Boxing and Drama, Part 1

 

By Ted Sares

Like snowflakes, no two boxing matches are alike. Each presents the possibility for spine-tingling drama or mind-numbing boredom. Surprise is part of the equation.

In 1982, Valerie Chacon, the wife of former WBC featherweight champion Bobby Chacon, shot herself to death because Bobby would not quit the ring until after his next fight. When Chacon received word of his wife’s death, he told the promoter that he would go through with the fight against Salvador Ugalde. Dedicating the fight to Valerie, he KO’ed Ugalde in the third round. This was the kind of drama that even boxing movies could not conjure up.

When cagey Archie Moore came back from Hell to take out Yvon Durelle in 1958 In a momentum-shifting, back-and-forth brawl that has to be seen to  be believed, the drama was palpable, but no more so than when the late Chico Corrales (pictured) shocked the boxing world with his sudden and unexpected turnaround against Jose Luis Castillo in 2005. Yes, surprise is definitely a part of it but sometimes the drama is part of a bigger picture.

Irish Mickey Ward revived his career in 1997 when, after taking round after round of beat-down punishment from young and undefeated Alfonzo Sanchez, he let loose a signature sizzling body shot that found the highly touted Mexican’s “floating rib.” The referee, the late Mitch Halpern said: “I told Ward, ‘Show me something or I’m stopping the fight…He was one punch away from me stopping it. Then he threw a hell of a punch.” The subsequent significance of that punch for Ward’s career cannot be measured.

Writer Ron Borges remembered Ward’s fight with Reggie Green in 1999 as follows:

“Ward would experience a moment similar to that of the Sanchez fight two years later against fellow journeyman Reggie Green. This time it wasn’t the Thomas and Mack Center, but rather an old ice arena in New Hampshire. …That is what boxing is for most prizefighters: a long walk to an ice arena in Nowhereville. Yet things can happen in such places on the right night. Or the wrong one, depending on where you end up.

“That night, less than 2,000 people, plus an ESPN2 audience, witnessed the kind of savagery one normally only reads about. For 20 seconds short of 10 rounds they had beaten each other half to death because they knew what they were fighting for. Their lives.”

 Teddy Atlas added: “That was not entertainment; that was not business. That was fighting. This is a barbaric thing at the core of it. It ain’t always pretty, but it’s real…. that was a real guy up there. It was like the first time your parents took you to the zoo and they said, ‘That there is a lion.’ And you look and he roars and you think, ‘Yeah, that’s a lion!’ Tonight, if you never been there before, that was a fighter.”

 It’s rumored that award-winning director Ang Lee soon will be making a technically innovative drama about the legendary Ali-Frazier Thrilla in Manilla, Nothing could be more appropriate, but another fight that caught my fancy took place in 1982. It was the backdrop of carefully orchestrated racial stratification rather than the fight itself that offered up the dramatic effect.

 Holmes vs. Cooney

 “He’s not the white man, he’s the right man”.-Dennis Rappaport, who along with Mike Jones was Gerry’s managers. The duo were known as the “Whacko Twins”.

 “Who the hell is Gerry Cooney….I’ve proved over and over again that I’m the baddest heavyweight in the world. I’ve beaten everyone. He’s the Great White Dope. Who’s he ever beaten? He ain’t never fought anybody. If he wasn’t white, he wouldn’t be anywhere. If he was black, nobody would know who he is.”—Larry Holmes

“This is a white and black fight”. –Don King, Holmes’s promoter.

When WBC Champion Larry Holmes (39-0) met the number one ranked Gerry Cooney (25-0) at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas on June 11, 1982, it was one of the most highly anticipated fights of the early 1980s. Don King had shrewdly orchestrated it as black vs. white and cast Cooney as “The Great White Hope,” but it really was black vs. white equals green. This was all about making money. Still, Cooney was riding the bandwagon, while an embittered Holmes, though the champion, was relegated to second fiddle. The media disrespected Holmes and heaped a load of expectations on Cooney’s back with the racial element fueling a dramatic and edgy backdrop to the event.

Finally the fight came and Cooney, whom many thought would beat Holmes, made the long walk to the ring with an old school green robe and hood covering his head, while an intense and focused Holmes came in, almost like an apparition, to his signature walk-in song (also used by David Haye) “Ain’t No Stopping Us Now” sung by the talented McFadden and Whitehead. The urgency of the rhythm blended well with Holmes’s intensity and the anticipative nature of the fight. Listen to it for the first time again: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VuAZTWGfQTs

First Verse:

Now, are you all ready?

