Everyone Has That ONE Favorite Boxing Match

Many count Castillo vs. Corrales (2005) as their favorite while older fans like Graziano vs. Zale (1947), Durelle vs. Moore (1958, Pep vs. Saddler (1949) and DeMarco vs. Basilio (1955). The “War” between Hagler and -Hearns (1985) rightfully tops many lists as does the drama-filled Jorge Castro–John David Jackson (1994). When Hearns came out fast at the opening bell only to be met by a bald headed monster, it was spine-tingling electricity at its best; it was anticipative mayhem. .Vazquez-Marquez (2008) and Morales-Barrera (2000) showcased Mexican fighters who combined technique with a brawler’s proclivity to create an atomic cocktail.

Bobby Chacon and Cornelius Boza Edwards (1983) was legendary, and Chacon’s classic battle with Rafael Limon (1982) was the most compelling and memorable in their four-fight series

The first Gatti vs. Ward is one that is at the top end of many memory banks and, of course, Ali’s bouts with Frazier and Foreman are up there along with the frenzy of Pryor vs. Arguello (1982).

Lyle and Foreman exchange bombs and knockdowns in 1976. Then in 1972, Michael Moorer and Bert Cooper did the same. These two brawls could easily be someone’s favorite. However, the Nardico-Norkus eight knockdown Pier Six in 1954 was quintessentially old school and it is on many leader boards.

The scary Tommy Morrison vs. Joe Hipp slugfest in Reno in1992 gave new meaning to the phrase “bone crunching.” Morrison‘s jaw and both of his hands were broken, but Joe lost via a 9th round comeback stoppage by the “Duke.” Not to be outdone, Joe suffered a complete shattering of his cheekbones.

Bruce Curry and Monroe Brooks put on their own version of “To Live and Die in LA” in 1978 at the Olympic Auditorium. For those who witnessed the fifth round of the incredible Somsak Sithchatchawal vs. Mahyar “Little Tyson” Monshipour savagery in 2006, Brooks-Curry was like that for almost nine full rounds. Neither man died in L.A.; they both lived on, but in different ways.

Thus, it seems that every serious fan, aficionado or writer has that One favorite fight, the one that is indelible and is locked into the memory like concrete.

Carl Thompson vs. Ezra Sellers (2001)

“Thompson looks to be hurt by every shot he takes, but then again so does Sellers.”—Spencer Oliver

High up on my list is Carl “The Cat” Thompson vs. the late Ezra Sellers, a classic match (with a prime Steve Smoger refereeing) in 2001 that involved at least six official knockdowns; Thompson was knocked down four times, Sellers twice. This was no boxing match but rather a no holds-barred fight between two of the most exciting punchers in boxing

Going into the third round, both men had been staggered and dropped hard. Both were on the verge of being put to sleep. Finally, Sellers became the Sandman when he KO’d The Cat in the fourth round with a crunching counter right hook, ending a winning streak that started after Thompson lost to Johnny Nelson in 1999. Thompson had been knocked down many times, but he always got up. This time he was separated from his senses and sent to Feline Dreamland. He finally rose from the canvas to the applause of the stunned and worried crowd.

This fight showed what can happen when two heavy handed types with suspect chins face off and decide to let it all hang out Here it is: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBX6OPvMdJg

Lee Roy “Solid Gold” Murphy vs. Chisanda Mutti (1985)

One of the most unique happenings in a boxing match occurred in Monte Carlo, Monaco, in 1985 when Chicagoan Lee Roy “Solid Gold” Murphy (the IBF cruiserweight titleholder) and rugged Zambian Chisanda Mutti engaged in a brutal simultaneous double knockdown in the waning moments of the fight. A badly hurt Murphy barely beat referee Larry Hazzard’s count while Mutti remained down and was counted out. The crowd was up and roaring in disbelief. And so was I.  Mutti then had to be helped from the ring.

This was no Rocky movie; this was real and unforgettable and it came after an 11th round that had to be seen to be believed. In fact, the entire fight involved seesaw exchanges that were of the career ending type. Because of its ending, this ended up being a cult classic

My ONE favorite (2000)

“It was almost as though Wayne and myself  [sic] had communicated through telepathy. Somehow he got it across to me that he’d taken enough and I stopped…”—Michael Ayers

“Squinting at features even more battered than his own, Michael Ayers could tell from the look of resignation in Wayne Rigby’s eyes that his opponent was finished. The fire which raged fiercely for 10 rounds had been doused. Then, with Rigby helpless and American referee Arthur Mercante Jr. hesitating, came a moment unique in boxing.”—Mike Lewis, February 24, 2001, the Telegraph

…a credit to the sport f—– nearly brought me to tears i would’ve emptied my pockets and thrown it in the ringposter named Tony Stephenson

On July 1, 2000, a bout occurred at the Bowler’s Arena in Manchester, UK, that, like Mutti-Murphy, also involved unique happenings. This one had all the ingredients for a classic Brit dust-up and it didn’t disappoint. The participants were late-substitute Wayne Rigby (17-5) from Manchester and Michael “Shaka” Ayers (28-3-1) from London. “Shaka” was the IBO lightweight titleholder.

On paper, Ayers, a stylist, looked to be the strong favorite. In fact, the accomplished Ayers had stopped the highly rated Colin Dunn in 1996. But the Mancunian challenger Rigby came to fight.

In the early going, Rigby started fast showing surprisingly fast hand speed and a punishing right uppercut that he landed repeatedly. Things heated up in the third round as both men exchanged bruising shots, but Rigby was dictating the action to this point.

In the 4th round, Ayers fought back using a variety of punches behind a good jab and tightened things up. Then, in the 6th, “Shaka” put the lad from Manchester down with a beautiful straight right, but he failed to close matters.

Rigby came storming back in the 7th as both men engaged in mutual savagery, but Ayers managed to get in two crunching blows just before the bell that probably won the round for him. Rigby was fortunate the bell rang.

