Golovkin Shows More Than Supreme Power versus Brook

This past Saturday night middleweight champ Gennady Golovkin 36-0 (33) stopped welterweight title holder Kell Brook 36-1 (25) in the fifth round when Brook’s corner threw in the towel. At the time of the stoppage Brook, though not on the verge of being knocked out – was starting to be overwhelmed by Golovkin. Gennady had him where he wanted and was unloading without the worriment of anything Brook was attempting to send back his way. And in the hours that have passed since the fight, I’ve heard some say that Golovkin showed some weaknesses and vulnerabilities that should make Canelo Alvarez more willing to fight him. And to that I say “are you nuts?” If anything Alvarez has more reason to delay the fight than he did this time last week.

Everybody wants to knock Brook for fighting the wrong fight, but what they fail to grasp is that when a wrecking machine is coming at you, it’s not possible to be deliberate and measured. Brook, who showed up to fight and win, had no choice by the time the bout ended because he was being swallowed and engulfed by Golovkin’s aggression and power.

It’s a lot different stopping and planting your shots and then getting out compared to the situation Brook was in. Kell was under duress and was forced to rush his shots because he was trying to occupy Golovkin in order to stabilize the fight. And when you’re forced to rush your punches, there isn’t a single fighter alive who can get much on them because it’s physically impossible. The intent is to give the fighter under assault enough time to try and figure something out that may work. Granted, like a majority of attackers, Golovkin is ineffective if you can make him go back. The problem is making him back up and at what cost? He’s reachable with uppercuts, but throwing them leaves you vulnerable to his big left hook.

Early on Brook did land some good counters but he couldn’t disrupt Gennady’s rhythm. And the reason for that, as we found out during the bout, is that Gennady Golovkin is a thinking fighter who completely understands his limitations. Golovkin is a terrific blend of physicality and processes strengths, weaknesses and a counter tactical attack quick and accurately.  And the fact that Brook was really there to win aided GGG and hastened the tactical decisions he made.

If you doubt that, consider the following: Instead of lying to himself and thinking Brook was getting lucky, GGG almost instantly figured out that Brook’s hands were much faster than his and he wasn’t making him miss with many leads or follow ups. The translation….Brook can easily out-box him if he has the time, space and leisure to do so and that must be eliminated. During the process of getting peppered more than he had in any other fight of his pro career, Golovkin realized after a round or two that Brook was too small and didn’t hit hard enough to hurt him and that it made more sense to allow himself to get hit and turn the fight into what he called “a bar fight.”

This was somewhat reminiscent of the decision that Marvin Hagler made when he fought Thomas Hearns, with the difference being that Hagler had a better understanding going in that if he afforded Hearns the luxury of stopping and planting, Thomas may have shut out the lights and therefore it was better to force Hearns to rush his shots so he couldn’t get everything on them. In some ways that’s not a conventional boxing IQ, but the adjustment and acceptance to get hit was a tactic that had to be adopted by GGG so that he could impose himself physically on Brook.

Many inferred that Golovkin’s defense is porous because he got hit so much, but that’s a fallacy. Gennady wasn’t thinking about looking good; he was most concerned with doing what it would take to end the fight. Yes, as Bernard Hopkins said during the broadcast, Golovkin was arm punching during some exchanges. That’s true, and as the fight progressed, like Brook, GGG also rushed some of his shots and didn’t get everything on them, yet he still broke Brook’s eye socket. And that’s because he is a natural two handed puncher and as I suggested before the bout – he’s capable of breaking almost anything he hits.

The thing that’s scary for you if you’re a future challenger of Gennady Golovkin at 160 pounds or less is that he has shown that he can decipher the strengths and weaknesses of his opponent and knows his own. He’s already starting out ahead of everybody else because of his physicality, and he implicitly believes that he can hurt you and that you can’t really do a lot to him to get him off his game. Sure, he lacks some head movement and a sharp shooter will no doubt have success finding his chin and nailing him. However, as we saw against Brook, he quickly assesses the situation and adjusts and forces the fighter in front of him to fight almost minute to minute while looking for an answer, and the strain of boxing/fighting like that takes so much out of a fighter in that predicament.

