Quick Results from London: Joshua Prevails by TKO 11 in a Humdinger

The late, great sportswriter Dick Young once wrote that the greatest moments in sports are the moments immediately preceding the first bell of a heavyweight championship fight. There haven’t been many moments like that since Young wrote these words, but today we witnessed one of those moments. The goosebumps were palpable as Anthony Joshua and Wladimir Klitschko awaited the opening bell at Wembley Stadium. And the great multitude was treated to a fight for the ages.

In the most anticipated fight since Mayweather-Pacquiao and the most anticipated heavyweight fight in a decade, Anthony Joshua dug himself out of a deep hole and stopped Wladimir Klitschko in the 11th frame. Klitschko was down twice in the round and although he made it to his feet on both occasions, referee David Fields was right to call it off.

There were four knockdowns in all. Joshua scored the first, putting Wladimir down in round five with a big left hook. But the 41-year-old Ukrainian veteran came back and had Joshua in trouble before the round was finished.

In the next round, Joshua hit the deck, put there by a right hand from Klitschko that landed flush on the Englishman’s jaw. Joshua weathered the storm, but the next round was all Klitschko and at this point Joshua’s chances looked dim. Round 8 saw Klitschko wobble Joshua with a big right hand, but one could sense that the younger man had more in his tank as the round drew to a close.

After two uneventful rounds, Joshua lowered the boom, decking Klitschko with a brutal uppercut. The second knockdown was an extension of the first.

Raised in a housing project only 10 miles from Wembley Stadium, Anthony Joshua successfully defended his IBF world title and won the vacant WBA “super” world heavyweight title. While Joshua was the defending champion and Klitschko the challenger who was coming off a loss, when Joshua’s hand was raised it yet felt like the coronation of a new champion.

Wladimir Klitschko ruled the heavyweight roost for a decade. Now his run is officially over, but in defeat he cemented his legacy as one of the all-time greats.

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In the main preliminary bout, Scott Quigg (33-1-2) had a much harder time than expected with Viorel Simion (21-2), a 35-year-old Romanian. Simion came out like gangbusters, but Quigg’s heavier blows eventually took their toll. The bout, conceived as an eliminator for Lee Selby’s IBF world featherweight title, went the full 12 with Quigg, a Lancashire man, prevailing by scores of 117-111 twice and 115-113. Quigg ate a lot of leather, but it was another feather in the cap of his new trainer, Freddie Roach.

Quigg vs. Simion, punctuated by numerous toe-to-toe exchanges, was an entertaining scrap. The same could not be said of the contest between Luke Campbell and Darleys Perez. One of seven former Olympians on the 7-bout card, Campbell improved to 17-1 (14) when Perez (33-3-2) was pulled out in the ninth frame with an injured arm, but Campbell’s performance was lackluster. Regardless, the 2012 gold medalist likely boosted himself into a match with reigning WBA world lightweight champion Jorge Linares who was ringside.

In a lightweight clash slated for 10 rounds, Ireland’s Katie Taylor thoroughly outclassed Germany’s Nina Meinke on route to a seventh round stoppage. There were no knockdowns, but Meinke’s face was lumpy when she left the ring.

The 30-year old Taylor, who improved to 5-0, had a storied amateur career. Hailing from the Irish seaside resort community of Bray, she has been called the top Irish sportsperson of her generation. Her next bout is expected to come against Uruguay’s Cecilia Communales (14-1) who holds the WBA version of the female lightweight title. There’s been talk about staging this bout in the United States in June or July. The gritty Meinke, who absorbed a lot of punishment, declined to 5-1.

Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel.

Wembley Stadium

COMMENTS

-Radam G :

Wow! I will eat my crow. Holla!


-ArneK. :

For a while there Radam, it looked like you were right on the money. The scorecards through the 10 completed rounds: 96-93 Joshua (Don Trella) 95-93 Joshua (Nelson Vazquez) 95-93 Klitschko (Steve Weisfeld) I surmise that Trella and Vazquez scored the fifth round 10-8 I side with reporter Gareth Davies of The Telegraph who scored that round 10-9 and had two rounds even.


-ArneK. :

For a while there Radam, it looked like you were right on the money. The scorecards through the 10 completed rounds: 96-93 Joshua (Don Trella) 95-93 Joshua (Nelson Vazquez) 95-93 Klitschko (Steve Weisfeld) I surmise that Trella and Vazquez scored the fifth round 10-8 I side with reporter Gareth Davies of The Telegraph who scored that round 10-9 and had two rounds even.


-oubobcat :

For a while there Radam, it looked like you were right on the money. The scorecards through the 10 completed rounds: 96-93 Joshua (Don Trella) 95-93 Joshua (Nelson Vazquez) 95-93 Klitschko (Steve Weisfeld) I surmise that Trella and Vazquez scored the fifth round 10-8 I side with reporter Gareth Davies of The Telegraph who scored that round 10-9 and had two rounds even.
I was curious about the scoring of the fifth and it does in fact appear a couple judges would have had it 10-8. Too many judges score rounds with a knock down as an automatic 10-8. The fighter scoring the knock down (Joshua in this case) gets a point for the knock down and credit in scoring the rest of the round for the blow or blows that put the opponent on the canvas. But the round still goes on and in this case Klitschko came back to dominate and hurt Joshua with some vicious clean punches of his own. In my opinion, did enough to come back in the round where it should have been scored 10-9 for Joshua. Give credit to Steve Farhood scoring the fight who had it in my opinion on the nose. Radam, no crow to eat here. Klitschko was putting it to Joshua in spots especially the middle rounds. As a matter of fact, in total control. But Joshua did show something that could not have been predicted by anyone. He dug down deep and when facing adversity in a tough fight managed to find a way to turn the tide late. He showed true character in the ring and that something special that great fighters have. He is not great yet but took a big step forward in this performance. And something to note as well, great work by Joshua's trainer Robert McCracken in coaching him in between rounds through the tough moments. McCracken is an underrated trainer but in my opinion one of the elites who does not get the credit he deserves.