Again showing great recuperative powers in the 8th round, Rigby drilled Shaka with every punch in the book and finally landed two hammering left hooks that sent the Londoner to the canvas like he had been hit with a Bobby’s sap. Somehow, someway, the tough champion, who was in danger of being stopped for the first time in his long career, got up and signaled to Rigby at the bell that he had indeed been rocked. Mutual respect and uncommon sportsmanship was now in play. What else was in play was that Ayers was at risk of losing to a man, albeit a former British champion, who had taken the fight on short notice.

Ayers also showed his ability to recuperate between rounds as he came out fast, but the ninth round was Rigby’s as he forced the action with straight rights, hooks and uppercuts to the rousing approval of his hometown fans. However, he expended valuable energy in the process. Both men continued to engage in malefic violence. Ayer’s mouth was bleeding and Rigby’s eyes were badly bruised.

The first half of the tenth round was even as both combatants continued to engage in what had become a closet classic. Ayers then began to use effective stinging right crosses and right leads. He took control with 1:26 left and accelerated his assault until the gallant Wayne found himself with an empty tank. Then, with only 29 seconds left, Ayers signaled to Mercante Jr. that the fight should be stopped, but for some inexplicable reason the clueless Mercante was not responsive. Ayers then pummeled his helpless and badly bloodied opponent until both men signaled that enough was enough, touched gloves, and headed back to their corners. This occurred with just 14 seconds left. It was a rare moment of poignancy that made those who witnessed it feel chills run down their spines.

Mercante finally put his arms around Rigby to officially halt the fight, but the two noble warriors had taken away that important responsibility from Mercante. In fact, Mercante’s potentially dangerous hesitation could well have resulted in Rigby taking unnecessary and career altering punishment. Here is the remarkable end: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-Q0KqEZ4Ro

As Mike Lewis writes, “Dropping their hands, Ayers and Rigby decided there and then that this memorable bruising battle was over. They touched gloves, nodded at one another and headed back to their respective corners. [It was] an extraordinary finish to an extraordinary contest. Hardened Manchester ringsiders had never seen anything like it. “Barry Hearn, my manager, said it was eerie,” recalled the then 36-year-old Londoner Ayers of his remarkable victory which was deemed to be a stoppage. “It was almost as though Wayne and myself [sic] had communicated through telepathy. Somehow he got it across to me that he’d taken enough and I stopped.”

But the very best quote came from Jerry Storey, Ayers’ Irish trainer, when he said, “Those two guys showed boxing still had a soul.”

Like most, I keep my own list of favorite fights. This one is at the top.

Do you have ONE?

Ted Sares is one of the world’s oldest active power lifters and holds several records. A member of the Ring 4 Hall of Fame, he enjoys writing about boxing.

Everyone Has That ONE Favorite Boxing Match

COMMENTS

-KO Digest :

Barkley-Olajide. I always tell people to watch that one.


-Kid Blast :

Barkley-Olajide. I always tell people to watch that one.
Good one indeed


-larueboenig :

The photo mentions Tyson. What’s that all about? How did he get into this act?


-Radam G :

Awesome read of classics. Holla!


-JohnnyTango :

You brought back some memories with this piece, Ted. Nicely researched and well written as usual. Here are some of my favorites not always in this order: 1. Hagler / Hearns 2. Corrales / Castillo No.1 (What a round 10!) 3. Tyson / Douglas 4. Foreman / Lyle 5. Duran / Barkley


-The Tijuana Kid :

One of my favorite fights are both fights between Scott Pemberton and Omar Sheika. Simply unforgettable. The non-stop assault of helicopter swings between both fighters had me giggling through every second of those fights.


-Radam G :

One of my favorite fights are both fights between Scott Pemberton and Omar Sheika. Simply unforgettable. The non-stop assault of helicopter swings between both fighters had me giggling through every second of those fights.
They both have paid for those wars. Their post career health is challenging. Holla!


-KO Digest :

Ortiz-Berto was pretty awesome, that was my first media credential, a fight of the year!


-Kid Blast :

The photo mentions Tyson. What’s that all about? How did he get into this act?
He had acted boorishly against Lou Savarese and the UK crowd did not care for it. Mike was on a Euro boxing tour at the time.


-Kid Blast :

One of my favorite fights are both fights between Scott Pemberton and Omar Sheika. Simply unforgettable. The non-stop assault of helicopter swings between both fighters had me giggling through every second of those fights.
Absolutely. I remember those wars well. As Radam says, they left both guys damaged. Pemberton was never in a dull fight and a prime Sheika could roll with the best. A prime Echols was also a force back then but has since become totally shot.


-Kid Blast :

Ortiz-Berto was pretty awesome, that was my first media credential, a fight of the year!
But KO, what was YOUR favorite one? Berto-Ortiz was a superb one for sure.


-Kid Blast :

You brought back some memories with this piece, Ted. Nicely researched and well written as usual. Here are some of my favorites not always in this order: 1. Hagler / Hearns 2. Corrales / Castillo No.1 (What a round 10!) 3. Tyson / Douglas 4. Foreman / Lyle 5. Duran / Barkley
But I need your MOST favorite as in Number One....


-Kid Blast :

Awesome read of classics. Holla!
Thank you kindly Radam G


-dollar bond :

The one you liked is remarkable, but wtf is Metcante doing in the UK refereeing? He is terrible and dangerous.


-FrankinDallas :

Number 1 for me is:
Mancini-Bramble II. I believe it was one of the last 15 round fights on TV. After pounding the crap out of each other, they embraced each other in the ring as the final bell sounded. A great show of sportsman ship. These are close second and third:
Duran-Barkley. Duran was supposed to get destroyed by Iran, but he won a real war.
Nigel Benn- Doug DeWitt. Doug has looked very good against Tommy Hearns and proved he had an iron chin. Seeing him KO'd by Benn (a very underrated boxer by US fans) was a real shocker.


-dollar bond :

How in God's name did you find the Rigby fight in the first place? Never heard about it before.


