Boxing and Drama: Part Three (Haye-Bellew)

I recently wrote that I have always had a special affinity for fighters from the United Kingdom. Maybe it has to do with their grit or maybe the drama that seems to unfold in many of the top fights. Alan Minter, Billy Schwer, and Dave “Boy” Green exemplified the qualities I admired. However, watching the likes of Carl Thompson, Chris Eubank, Michael Watson and Nigel Benn provided unmatched thrills—unmatched that is until the recent Chisora vs. Whyte war. Now comes Bellew and Haye and this one moves to the very top of my list. 123

While the fight itself has already been vetted, there was a subtleness that added to the drama that was missed by many observers. There were some nuggets of gold that emerged that added to the drama.

The Limp

As David “Haymaker” Haye made his way to the ring to his trademark seventies disco classic, McFadden & Whitehead’s “Ain’t No Stopping Us Now,” (also used by Larry Holmes), something seemed amiss with his gait—there seemed to be a slight limp. Few noticed it.

Hayemaker fans –and he has throngs in London–were primed for a quick knockout and so were most “experts.” As it turned out, the injury would become far worse than slight as rumors of a torn Achilles tendon became the truth in the incredible sixth round in which both men would visit the canvas, but not by knockdowns– or so the referee ruled.

From that point on, Haye was left hobbling on one leg as underdog Tony “Bomber” Bellew took full advantage and showed no mercy to secure a stoppage in what was a scintillating grudge match at London’s O2.

Haye started quickly, hitting Bellew with good shots, but the man from Liverpool fought wisely and kept coming and coming and coming. Still, David battled back until the eleventh when the one-sided onslaught was halted by a fluttering white towel.

Haye was hailed for his courage as he continued for five rounds with a terribly painful injury. After the fight, Tony Bellew said, “I looked at Shane (McGuigan, Haye’s trainer), and said ‘Stop it lad.’ I know he said all through the buildup how he wanted to put me in hospital and leave me on a stretcher. That was never my intention, never is. He’s got two kids. Kids need their dads.”

Both men knew you don’t play boxing.

The Gesture

Immediately after the fight was stopped, Bellew rushed to assist Haye, shoving promoter Eddie Hearn away to minister to the stricken fighter. Bellew’s gesture, said writer John Wight, “should see him elevated to cult status even in the eyes of his detractors.” The Scousers (the fans from Liverpool) saw it and roared their approval.

Respect

At the end, Bellew thanked Haye, saying “you’ve helped me secure my kids’ future.” Haye returned the compliment: “And thank you for such a great fight. I can’t believe you’re still standing. But some of you don’t believe me. I’ve got no switch-off button. It’s scary. No matter how hard or painful it gets, I can’t stop. The biggest danger in this game to me is me. (There are) only a certain number of times you can keep doing this. There won’t be many more times.”

This was another Paulie Malignaggi vs. Miguel Cotto where the loser (Paulie) left with more respect than he came in with. Indeed, Haye’s warrior performance erased any question of his will, heart and desire. Derek Chisora, who was one of a very few who correctly called the fight, said: “I have more respect for David now because he didn’t quit…He had his son ringside – I think for the first time I think – so he could not quit…. He was just hoping for one shot. If he had knocked out Tony with one leg he would have been a hero.”

Following the operation to repair the damage, Haye spoke to Kevin Mitchell of The Guardian. David had this to say: “I was proud of my performance. It was a tough, tough night at the office but I knew I was alive in there. Even on one leg I thought I could knock Tony Bellew out. I was gutted when Shane McGuigan threw in the towel. But maybe it saved me for another day. He said he’d do it again. If he gives me a rematch, I’ll give him a rubber match. I’ve never had that (rivalry) like other fighters. Maybe Tony Bellew is my Benn-Eubank.”

“It will not seem so to him as he contemplates the fading of his days,” wrote Mitchell, “but this was Haye’s finest night.”

This was not about pundits, promoters or detractors; this was about two men who put on a special and memorable performance that will be discussed for years to come. Whatever happens in the event they meet again, it will not equal this one for pure drama.

Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel.

Ted Sares is one of the world’s oldest active power lifters and holds several records in the Grand Master class. A member of Ring 4’s Boxing Hall of Fame, he enjoys writing about boxing.