Are y’all ready?

Now we gonna do it with the fever

Yeah, Come on

Ain’t no stoppin’ us now

We’re on the move (yeah-ee-a, yeah-ee-a)

Ain’t no stoppin’ us now

We’ve got the groove

 Adding to the delight of the Cooney fans, the ring announcer, Chuck Hull, shamefully introduced Holmes first. This was unprecedented because traditionally the challenger is announced first and the champion last. Many at ringside considered it terribly disrespectful toward Holmes, but Larry kept his cool. In fact, after referee Mills Lane gave the instructions, Larry looked at the big 6’6” Irishman (who kept his eyes downward) and said, “Let’s have a good fight.”

As for the fight itself, while it did not quite equal the drama of the build-up, it was a dandy with Holmes finally bloodying, breaking down, and stopping the courageous but outclassed Cooney in the 13th round. There was one moment when the bell rang ending the gut-crunching 10th round when both men simultaneously made a motion to pat each other on the back in a wordless gesture of mutual respect. Given the nasty context created by the whacko twins, this was a refreshingly marvelous thing to behold.

Fast Forward

The movie “Bleed for This” is due out in late November 2016 and is about Vinny Pazienza, who shot to stardom after winning two world title fights but was told he might never walk again after a horrific car accident left him with a severe spine injury. But he did come back and he did win as real-life drama ruled. Of course, in this age of social media, “Drama” takes on a more manufactured meaning but it still sells fights.

Klitschko vs. Fury Number Two will not be Holmes vs. Cooney by any stretch of the imagination. Shannon Briggs reinvented himself as an interesting personality. But he has a phony and totally manufactured –if not bile-inducing–aura about him. On another level, Deontay Wilder is just vulnerable enough to provide the dramatic effect. Had he fought Povetkin, that quality quite likely would have emerged?

Gennady Golovkin always promises a “good drama show,” but he is simply too good to offer up much more than a brutal knockout. His shows are highly entertaining and knockouts sell, but at what point does the predictability get stale? Fighters like Orlando “Siri “Salido are more likely to provide the chills required for a “good drama show.” Arturo Gatti –even in death– was the personification of boxing and drama.  Miguel Cotto’s symbiosis with the fans in Madison Square Garden nails it.

In the end, trying to predict drama in boxing can be daunting, as the element of surprise can pop up at any time. An exciting matchup can be boring while a boring one can surprise.  Hagler starched Hearns (no surprise that it was during a great fire-fight), but Hearns shocked and waxed Duran in frightening fashion – the same Roberto Duran that went 15 rounds with Marvin Hagler.

Yes, each fight is like a snowflake.

Ted Sares is one of the world’s oldest active power lifters and holds several records. A member of Ring 4’s Boxing Hall of Fame, he enjoys writing about boxing.

COMMENTS

-JohnnyTango :

"Black vs. white equals green." Ha, so damn true with Don King! I'm not looking forward to "Bleed for This" about the life of Vinny Pazienza. "Hands of Stone" is doing terrible at the box office. Rotten Tomatoes gives it a 44-percent rating. With the exception of a few boxing films, most just suck! I enjoyed the read, Ted. Well researched, interesting, and informative as usual. I can't wait for part-two.


-Kid Blast :

Thanks mate. I agree that most boxing films suck. And now they are coming out with one on Chuck Wepner. Give me a break.


-brownsugar :

