bout against Porter. Porter made 144lbs with ease while Broner's weight was in doubt until he finally hit the scales. Against Granados recently Broner made 146.5lbs during their competitive welterweight clash. Mikey last fought at lightweight. Mikey Garcia looks smooth without much definition but just beneath the surface Mikey is literally rippling with pure muscle. Broner who is much more defined visually is equally powerful (if not more so). Since Broner's XIII personal episode outside of the ring which may have involed police intervention, embarassing social media videos, strippers, alchohol, an altercation, and possibly all of the above **** Broner has again announced he's had a "Come to Jesus" style awakening where he claims to have had yet another epiphany regarding his turbulent boxing career and vows to avoid all distractions, and move his training camp to a calmer, more isolated surrounding while he dedicates himself like a Shoalin Monk during his preparation for Garcia. I usually go with the bigger guy if both fighters have similar physical attributes and their skill levels are close. But I'll have to wait and see where Broner's head is at halfway through training camp to make an educated guess. For the present, Mikey has to be the prohibitive favorite based on his history.
I'm hearing reports that AB is basically on weight (within 10 pounds). AB is the underdog as far as betting goes and many of the boxing pundits have written him off too, but if he comes in shape to the fight with his mind right, Mikey has a serious problem on his hands. If AB fights Mikey stylistically the way that he fought John Molina (stick and Move), he wins. Mikey is technically sound and has very good power, but Broner is the better athlete and does very well against "boxers." His two losses are to fighters that are brawlers/maulers, which isn't Mikey's temperament or style. I smell crow cooking!


-Radam G :

I'm hearing reports that AB is basically on weight (within 10 pounds). AB is the underdog as far as betting goes and many of the boxing pundits have written him off too, but if he comes in shape to the fight with his mind right, Mikey has a serious problem on his hands. If AB fights Mikey stylistically the way that he fought John Molina (stick and Move), he wins. Mikey is technically sound and has very good power, but Broner is the better athlete and does very well against "boxers." His two losses are to fighters that are brawlers/maulers, which isn't Mikey's temperament or style. I smell crow cooking!
Broner is training in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He will be in shape. But I think that he will still fall short against MG. Holla!


-Radam G :

I'm hearing reports that AB is basically on weight (within 10 pounds). AB is the underdog as far as betting goes and many of the boxing pundits have written him off too, but if he comes in shape to the fight with his mind right, Mikey has a serious problem on his hands. If AB fights Mikey stylistically the way that he fought John Molina (stick and Move), he wins. Mikey is technically sound and has very good power, but Broner is the better athlete and does very well against "boxers." His two losses are to fighters that are brawlers/maulers, which isn't Mikey's temperament or style. I smell crow cooking!
Broner is training in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He will be in shape. But I think that he will still fall short against MG. Holla!


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

Broner is training in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He will be in shape. But I think that he will still fall short against MG. Holla!
I don't know about that. AB has fought the better competition and is the naturally bigger fighter. It will be interesting to see if Mikey loses anything moving up in weight (speed, power, etc.). The only way Mikey wins in my opinion is if he pressures AB. Like I said my previous post, AB does not do well against pressure fighters, but deals with boxers fine. Mikey is going to have to show a new wrinkle to his game if he wants to win this one.


-brownsugar :

I'm hearing reports that AB is basically on weight (within 10 pounds). AB is the underdog as far as betting goes and many of the boxing pundits have written him off too, but if he comes in shape to the fight with his mind right, Mikey has a serious problem on his hands. If AB fights Mikey stylistically the way that he fought John Molina (stick and Move), he wins. Mikey is technically sound and has very good power, but Broner is the better athlete and does very well against "boxers." His two losses are to fighters that are brawlers/maulers, which isn't Mikey's temperament or style. I smell crow cooking!
As boxing gamblers advisory pundit Dwyer said on his podcast recently..... AINT NO WAY BRONER IS A 5-1 UNDERDOG. The fight is closer than that even on his worst day. .... Salido found some chinks in Mikey's armour as well (chin, stamina and susceptible to body shots) so lets not act as if Mikey is invincible (according to most of the boxing industry). But historically once fighters move up (and haven't made a certain weight in at least 5 years, they will never make that weight again) However with the assistance of a good nutritionist and EXTREME discipline, maybe we can see the old Broner. But it's tough for me to believe in Broner, who seems to have gotten comfortable with underachieving. I hope I'm wrong .... I don't care what Broner does outside of the ring but you have to admit his erratic behavior and alcohol usage, poor drcisions, and difficulty making weight doesn't enhance his boxing ability or induce confidence in boxing fans. I wish Broner the best... At least he wears his promoters hat well. For now we will have to weight and see....so far i give the edge to Garcia. Thanks for the comments


