Charisma and Swagger: Boxers With Magnetic Personalities

BOXERS WITH THE “IT’ FACTOR — Irish Jerry Quarry, a well-spoken and good looking kid from Southern California but an offspring of the dust bowl, was humble and accessible to his adoring fans. His walk-ins were all about getting the business done in the ring and were not accompanied by rappers or huge entourages. No Justin Beibers for Jerry. When he lost, his fans felt the pain along with him. “Nobody didn’t like Sara Lee” went the popular food commercial and nobody didn’t like Jerry Quarry. His was what personal magnetism was all about.

Iron Mike Tyson had his own brand of charisma and it was structured around his fearsome persona. The electricity before a prime Tyson old-school walk-in would surge through the entire arena. Excitement was on its way. Tyson aroused enthusiasm like no other, though Carlos Monzon had it in a more surreal and romantic sense. Here is what the opening paragraph from an early Tyson Mini Bio states: “One of the most frightening human beings ever to step into the boxing ring, Mike Tyson was the model of the supreme gladiator – unbeaten and unbeatable. Never before had one individual captured the attention of the wider world via sport except Muhammad Ali.”

Strangely enough, Floyd Mayweather Jr, notwithstanding his 49-0 record, great skills, changing monikers, monster bodyguards and Justin Bieber, has never really made that deeply electric connection with fans that a Manny Pacquiao or Marcos Maidana has. Maybe it’s because Junior seems to prize his trophies of wealth above his in-ring accomplishments.  As Frank Lotierzo puts it, “I’ve always maintained that as great as he was on the basketball court, there was nothing more boring or condescending than a Michael Jordan Sunday night conversation on ESPN. Move over Michael, because Floyd Mayweather is in da house and he’s every bit your equal, perhaps even surpassing you.”

These days, a red-headed Mexican named Saul “Canelo” Alvarez has that special quality and then some. Just 26 years old but mature beyond his years, Canelo (“Cinnamon”) has a remarkable record of 48-1-1 and is often ranked in pound for pound lists. Showing concern for his knockout victims in the ring has endeared him to devoted fans throughout Mexico and has provided the basis for fighting Julio Cesar Chavez Jr., a fight already being dubbed the biggest fight in Mexican boxing history.

Perhaps if Abel Sanchez stopped trying so hard to hype Gennady Golovkin at each and every turn, GGG’s charisma would burst out, though for many it already has. Conversely, no matter what Andre Ward seems to do, charisma is not going to be part of his makeup.

The above are simply examples from a long list of fighters who carried the label of being charismatic for having a special connection with the fans. There were some others — though not as many– who combined charisma with swagger in their persona.

Charisma and Swagger

“[Jack] Johnson enjoyed a bit of renaissance in the late 1960s when Howard Sackler’s play, ‘The Great White Hope,’ a thinly veiled fictional version of Johnson’s life, was performed on Broadway. But more people at the time thought the play was actually a commentary on then-heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali, who openly identified with Johnson in interviews and in his autobiography, ‘The Greatest: My Own Story’ (1975).” –Gerald Early

Back in the day, Jack Johnson (the first African-American world heavyweight champion), and later Max Baer, had plenty of both. Here is what the International Boxing Hall of Fame has to say about Max: “Possessing perhaps the most powerful right hand in heavyweight history, Max Baer was a flashy performer who wise-cracked and clowned his way through his career. Although he never fully realized his tremendous potential, Baer won the heavyweight title, and his showmanship entertained an America rocked by the Great Depression.”

It just didn’t get any better than when Max Baer (as the heartless Buddy Brannen character in “The Harder They Fall,”) sauntered over to the doomed Gus Dundee’s corner to wish Gus well against the duped Toro Moreno — the way he sauntered defined swagger.

As for Jack Johnson, the following analysis of the film “Unforgivable Blackness,” directed by Ken Burns, says it all. See http://www.pbs.org/unforgivableblackness/rebel/

Muhammed Ali arguably was the greatest example of someone who could behave in a boastful and arrogant manner, yet concurrently be the very epitome of charisma. His ostentatious display of arrogance was often perceived as tongue-in-cheek and simply contributed to his charisma. In this, he was unique.

Chris Eubank Sr. is the quintessential combination. Even his nickname—“Simply the Best” – carried pomp, but there was far more. His eccentricity, attire and posing was unique, and unlike a more humble Nigel Benn, he milked it to the limit. Of course, Chris could back it up in the squared circle. His air of overbearing self-confidence was his trademark.  Check out this YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0zlIMvgoBo

Again, the above are representative; there are far more.

 Swagger

Now when it comes to an air of overbearing self-confidence, it’s hard to top Jorge Paez Sr. who wore a dress to his 1992 fight against Rafael Ruelas. “El Maromero” was the very definition of a scary clown and the fans loved him for it. See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKI9nqM5nfM

Some might argue that Adrien Broner is the quintessential boxer with swagger, but I’d counter by asserting that “The Problem” is more of a supercilious front. Swagger has to have some substance to back up the pomp. Broner has in large part been seen as a hyped gimmick that can’t back up his motor mouth by winning the big one. This could change.

Roy Jones Jr. was all about swagger and he could back it up. (He still swaggers, but sadly he can no longer back it up.) Macho Camacho, Prince Naz, James Toney, Fernando Vargas, Fighting Harada, Khaosai Galaxy, Anthony Mundine, Sung Kil Moon all had it in spades.

Deontay Wilder has plenty of swagger but is lacking in the charisma department. Conversely, Jerry Quarry had charisma but not much swagger; he was all about business.