-Kid Blast :

I can't recall but I wrote about years ago on another site in another way using a different angle. Now I'm starting to get emails from people listing their favorite fight. The Darryl Tyson vs Freddie Pendleton bout held at the old Capital Centre in Maryland in April of 1995 was a great fight Pintor=Gomez Hearns vs Hagler.... There will be more and I'll insert them on this post with edits. This just in: Durelle v. Moore-maybe the greatest fight of all time. And this: two Arguello-Escalera fights. And this just in: Ted: I have seen my share of GREAT, not good, but GREAT fights. Have also seen absolute ridiculous bouts that should have been illegal!! Some of these boxing commissioners that sanction this stuff should have to get in the ring and take an *** whipping? so they understand what is going on in that ring. I have seen Leonard, Duran, Hagler, Benitez, Hearns, Tyson, JC Chavez, Sr., Olivares, Camacho, Mancini, Howard Davis, Cuevas, Duarte, Davila, Palomino, Holmes, Caveman Lee, ?The Beast? Mugabi, Danny Lopez, Arguello, Armando Muniz? all fight in person. I actually saw LIVE AND IN PERSON, one of the four Bobby Chacon-Bazooka Limon fights!!! ? I can?t even remember all the great fights I have seen, like you, there have been so many. And I am not even talking about watching on TV!!! These are guys I saw fight in person. There are so many GREAT fights we have seen. All the one?s mentioned in your article were, no doubt about it... GREAT! But one of the greatest bouts I ever saw in person was Alfonso Zamora VS Albert ?Superfly? Sandoval at the Olympic in Los Angeles.


-Skibbz :

Hard to pick... In no particular order...
1. Duran - Leonard I -- Two phenomenal boxers and athletes, had that special something you find once in a generation.
2. Eubank - Benn -- If this doesn't rank up there, you need to watch it again. They would have been happy to scrap it out on the moon, no money no nothing, just go at it.
3. Tszyu - Lopez -- Tszyu's first fight stateside, against a very experienced Mexican. Very good learning fight for young Kostya.
4. Valero - De Marco -- Fought with a gash that would stop most fights these days.... And absolutely battered a tall, young De Marco.
5. JCC - Rosario -- "The" guide to fighting on the inside. And most recently, Provodnikov - Bradley. What a war.


-JohnnyTango :

But I need your MOST favorite as in Number One....
I gotta go with Hagler / Hearns, Ted. I'll argue anyone that round 1 was the best round in boxing history! FYI: I lost money on the fight ... I went with Hearns AND would do it again.


-JohnnyTango :

And then Hearns's legs got wobbly and I thought "Oh ****!"


-deepwater2 :

Dempsey vs Jess Willard. Derrick Jefferson vs Maurice Harris. Just rewatched this fight- Kevin Kelly vs Gainer. Great fight.


-Kid Blast :

Dempsey vs Jess Willard. Derrick Jefferson vs Maurice Harris. Just rewatched this fight- Kevin Kelly vs Gainer. Great fight.
wow. Derrick Jefferson vs Maurice Harris was almost the first decapitation in a fight. It was super.


-Kid Blast :

The one you liked is remarkable, but wtf is Metcante doing in the UK refereeing? He is terrible and dangerous.
Being clueless and dangerous as is his wont


-Kid Blast :

Number 1 for me is:
Mancini-Bramble II. I believe it was one of the last 15 round fights on TV. After pounding the crap out of each other, they embraced each other in the ring as the final bell sounded. A great show of sportsman ship. These are close second and third:
Duran-Barkley. Duran was supposed to get destroyed by Iran, but he won a real war.
Nigel Benn- Doug DeWitt. Doug has looked very good against Tommy Hearns and proved he had an iron chin. Seeing him KO'd by Benn (a very underrated boxer by US fans) was a real shocker.
But I think Mancini got stiffed in that one.


-Kid Blast :

I gotta go with Hagler / Hearns, Ted. I'll argue anyone that round 1 was the best round in boxing history! FYI: I lost money on the fight ... I went with Hearns AND would do it again.
No argument from me. None whatsoever.


-brownsugar :

Pryor vs Paul is one of my favorites. Leonard vs anybody Mayweather vs Corrals Ali vs Foreman Sorry my list changes every day


-brownsugar :

Hagler vs Mugabi


-Kid Blast :

Hard to pick... In no particular order...
1. Duran - Leonard I -- Two phenomenal boxers and athletes, had that special something you find once in a generation.
2. Eubank - Benn -- If this doesn't rank up there, you need to watch it again. They would have been happy to scrap it out on the moon, no money no nothing, just go at it.
3. Tszyu - Lopez -- Tszyu's first fight stateside, against a very experienced Mexican. Very good learning fight for young Kostya.
4. Valero - De Marco -- Fought with a gash that would stop most fights these days.... And absolutely battered a tall, young De Marco.
5. JCC - Rosario -- "The" guide to fighting on the inside. And most recently, Provodnikov - Bradley. What a war.
Interesting and very sage picks. I loved 4. Valero - De Marco. It was his last fight. Great warrior. Eubank - Benn a true thriller. Great picks.


-Kid Blast :

Hagler vs Mugabi
Brutal fight that took it's toll on both guys.


-Kid Blast :

And then Hearns's legs got wobbly and I thought "Oh ****!"
Hagler was a great closer, though I think SRL was the best closer of all time. The rumor has it that Hearns had a massage the night before the fight. but I have never corroborated it. If so, it was a terrible mistake..


-JohnnyTango :

Hagler was a great closer, though I think SRL was the best closer of all time. The rumor has it that Hearns had a massage the night before the fight. but I have never corroborated it. If so, it was a terrible mistake..
Is/was that a legit massage? I'm lost, Ted ... Why would a massage prior to a fight be a terrible mistake?


-Yogo :

Hagler vs Mugabi
Watched this one with my old man Saturday. These are my fave threads, where old school aficionado's point me in the direction of bouts I ain't seen before. Thanks. Duran v Dejesus 2.


-brownsugar :

Watched this one with my old man Saturday. These are my fave threads, where old school aficionado's point me in the direction of bouts I ain't seen before. Thanks. Duran v Dejesus 2.
Wow, you go back a little ways further than I thought.... didn't figure you for a "fully mature man" as we say in Ohio. I saw it live and it was an intense rollercoaster-ride/chess match while it lasted although Dejesus was much better the first time around. Duran came back with a vengeance in part 2 and separated himself from being one of the very good to become one of the greats.