Good read Ted, I'm glad you brought up Golovkin, a boxing fan brought this too my attention earlier today.... its been four whole, long years since Golovkin became champ and has he's been sitting on the shelf like Cinderella waiting for the arrival of the Sweet Prince, Golovkin has been awaiting a worthy challenger to test his skillset......for four long years. (I bet he never saw this coming) Jacobs said recently that he wanted the fight against GGG..... but he wants three times what he made against Quillen. That's approximately 3.7 million. What's he trying to do? Set up a retirement and disability fund? Its getting ridiculous, we finally get the type of fighting machine that fight fans crave, the kind of fighter that only comes around once every decade or two and no one has stepped forward except for Brook to fulfill our craving for the big drama show. Shameless. And unfortunately in my humble opinion Brook is going down like all the rest .... while Canelo muses about fighting Conner McGregor. and in other news Luis Ortiz vs Ustinov is falling apart because Ortiz is demanding more money. Hughey Fury may be sidelined in his upcoming fight because of an extreme case of acne, ..pus bubbles and all. And Gervonta Davis is supposedly fighting Jason Sosa, the muscular Dominican who recently usurped the title from Javier Fortuna via a shocking upset. Just 10 or 11 fights in and the young prospect Gervonta is being led toward the proverbial baptism of fire with his toughest opponent being the personage of Cristobal Cruz, a faded fighter who is a mere shadow of his former self. This I gotta see... according to Gervonta's twitter feed he can't wait to get that belt. Apparently... The influx of cash, notoriety and status has proven to be too much of a magnet for the young and upcoming prospect to resist. I mean how could any kid in Gervonta's shoes resist... Just a week ago he was complaining that Floyd had him rotting on the self on social media. Floyd always matches his guys tough, which is why so many of them have losses. Its time to see if Gervonta can pass his first midterm examination. I'm cautiously picking Gervonta, based on his youth, hunger, and unadulterated punching power. Great article.


-JohnnyTango :

Good read Ted, I'm glad you brought up Golovkin, a boxing fan brought this too my attention earlier today.... its been four whole, long years since Golovkin became champ and has he's been sitting on the shelf, like Cinderella waiting in a coma, for the arrival of the Good Prince, a worthy challenger to test his skillset......for four long years. Jacobs said recently that he wanted the fight... but he wants three times what he made against Quillen. That's approximately 3.7 million. What's he trying to do? Set up a retirement and disability fund? Its getting ridiculous, we get the type of fighting machine that fight fans crave, and no one has stepped forward except Brook to fulfill our craving for the big drama show. Shameless. And Brook is going down like all the rest ....
That's what I like about the UFC. Fights fans want are made quickly especially in the women's 135-pound division.


-brownsugar :

If there was a like button on this site Johnny I'd be hitting it right now. ...so true.


-JohnnyTango :

Thirty-something years ago the middleweight division was exciting. Leonard fought Duran, Hearns, and Hagler. Hagler fought Hearns and Duran. Hearns fought Hagler, Leonard, and Duran. You see where I'm going with this. That was an exciting division and an interesting time to follow boxing.


-JohnnyTango :

If there was a like button on this site Johnny I'd be hitting it right now. ...so true.
Thanks, B. Likewise.


-Kid Blast :

Good read Ted, I'm glad you brought up Golovkin, a boxing fan brought this too my attention earlier today.... its been four whole, long years since Golovkin became champ and has he's been sitting on the shelf like Cinderella waiting for the arrival of the Sweet Prince, Golovkin has been awaiting a worthy challenger to test his skillset......for four long years. (I bet he never saw this coming) Jacobs said recently that he wanted the fight against GGG..... but he wants three times what he made against Quillen. That's approximately 3.7 million. What's he trying to do? Set up a retirement and disability fund? Its getting ridiculous, we finally get the type of fighting machine that fight fans crave, the kind of fighter that only comes around once every decade or two and no one has stepped forward except for Brook to fulfill our craving for the big drama show. Shameless. And unfortunately in my humble opinion Brook is going down like all the rest .... while Canelo muses about fighting Conner McGregor. and in other news Luis Ortiz vs Ustinov is falling apart because Ortiz is demanding more money. Hughey Fury may be sidelined in his upcoming fight because of an extreme case of acne, ..pus bubbles and all. And Gervonta Davis is supposedly fighting Jason Sosa, the muscular Dominican who recently usurped the title from Javier Fortuna via a shocking upset. Just 10 or 11 fights in and the young prospect Gervonta is being led toward the proverbial baptism of fire with his toughest opponent being the personage of Cristobal Cruz, a faded fighter who is a mere shadow of his former self. This I gotta see... according to Gervonta's twitter feed he can't wait to get that belt. Apparently... The influx of cash, notoriety and status has proven to be too much of a magnet for the young and upcoming prospect to resist. I mean how could any kid in Gervonta's shoes resist... Just a week ago he was complaining that Floyd had him rotting on the self on social media. Floyd always matches his guys tough, which is why so many of them have losses. Its time to see if Gervonta can pass his first midterm examination. I'm cautiously picking Gervonta, based on his youth, hunger, and unadulterated punching power. Great article.
I thank you kindly BS. Your post was spot on.