Tyson Fury is an original and even wears a sweat shirt that says SWAG DON’T COME CHEAP. He’s not quite a “Peck’s Bad Boy,” but he comes pretty close. Some say he is dragging boxing through the mud; I say he just might be what boxing needs in a sport/business that overwhelms us with nonstop lawsuits.  Whatever the case, he is not hesitant to speak his mind. Yes, the giant gypsy’s temperament could use more tempering, but I suspect he could care less what others think about him. All the rhetoric and loud mouthing is likely a load of blarney and he knows it better than anyone. Oh sure, he could embrace humility, but then he wouldn’t be Tyson Fury. He is the UK’s answer to Ricardo Mayorga, and his quotes or those he inspires are the stuff of a promoter’s dream. Let’s hope he comes back.

Like the other two categories, this one is representative. Perhaps you can add some more names to the lists.

Ted Sares is one of the world’s oldest active power lifters and holds several records in the Grand Master class. A member of Ring 4’s Boxing Hall of Fame, he enjoys writing about boxing.

COMMENTS

-SuperLight :

Spot on about Tyson capturing attention compared with Ali. My mum (non a fight fan) would know who Tyson is but not Floyd. I'd wager Tyson's name is dropped in many a rap, probably followed by Ali. I do recall Snoop and EPMD mentioning Holyfield, but there's something about Tyson's fearsome image, and that photo above captures it. Hagler is pretty much on the Quarry end of the spectrum. Relatively humble but surely a BAMF as the kids would say.


-New York Tony :

An interesting idea, this. I would add Jack Dempsey, who was not only charismatic, but the most popular sports figure of his day, beating out even Babe Ruth. Joe Louis was so beloved that he crossed racial lines, no small feat in his day. And Rocky Marciano had the immense appeal of the everyman. I'd also add Tony Galento. Although not exactly charismatic, he was arguably the most colorful figure to ever enter the squared circle. Jack Johnson is iffy, I think. A powerful personality, with plenty of swagger, but he went out of his way to be objectionable to whites. Black reaction must have been mixed -- delight that there was a black heavyweight champ, but dread that his shenanigans only served to increase white hostility. Anyway, that's my two cents.


-Paul Kevin :

Mayweather ALI Tyson


-KO Digest :

Aged 16 in 1986, Tyson captured my attention like nobody before or since. It was an obsession that went on for MANY years in my boxing-based life...


-ArneK. :

Although he mentioned Jack Johnson and Max Baer, Ted rarely references a fighter who came before he started following boxing as a young boy. That would explain the omission of Jack Dempsey who was -- in the title of Roger Kahn's book -- "A Flame of Pure Fire." John L. Sullivan was the personification of charisma/swagger -- he fairly invented the persona -- but now we're going back to the 19th century.


-dollar bond :

Edwin Valero did it for me.


-Kid Blast :

An interesting idea, this. I would add Jack Dempsey, who was not only charismatic, but the most popular sports figure of his day, beating out even Babe Ruth. Joe Louis was so beloved that he crossed racial lines, no small feat in his day. And Rocky Marciano had the immense appeal of the everyman. I'd also add Tony Galento. Although not exactly charismatic, he was arguably the most colorful figure to ever enter the squared circle. Jack Johnson is iffy, I think. A powerful personality, with plenty of swagger, but he went out of his way to be objectionable to whites. Black reaction must have been mixed -- delight that there was a black heavyweight champ, but dread that his shenanigans only served to increase white hostility. Anyway, that's my two cents.
Dempsey a great choice


-Kid Blast :

Edwin Valero did it for me.
And for me as well. He was as charismatic as you could get, but with a dangerous edge.


-Kid Blast :

Although he mentioned Jack Johnson and Max Baer, Ted rarely references a fighter who came before he started following boxing as a young boy. That would explain the omission of Jack Dempsey who was -- in the title of Roger Kahn's book -- "A Flame of Pure Fire." John L. Sullivan was the personification of charisma/swagger -- he fairly invented the persona -- but now we're going back to the 19th century.
I was at ringside for many of his fights. LOL


-Kid Blast :

Aged 16 in 1986, Tyson captured my attention like nobody before or since. It was an obsession that went on for MANY years in my boxing-based life...
I think he hooked a lot of kids back then. He was special. Pure electricity.


-Kid Blast :

Spot on about Tyson capturing attention compared with Ali. My mum (non a fight fan) would know who Tyson is but not Floyd. I'd wager Tyson's name is dropped in many a rap, probably followed by Ali. I do recall Snoop and EPMD mentioning Holyfield, but there's something about Tyson's fearsome image, and that photo above captures it. Hagler is pretty much on the Quarry end of the spectrum. Relatively humble but surely a BAMF as the kids would say.
Kids have been named after him. So have dogs (probably pit bulls). So have boxers like Tyson Cave, Tyson Brusin, Tyson Fury, and all of the Little Tysons. Floyd is as boring as they come IMO. But my personal favorites remain Eubank and Paez


-FrankinDallas :

The best ring entrance I've ever seen was, of all people, Arthur Abraham. I forget which fight it was, but it was in Germany. He came down from the arena ceiling in what looked like a spaceship, with all sorts of lights going off and pounding music. The crowd at a German boxing event is very mild and quiet (unless a UK guy it fighting) but their pre-fight shows are great.