-Domenic :

wow. Derrick Jefferson vs Maurice Harris was almost the first decapitation in a fight. It was super.
Isn't that the fight that Larry Merchant bellowed, 'Derrick Jefferson, I love you!'


-Domenic :

Call me crazy, but I always loved the Bowe-Golota fights. Holyfield-Tyson 1. Benn-Mcllellan. Corrales-Castillo 1. Mercer-Cooper. Lewis-Klitschko. Chavez-Taylor 1. List constantly changes.


-JohnnyTango :

I forgot Chavez / Taylor. That was a good one, Domenic.


-JohnnyTango :

Why no mention (anyone) of Ali / Frazier? Number one was a damn good fight! That was the year I started watching the fight game.


-JohnnyTango :

Now don't we all miss the knowledgeable and oh so eloquent Larry Merchant?


-stormcentre :

There are so many. Really. That's why the sport remains as a main attraction despite all the dangers, deception, and controversies. Someone above mentioned Chavez V Taylor. I agree. Toney was involved in a purely sensational fight too where I don't think there was a finer display of despiteful punching that I have ever seen. But the actual fight escapes me right now. Arguello V Pryor was huge. Fenech V Villassana (often overlooked, but an extremely brutal and non-stop fight) was dangerous to Marcos' health in a way that made Ali V3 Frazier entertaining. Kostya Tszyu V Miguel Angel Gonzales was incredible and displayed the extent that one guy will cheat and be severely punished for it. Thrilla in Manila was and always will be incredible. I could go on . . . . . But I think my pick is probably the 1st Greb V Tunney fight in 1922. And here is why . . .


->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?19189-A-boxer-you-want-to-have-a-drink-with&p=73336&viewfull=1#post73336
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?19189-A-boxer-you-want-to-have-a-drink-with/page2

Cheers,
Storm. :) :)


-joebruno999 :

Hagler - Hearns - hands down. Three rounds of mayhem. Then Lyle-Forman. I lost count of the knockdowns. Joe Bruno - Fromer VP of the Boxing Qriters Association.


-Kid Blast :