Kell Brook was clearly the most skilled and well-rounded opponent Golovkin has faced to date. As is often the case, the lighter fighter moving up is the better boxer and technician. As we’ve seen in many bouts where the smaller fighter challenges the bigger fighter at the higher weight – it’s been the bigger fighter who never quite figures out how to apply his greater strength and power, and ends up befuddled by the fighter moving up via their abundance of quickness and aptitude.

This wasn’t the case in Golovkin-Brook. It was the bigger man who knew there was only one path to victory and that his greater strength and power would be worthless if he didn’t apply it. I say Gennady earned props for that and I don’t demote him because he took more shots than normal and even seemed stymied for a moment midway through the fight. The bottom line is that GGG adjusted. He accepted the trade-off, realizing that in getting his hands on Brook he’d have to get hit a little more than he had in other bouts. That’s what it took for him to win and winning was his intent, not looking pretty and efficient.

Golovkin is a very dangerous middleweight with what looks to be once in a generation power and he has a higher boxing IQ than I initially gave him credit for. He may not be the hardest puncher out there but he’s certainly the most damaging. The cookbook strategists will be espousing strategies and game plans on how to beat him over the next few weeks, and some of them may even make a cogent case. That said, it’ll take more than a fight plan and supreme boxing skills to carry it out. It will require a fighter with physical skill, a great thinking mind who has the strength to impede Golovkin’s aggression and who at the same time isn’t worn to a frazzle trying to hold him off. Yeah, it’ll take the opponent fighting the right fight, but he better be mentally and physically equipped to follow it through. Among fighters currently campaigning between 154 and 160, no such fighter exists – at least not that I’ve seen.

Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at GlovedFist@Gmail.com

Golovkin Shows More Than Supreme Power / Check out more boxingnews andvideos a The Boxing Channel.

COMMENTS

-brownsugar :

Most incisive analysis yet... skull cracking power. And they say challengers will come running out of the woodwork. I doubt it. But its strange when a couple of dozen other fighters start critiquing one fighter....what a crazy mix of reviews. I'm not even going mention the haters, Someone else can do the honors. Even fighters who have ducked him before have something to say....(Eubanks junior and Saunders now say they want a piece) We knew that Kell had not exhibited the capabilities to overcome such a daunting challenge. Neither did Khan... I'm growing tired of commending these guys for their bravery, I'm tired of validating moral victories in the face of insurmountable odds. Kudos to the WBA for not sanctioning the farce. I'm not dissing Brook, just saying Im growing as tired of these circus attractions as I am watching used up trial horses take a beating. Its not fun watching Robert Guerrero and Soto-Karass being reduced to having the skill set of Angulo.. and a little sad. I respect those guys too much. But at the same time the fans who are trying to put Golovkin in with Kovalev and Ward are asking way too much. Its time for promoters to start screening these bizarre match ups. Props to Kell for giving G a little work but it was a suicide mission and now he has soft spot on his head that could be aggravated again. Sorry to sound so depressing, just recovered from a hectic birthday weekend.


-stormcentre :