-Kid Blast :

The best ring entrance I've ever seen was, of all people, Arthur Abraham. I forget which fight it was, but it was in Germany. He came down from the arena ceiling in what looked like a spaceship, with all sorts of lights going off and pounding music. The crowd at a German boxing event is very mild and quiet (unless a UK guy it fighting) but their pre-fight shows are great.
I love German boxing crowds. When they sense the end, the come alive with a half-hiss-half whistle sound that is very cool and signals to the referee to stop the slaughter.


-KO Digest :

I think he hooked a lot of kids back then. He was special. Pure electricity.
I loved how lurid, and vulgar, and violent he was. Mike Tyson was my generation's Sonny Liston. The baddest man on the planet.


-dollar bond :

I always liked Tommy Morison. He had loads of charisma in my view. Merger lacked it. Domes had it as well but Razor Ruddick didn't. Great angle here to an article. Very original.


-JohnnyTango :

I would have added Jack Dempsey (charisma) and Roberto Duran (swagger) to the list. Other than that, the piece was right on the mark, Ted. Marvin Hagler had neither; however, all he did was walk into the ring and get the job done. He was a true professional and hard worker -- always in shape. Thanks for the trip down memory lane, Ted. It was a nice journey.


-Kid Blast :

I would have added Jack Dempsey (charisma) and Roberto Duran (swagger) to the list. Other than that, the piece was right on the mark, Ted. Marvin Hagler had neither; however, all he did was walk into the ring and get the job done. He was a true professional and hard worker -- always in shape. Thanks for the trip down memory lane, Ted. It was a nice journey.
Keep in mind that I was mentioning representative examples. But I did neglect Duran. He should have been included. I put Hagler in a category of menacing and nourish. When he entered the ring in that old school white cape, he looked very fearsome. All business and ready to go to war. I'd put Hearns in there as well. Very menacing.


-JohnnyTango :

Although he mentioned Jack Johnson and Max Baer, Ted rarely references a fighter who came before he started following boxing as a young boy. That would explain the omission of Jack Dempsey who was -- in the title of Roger Kahn's book -- "A Flame of Pure Fire." John L. Sullivan was the personification of charisma/swagger -- he fairly invented the persona -- but now we're going back to the 19th century.
?The most popular prize-fighter that ever lived was Jack Dempsey. Nearly everyone in every walk of life seemed to love and admire Jack Dempsey. There was hardly any class to whose imagination he did not appeal. He was and still remains today in the minds of millions of people the perfect type of fighting man.? ~Paul Gallico, American novelist, 1938


-JohnnyTango :

Fighters with the LEAST charisma and no swagger is tied between Audley Harrison and John "The Quiet Man" Ruiz, respectively.


-stormcentre :

Lennox Lewis and Wladimir Klitscho will hopefully not be nominated by anyone on this forum. Probably not Cotto either. Tyson - in my view - had more of an aura around him; than charisma. I think Oscar (especially pre-Trinidad) probably had one of the greatest charisma's around him for any boxer. It wasn't always pleasing to witness from my viewpoint as at times it was a bit glossy/cheesy; but very few boxers had Oscar's perceivable savoir-faire and had achieved his cross over popularity. So if they're your metrics for charisma, Oscar would have to be up there. If not for the word "magnetic" you would also have to say Floyd Mayweather Jr. too, as he has spades of charisma; it's just that the fans are divided over whether it's positive or negative charisma - but nonetheless the PPV numbers and earnings have often told the story of his ability to attract audiences. Naseem Hamed would be up there too. That cat was nuts with his acts and antics in/out of the ring and - once you realized it was all just fun and an act - it becomes obvious he was extremely charismatic. Hector Camacho was pretty charismatic too. As was Sugar Ray Leonard. Duran had both an aura about him and also a dark charisma. Eubank Sr. was charismatic, intoxicated with himself, crazy, and funny all at the same time. Hector Lopez was a bit charismatic as well, in a gunslinger kind of way. There are others, but that's all I can think of for now. It's interesting as for the most part in this thread, it appears that in order to be considered a charismatic boxer you must also be considered to be largely successful. Which raises the question, are charismatic fighters naturally more successful? Or, are successful fighters naturally more charismatic? Cheers,
Storm :) :)


-stormcentre :

Lennox Lewis and Wladimir Klitscho will hopefully not be nominated by anyone on this forum. Probably not Cotto either. Tyson - in my view - had more of an aura around him; than charisma. I think Oscar (especially pre-Trinidad) probably had one of the greatest charisma's around him for any boxer. It wasn't always pleasing to witness from my viewpoint as at times it was a bit glossy/cheesy; but very few boxers had Oscar's perceivable savoir-faire and had achieved his cross over popularity. So if they're your metrics for charisma, Oscar would have to be up there. If not for the word "magnetic" you would also have to say Floyd Mayweather Jr. too, as he has spades of charisma; it's just that the fans are divided over whether it's positive or negative charisma - but nonetheless the PPV numbers and earnings have often told the story of his ability to attract audiences. Naseem Hamed would be up there too. That cat was nuts with his acts and antics in/out of the ring and - once you realized it was all just fun and an act - it becomes obvious he was extremely charismatic. Hector Camacho was pretty charismatic too. As was Sugar Ray Leonard. Duran had both an aura about him and also a dark charisma. Eubank Sr. was charismatic, intoxicated with himself, crazy, and funny all at the same time. Hector Lopez was a bit charismatic as well, in a gunslinger kind of way. There are others, but that's all I can think of for now. It's interesting as for the most part in this thread, it appears that in order to be considered a charismatic boxer you must also be considered to be largely successful. Which raises the question, are charismatic fighters naturally more successful? Or, are successful fighters naturally more charismatic? Anyway, hands down, the most charismatic boxer has to be Muhammad Ali. Has to be. Harry Greb is probably second. Cheers,
Storm :) :)