Many count Castillo vs. Corrales (2005) as their favorite while older fans like Graziano vs. Zale (1947), Durelle vs. Moore (1958, Pep vs. Saddler (1949) and DeMarco vs. Basilio (1955). The ?War? between Hagler and -Hearns (1985) rightfully tops many lists as does the drama-filled Jorge Castro?John David Jackson (1994). When Hearns came out fast at the opening bell only to be met by a bald headed monster, it was spine-tingling electricity at its best; it was anticipative mayhem. .Vazquez-Marquez (2008) and Morales-Barrera (2000) showcased Mexican fighters who combined technique with a brawler?s proclivity to create an atomic cocktail. Bobby Chacon and Cornelius Boza Edwards (1983) was legendary, and Chacon?s classic battle with Rafael Limon (1982) was the most compelling and memorable in their four-fight series The first Gatti vs. Ward is one that is at the top end of many memory banks and, of course, Ali?s bouts with Frazier and Foreman are up there along with the frenzy of Pryor vs. Arguello (1982). Lyle and Foreman exchange bombs and knockdowns in 1976. Then in 1972, Michael Moorer and Bert Cooper did the same. These two brawls could easily be someone?s favorite. However, the Nardico-Norkus eight knockdown Pier Six in 1954 was quintessentially old school and it is on many leader boards. The scary Tommy Morrison vs. Joe Hipp slugfest in Reno in1992 gave new meaning to the phrase ?bone crunching.? Morrison?s jaw and both of his hands were broken, but Joe lost via a 9th round comeback stoppage by the ?Duke.? Not to be outdone, Joe suffered a complete shattering of his cheekbones. Bruce Curry and Monroe Brooks put on their own version of ?To Live and Die in LA? in 1978 at the Olympic Auditorium. For those who witnessed the fifth round of the incredible Somsak Sithchatchawal vs. Mahyar ?Little Tyson? Monshipour savagery in 2006, Brooks-Curry was like that for almost nine full rounds. Neither man died in L.A.; they both lived on, but in different ways. Thus, it seems that every serious fan, aficionado or writer has that One favorite fight, the one that is indelible and is locked into the memory like concrete. Carl Thompson vs. Ezra Sellers (2001) ?Thompson looks to be hurt by every shot he takes, but then again so does Sellers.??Spencer Oliver High up on my list is Carl ?The Cat? Thompson vs. the late Ezra Sellers, a classic match (with a prime Steve Smoger refereeing) in 2001 that involved at least six official knockdowns; Thompson was knocked down four times, Sellers twice. This was no boxing match but rather a no holds-barred fight between two of the most exciting punchers in boxing Going into the third round, both men had been staggered and dropped hard. Both were on the verge of being put to sleep. Finally, Sellers became the Sandman when he KO?d The Cat in the fourth round with a crunching counter right hook, ending a winning streak that started after Thompson lost to Johnny Nelson in 1999. Thompson had been knocked down many times, but he always got up. This time he was separated from his senses and sent to Feline Dreamland. He finally rose from the canvas to the applause of the stunned and worried crowd. This fight showed what can happen when two heavy handed types with suspect chins face off and decide to let it all hang out Here it is: [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBX6OPvMdJg]
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBX6OPvMdJg
Lee Roy ?Solid Gold? Murphy vs. Chisanda Mutti (1985) One of the most unique happenings in a boxing match occurred in Monte Carlo, Monaco, in 1985 when Chicagoan Lee Roy ?Solid Gold? Murphy (the IBF cruiserweight titleholder) and rugged Zambian Chisanda Mutti engaged in a brutal simultaneous double knockdown in the waning moments of the fight. A badly hurt Murphy barely beat referee Larry Hazzard?s count while Mutti remained down and was counted out. The crowd was up and roaring in disbelief. And so was I.* Mutti then had to be helped from the ring. This was no Rocky movie; this was real and unforgettable and it came after an 11th round that had to be seen to be believed. In fact, the entire fight involved seesaw exchanges that were of the career ending type. Because of its ending, this ended up being a cult classic My ONE favorite (2000) ?It was almost as though Wayne and myself *[sic] had communicated through telepathy. Somehow he got it across to me that he?d taken enough and I stopped???Michael Ayers ?Squinting at features even more battered than his own, Michael Ayers could tell from the look of resignation in Wayne Rigby?s eyes that his opponent was finished. The fire which raged fiercely for 10 rounds had been doused. Then, with Rigby helpless and American referee Arthur Mercante Jr. hesitating, came a moment unique in boxing.??Mike Lewis, February 24, 2001, the Telegraph ?a credit to the sport f----- nearly brought me to tears i would?ve emptied my pockets and thrown it in the ring?poster named Tony Stephenson On July 1, 2000, a bout occurred at the Bowler?s Arena in Manchester, UK, that, like Mutti-Murphy, also involved unique happenings. This one had all the ingredients for a classic Brit dust-up and it didn?t disappoint. The participants were late-substitute Wayne Rigby (17-5) from Manchester and Michael ?Shaka? Ayers (28-3-1) from London. ?Shaka? was the IBO lightweight titleholder. On paper, Ayers, a stylist, looked to be the strong favorite. In fact, the accomplished Ayers had stopped the highly rated Colin Dunn in 1996. But the Mancunian challenger Rigby came to fight. In the early going, Rigby started fast showing surprisingly fast hand speed and a punishing right uppercut that he landed repeatedly. Things heated up in the third round as both men exchanged bruising shots, but Rigby was dictating the action to this point. In the 4th round, Ayers fought back using a variety of punches behind a good jab and tightened things up. Then, in the 6th, ?Shaka? put the lad from Manchester down with a beautiful straight right, but he failed to close matters. Rigby came storming back in the 7th as both men engaged in mutual savagery, but Ayers managed to get in two crunching blows just before the bell that probably won the round for him. Rigby was fortunate the bell rang. Again showing great recuperative powers in the 8th round, Rigby drilled Shaka with every punch in the book and finally landed two hammering left hooks that sent the Londoner to the canvas like he had been hit with a Bobby?s sap. Somehow, someway, the tough champion, who was in danger of being stopped for the first time in his long career, got up and signaled to Rigby at the bell that he had indeed been rocked. Mutual respect and uncommon sportsmanship was now in play. What else was in play was that Ayers was at risk of losing to a man, albeit a former British champion, who had taken the fight on short notice. Ayers also showed his ability to recuperate between rounds as he came out fast, but the ninth round was Rigby?s as he forced the action with straight rights, hooks and uppercuts to the rousing approval of his hometown fans. However, he expended valuable energy in the process. Both men continued to engage in malefic violence. Ayer?s mouth was bleeding and Rigby?s eyes were badly bruised. The first half of the tenth round was even as both combatants continued to engage in what had become a closet classic. Ayers then began to use effective stinging right crosses and right leads. He took control with 1:26 left and accelerated his assault until the gallant Wayne found himself with an empty tank. Then, with only 29 seconds left, Ayers signaled to Mercante Jr. that the fight should be stopped, but for some inexplicable reason the clueless Mercante was not responsive. Ayers then pummeled his helpless and badly bloodied opponent until both men signaled that enough was enough, touched gloves, and headed back to their corners. This occurred with just 14 seconds left. It was a rare moment of poignancy that made those who witnessed it feel chills run down their spines. Mercante finally put his arms around Rigby to officially halt the fight, but the two noble warriors had taken away that important responsibility from Mercante. In fact, Mercante?s potentially dangerous hesitation could well have resulted in Rigby taking unnecessary and career altering punishment. Here is the remarkable end: [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-Q0KqEZ4Ro]
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-Q0KqEZ4Ro
As Mike Lewis writes, ?Dropping their hands, Ayers and Rigby decided there and then that this memorable bruising battle was over. They touched gloves, nodded at one another and headed back to their respective corners. [It was] an extraordinary finish to an extraordinary contest. Hardened Manchester ringsiders had never seen anything like it. ?Barry Hearn, my manager, said it was eerie,? recalled the then 36-year-old Londoner Ayers of his remarkable victory which was deemed to be a stoppage. ?It was almost as though Wayne and myself [sic] had communicated through telepathy. Somehow he got it across to me that he?d taken enough and I stopped.? But the very best quote came from Jerry Storey, Ayers? Irish trainer, when he said, ?Those two guys showed boxing still had a soul.? Like most, I keep my own list of favorite fights. This one is at the top. Do you have ONE? Ted Sares is one of the world?s oldest active power lifters and holds several records. A member of the Ring 4 Hall of Fame, he enjoys writing about boxing. Everyone Has That ONE Favorite Boxing Match
test


-Kid Blast :

something has gone amiss with the thread. A technical issue. I think it's ok now


-Kid Blast :

Hagler - Hearns - hands down. Three rounds of mayhem. Then Lyle-Forman. I lost count of the knockdowns. Joe Bruno - Fromer VP of the Boxing Qriters Association.
Good choice Joe. Three rounds of un mitigated savagery.


-Kid Blast :

Is/was that a legit massage? I'm lost, Ted ... Why would a massage prior to a fight be a terrible mistake?
It relaxes your body too much. It takes about two days to recover. I learned this the hard way in weight lifting.


-Kid Blast :

Call me crazy, but I always loved the Bowe-Golota fights. Holyfield-Tyson 1. Benn-Mcllellan. Corrales-Castillo 1. Mercer-Cooper. Lewis-Klitschko. Chavez-Taylor 1. List constantly changes.
Not crazy but possibly a tad sadistic.... lol


-Kid Blast :

I forgot Chavez / Taylor. That was a good one, Domenic.
But edgy and scary. It's like Benn and G-Man. I can't watch either one. Just something about knowing what the after effect were that makes me want to skip them.


-Kid Blast :

Wow, you go back a little ways further than I thought.... didn't figure you for a "fully mature man" as we say in Ohio. I saw it live and it was an intense rollercoaster-ride/chess match while it lasted although Dejesus was much better the first time around. Duran came back with a vengeance in part 2 and separated himself from being one of the very good to become one of the greats.
BS. I need that ONE from you. The FAVORITE ONE.