I just happened to be over in London for this one. I didn?t travel there specifically for the fight, but it didn?t hurt the entertainment efforts we engaged in that it was on/available. Triple actually made it very clear prior to his fight with Brook that the bout was going to be a street fight, and that alone explains the carelessness that that Triple displayed as he prioritized ruthless offence that at times also made him appear vulnerable and human. Aside from that; Gennady was probably in a hurry and/or eager to set a decent pace and close out the fight early because he knows his red blood cell count, strength, and perhaps some other factors, allow him to set a pace that most guys - Brook included - simply can't handle. Up the temperature and someone usually starts to cook. And that's usually the guy that can't think and operate as well under the heat and pressure as the other cat. Additionally, there was always the chance that Brook's pre-fight comments also fired Triple up and placed him - as it were - "in a hurry" to damage Brook and prove a point. Brook had made several dismissive and other perceivably disrespectful prophetic comments before the fight that suggested Triple was in for a surprise. Including those that were dismissive of Triple's ability/strength - those signifying that Kell was looking forward to beating Gennady - and those that advised of how much Brook was looking forward to hitting Golovkin and seeing his reaction. All that combined with the bitter reaction Triple sometimes received by some boisterous parts of the UK crowd whom were exclusively rooting for Brook, seemed to me to put Triple in a frame of mind where the last thing he was concerned with was; formalities, wasting time, and doing anything that appeared to suggest that Kell Brook - regardless of whether he was the most talented fighter Triple has ever professionally faced - would not cave in just as quick and like all the others. And, no matter which way the media may spin it, that is exactly what happened. As Triple simply steamrolled over and dismantled Brook almost as much as he made a fool out of some of the UK media celebrities that suggested otherwise. Some (same) parts of the media (still, after the fight, remarkably) talk of Brook's eye fracture almost as if it were a separate entity. One that was as removed from Brook's accountability - as it was sometimes explained within the context where direct ownership and/or association to Gennady was momentarily suspended. Fact of the matter is that Triple had complete dominion over the fractured eye socket injury that was inflicted upon Brook. Fact of the matter also is that Triple literally broke Brook's face, busted him up pretty convincingly, and made his corner stop the (sanctioned street) fight. Furthermore, this all possibly happened in response to and/or alignment with;


A) Not only, Brook suggesting to the media that he can't wait to feel Triple's power and punch him back.
B) But also, Abel Sanchez' pre-fight prediction that Kell would probably be stopped, and that more than likely it would be Brook's corner that would take an active role in that merciful activity.

Still, some other observations from the fight are as follows . . . .


- Triple hits like a mule and wears a pretty good shot too.
- Going into the fight, there was never any doubt whom, between Brook and Triple, would have the best punch resistance and power; and those 2 metrics right there themselves tell you a fair but about the outcome.

Not in the least, as that means the guy that doesn?t have the best punch resistance and power must be able to (despite the deficits, still) remain extremely composed, hold a good shot, and have excellent (if not superior) stamina and skills.


- However, going into the fight, there was never any doubt in my mind whom, between Brook and Triple, had the superior stamina, skills, and experience; Triple.
- In fact, going into the fight, there was never any doubt in my mind whom, between Brook and Triple, held the majority of the advantages.
- Brook, when choosing to shoot it out, may perhaps have been better served maintaining a more active defence (say like Floyd's); one that allowed and/or facilitated him to remain in the pocket and get shots off; rather than simply backing up and providing Triple with the space to operate.

Certainly, one could have been forgiven for thinking that all that additional strength Brook worked on and achieved prior to the fight via his strength, conditioning, and sport?s science team/program would have surely assisted him with both holding ground and this strategy. Additionally, that strategy also seemed to be something Brook himself advertised prior to the fight.


- Brook, at times, stunned Triple and exposed both, how his lack of defence and some of the inherent clumsiness associated with favoring supinated hooks, could possibly be exploited by stronger and more adroit men, and/or when he Gennady is fatigued; which (the last point) may also play into why Triple likes to close the show early.
- Ward and Degale would (in my opinion and provided they were not contracted to drop weight for the fight) present issues for Triple.

And the same might be the case also for Arum's new middleweight champion (Ramirez) that recently beat Abraham, provided he can continue to fight in the manner that he did against Artur when in with better competition.


- Still, Brook did better than most other middleweights Triple has fought.
- However, given Kell?s professional ledger it?s doubtable that Brook is the most professionally accomplished fighter Triple has ever faced. Perhaps better put; out of all the professional boxers Triple has faced, Brook is the fighter whom has possibly learnt the most skills. Whether or not they're always on display, well that?s another matter.

An often overlooked consideration with complex and superior styles is that it can sometimes take more effort and energy to keep all the intricate parts moving, than otherwise would be the case. Furthermore, at times, they're also only as strong as their weakest link and as such - when seriously damaged and their owners are unable to remain composed - they often don?t lend well to major disaster recovery efforts midstream of the action.