-Kid Blast :

Lennox Lewis and Wladimir Klitscho will hopefully not be nominated by anyone on this forum. Probably not Cotto either. Tyson - in my view - had more of an aura around him; than charisma. I think Oscar (especially pre-Trinidad) probably had one of the greatest charisma's around him for any boxer. It wasn't always pleasing to witness from my viewpoint as at times it was a bit glossy/cheesy; but very few boxers had Oscar's perceivable savoir-faire and had achieved his cross over popularity. So if they're your metrics for charisma, Oscar would have to be up there. If not for the word "magnetic" you would also have to say Floyd Mayweather Jr. too, as he has spades of charisma; it's just that the fans are divided over whether it's positive or negative charisma - but nonetheless the PPV numbers and earnings have often told the story of his ability to attract audiences. Naseem Hamed would be up there too. That cat was nuts with his acts and antics in/out of the ring and - once you realized it was all just fun and an act - it becomes obvious he was extremely charismatic. Hector Camacho was pretty charismatic too. As was Sugar Ray Leonard. Duran had both an aura about him and also a dark charisma. Eubank Sr. was charismatic, intoxicated with himself, crazy, and funny all at the same time. Hector Lopez was a bit charismatic as well, in a gunslinger kind of way. There are others, but that's all I can think of for now. It's interesting as for the most part in this thread, it appears that in order to be considered a charismatic boxer you must also be considered to be largely successful. Which raises the question, are charismatic fighters naturally more successful? Or, are successful fighters naturally more charismatic? Mayweather = boring SRL = Charisma + along with Tyson, Ali, Dempsey, John L. Sullivan, and others I mentioned. Anyway, hands down, the most charismatic boxer has to be Muhammad Ali. Has to be. Harry Greb is probably second. Cheers,
Storm :) :)
For me the metric is a special and magnetic aura backed up by an electric connection to the fans. James J. Braddock had it; Joe Louis did not. Galento had swagger for sure. Jeff Fenech had it. Not so sure Danny Green has it. That's a close one. If you go county to country, you will come up with one for sure. Russia = Kostya. Japan = Fighting Harrada. Argentina = a bunch including Monzon. Brazil = Popo. Or the Hyena. China = none. Mexico = Raton, Sanchez, Canelo, etc, etc. Canada = Durelle. Bute. Lemieux. The Hiltons. Gatti. Puerto Rico = Ben?tez, Gomez,. Italy = Duilio Loi. Cuba = Kid Gavilan but definitely not Guillermo ?El Chacal? Rigondeaux. Frampton =yes. Santa Cruz = no. Ghana = Azumha Nelson. But not Ike Quartey. Nigeria = Kid Akeem but not Samuel Peters. And on and on and on. First version of Foreman had swagger +; second did not. As for non-successful fighters: I can think of Emmanuel Augustus and Freddy Pendleton off the top of my head.


-stormcentre :

Yeh, look, appreciate everyone has a different perspective. Jeff fenech - whom I liked and shared a gym with for a while there - was charismatic to me. But truth be told he was not to many others (much like Floyd) and also hated (much like Floyd) in many parts of Australia, and that?s why a lot of his fights were in Melbourne. This is why I excluded him. In consideration of that you could say is the thread's question about charisma only related to your own personal viewpoint - or what really happens in the context of; ""was there a large group of people/fans that (despite those whom didn't) really found this guy interesting and/or charismatic"." And, it's hard to say that is not the case for Floyd; even if some subjectively/justifiably found him boring also. Floyd may be boring - I accept that - but there is still a huge audience that finds him charismatic, and at least entertaining. So, if Jeff Fenech gets a pass (from you) then Floyd must too; so long as we accept that charisma doesn?t necessarily mean being loved by all, all the time. Green has a strong personality, but I am not sure it?s charismatic; as he's quite inconsistent and goofy. Many fighters have not been appreciated but still had a charismatic charm about them. Calzaghe is about as successful and highly decorated as any professional middleweight boxer can be. Yet, for long periods of Calzaghe's life (particularly before he flogged Lacy) he was scorned upon and assumed to be boring; and as that all happened he was still (if you knew him) quite a personality and charismatic. Now, he's an unbeaten legend. So, you see, (even aside from the above-mentioned and seeming inconsistency between Jeff fenech and Floyd Mayweather) there are many dimensions to this; charisma. Don?t get me wrong here, as I get and see why folks don?t like Floyd. Sometimes he irks me too. But along with all that, you also have to say that those whom don?t Floyd him - due to how popular Floyd is to those that do like him - can't really say that he isnt charismatic; to those that like/appreciate Floyd. And it was on that objective basis that I raised Mayweather?s name in this thread; which coincidentally will be a difficult basis to argue against. In closing; I appreciate your charismatic meaning (and possibly others) in relation to Floyd and him being boring is subjective. That?s OK too. Cheers,
Storm :) :) This is red hot, easy going, and just out of the studio oven . . .

Just for you Ted.