-Radam G :

Very impressive copy. You got skills! And with every one of your masterpiece features, you are giving TSS Universe amazing thrills. Holla!


-Radam G :

"Black vs. white equals green." Ha, so damn true with Don King! I'm not looking forward to "Bleed for This" about the life of Vinny Pazienza. "Hands of Stone" is doing terrible at the box office. Rotten Tomatoes gives it a 44-percent rating. With the exception of a few boxing films, most just suck! I enjoyed the read, Ted. Well researched, interesting, and informative as usual. I can't wait for part-two.
Hehehe! You gots jokes! But no doubt that da Don K has been an archmaster promoter in making green outta black and white and even mixing in brown and yellow. Holla!


-jilrenee :

Ted, you're always a great read. And this is truly interesting and intimate material. You are material for a movie!


-stormcentre :

Good stuff KB. Nice write up.
Storm. :) :)


-Tex Hassler :

If a fighter stays in boxing long enough he can expect brain problems and probably brain problems. It is tough sport. One of the amatuers in the gym I trained at had 40 fights at age 16 and was having brain problems even at that early age. Bigger gloves, head guards and what ever else will not keep one from serious injury. As Joe Frazier said, "Boxinb is a hurting business!" Fine insight from Dr. Sares, as always.


-Tex Hassler :

I meant to say brain and possible vision problems. That is the two area boxers can sooner or later expect problems in. I fought with one amateur who lost vision in one eye. I took the fight knowing that but made a real effort not to punch his bad eye. I know his family and did not want to cause more problems. He wanted to have one final time with the gloves on and I wanted to see he did not get hurt.


-Kid Blast :

Very impressive copy. You got skills! And with every one of your masterpiece features, you are giving TSS Universe amazing thrills. Holla!
Thank you so much Radam. Much appreciated


-Kid Blast :

Good stuff KB. Nice write up.
Storm. :) :)
Thank you Storm but why no music?


-Kid Blast :

Ted, you're always a great read. And this is truly interesting and intimate material. You are material for a movie!
A chance to make some BIG money before I meet the BIG power lifter in the sky, eh?


-stormcentre :

Thank you Storm but why no music?
Ask and ye shall receive. Cheers,
Storm. :) :) :)
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZY7SX7rRlA


-Kid Blast :

Maybe Bobby Chacon can join Valerie now. I am stunned, saddened and in disbelief. His ring exploits were a major part of my passion for boxing.


-dollar bond :

Brilliant stuff, Ted. Nicely composed and very tight, the perfect essay. It flowed smoothly.


-KO Digest :

Bold copy, literally and figuratively.


-FrankinDallas :

I'm not up on Asian boxing, but has there ever been a big fight between a Japanese boxer and a Korean boxer? Ever? Like in the Olympics and/or professional, or during the Japanese occupation of Korea? Talk about big drama...it gets huge drama when it's between two countries or two competing ideologies, like Louis vs. Schmeling.


-Kid Blast :

Brilliant stuff, Ted. Nicely composed and very tight, the perfect essay. It flowed smoothly.
Thank you Billy


-Kid Blast :

Bold copy, literally and figuratively.
Thank you so much Jeffery


-Kid Blast :

I'm not up on Asian boxing, but has there ever been a big fight between a Japanese boxer and a Korean boxer? Ever? Like in the Olympics and/or professional, or during the Japanese occupation of Korea? Talk about big drama...it gets huge drama when it's between two countries or two competing ideologies, like Louis vs. Schmeling.
I think there was one between North and South Korea. I'll look it up. I think I wrote about it once.


-Kid Blast :