-brownsugar :

I'm hearing reports that AB is basically on weight (within 10 pounds). AB is the underdog as far as betting goes and many of the boxing pundits have written him off too, but if he comes in shape to the fight with his mind right, Mikey has a serious problem on his hands. If AB fights Mikey stylistically the way that he fought John Molina (stick and Move), he wins. Mikey is technically sound and has very good power, but Broner is the better athlete and does very well against "boxers." His two losses are to fighters that are brawlers/maulers, which isn't Mikey's temperament or style. I smell crow cooking!
As boxing gamblers advisory pundit Dwyer said on his podcast recently..... AINT NO WAY BRONER IS A 5-1 UNDERDOG. The fight is closer than that even on his worst day. .... Salido found some chinks in Mikey's armour as well (chin, stamina and susceptible to body shots) so lets not act as if Mikey is invincible (according to most of the boxing industry). But historically once fighters move up (and haven't made a certain weight in at least 5 years, they will never make that weight again) However with the assistance of a good nutritionist and EXTREME discipline, maybe we can see the old Broner. But it's tough for me to believe in Broner, who seems to have gotten comfortable with underachieving. I hope I'm wrong .... I don't care what Broner does outside of the ring but you have to admit his erratic behavior and alcohol usage, poor drcisions, and difficulty making weight doesn't enhance his boxing ability or induce confidence in boxing fans. I wish Broner the best... At least he wears his promoters hat well. For now we will have to weight and see....so far i give the edge to Garcia. Thanks for the comments


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

As boxing gamblers advisory pundit Dwyer said on his podcast recently..... AINT NO WAY BRONER IS A 5-1 UNDERDOG. The fight is closer than that even on his worst day. .... Salido found some chinks in Mikey's armour as well (chin, stamina and susceptible to body shots) so lets not act as if Mikey is invincible (according to most of the boxing industry). But historically once fighters move up (and haven't made a certain weight in at least 5 years, they will never make that weight again) However with the assistance of a good nutritionist and EXTREME discipline, maybe we can see the old Broner. But it's tough for me to believe in Broner, who seems to have gotten comfortable with underachieving. I hope I'm wrong .... I don't care what Broner does outside of the ring but you have to admit his erratic behavior and alcohol usage, poor drcisions, and difficulty making weight doesn't enhance his boxing ability or induce confidence in boxing fans. I wish Broner the best... At least he wears his promoters hat well. For now we will have to weight and see....so far i give the edge to Garcia. Thanks for the comments
I don't gamble, but Dwyer's YouTube videos are usually on point.


-brownsugar :

I don't gamble, but Dwyer's YouTube videos are usually on point.
There is a website SRD called HealthyWager, where you bet the house you can lose between 10lbs and 100lbs in 6 months (safely) you bet anything between 10-500 bucks each month for 6 months and if you reach your goal you can double, or triple you cash. My details may be a little off. I'm going to bet 50bucks a month that I can lose 20lbs in 6 months. (If the site checks out as legit) I guarantee you that I can lose 15 lbs but that extra 5 lbs is almost as difficult as Broner making 140...because there's not alot to lose. Sometimes all it takes is losing a few ounces of bio mass to completely disrupt an athletes fine physical and mental machinery. I'm very interested to see if Broner can pull it off. (But I only bet on me)...lol But 98 times out of 100, it never works out for the guy losing weight or even sometimes maintaining weight. (Remember Chavez Jr who just showed up for a check) The encouraging news is Shawn Porter who started out as a junior middleweight then went to welterweight, made Broners catch weight of 144lbs better than Broner did. Maybe there's the slim hope Broner can shock the world like Jeff Horn...lol.


-Radam G :

I don't know about that. AB has fought the better competition and is the naturally bigger fighter. It will be interesting to see if Mikey loses anything moving up in weight (speed, power, etc.). The only way Mikey wins in my opinion is if he pressures AB. Like I said my previous post, AB does not do well against pressure fighters, but deals with boxers fine. Mikey is going to have to show a new wrinkle to his game if he wants to win this one.
Well I told cha that size doesn't with knowledge of whup azz. Broner is going to get his naturally bigger arse torched. MG is going to have Broner's arse on fire and some. Holla!


-Radam G :

I don't know about that. AB has fought the better competition and is the naturally bigger fighter. It will be interesting to see if Mikey loses anything moving up in weight (speed, power, etc.). The only way Mikey wins in my opinion is if he pressures AB. Like I said my previous post, AB does not do well against pressure fighters, but deals with boxers fine. Mikey is going to have to show a new wrinkle to his game if he wants to win this one.
Well I told cha that size doesn't with knowledge of whup azz. Broner is going to get his naturally bigger arse torched. MG is going to have Broner's arse on fire and some. Holla!