-Kid Blast :

Thanks I dig that kind of music as you know. Between Green, Fenech and Mundine, I'd say Choc had the most swagger. Now here is one for you:
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QUYO69aclU


-stormcentre :

Thanks I dig that kind of music as you know. Between Green, Fenech and Mundine, I'd say Choc had the most swagger. Now here is one for you:
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QUYO69aclU
Ta, Ted. There are some parallels with the way the public responded to Chock in Australia, and how some do in the USA to Floyd. But, for the most part (and this, to some {but not all} extent, applies with Floyd too); it was not Chock that was the villain; despite him being cast in that light. Often people (whom don't always independently think) love to hate and just jump on the bandwagon; as there's comfort in numbers - plus, it's easy not to do your homework on the subject when, if you wind up being wrong, so is the majority of all the others that did the same as you. There was an article written on BoxingScene a long time ago (after the first Green v Mundine fight) that captured what happened between the two of them perfectly; it was scorched earth at the time due to the fact it told the story straight, didn't pull punches, and was a media release that was not controlled by Green and Fenech. I can try and dig it up for you if you want - just let me know. However, between the two of them, truth be told, it was really Green that was the one that mostly was out of line. Sure Chock can say some strange things, but he actually is a really nice guy; whereas Green - for a while there - he was really full of himself. Anyway, getting back to my earlier Fenech/charisma comments . . . . It was actually Jeff Fenech that signed, steered, and manipulated Danny into doing some of these really disgraceful things. Take it from me though . . . Jeff Fenech, despite his blazing guns approach to fighting - the non stop action when he fought - the wild fans and entourage - his popularity - all the run ins with the law - and all the extremely controversial and public claims/things he authored . . . he was really hated for a while there too. Truth is often stranger than fiction. I can still remember going to Melbourne for one of his fights and people I knew there couldn't believe I supported him. Keep up the good work. Cheers,
Storm :) :)


-larueboenig :

* by Ted Sares BOXERS WITH THE ?IT? FACTOR -- Irish Jerry Quarry, a well-spoken and good looking kid from Southern California but an offspring of the dust bowl, was humble and accessible to his adoring fans. His walk-ins were all about getting the business done in the ring and were not accompanied by rappers or huge entourages. No Justin Beibers for Jerry. When he lost, his fans felt the pain along with him. ?Nobody didn?t like Sara Lee? went the popular food commercial and nobody didn?t like Jerry Quarry. His was what personal magnetism was all about. Iron Mike Tyson had his own brand of charisma and it was structured around his fearsome persona. The electricity before a prime Tyson old-school walk-in would surge through the entire arena. Excitement was on its way. Tyson aroused enthusiasm like no other, though Carlos Monzon had it in a more surreal and romantic sense. Here is what the opening paragraph from an early Tyson Mini Bio states: ?One of the most frightening human beings ever to step into the boxing ring, Mike Tyson was the model of the supreme gladiator - unbeaten and unbeatable. Never before had one individual captured the attention of the wider world via sport except Muhammad Ali.? Strangely enough, Floyd Mayweather Jr, notwithstanding his 49-0 record, great skills, changing monikers, monster bodyguards and Justin Bieber, has never really made that deeply electric connection with fans that a Manny Pacquiao or Marcos Maidana has. Maybe it?s because Junior seems to prize his trophies of wealth above his in-ring accomplishments. As Frank Lotierzo puts it, ?I?ve always maintained that as great as he was on the basketball court, there was nothing more boring or condescending than a Michael Jordan Sunday night conversation on ESPN. Move over Michael, because Floyd Mayweather is in da house and he?s every bit your equal, perhaps even surpassing you.? These days, a red-headed Mexican named Saul ?Canelo? Alvarez has that special quality and then some. Just 26 years old but mature beyond his years, Canelo ("Cinnamon") has a remarkable record of 48-1-1 and is often ranked in pound for pound lists. Showing concern for his knockout victims in the ring has endeared him to devoted fans throughout Mexico and has provided the basis for fighting Julio Cesar Chavez Jr., a fight already being dubbed the biggest fight in Mexican boxing history. Perhaps if Abel Sanchez stopped trying so hard to hype Gennady Golovkin at each and every turn, GGG?s charisma would burst out, though for many it already has. Conversely, no matter what Andre Ward seems to do, charisma is not going to be part of his makeup. The above are simply examples from a long list of fighters who carried the label of being charismatic for having a special connection with the fans. There were some others -- though not as many-- who combined charisma with swagger in their persona. Charisma and Swagger ?