COMMENTS

-KO Digest :

Nice fight and to my knowledge, I'm the only fight writer in the world who picked Bellew to win. Well, aside from those good lads at the Liverpool Times Gazette.


-KO Digest :

Nice fight and to my knowledge, I'm the only fight writer in the world who picked Bellew to win. Well, aside from those good lads at the Liverpool Times Gazette.


-Kid Blast :

Nice fight and to my knowledge, I'm the only fight writer in the world who picked Bellew to win. Well, aside from those good lads at the Liverpool Times Gazette.
DelBoy picked the round.


-Kid Blast :

Nice fight and to my knowledge, I'm the only fight writer in the world who picked Bellew to win. Well, aside from those good lads at the Liverpool Times Gazette.
DelBoy picked the round.


-KO Digest :

Impressive. I had Bellew grinding out a decision win over a fading old Haye.


-KO Digest :

Impressive. I had Bellew grinding out a decision win over a fading old Haye.


-Kid Blast :

Good call[QUOTE=KO Digest;110162]Impressive. I had Bellew grinding out a decision win over a fading old Haye.[/QUOTE Great call]


-Kid Blast :

Good call[QUOTE=KO Digest;110162]Impressive. I had Bellew grinding out a decision win over a fading old Haye.[/QUOTE Great call]


-Kid Blast :

Impressive. I had Bellew grinding out a decision win over a fading old Haye.
Great call


-Kid Blast :

Impressive. I had Bellew grinding out a decision win over a fading old Haye.
Great call


-dollar bond :

Well done. I loved the way you gave both men respect but it was the gesture that really nailed this one. That was unique.


-Kid Blast :

Well done. I loved the way you gave both men respect but it was the gesture that really nailed this one. That was unique.
Yeah, it was that gesture from the Bomber at the end that did it for me as well. That's what inspired the article. Thanks, Bill


-Kid Blast :

Well done. I loved the way you gave both men respect but it was the gesture that really nailed this one. That was unique.
Yeah, it was that gesture from the Bomber at the end that did it for me as well. That's what inspired the article. Thanks, Bill


-JohnnyTango :

I didn't watch it. I'm not much of a Haye fan. Nice read, Ted. You piqued my interest. Maybe I'll check it out on YouTube.


-JohnnyTango :

A game effort by Haye. Here is round 6 if anyone is interested.
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BVih1mABKU


-JohnnyTango :

A game effort by Haye. Here is round 6 if anyone is interested.
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BVih1mABKU


-oubobcat :

Great write up on the fight. I will admit to not being a David Haye fan at all. I wasn't a fan of his before the Klitschko fight and Haye's effort in that fight (a fight I had hoped would be a good heavyweight bout) further turned me away from him. I was hoping to see him lose to Bellew but thought it would take a minor miracle for that to happen. Well, the injury turned into that minor miracle. But I was inspired by Haye's effort against Bellew. He could have stayed on the canvas in round six and nobody would have questioned him like was done after the Klitschko fight. Haye showed a lot of courage in not only continuing to fight but fighting to win and not survive. He gave it his all and then some fighting through a terribly painful injury. As for Bellew, I still wonder and will for some time how he did not get Haye out of there sooner. Bellew had a one legged fighter who was throwing back one punch at a time with nothing at all behind it and still took him five additional rounds to finish the job. And guess who else sitting ringside noticed that and will be licking his chops for an all English showdown in the future. Anthony Joshua who win or lose to Klitschko has a date all but lined with Bellew in the not so distant future.


-oubobcat :

Great write up on the fight. I will admit to not being a David Haye fan at all. I wasn't a fan of his before the Klitschko fight and Haye's effort in that fight (a fight I had hoped would be a good heavyweight bout) further turned me away from him. I was hoping to see him lose to Bellew but thought it would take a minor miracle for that to happen. Well, the injury turned into that minor miracle. But I was inspired by Haye's effort against Bellew. He could have stayed on the canvas in round six and nobody would have questioned him like was done after the Klitschko fight. Haye showed a lot of courage in not only continuing to fight but fighting to win and not survive. He gave it his all and then some fighting through a terribly painful injury. As for Bellew, I still wonder and will for some time how he did not get Haye out of there sooner. Bellew had a one legged fighter who was throwing back one punch at a time with nothing at all behind it and still took him five additional rounds to finish the job. And guess who else sitting ringside noticed that and will be licking his chops for an all English showdown in the future. Anthony Joshua who win or lose to Klitschko has a date all but lined with Bellew in the not so distant future.