-oubobcat :

For a while there Radam, it looked like you were right on the money. The scorecards through the 10 completed rounds: 96-93 Joshua (Don Trella) 95-93 Joshua (Nelson Vazquez) 95-93 Klitschko (Steve Weisfeld) I surmise that Trella and Vazquez scored the fifth round 10-8 I side with reporter Gareth Davies of The Telegraph who scored that round 10-9 and had two rounds even.
I was curious about the scoring of the fifth and it does in fact appear a couple judges would have had it 10-8. Too many judges score rounds with a knock down as an automatic 10-8. The fighter scoring the knock down (Joshua in this case) gets a point for the knock down and credit in scoring the rest of the round for the blow or blows that put the opponent on the canvas. But the round still goes on and in this case Klitschko came back to dominate and hurt Joshua with some vicious clean punches of his own. In my opinion, did enough to come back in the round where it should have been scored 10-9 for Joshua. Give credit to Steve Farhood scoring the fight who had it in my opinion on the nose. Radam, no crow to eat here. Klitschko was putting it to Joshua in spots especially the middle rounds. As a matter of fact, in total control. But Joshua did show something that could not have been predicted by anyone. He dug down deep and when facing adversity in a tough fight managed to find a way to turn the tide late. He showed true character in the ring and that something special that great fighters have. He is not great yet but took a big step forward in this performance. And something to note as well, great work by Joshua's trainer Robert McCracken in coaching him in between rounds through the tough moments. McCracken is an underrated trainer but in my opinion one of the elites who does not get the credit he deserves.


-brownsugar :

Coasting in rounds 7 and 8 was a wise choice by Joshua and saved his bacon... Smarts overruled pride.


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

What a fight, what a fight! I predicted that Joshua would win inside of 10 rounds via stoppage, but the fight went 11 rounds. Wlad fought very well, but if it wasn't for Joshua's poor stamina, Klitschko would have been blown away much earlier. Throw the technical analysis of Joshua out the window tonight because he showed the heart and grit that it takes to be a great champion. In this regard, he was very "Aliesque" today. I don?t see Wilder or Parker beating Joshua, BUT if Wilder can connect with his right cross like Wlad did several times today there is a good chance that Joshua will go to sleep. For as deadly as Wladimir Klitschko's right cross is, Wilder's even more deadly. Wilder vs. Joshua is the fight that I want to see because I don't think Fury will ever be in the mental and physical shape necessary to be relevant again. Holla!


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

It looks like my last post got deleted for some reason. I don't know why? Anyway, Joshua did as most of us predicted and won by stoppage. However, it was the fashion in which did it that has impressed us. The youngster showed that he has the heart and determination to dominate the division for years to come. I think that he is the best in the division but Wilder has a puncher's chance against him. AJ got hit with a lot of straight rights, which will surely have to be corrected in the gym. Despite the the technical flaws of AJ, I am very impressed with how he passed his first true test. What a night of boxing!


-deepwater2 :

Great fight. WK came to fight and gave us his best. It looked like Klit was on his way to a decision win and beautiful uppercut with terrible consequences happened. Joshua showed us he is special and he should improve as this fight just gave him a great experience to add to his tools. Fury vs Joshua next year or 16 months should hold 100,000. Fury has to get his two or three bums first and build up the hype. England is the place to be if you are a boxing fan.


-teaser :

joshua just beat the best vlad i have seen ....he was actually (here it is ) entertaining or trying to be ...the dude was loosey goosey ...wished he would have fought like that the last ten fights ...


-brownsugar :

I think the reason why Vlad looked so good is because he had been preparing for Tyson by quietly correcting the behavior which created the scoring deficit in his last fight. This may be the reason why WK's confidence was perceived as being so authentic and much more than an elaborate mind game. But no matter how well and older athlete prepares... His body naturally loses muscle mass. Due to the naturally occuring loss of testosterone with age. Its a physical decline that cannot be reversed under any amount of training. Youth cannot be denied... Joshua showed remarkable savvy by taking the 7th and the 8th round off. Once those humungous slabs of muscle got a chance to breathe, Joshua was recharged and was able to dial in the pain and destruction again. The stoppage was good even though most of the punches thrown were missed or deflected. ....however a sharp thudding right hand to the left side of Klits body insured there would be no further rallies by the Ukrainian. There was no protest by WK or his corner. No way Joshua's team would have allowed him to take the fight if Josh had not been trained to go a hard 12 rounds. Josh had to have gone through all kinds of endurance and recovery drills to have finished so strongly. Yes .... Digging deep is always commendable but it doesn't mean a damn thing if the foundation wasn't first laid through intensive training. The kid is the real deal. But any superheavy can be knocked off with a single blow. Fans of the UK may want the Fury fight but personally a fighter who abuses his body with PED's ...cocaine...suffers from depression and puts on 100lbs of viceral fat during 18 months of downtime will ever reach the physical summit required to beat Joshua. I just hope Wilder and the invisible man...Ortiz will get a crack at Josh in the near future.