To use an automotive analogy, ask a touring car racing mechanic which - out of Jaguar?s V12 (327 CI), Ford?s Windsor 5.0 Litre V8 (302 CI), and Chevrolet?s 5.3 Litre V8 (327 CI) - is the most reliable and easiest to conduct in race repairs on? Not many will tell you it?s the Jaguar?s V12 (327 CI). Same for owners of road vehicles accommodating the above internal combustion engines. Yet, from an engineering perspective the Jaguar?s V12 (327 CI) undoubtedly has many superior and significant features over the Ford and Chev. And, those superior and significant features pretty much mean nothing if they can?t be reliably and meaningfully utilized and/or when/if they fail they cause catastrophic damage. This is why racing exotic cars (and internal combustion engines) is an expensive pursuit and almost always requires stand alone design and refinement above and beyond what the other more traditional brands usually undertake; in order to both, proactively address any inherent design weaknesses associated with the additional intricacy, and to also underpin the entire race program/activity with reliability and durability that approaches the standard and requirements of racing an intricate and complex design. The analogy in boxing terms is that (throughout the entie fight, but also particularly in the later rounds) there is a far greater reliance upon stamina, propreiception, psychological composure, and other fighting metrics, to successfully sustain complex fighting styles and ensure all their intricate parts are well oiled, reliable, and moving as expected; than exists for, say, a traditional Mexican style. This is one reason why Floyd Mayweather, particularly later in his career - when performing in the ring - fought in a manner where (especially if he had already won the round and/or was on the way to doing so) he was unenthusiastic about unnecessary risk and cautious about expending large reserves of energy and stamina. As - even if it doesn?t provide for an increase of speed and technical ability in the later rounds where it will have the greatest and most obvious impact upon the fight and scorecards -that strategy almost always ensures a win. This is also why Andre Ward fights in the same way. These guys are in a dangerous and lucrative game, and they're not idiots.




- Brook's lack of a noticeably *superior hand speed was also a part of the reason he was not successful moving up from welterweight to middleweight.

Sorry, Frank we differ on this *point. But then you did forecast my ?cookbook strategy? post; which by the way was largely written - despite the similarities - prior to your piece. Only just had time to post now.


- That said, many elements of Brook's approach to the fight were also strategically sound; as the fact of the matter was perhaps not so much that Brook moved up to fight in a division 13 pounds heavier - but more he didn't have the firepower, armory, and experience to match Triple.
- Provided Kell still failed to exhibit noticeably superior hand speed and an active defence; in my opinion the outcome would probably be the same even if Brook was a natural middleweight and/or had already operated there previously.
- Brook's style is one that - particularly if it were to inhabit a naturally bigger guy and not suffer from a speed deficiency - could seriously trouble Triple; which is probably why Triple;


A) Didn't fight Ward at 168.

Please note that - whilst they manifest themselves in a slightly different style - Ward possesses a very similar set of skills to Brook.


B) Wont move up (as Brook did for Triple) and fight Ward as a light heavyweight.


- Even aside from the heavy artillery Gennady brought to the party; Triple's pace and the pressure it brought along with it ensured Brook was unable to meaningfully utilize and/or sustain any technical or stylistic advantage he may have had.

It seems that Frank and I agree on this.


- One, perhaps more subtle indicator (than the explicit beating Triple administered) of how Brook was unable to meaningfully utilize and/or sustain any technical or stylistic advantage he may have had, can be seen from how comfortable and long Brook remained in the southpaw stance for.
- Sanchez' pre-fight comments about how it will take more than a 6 week science experiment to beat Triple were pretty spot on too.

They were, of course, in response to the sport's science program Kell was subjected to going into the fight; as a means of both, (i) cardiovascular, endurance, and strength preparation, and also to (ii) ensure Kell didn't take off as much weight as he usually does before a fight in a way that would best benefit him.



Notice, with the above statement, I didn't say . . .