I'm not up on Asian boxing, but has there ever been a big fight between a Japanese boxer and a Korean boxer? Ever? Like in the Olympics and/or professional, or during the Japanese occupation of Korea? Talk about big drama...it gets huge drama when it's between two countries or two competing ideologies, like Louis vs. Schmeling.
Here you go: Masamori Tokuyama (Chang Soo Hong) (1994-2006) It's a shame for a Korean not to speak Korean fluently and so I have decided to dedicate myself to studying the Korean language after retirement… --Tokuyama My dream is to set up a ring on the 38th parallel and fight a title match there. --Tokuyama I received many threatening messages that hurt my feelings," he said. "But I also received many encouraging mails from fans. I just want to live as a Korean boxer in Japan. --Tokuyama The ancestors of this former WBC World Super Flyweight Champions are from a village in the northern part of the Korean Peninsula. They were taken to Japan as forced laborers during Japan's colonial occupation of the Korean Peninsula in the first half of the 20th century. Tokuyama (Hong) flew under the radar because of his perceived pro-Pyongyang affiliation with North Korea. He was born in Japan and is a third generation Zainichi, just one of some 600,000 ethnic Koreans who reside in Japan, the largest ethnic minority group-- and the largest group of foreign permanent residents—in the country. The majority of Koreans in Japan are known as Zainichi which is a Japanese word that means "staying in Japan." Zainichi Korean refers only to long term, permanent residents of Japan who have retained their South Korean nationalities. Tokuyama used both his Japanese name (Masamori Tokuyama) and real name (Chang-soo Hong), while declaring that he was a Zainichi Korean. He often took political controversy inside the ring, carrying a North Korean flag in his entrances and wearing trunks labeled "One Korea." The shorts with an embroidered outline of the Korean peninsula became Hong's trademark, and fans were accustomed to his shouting of "Korea is one" after every bout. Adding fuel to his political leanings, he often used the North Korean national anthem as his entrance theme. Needless to say, such displays of ethnic pride did little for his career in South Korea. However, in a stunning act of reversal in 2007 and reflecting the fact that deep down he really had little interest (or perhaps understanding) in the complex politics between South Korea and Stalinist North Korea, he changed his nationality to South Korean and is now studying the South Korean language in an attempt to shed any trace of a North Korean accent, a low-status marker that often holds back North Korean defectors. Ring Accomplishments As for his great accomplishments in the ring, Hong won the WBC Super Flyweight Title in August 2000 by beating then undefeated In-Joo Cho (18-0 coming in) and defended the title eight consecutive times before he was stopped by Japan's Katsushige Kwashima in June 2004. However, he avenged this defeat by beating Kwashima and regaining his crown again in Japan. Curiously, his second win over In-Joo Cho was in Seoul, the only time he fought outside of Japan. In February 2006, he retained the title with a unanimous decision over the very capable Jose Navarro (23-1 at the time). Hong relinquished his title after this fight and announced his retirement but later said he would continue fighting if he could face Hozumi Hasegawa (then 19-2 ) for the WBC Bantamweight Title. However, Hasegawa declined the challenge so Tokuyama, citing lack of motivation, remained retired, finishing with a mark of 32-3-1. A review of Masamori Tokuyama’s opponents reveals some astonishing information. In addition to beating Katsushige Kawashima in two of three bouts, he also had wins over former world champion Dmitri “The Baby” Kirillov, former world champion Gerry “Fearless” Penalosa (twice), former world champion In-Joo Cho (twice), Pone Saengmorakot (19-1) for the vacant OPBF Super Flyweight Title, and former world champion Hiroki Ioka. Some might say a case could be made for inducting Hong into the Hall of Fame, but then others might say that it would easier for a camel getting through the eye of a needle.


-FrankinDallas :

Great stuff, Ted. I wonder what that nut job Kim Jong Il would do to Hong if he ever went to N Korea.


-Radam G :

Great stuff, Ted. I wonder what that nut job Kim Jong Il would do to Hong if he ever went to N Korea.
Boxing is still banned in North Korea. Holla!


-Skibbz :