-Kid Blast :

Great write up on the fight. I will admit to not being a David Haye fan at all. I wasn't a fan of his before the Klitschko fight and Haye's effort in that fight (a fight I had hoped would be a good heavyweight bout) further turned me away from him. I was hoping to see him lose to Bellew but thought it would take a minor miracle for that to happen. Well, the injury turned into that minor miracle. But I was inspired by Haye's effort against Bellew. He could have stayed on the canvas in round six and nobody would have questioned him like was done after the Klitschko fight. Haye showed a lot of courage in not only continuing to fight but fighting to win and not survive. He gave it his all and then some fighting through a terribly painful injury. As for Bellew, I still wonder and will for some time how he did not get Haye out of there sooner. Bellew had a one legged fighter who was throwing back one punch at a time with nothing at all behind it and still took him five additional rounds to finish the job. And guess who else sitting ringside noticed that and will be licking his chops for an all English showdown in the future. Anthony Joshua who win or lose to Klitschko has a date all but lined with Bellew in the not so distant future.
I think Bellew is looking for that one big early retirement payday and then he is done. Just a hunch based on his own feelings towards boxing. Good post, BTW. Says it all.


-Kid Blast :

Great write up on the fight. I will admit to not being a David Haye fan at all. I wasn't a fan of his before the Klitschko fight and Haye's effort in that fight (a fight I had hoped would be a good heavyweight bout) further turned me away from him. I was hoping to see him lose to Bellew but thought it would take a minor miracle for that to happen. Well, the injury turned into that minor miracle. But I was inspired by Haye's effort against Bellew. He could have stayed on the canvas in round six and nobody would have questioned him like was done after the Klitschko fight. Haye showed a lot of courage in not only continuing to fight but fighting to win and not survive. He gave it his all and then some fighting through a terribly painful injury. As for Bellew, I still wonder and will for some time how he did not get Haye out of there sooner. Bellew had a one legged fighter who was throwing back one punch at a time with nothing at all behind it and still took him five additional rounds to finish the job. And guess who else sitting ringside noticed that and will be licking his chops for an all English showdown in the future. Anthony Joshua who win or lose to Klitschko has a date all but lined with Bellew in the not so distant future.
I think Bellew is looking for that one big early retirement payday and then he is done. Just a hunch based on his own feelings towards boxing. Good post, BTW. Says it all.


-Kid Blast :

A game effort by Haye. Here is round 6 if anyone is interested.
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BVih1mABKU
Thanks Tango.. Round of the year so far? Maybe. Haye hit the canvas three times; Bellew once. But only one pure knockdown.


-Kid Blast :

A game effort by Haye. Here is round 6 if anyone is interested.
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BVih1mABKU
Thanks Tango.. Round of the year so far? Maybe. Haye hit the canvas three times; Bellew once. But only one pure knockdown.


-larueboenig :

I think Bellew is looking for that one big early retirement payday and then he is done. Just a hunch based on his own feelings towards boxing. Good post, BTW. Says it all.
Yes, Round of the year


-larueboenig :

I think Bellew is looking for that one big early retirement payday and then he is done. Just a hunch based on his own feelings towards boxing. Good post, BTW. Says it all.
Yes, Round of the year


-larueboenig :