[Jack] Johnson enjoyed a bit of renaissance in the late 1960s when Howard Sackler?s play, 'The Great White Hope,? a thinly veiled fictional version of Johnson?s life, was performed on Broadway. But more people at the time thought the play was actually a commentary on then-heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali, who openly identified with Johnson in interviews and in his autobiography, 'The Greatest: My Own Story? (1975).? --Gerald Early Back in the day, Jack Johnson (the first African-American world heavyweight champion), and later Max Baer, had plenty of both. Here is what the International Boxing Hall of Fame has to say about Max: ?Possessing perhaps the most powerful right hand in heavyweight history, Max Baer was a flashy performer who wise-cracked and clowned his way through his career. Although he never fully realized his tremendous potential, Baer won the heavyweight title, and his showmanship entertained an America rocked by the Great Depression.? It just didn?t get any better than when Max Baer (as the heartless Buddy Brannen character in ?The Harder They Fall,?) sauntered over to the doomed Gus Dundee?s corner to wish Gus well against the duped Toro Moreno -- the way he sauntered defined swagger. As for Jack Johnson, the following analysis of the film ?Unforgivable Blackness,? directed by Ken Burns, says it all. See [url=http://www.pbs.org/unforgivableblackness/rebel/]http://www.pbs.org/unforgivableblackness/rebel/ Muhammed Ali arguably was the greatest example of someone who could behave in a boastful and arrogant manner, yet concurrently be the very epitome of charisma. His ostentatious display of arrogance was often perceived as tongue-in-cheek and simply contributed to his charisma. In this, he was unique. Chris Eubank Sr. is the quintessential combination. Even his nickname??Simply the Best? ? carried pomp, but there was far more. His eccentricity, attire and posing was unique, and unlike a more humble Nigel Benn, he milked it to the limit. Of course, Chris could back it up in the squared circle. His air of overbearing self-confidence was his trademark. Check out this YouTube: [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0zlIMvgoBo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0zlIMvgoBo Again, the above are representative; there are far more. *Swagger Now when it comes to an air of overbearing self-confidence, it?s hard to top Jorge Paez Sr. who wore a dress to his 1992 fight against Rafael Ruelas. ?El Maromero? was the very definition of a scary clown and the fans loved him for it. See: [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKI9nqM5nfM]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKI9nqM5nfM Some might argue that Adrien Broner is the quintessential boxer with swagger, but I?d counter by asserting that ?The Problem? is more of a supercilious front. Swagger has to have some substance to back up the pomp. Broner has in large part been seen as a hyped gimmick that can?t back up his motor mouth by winning the big one. This could change. Roy Jones Jr. was all about swagger and he could back it up. (He still swaggers, but sadly he can no longer back it up.) Macho Camacho, Prince Naz, James Toney, Fernando Vargas, Fighting Harada, Khaosai Galaxy, Anthony Mundine, Sung Kil Moon all had it in spades. Deontay Wilder has plenty of swagger but is lacking in the charisma department. Conversely, Jerry Quarry had charisma but not much swagger; he was all about business. Tyson Fury is an original and even wears a sweat shirt that says SWAG DON?T COME CHEAP. He?s not quite a ?Peck?s Bad Boy,? but he comes pretty close. Some say he is dragging boxing through the mud; I say he just might be what boxing needs in a sport/business that overwhelms us with nonstop lawsuits. Whatever the case, he is not hesitant to speak his mind. Yes, the giant gypsy?s temperament could use more tempering, but I suspect he could care less what others think about him. All the rhetoric and loud mouthing is likely a load of blarney and he knows it better than anyone. Oh sure, he could embrace humility, but then he wouldn?t be Tyson Fury. He is the UK?s answer to Ricardo Mayorga, and his quotes or those he inspires are the stuff of a promoter?s dream. Let?s hope he comes back. Like the other two categories, this one is representative. Perhaps you can add some more names to the lists. Ted Sares is one of the world?s oldest active power lifters and holds several records in the Grand Master class. A member of Ring 4?s Boxing Hall of Fame, he enjoys writing about boxing.