a boxing fan brought this too my attention earlier today.... its been four whole, long years since Golovkin became champ and has he's been sitting on the shelf like Cinderella waiting for the arrival of the Sweet Prince, Golovkin has been awaiting a worthy challenger to test his skillset......for four long years. (I bet he never saw this coming) Jacobs said recently that he wanted the fight against GGG..... but he wants three times what he made against Quillen. That's approximately 3.7 million. What's he trying to do? Set up a retirement and disability fund? Its getting ridiculous, we finally get the type of fighting machine that fight fans crave, the kind of fighter that only comes around once every decade or two and no one has stepped forward except for Brook to fulfill our craving for the big drama show. Shameless. And unfortunately in my humble opinion Brook is going down like all the rest .... while Canelo muses about fighting Conner McGregor. and in other news Luis Ortiz vs Ustinov is falling apart because Ortiz is demanding more money. Hughey Fury may be sidelined in his upcoming fight because of an extreme case of acne, ..pus bubbles and all. And Gervonta Davis is supposedly fighting Jason Sosa, the muscular Dominican who recently usurped the title from Javier Fortuna via a shocking upset. Just 10 or 11 fights in and the young prospect Gervonta is being led toward the proverbial baptism of fire with his toughest opponent being the personage of Cristobal Cruz, a faded fighter who is a mere shadow of his former self. This I gotta see... according to Gervonta's twitter feed he can't wait to get that belt. Apparently... The influx of cash, notoriety and status has proven to be too much of a magnet for the young and upcoming prospect to resist. I mean how could any kid in Gervonta's shoes resist... Just a week ago he was complaining that Floyd had him rotting on the self on social media. Floyd always matches his guys tough, which is why so many of them have losses. Its time to see if Gervonta can pass his first midterm examination. I'm cautiously picking Gervonta, based on his youth, hunger, and unadulterated punching power. Great article.
Gotta agree with you Bsuge. Golovkin's outfit shouldn't have to mint everyone they face off against GGG but that's what the opponents are all demanding. I was one of the voices who cried out saying Golovkin still has a below par resume, but his skill and professional ethic is there for all to see and admire. Going onto your point about Floyd mathcing his guys tough, I think you're right and so is Floyd's approach. I recently spoke to Joshua Buatsi the GB Light Heavyweight bronze medallist, he said he's going to finish his degree in University and then decide which way to turn in his boxing career. He seemed at a crossroads when talking about a future promoter and my advice was to him that whoever represents you, do not let them wrap you up for 20 fights. It is the safest route without doubt, but you miss out a lot on vital experience and learning, and also the fans are clued up now thanks to BoxRec etc. to many guys that fill u the records. In a similar vain, Charlie Edwards, the flyweight fighting this weekend is up against RG's countryman Johnriel Casimero, in only his 9th bout... A huge step up, and I do not see him beating Casimero, but applause to him for taking the fight at such an early age, not being afraid to lose and mix it with one of the best in the division. That's how to grow as a fighter in my opinion.


-Kid Blast :

Casimero is a heavy load for anyone. He is very good.


-tlig :

Chuck Hull had a habit of sometimes introducing the champion first. It's funny how much Larry Holmes whines about that supposed injustice (like he does about everything else). Go watch Holmes challenging Ken Norton for the WBC title in 1978 and tell me who was introduced last. That's right, it was the challenger Larry Holmes. And by the same Chuck Hall no less.


-Kid Blast :

tlig, you have it right.; Holmes, JMM, and Cotto are whiners in my opinion. But all three are great fighters.


-deepwater2 :

Cotto vs GGG at 155 would be a good massacre to watch.


-Kid Blast :

Cotto vs GGG at 155 would be a good massacre to watch.
I'd love to watch it--and at MSG to boot. Worse than Margo Number One.


-JohnnyTango :

Brilliant stuff, Ted. Nicely composed and very tight, the perfect essay. It flowed smoothly.
Good ebb and flow I might add.


-JohnnyTango :

Chuck Hull had a habit of sometimes introducing the champion first. It's funny how much Larry Holmes whines about that supposed injustice (like he does about everything else). Go watch Holmes challenging Ken Norton for the WBC title in 1978 and tell me who was introduced last. That's right, it was the challenger Larry Holmes. And by the same Chuck Hall no less.
FYI: If anyone cares ... The late Chuck Hull managed the Oxnard Theater (Oxnard, Calif.) back in the 50s. My ex mother-in-law worked for him as a ticket taker when she was 16-years-old.


-JohnnyTango :

Chuck Hull had a habit of sometimes introducing the champion first. It's funny how much Larry Holmes whines about that supposed injustice (like he does about everything else). Go watch Holmes challenging Ken Norton for the WBC title in 1978 and tell me who was introduced last. That's right, it was the challenger Larry Holmes. And by the same Chuck Hall no less.

->http://lasvegassun.com/news/2000/feb/16/hull-las-vegas-longtime-voice-of-boxing-dies-at-75/


-Kid Blast :

"My husband did not sell himself like some announcers do, but rather he sold the product -- and that was the fighters, whom he admired because they trained so hard," Mary Hull said. :In the late 1980s Hull was forced out of boxing when national promoters demanded more
flamboyant announcers to hype their events. Hull refused to jazz up his act. Mary said Chuck told her: "I will not prostitute my craft." Hmm. Who could that be?