""And also to (ii) ensure Kell puts on as much required weight . . . before the fight and in a way that would best benefit him"".




- What may have been lost on some is that these types of sports science activities - such as those Kell undertook prior to facing Triple - were most likely a regular feature in Triple's Eastern Bloc amateur program when he first transitioned into the open class seniors and represented the country.
- Meaning that the routine that Triple has honed for himself these days is most likely already (as it applies to him) decades ahead of any broad diagnosis that Brook was ever going to achieve with his . . . . as Sanchez put it . . . pre-fight "science experiment".

To close the post out . . . . I think Triple could probably easily fight Brook at a slightly slower and neater pace, and prolong the pain with carefully timed power shots; and still win. Sort of how a prime Chavez Sr. used to methodically beat on guys and prolong the pain so much so that very few ever asked for rematches. Gennady could probably also give more respect to defence also. But, whilst he holds all the advantages, and enjoys overpowering and disrespecting opponents with pure savagery in the ring, there's probably no point for him in doing so. So he doesn't. Also, it would be nice if Johnny Nelson remembers what he says and claims before a fight - prior to releasing equally eyebrow raising comments after it. I still like Brook and think he has potential though. But his post fight comments about him expecting Triple to be a bigger puncher were (to put it mildly) a bit stretched. After all, Triple was the one that completely overpowered and dominated Brook. Plus, Gennady Golovkin was the same guy that broke Kell's face, and - had Ingle not (wisely) thrown the towel in - Gennady Golovkin was probably also about to do some really serious further damage; as Brook looked pretty spent to me in round 5 just before Dominic raised the towel. Oh, and finally, Triple was also the guy that sent Brook to hospital straight after the fight. So . . . the question begs . . . How much of a bigger puncher do you (Kell) want to meet? How much harder do you really want to be punched? Imagine if Triple hadn't travelled to London and Brook was the one that travelled and had to adjust? Still we know what lies at the origins of these comments. Anyway, just as this now potentially opens up Brook's welterweight title for a vacation and gives new promise to Spence and a few others career; there's also a lot of interesting fights out there for Brook now. With the Triple V Brook fight Kell has got his first major payday and that (plus the inbuilt excuse of moving up in weight) will probably ease the pain associated with his injuries and both, his first professional loss and possibly leaving welterweight and his title behind. And, Triple . . . . Well his show rolls on with another knockout win just as much as it continues to serve as a good example of well managed boxing talent. Gennady Golovkin. Like Brook, still has some interesting options too. Like say . . . .. If Triple fights and beats down middleweights Billy Saunders and/or Chris Eubank Jr. (which is something Triple can do) that earns him another middleweight title and/or loads of UK fans. From there he can fight Danny Jacobs. And that fight against Jacobs - should it happen - will probably be Triple's first truly signature middleweight fight. Just as much as it could present embarrassing problems for the WBA and possibly expose them for ?championship belt prostitution and/or pimping?. As what status does the winner (or loser) of a fight involving both, the WBA "super world" middleweight champion (Triple) and also the WBA "regular" world middleweight champion (Jacobs), own? Does anybody really know?
Storm. :) :) :)


-KO Digest :

Whether he wants to admit it or not, Shawn Porter should be as impressed as anybody with Gennady Golovkin's eye socket crushing performance against welterweight champion Kell Brook. It was Porter who Brook bested in 2014 to wrest away the IBF 147 pound championship. During the fight, Brook slashed away at Porter on the inside, a place where Porter usually does his best work as a bullish pressure fighter. Brook took all that away with finesse, and in the final round, put Porter into a submissive posture by landing precision power punches with less than ten (10) seconds to go. I scored it 117-111 for Brook. As good as Special K is, GGG walked through him like the best pound-for-pound fighter on the planet that he still is.


-Kid Blast :

Solid analysis, Frank. He is the best until proven otherwise. And his Ring IQ is off the charts.