-Kid Blast :

I'll be dipped. Didn't figure you for an historian. Though I do like Tunney a whole lot. Meant for Storm.


-Skibbz :

Interesting and very sage picks. I loved 4. Valero - De Marco. It was his last fight. Great warrior. Eubank - Benn a true thriller. Great picks.
There's a lot of similarities between Valero and Golovkin, least of all their knock out power. But man Valero was always stunning to watch. That fight vs the Panamanian who's name ashamedly I can't recall, I just remember it went longer than the first two rounds! What a fight!


-Paul Kevin :

Of course Tyson is no doubt a true skill full boxer of all time


-Kid Blast :

There are so many. Really. That's why the sport remains as a main attraction despite all the dangers, deception, and controversies. Someone above mentioned Chavez V Taylor. I agree. Toney was involved in a purely sensational fight too where I don't think there was a finer display of despiteful punching that I have ever seen. But the actual fight escapes me right now. Arguello V Pryor was huge. Fenech V Villassana (often overlooked, but an extremely brutal and non-stop fight) was dangerous to Marcos' health in a way that made Ali V3 Frazier entertaining. Kostya Tszyu V Miguel Angel Gonzales was incredible and displayed the extent that one guy will cheat and be severely punished for it. Thrilla in Manila was and always will be incredible. I could go on . . . . . But I think my pick is probably the 1st Greb V Tunney fight in 1922. And here is why . . .


->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?19189-A-boxer-you-want-to-have-a-drink-with&p=73336&viewfull=1#post73336
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?19189-A-boxer-you-want-to-have-a-drink-with/page2

Cheers,
Storm. :) :)
I'll be dipped. Didn't figure you for an historian. Though I do like Tunney a whole lot.


-stormcentre :

Someone above mentioned the Holyfield V Bowe fights. They were pretty good too. Has there ever been (aside from Toney) a more relaxed Heavyweight puncher that approached doing damage, taking shots, and throwing combinations as casually as Bowe did? Brilliant stuff.

--------------------------------------------------- Other favorites of mine are as follows and not necessarily in any order . . .

Julio Chavez Sr. V Meldrick Taylor. Jeff Fenech V Marcos Villasana. Jeff Fenech V1 Azuma Nelson. Holyfield V Bowe (All). James Toney V Vassiliy Jirov. James Toney V Evander Holyfield. James Toney V Michael Nunn. James Toney V Iran Barkley (Incredible display of Old Skool slip/slide technique and punching). Ike Ibeabuchi V David Tua. Kostya Tszyu V Miguel Angel Gonzales Jose Luis Castillo V Diego Corrales. Manny Pacquio V1 Juan Manuel Marquez. Marco Antonio Barrera V Kennedy McKinney. Dennis Andries V Jeff Harding. Joe Calzaghe V Chris Eubank. Miguel Cotto V1 Antonio Margarito. Floyd Mayweather Jr. V Jesus Chavez. Floyd Mayweather Jr. V Phillip Ndou. Floyd Mayweather Jr. V Arturo Gatti. Kostya Tszyu V Zab Judah. Kostya Tszyu V Vince Phillips. Kostya Tszyu V Jake Rodriguez. Kostya Tszyu V Oktay Urkal. Kostya Tszyu V Julio Cesar Chavez. Kostya Tszyu V Vernon Forrest (Amateur bout). Jack Dempsey V Luis Firpo (11 KDs). Sam McVey V Joe Jeannette(TKO RD 49!!). Rocky Marciano V Jersey Joe Walcott. Larry Holmes V Ken Norton. George Foreman V Ron Lyle. George Foreman V1 Joe Frazier. George Foreman V Muhammad Ali. Israel Vazquez V Rafael Marquez. Kostya Tszyu V Rafael Ruelaz. Manny Pacquaio V1 Erik Morales. Manny Pacquiao V Ricky Hatton. Floyd Mayweather Jr. V Ricky Hatton. Muhammad Ali V Ken Norton. Roberto Duran V1 Sugar Ray Leonard. Roberto Duran V2 Sugar Ray Leonard. Sugar Ray Leonard V Marvin Hagler. Sugar Ray Leonard V Thomas Hearns. Sugar Ray Leonard V Wilfredo Benitez. Marvin Hagler V Thomas Hearns. Roberto Duran V Davey Moore. Carmen Basilio V Sugar Ray Robinson. 3 others involving Sugar Ray Robinson but I can't remember them right now; shame on me. Erik Morales V1 Marco Antonio Barrera. Joe Louis V Max Schmeling. Rocky Graziano V Tony Zale. Gene Tunney V Jack Dempsey. Willie Pep V Sandy Saddler. 2 others involving Willie Pep but I can't remember them right now; shame on me. Benny Leonard V Charley White. Benny Leonard V Richie Mitchell. Benny Leonard V Jack Britton. Naseem Hamed V Augie Sanchez. Naseem Hamed V Kevin Kelly. Naseem Hamed V Jose Badillo. Joe Louis V Billy Conn. Alex Arguello V Aaron Pryor Gatti V1 Ward.

---------------------------------------------------

Despite all of them, I think my 1st pick is still the 1st Greb V Tunney fight in 1922. Cheers,
Storm. :) :)


-stormcentre :

I'll be dipped. Didn't figure you for an historian. Though I do like Tunney a whole lot.
Really KB? Surprised to hear that. Check my avatar. :) Greb was - in my opinion - a class - perhaps even 2 - above almost all exciting and yet to arrive legends. Including Sugar Ray Robinson. He was as close to being a perpetual mechanical punching/fighting machine that any human can be. His story and history is incredible. And even though it took place whilst many of yesteryear's other great and legendary fighters were still around and either active or retired, it still stands out amongst them. Cheers,
Storm. :) :)


-King Beef :

Too many to list, but Castillo/Coralles is a fav, and definitely Ward/Gatti 1, also the first 3 Marquez/Vazquez were barn burners.