-larueboenig :

Christy Martin, Mia St. John, Gogrty and Rijker, Shame on you for forgetting the woman,


-larueboenig :

ience.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/another-tyson.jpg"> * by Ted Sares BOXERS WITH THE ?IT? FACTOR -- Irish Jerry Quarry, a well-spoken and good looking kid from Southern California but an offspring of the dust bowl, was humble and accessible to his adoring fans. His walk-ins were all about getting the business done in the ring and were not accompanied by rappers or huge entourages. No Justin Beibers for Jerry. When he lost, his fans felt the pain along with him. ?Nobody didn?t like Sara Lee? went the popular food commercial and nobody didn?t like Jerry Quarry. His was what personal magnetism was all about. Iron Mike Tyson had his own brand of charisma and it was structured around his fearsome persona. The electricity before a prime Tyson old-school walk-in would surge through the entire arena. Excitement was on its way. Tyson aroused enthusiasm like no other, though Carlos Monzon had it in a more surreal and romantic sense. Here is what the opening paragraph from an early Tyson Mini Bio states: ?One of the most frightening human beings ever to step into the boxing ring, Mike Tyson was the model of the supreme gladiator - unbeaten and unbeatable. Never before had one individual captured the attention of the wider world via sport except Muhammad Ali.? Strangely enough, Floyd Mayweather Jr, notwithstanding his 49-0 record, great skills, changing monikers, monster bodyguards and Justin Bieber, has never really made that deeply electric connection with fans that a Manny Pacquiao or Marcos Maidana has. Maybe it?s because Junior seems to prize his trophies of wealth above his in-ring accomplishments. As Frank Lotierzo puts it, ?I?ve always maintained that as great as he was on the basketball court, there was nothing more boring or condescending than a Michael Jordan Sunday night conversation on ESPN. Move over Michael, because Floyd Mayweather is in da house and he?s every bit your equal, perhaps even surpassing you.? These days, a red-headed Mexican named Saul ?Canelo? Alvarez has that special quality and then some. Just 26 years old but mature beyond his years, Canelo ("Cinnamon") has a remarkable record of 48-1-1 and is often ranked in pound for pound lists. Showing concern for his knockout victims in the ring has endeared him to devoted fans throughout Mexico and has provided the basis for fighting Julio Cesar Chavez Jr., a fight already being dubbed the biggest fight in Mexican boxing history. Perhaps if Abel Sanchez stopped trying so hard to hype Gennady Golovkin at each and every turn, GGG?s charisma would burst out, though for many it already has. Conversely, no matter what Andre Ward seems to do, charisma is not going to be part of his makeup. The above are simply examples from a long list of fighters who carried the label of being charismatic for having a special connection with the fans. There were some others -- though not as many-- who combined charisma with swagger in their persona. Charisma and Swagger ?[Jack] Johnson enjoyed a bit of renaissance in the late 1960s when Howard Sackler?s play, 'The Great White Hope,? a thinly veiled fictional version of Johnson?s life, was performed on Broadway. But more people at the time thought the play was actually a commentary on then-heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali, who openly identified with Johnson in interviews and in his autobiography, 'The Greatest: My Own Story? (1975).? --Gerald Early Back in the day, Jack Johnson (the first African-American world heavyweight champion), and later Max Baer, had plenty of both. Here is what the International Boxing Hall of Fame has to say about Max: ?Possessing perhaps the most powerful right hand in heavyweight history, Max Baer was a flashy performer who wise-cracked and clowned his way through his career. Although he never fully realized his tremendous potential, Baer won the heavyweight title, and his showmanship entertained an America rocked by the Great Depression.? It just didn?t get any better than when Max Baer (as the heartless Buddy Brannen character in ?The Harder They Fall,?) sauntered over to the doomed Gus Dundee?s corner to wish Gus well against the duped Toro Moreno -- the way he sauntered defined swagger. As for Jack Johnson, the following analysis of the film ?Unforgivable Blackness,? directed by Ken Burns, says it all. See [url=http://www.pbs.org/unforgivableblackness/rebel/]http://www.pbs.org/unforgivableblackness/rebel/ Muhammed Ali arguably was the greatest example of someone who could behave in a boastful and arrogant manner, yet concurrently be the very epitome of charisma. His ostentatious display of arrogance was often perceived as tongue-in-cheek and simply contributed to his charisma. In this, he was unique. Chris Eubank Sr. is the quintessential combination. Even his nickname??Simply the Best? ? carried pomp, but there was far more. His eccentricity, attire and posing was unique, and unlike a more humble Nigel Benn, he milked it to the limit. Of course, Chris could back it up in the squared circle. His air of overbearing self-confidence was his trademark. Check out this YouTube: [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0zlIMvgoBo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0zlIMvgoBo Again, the above are representative; there are far more. *Swagger Now when it comes to an air of overbearing self-confidence, it?s hard to top Jorge Paez Sr. who wore a dress to his 1992 fight against Rafael Ruelas. ?El Maromero? was the very definition of a scary clown and the fans loved him for it. See: [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKI9nqM5nfM]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKI9nqM5nfM Some might argue that Adrien Broner is the quintessential boxer with swagger, but I?d counter by asserting that ?The Problem? is more of a supercilious front. Swagger has to have some substance to back up the pomp. Broner has in large part been seen as a hyped gimmick that can?t back up his motor mouth by winning the big one. This could change. Roy Jones Jr. was all about swagger and he could back it up. (He still swaggers, but sadly he can no longer back it up.) Macho Camacho, Prince Naz, James Toney, Fernando Vargas, Fighting Harada, Khaosai Galaxy, Anthony Mundine, Sung Kil Moon all had it in spades. Deontay Wilder has plenty of swagger but is lacking in the charisma department. Conversely, Jerry Quarry had charisma but not much swagger; he was all about business. Tyson Fury is an original and even wears a sweat shirt that says SWAG DON?T COME CHEAP. He?s not quite a ?Peck?s Bad Boy,? but he comes pretty close. Some say he is dragging boxing through the mud; I say he just might be what boxing needs in a sport/business that overwhelms us with nonstop lawsuits. Whatever the case, he is not hesitant to speak his mind. Yes, the giant gypsy?s temperament could use more tempering, but I suspect he could care less what others think about him. All the rhetoric and loud mouthing is likely a load of blarney and he knows it better than anyone. Oh sure, he could embrace humility, but then he wouldn?t be Tyson Fury. He is the UK?s answer to Ricardo Mayorga, and his quotes or those he inspires are the stuff of a promoter?s dream. Let?s hope he comes back. Like the other two categories, this one is representative. Perhaps you can add some more names to the lists. Ted Sares is one of the world?s oldest active power lifters and holds several records in the Grand Master class. A member of Ring 4?s Boxing Hall of Fame, he enjoys writing about boxing.


-stormcentre :

Yes, Ted, Shame on you. How could you forget such an important part of boxing? What about equal rights for all the downtrodden women of the world? Cheers,
Storm :) :)


-larueboenig :