-King Beef :

Most incisive analysis yet... skull cracking power. And they say challengers will come running out of the woodwork. I doubt it. But its strange when a couple of dozen other fighters start critiquing one fighter....what a crazy mix of reviews. I'm not even going mention the haters, Someone else can do the honors. Even fighters who have ducked him before have something to say....(Eubanks junior and Saunders now say they want a piece) We knew that Kell had not exhibited the capabilities to overcome such a daunting challenge. Neither did Khan... I'm growing tired of commending these guys for their bravery, I'm tired of validating moral victories in the face of insurmountable odds. Kudos to the WBA for not sanctioning the farce. I'm not dissing Brook, just saying Im growing as tired of these circus attractions as I am watching used up trial horses take a beating. Its not fun watching Robert Guerrero and Soto-Karass being reduced to having the skill set of Angulo.. and a little sad. I respect those guys too much. But at the same time the fans who are trying to put Golovkin in with Kovalev and Ward are asking way too much. Its time for promoters to start screening these bizarre match ups. Props to Kell for giving G a little work but it was a suicide mission and now he has soft spot on his head that could be aggravated again. Sorry to sound so depressing, just recovered from a hectic birthday weekend.
Good points B-Sug, It's funny to see all these guys (for whatever reasons) not fighting, now wanting a piece. Although I don't think it was that much of an exposure of GGG like some of the talking heads are saying, I can't give him unlimited kudos for being damn near 40 fights in and having his "toughest challenge" with a welterweight; and by no means is that any disrespect to Brook, but he picked a mountain too tall to climb... ( and they have to sell the fight). Can't really blame the fans for wanting match GGG up, especially when his camp is always spewing the nobody will last 12, and sparring K.O stories of all the way up to Light heavy, I personally would like to see him give 168 a shot, I still believe that there is nobody at 160 that stands too much of a chance aside from maybe Jacobs if he can keep that chin outta harms way, still not sold on Eubanks Jr yet. I am also curious to see where Brook settles at, 154 or going back to check out young Spence. Btw..happy belated born day


-brownsugar :

Good points B-Sug, It's funny to see all these guys (for whatever reasons) not fighting, now wanting a piece. Although I don't think it was that much of an exposure of GGG like some of the talking heads are saying, I can't give him unlimited kudos for being damn near 40 fights in and having his "toughest challenge" with a welterweight; and by no means is that any disrespect to Brook, but he picked a mountain too tall to climb... ( and they have to sell the fight). Can't really blame the fans for wanting match GGG up, especially when his camp is always spewing the nobody will last 12, and sparring K.O stories of all the way up to Light heavy, I personally would like to see him give 168 a shot, I still believe that there is nobody at 160 that stands too much of a chance aside from maybe Jacobs if he can keep that chin outta harms way, still not sold on Eubanks Jr yet. I am also curious to see where Brook settles at, 154 or going back to check out young Spence. Btw..happy belated born day
Thanks KB (same as Kell Brook's initials) I'm at the point where instead of wanting to be older, I now look for ways to reverse the time stream continuum, or recode my dna to ignore the genetic markers that tell our bodies to grow older. Theoretically people could live forever without those aging genes and the body could live forever if the master designer wanted to construct us that way... I've got a fresh $50 dollar bill for anyone who can break the code. Yes KB I agree, I thought the result was inevitable and never in doubt... but the route GGG took to get there was "less than artistic" even if he wanted a "Street Fight" "I vant streetfight , I vant sparring match, I vant big drama show" ....Lol Gennadys' going to feel those free shots he's giving away at some point if he lives long enough. I think 168 is within reasonable limits.... Ramirez would be a tough fight with his movement and stamina, the guy exudes youth and resilience. My personal favorites is Jacobs who has a string of 12 ko's against arguably better middleweights than Golovkin, he may not have good punch resistance. But he makes up for it by having incredible savvy and technique... anybody who can catch and skin the savvy Latin snake is no joke. Jacobs hits so hard he can buckle anybody..... not saying he will beat Golovkin but Jacobs could at least be Golovkins signature middleweight opponent at the very least... Both Saunders and Eubanks have been avoiding him. Good comments