-stormcentre :

Please add Trinidad V Vargas to my above favorite fights list. What a fight. What a shootout at the end. How big is Vargas' heart?
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?272163640-Everyone-Has-That-ONE-Favorite-Boxing-Match&p=102658&viewfull=1#post102658
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?272163612-The-Greatest-Fighter-Alive&p=102675&viewfull=1#post102675 Cheers,
Storm. :) :) Lovely creative tune this one . . . .


-stormcentre :

Too many to list, but Castillo/Coralles is a fav, and definitely Ward/Gatti 1, also the first 3 Marquez/Vazquez were barn burners.
Hey KB . . . What's going down? What have you been doing? Still "Cripping" round Southside LA? Ha ha ha.
Storm. :) :) :)


-Kid Blast :

Getting ready to do three powerlifting events in the Fall. Vermont, NH and Rhode Island. All tough ones and I'll be lifting through nagging wrist injuries. As I move into 2017, I'll BE looking at the possibility of extending my reach and competing in California, Las Vegas, and maybe down south, but there are lots of contingencies. I also plan to win my fourth consecutive EPF Nationals Championship in Johnson, RI in April. As I approach 80, I will compete in a very exclusive category where most of my competitors are either dead or fouled up by using too many roids. Can't weight--pun intended Boxing and Lifting + Golf = nice combination Actually, being from Chiraq, Southside LA is child's play. Chicago is where my story begins. Ugh


-King Beef :

Hey KB . . . What's going down? What have you been doing? Still "Cripping" round Southside LA? Ha ha ha.
Storm. :) :) :)
Sup Storm, Just been hanging back taking it all in; and I am East Coast all day these days.


-King Beef :

Getting ready to do three powerlifting events in the Fall. Vermont, NH and Rhode Island. All tough ones and I'll be lifting through nagging wrist injuries. As I move into 2017, I'll BE looking at the possibility of extending my reach and competing in California, Las Vegas, and maybe down south, but there are lots of contingencies. I also plan to win my fourth consecutive EPF Nationals Championship in Johnson, RI in April. As I approach 80, I will compete in a very exclusive category where most of my competitors are either dead or fouled up by using too many roids. Can't weight--pun intended Boxing and Lifting + Golf = nice combination Actually, being from Chiraq, Southside LA is child's play. Chicago is where my story begins. Ugh
Good luck with those meets Blast!


-deepwater2 :

Getting ready to do three powerlifting events in the Fall. Vermont, NH and Rhode Island. All tough ones and I'll be lifting through nagging wrist injuries. As I move into 2017, I'll BE looking at the possibility of extending my reach and competing in California, Las Vegas, and maybe down south, but there are lots of contingencies. I also plan to win my fourth consecutive EPF Nationals Championship in Johnson, RI in April. As I approach 80, I will compete in a very exclusive category where most of my competitors are either dead or fouled up by using too many roids. Can't weight--pun intended Boxing and Lifting + Golf = nice combination Actually, being from Chiraq, Southside LA is child's play. Chicago is where my story begins. Ugh
God save Chiraq! Forget those nagging wrist injuries. Go win and celebrate with some Vermont beer.


-Kid Blast :

God save Chiraq! Forget those nagging wrist injuries. Go win and celebrate with some Vermont beer.
Yes, Shed is a nice beer. Chicago is toast Tylenol for my wrists plus super tight special wrist wraps


-deepwater2 :

Yes, Shed is a nice beer. Chicago is toast Tylenol for my wrists plus super tight special wrist wraps
The orthopedist can inject those wrist if needed.


-Skibbz :

Someone above mentioned the Holyfield V Bowe fights. They were pretty good too. Has there ever been (aside from Toney) a more relaxed Heavyweight puncher that approached doing damage, taking shots, and throwing combinations as casually as Bowe did? Brilliant stuff.

--------------------------------------------------- Other favorites of mine are as follows and not necessarily in any order . . .

Julio Chavez Sr. V Meldrick Taylor. Jeff Fenech V Marcos Villasana. Jeff Fenech V1 Azuma Nelson. Holyfield V Bowe (All). James Toney V Vassiliy Jirov. James Toney V Evander Holyfield. James Toney V Michael Nunn. James Toney V Iran Barkley (Incredible display of Old Skool slip/slide technique and punching). Ike Ibeabuchi V David Tua. Kostya Tszyu V Miguel Angel Gonzales Jose Luis Castillo V Diego Corrales. Manny Pacquio V1 Juan Manuel Marquez. Marco Antonio Barrera V Kennedy McKinney. Dennis Andries V Jeff Harding. Joe Calzaghe V Chris Eubank. Miguel Cotto V1 Antonio Margarito. Floyd Mayweather Jr. V Jesus Chavez. Floyd Mayweather Jr. V Phillip Ndou. Floyd Mayweather Jr. V Arturo Gatti. Kostya Tszyu V Zab Judah. Kostya Tszyu V Vince Phillips. Kostya Tszyu V Jake Rodriguez. Kostya Tszyu V Oktay Urkal. Kostya Tszyu V Julio Cesar Chavez. Kostya Tszyu V Vernon Forrest (Amateur bout). Jack Dempsey V Luis Firpo (11 KDs). Sam McVey V Joe Jeannette(TKO RD 49!!). Rocky Marciano V Jersey Joe Walcott. Larry Holmes V Ken Norton. George Foreman V Ron Lyle. George Foreman V1 Joe Frazier. George Foreman V Muhammad Ali. Israel Vazquez V Rafael Marquez. Kostya Tszyu V Rafael Ruelaz. Manny Pacquaio V1 Erik Morales. Manny Pacquiao V Ricky Hatton. Floyd Mayweather Jr. V Ricky Hatton. Muhammad Ali V Ken Norton. Roberto Duran V1 Sugar Ray Leonard. Roberto Duran V2 Sugar Ray Leonard. Sugar Ray Leonard V Marvin Hagler. Sugar Ray Leonard V Thomas Hearns. Sugar Ray Leonard V Wilfredo Benitez. Marvin Hagler V Thomas Hearns. Roberto Duran V Davey Moore. Carmen Basilio V Sugar Ray Robinson. 3 others involving Sugar Ray Robinson but I can't remember them right now; shame on me. Erik Morales V1 Marco Antonio Barrera. Joe Louis V Max Schmeling. Rocky Graziano V Tony Zale. Gene Tunney V Jack Dempsey. Willie Pep V Sandy Saddler. 2 others involving Willie Pep but I can't remember them right now; shame on me. Benny Leonard V Charley White. Benny Leonard V Richie Mitchell. Benny Leonard V Jack Britton. Naseem Hamed V Augie Sanchez. Naseem Hamed V Kevin Kelly. Naseem Hamed V Jose Badillo. Joe Louis V Billy Conn. Alex Arguello V Aaron Pryor Gatti V1 Ward.