nce.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/another-tyson.jpg"> * by Ted Sares BOXERS WITH THE ?IT? FACTOR -- Irish Jerry Quarry, a well-spoken and good looking kid from Southern California but an offspring of the dust bowl, was humble and accessible to his adoring fans. His walk-ins were all about getting the business done in the ring and were not accompanied by rappers or huge entourages. No Justin Beibers for Jerry. When he lost, his fans felt the pain along with him. ?Nobody didn?t like Sara Lee? went the popular food commercial and nobody didn?t like Jerry Quarry. His was what personal magnetism was all about. Iron Mike Tyson had his own brand of charisma and it was structured around his fearsome persona. The electricity before a prime Tyson old-school walk-in would surge through the entire arena. Excitement was on its way. Tyson aroused enthusiasm like no other, though Carlos Monzon had it in a more surreal and romantic sense. Here is what the opening paragraph from an early Tyson Mini Bio states: ?One of the most frightening human beings ever to step into the boxing ring, Mike Tyson was the model of the supreme gladiator - unbeaten and unbeatable. Never before had one individual captured the attention of the wider world via sport except Muhammad Ali.? Strangely enough, Floyd Mayweather Jr, notwithstanding his 49-0 record, great skills, changing monikers, monster bodyguards and Justin Bieber, has never really made that deeply electric connection with fans that a Manny Pacquiao or Marcos Maidana has. Maybe it?s because Junior seems to prize his trophies of wealth above his in-ring accomplishments. As Frank Lotierzo puts it, ?I?ve always maintained that as great as he was on the basketball court, there was nothing more boring or condescending than a Michael Jordan Sunday night conversation on ESPN. Move over Michael, because Floyd Mayweather is in da house and he?s every bit your equal, perhaps even surpassing you.? These days, a red-headed Mexican named Saul ?Canelo? Alvarez has that special quality and then some. Just 26 years old but mature beyond his years, Canelo ("Cinnamon") has a remarkable record of 48-1-1 and is often ranked in pound for pound lists. Showing concern for his knockout victims in the ring has endeared him to devoted fans throughout Mexico and has provided the basis for fighting Julio Cesar Chavez Jr., a fight already being dubbed the biggest fight in Mexican boxing history. Perhaps if Abel Sanchez stopped trying so hard to hype Gennady Golovkin at each and every turn, GGG?s charisma would burst out, though for many it already has. Conversely, no matter what Andre Ward seems to do, charisma is not going to be part of his makeup. The above are simply examples from a long list of fighters who carried the label of being charismatic for having a special connection with the fans. There were some others -- though not as many-- who combined charisma with swagger in their persona. Charisma and Swagger ?[Jack] Johnson enjoyed a bit of renaissance in the late 1960s when Howard Sackler?s play, 'The Great White Hope,? a thinly veiled fictional version of Johnson?s life, was performed on Broadway. But more people at the time thought the play was actually a commentary on then-heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali, who openly identified with Johnson in interviews and in his autobiography, 'The Greatest: My Own Story? (1975).? --Gerald Early Back in the day, Jack Johnson (the first African-American world heavyweight champion), and later Max Baer, had plenty of both. Here is what the International Boxing Hall of Fame has to say about Max: ?Possessing perhaps the most powerful right hand in heavyweight history, Max Baer was a flashy performer who wise-cracked and clowned his way through his career. Although he never fully realized his tremendous potential, Baer won the heavyweight title, and his showmanship entertained an America rocked by the Great Depression.? It just didn?t get any better than when Max Baer (as the heartless Buddy Brannen character in ?The Harder They Fall,?) sauntered over to the doomed Gus Dundee?s corner to wish Gus well against the duped Toro Moreno -- the way he sauntered defined swagger. As for Jack Johnson, the following analysis of the film ?Unforgivable Blackness,? directed by Ken Burns, says it all. See [url=http://www.pbs.org/unforgivableblackness/rebel/]http://www.pbs.org/unforgivableblackness/rebel/ Muhammed Ali arguably was the greatest example of someone who could behave in a boastful and arrogant manner, yet concurrently be the very epitome of charisma. His ostentatious display of arrogance was often perceived as tongue-in-cheek and simply contributed to his charisma. In this, he was unique. Chris Eubank Sr. is the quintessential combination. Even his nickname??Simply the Best? ? carried pomp, but there was far more. His eccentricity, attire and posing was unique, and unlike a more humble Nigel Benn, he milked it to the limit. Of course, Chris could back it up in the squared circle. His air of overbearing self-confidence was his trademark. Check out this YouTube: [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0zlIMvgoBo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0zlIMvgoBo Again, the above are representative; there are far more. *Swagger Now when it comes to an air of overbearing self-confidence, it?s hard to top Jorge Paez Sr. who wore a dress to his 1992 fight against Rafael Ruelas. ?El Maromero? was the very definition of a scary clown and the fans loved him for it. See: [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKI9nqM5nfM]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKI9nqM5nfM Some might argue that Adrien Broner is the quintessential boxer with swagger, but I?d counter by asserting that ?The Problem? is more of a supercilious front. Swagger has to have some substance to back up the pomp. Broner has in large part been seen as a hyped gimmick that can?t back up his motor mouth by winning the big one. This could change. Roy Jones Jr. was all about swagger and he could back it up. (He still swaggers, but sadly he can no longer back it up.) Macho Camacho, Prince Naz, James Toney, Fernando Vargas, Fighting Harada, Khaosai Galaxy, Anthony Mundine, Sung Kil Moon all had it in spades. Deontay Wilder has plenty of swagger but is lacking in the charisma department. Conversely, Jerry Quarry had charisma but not much swagger; he was all about business. Tyson Fury is an original and even wears a sweat shirt that says SWAG DON?T COME CHEAP. He?s not quite a ?Peck?s Bad Boy,? but he comes pretty close. Some say he is dragging boxing through the mud; I say he just might be what boxing needs in a sport/business that overwhelms us with nonstop lawsuits. Whatever the case, he is not hesitant to speak his mind. Yes, the giant gypsy?s temperament could use more tempering, but I suspect he could care less what others think about him. All the rhetoric and loud mouthing is likely a load of blarney and he knows it better than anyone. Oh sure, he could embrace humility, but then he wouldn?t be Tyson Fury. He is the UK?s answer to Ricardo Mayorga, and his quotes or those he inspires are the stuff of a promoter?s dream. Let?s hope he comes back. Like the other two categories, this one is representative. Perhaps you can add some more names to the lists. Ted Sares is one of the world?s oldest active power lifters and holds several records in the Grand Master class. A member of Ring 4?s Boxing Hall of Fame, he enjoys writing about boxing.


-Kid Blast :

Deidre Gogarty had it in spades. Layla Me Carter also has it today.


-KO Digest :

GGG got that swagger in the ring. Strolling away from beaten prey like he's a prime Mike Tyson.


-Kid Blast :

GGG got that swagger in the ring. Strolling away from beaten prey like he's a prime Mike Tyson.
Yes. More and more with each slaughter. He is ever-so-gradually morphing from ultra-humility to quasi-swagger. A definite change has taken place. Good call.