-King Beef :

Thanks KB (same as Kell Brook's initials) I'm at the point where instead of wanting to be older, I now look for ways to reverse the time stream continuum, or recode my dna to ignore the genetic markers that tell our bodies to grow older. Theoretically people could live forever without those aging genes and the body could live forever if the master designer wanted to construct us that way... I've got a fresh $50 dollar bill for anyone who can break the code. Yes KB I agree, I thought the result was inevitable and never in doubt... but the route GGG took to get there was "less than artistic" even if he wanted a "Street Fight" "I vant streetfight , I vant sparring match, I vant big drama show" ....Lol Gennadys' going to feel those free shots he's giving away at some point if he lives long enough. I think 168 is within reasonable limits.... Ramirez would be a tough fight with his movement and stamina, the guy exudes youth and resilience. My personal favorites is Jacobs who has a string of 12 ko's against arguably better middleweights than Golovkin, he may not have good punch resistance. But he makes up for it by having incredible savvy and technique... anybody who can catch and skin the savvy Latin snake is no joke. Jacobs hits so hard he can buckle anybody..... not saying he will beat Golovkin but Jacobs could at least be Golovkins signature middleweight opponent at the very least... Both Saunders and Eubanks have been avoiding him. Good comments
Lol, One of the so called free shots might open up a fight ending cut. (wouldn't that be ironic) I think most of Brook"s shots found there way in from hand speed, and lack of head movement. It's easy to give those shot away when your in a "street fight" with your "little brother" who you know can't hurt you. I'd like to see Jacobs get in there, but I have a funny feeling the negotiations are gonna breakdown, and Danny's chin worries me; GGG is the wrong person to be in there with if you have a suspect chin. Ramirez would be good, and I hear DeGale had already been wanting a piece of the action.


-Radam G :

Good points B-Sug, It's funny to see all these guys (for whatever reasons) not fighting, now wanting a piece. Although I don't think it was that much of an exposure of GGG like some of the talking heads are saying, I can't give him unlimited kudos for being damn near 40 fights in and having his "toughest challenge" with a welterweight; and by no means is that any disrespect to Brook, but he picked a mountain too tall to climb... ( and they have to sell the fight). Can't really blame the fans for wanting match GGG up, especially when his camp is always spewing the nobody will last 12, and sparring K.O stories of all the way up to Light heavy, I personally would like to see him give 168 a shot, I still believe that there is nobody at 160 that stands too much of a chance aside from maybe Jacobs if he can keep that chin outta harms way, still not sold on Eubanks Jr yet. I am also curious to see where Brook settles at, 154 or going back to check out young Spence. Btw..happy belated born day
Hehehe! And you are the king. I'm reminded of "Coming to America" from back in da day." Holla!


-Radam G :

Lol, One of the so called free shots might open up a fight ending cut. (wouldn't that be ironic) I think most of Brook"s shots found there way in from hand speed, and lack of head movement. It's easy to give those shot away when your in a "street fight" with your "little brother" who you know can't hurt you. I'd like to see Jacobs get in there, but I have a funny feeling the negotiations are gonna breakdown, and Danny's chin worries me; GGG is the wrong person to be in there with if you have a suspect chin. Ramirez would be good, and I hear DeGale had already been wanting a piece of the action.
Dude didn't give a syet. He got crack and popped evident by a cut on the forehead and a puffy left eye that was waiting to pop open in another round. The boogie man got exposed by a blown-up welterweight, who didn't know syet about going up the correct way in weight. I will bet my California house with umpteen various types of fruit trees on it against your kingdom of beef that Canelo kayos 3g when they meet. I doubt that 3g even gets pass Empire State Danny "The Miracle Man" Jacob without extreme difficulty. Holla!


-FRANK MC GOWAN :

Great article by Frank Lotierzo. You have to possess a great natural aptitude for boxing to be able to assess a fight and fighters the way Frank does. Of all the readings i've done on boxing, nobody puts their words and thoughts on paper like him. You nailed this fight.