I recently wrote that I have always had a special affinity for fighters from the United Kingdom. Maybe it has to do with their grit or maybe the drama that seems to unfold in many of the top fights. Alan Minter, Billy Schwer, and Dave ?Boy? Green exemplified the qualities I admired. However, watching the likes of Carl Thompson, Chris Eubank, Michael Watson and Nigel Benn provided unmatched thrills---unmatched that is until the recent Chisora vs. Whyte war. Now comes Bellew and Haye and this one moves to the very top of my list. While the fight itself has already been vetted, there was a subtleness that added to the drama that was missed by many observers. There were some nuggets of gold that emerged that added to the drama. The Limp As David ?Haymaker? Haye made his way to the ring to his trademark seventies disco classic, McFadden & Whitehead?s ?Ain?t No Stopping Us Now,? (also used by Larry Holmes), something seemed amiss with his gait?there seemed to be a slight limp. Few noticed it. Hayemaker fans ?and he has throngs in London--were primed for a quick knockout and so were most ?experts.? As it turned out, the injury would become far worse than slight as rumors of a torn Achilles tendon became the truth in the incredible sixth round in which both men would visit the canvas, but not by knockdowns-- or so the referee ruled. From that point on, Haye was left hobbling on one leg as underdog Tony ?Bomber? Bellew took full advantage and showed no mercy to secure a stoppage in what was a scintillating grudge match at London?s O2. Haye started quickly, hitting Bellew with good shots, but the man from Liverpool fought wisely and kept coming and coming and coming. Still, David battled back until the eleventh when the one-sided onslaught was halted by a fluttering white towel. Haye was hailed for his courage as he continued for five rounds with a terribly painful injury. After the fight, Tony Bellew said, ?I looked at Shane (McGuigan, Haye?s trainer), and said ?Stop it lad.? I know he said all through the buildup how he wanted to put me in hospital and leave me on a stretcher. That was never my intention, never is. He?s got two kids. Kids need their dads.? Both men knew you don?t play boxing. The Gesture Immediately after the fight was stopped, Bellew rushed to assist Haye, shoving promoter Eddie Hearn away to minister to the stricken fighter. Bellew?s gesture, said writer John Wight, ?should see him elevated to cult status even in the eyes of his detractors.? The Scousers (the fans from Liverpool) saw it and roared their approval. Respect At the end, Bellew thanked Haye, saying ?you?ve helped me secure my kids? future.? Haye returned the compliment: ?And thank you for such a great fight. I can?t believe you?re still standing. But some of you don?t believe me. I?ve got no switch-off button. It?s scary. No matter how hard or painful it gets, I can?t stop. The biggest danger in this game to me is me. (There are) only a certain number of times you can keep doing this. There won?t be many more times.? This was another Paulie Malignaggi vs. Miguel Cotto where the loser (Paulie) left with more respect than he came in with. Indeed, Haye?s warrior performance erased any question of his will, heart and desire. Derek Chisora, who was one of a very few who correctly called the fight, said: ?I have more respect for David now because he didn?t quit?He had his son ringside ? I think for the first time I think ? so he could not quit?. He was just hoping for one shot. If he had knocked out Tony with one leg he would have been a hero.? Following the operation to repair the damage, Haye spoke to Kevin Mitchell of The Guardian. David had this to say: ?I was proud of my performance. It was a tough, tough night at the office but I knew I was alive in there. Even on one leg I thought I could knock Tony Bellew out. I was gutted when Shane McGuigan threw in the towel. But maybe it saved me for another day. He said he?d do it again. If he gives me a rematch, I?ll give him a rubber match. I?ve never had that (rivalry) like other fighters. Maybe Tony Bellew is my Benn-Eubank.? ?It will not seem so to him as he contemplates the fading of his days,? wrote Mitchell, ?but this was Haye?s finest night.? This was not about pundits, promoters or detractors; this was about two men who put on a special and memorable performance that will be discussed for years to come. Whatever happens in the event they meet again, it will not equal this one for pure drama. Check out more boxing news on video at [url=http://theboxingchannel.tv]The Boxing Channel. Ted Sares is one of the world?s oldest active power lifters and holds several records in the Grand Master class. A member of Ring 4?s Boxing Hall of Fame, he enjoys writing about boxing.
Another riveter, Ted the Bull


-EZEGINO :

Uncle Blast, got a lot of catching up to do. Anyway, no matter the ending or 'the beginning of the end' this fight did the game, both local & abroad, plenty good. Bellew really put himself in quite a position with ton of option$$. Although I was expecting Haye to win by stoppage I really was rooting and hoping for the underdog to take the fight deep into the later rounds. I have no problems being wrong in cases like this. Fine piece as your norm and will begin to catch up now that I'm off this week.