---------------------------------------------------

Despite all of them, I think my 1st pick is still the 1st Greb V Tunney fight in 1922. Cheers,
Storm. :) :)
Ahh too many to list too many to list! Boxing is truly a blessing.


-stormcentre :

Sup Storm, Just been hanging back taking it all in; and I am East Coast all day these days.
Yep I was pretty sure you were not chilling in LA and/or on the West Coast . . . But I needed to use that LA Crip's "Crippin" line somehow. :) I'm alright man - just doing what I do. Actually, I'm recovering from cracked ribs right now, so not an entirely happy possum; but getting there. Who have you got? Triple or Brook? Cheers,
Storm. :) :)


-Kid Blast :

The orthopedist can inject those wrist if needed.
Yeah, cortisone. A neat way to get steroids into your system. heh heh


-Tex Hassler :

The 1964 fight between Dick Tiger and Jose Gonzalez is one of my all time favorites. The KO was sudden and totally unexpected by Jose.


-Kid Blast :

The 1964 fight between Dick Tiger and Jose Gonzalez is one of my all time favorites. The KO was sudden and totally unexpected by Jose.
Thanks Tex, one I did not see but will now check out ASAP.


-King Beef :

Yep I was pretty sure you were not chilling in LA and/or on the West Coast . . . But I needed to use that LA Crip's "Crippin" line somehow. :) I'm alright man - just doing what I do. Actually, I'm recovering from cracked ribs right now, so not an entirely happy possum; but getting there. Who have you got? Triple or Brook? Cheers,
Storm. :) :)
I gotta stick with my original pick of GGG, I can't see it going any different than Canelo/Khan. (although they are really trying to sell it otherwise!) I know Brook is supposed to be this "monster" now, but he just hasn't beaten anybody of stature to make me believe he can beat GGG. Beating a (super athletic but a little short on good boxing skills) Porter just doesn't do it for me. I think it will go very similar to Canelo/Khan, Brook will look good early, and then he will eventually get blasted outta there mid fight unless GGG allows the fight to linger. If Brook doesn't have enough "pop" to keep GGG from just strolling in to get his shots off, then it will be a bad night for Brook. I do agree technically this might be a good fight on paper, but unfortunately for Brook, its not on paper.....but who knows, maybe Brook proves he is special...but I doubt it...not with this fight anyway. How do you see it going...?


-stormcentre :

If you combined all the good and relevant (particularly to how Brook has approached the fight) attributes of, Daniel Geale, Curtis Stevens, Matthew Macklin, and Martin Murray; that would probably represent a good approximation to whom Brook is either, said, or trying, to be. And, aside from Kassim Ouma, they are all guys that perhaps also stand out from being the usual fodder Triple feasts on too.

Stevens and Murray were pretty muscular and strong; probably to the equivalent of Brook. Geale and Macklin were, I think, previous legitimate champions and they both had some great technical skills. In fact Geale's technical approach to the Triple V Geale fight was pretty spot on.

At the end of the day none of it mattered. Because Triple has the experience, stamina, and armory to go with his big guns; and he knows how to get close and land. Add to it all Triple's style is a bit unusual and not one that most other fighters encounter and/or can easily prepare for. Not in the least, as he doesn't always commit to fluent combinations and punching when expected, and such he can be difficult to get a good counterpunch read off of. But at the same time Triple's opponents soon learn the same can't be said for them. Which, may just be something that Triple's apparent (or tactically interesting) lack of defense also serves him well with. Its interesting that each and everyone of those above-mentioned Triple opponents all at one stage or another - after their fight with Gennady - said this guy's power is real and/or the most they have ever felt. Everyone - including competent light heavyweights and cruisers - at the Summit gym also say the same. That means no matter how good Brook has become and/or is - which is itself hard to quantify - he will either need to keep away from shots all night and/or have developed freakish punch resistance and composure beyond what all those above-mentioned Triple opponents and sparring partners had. Even if Brook can easily come in at super/middleweight without necessarily bulking up any more than he would by simply not cutting down to welter weight; that's still a big ask. Being bigger than you normally are doesn't always help you. Especially if Brook has not regularly competed in that form and weight class. I agree with you, it's hard to see whom Brook has fought that has prepared him for this. Remember Kell's (was it his first?) fight with Carson Jones? That was pretty well contested and Gennady would walk through that version of Jones on any day. You could probably say the same for Porter. And, Porter probably constitutes Brook's best chance of being a signature fight to show us how he can handle Triple. So all up I can see how bulking up and being stronger may suit both Kell and a fight approach of staying off the ropes, smothering, and throwing individual shots with enough space between them (as Brook sometimes does) to assess what to do next. I also think Brook has the skills and ability to make something of Triple's poor active defense too. But I am still not sure that any of that will be enough when Triple's bombs and supinated hooks to the temple, jaw, and body start to land. Triple is a freakish puncher. And that is usually the most dominating and overriding factor of any his fights. Furthermore, even if you could get your punch resistance ready for that, not many gyms would prepare you well for the delivery style Triple exhibits. It's a problem for his opponents and those that regularly train with him. Brook moving up a few divisions to light/middleweight has been compared to Sugar Ray Leonard moving up and fighting Hagler. But aside from whether Triple represents Marvin Hagler well or not . . . . . I doubt Brook's accomplishments at welterweight (as good as they are) are really comparable to Sugar Ray Leonard and/or sufficient to successfully underpin this move in the same way that Leonard's were. That said, I hope I am wrong. As this would be a sensational win for Kell Brook if he pulls it off. Big up to Kell for stepping up to the challenge. Cheers,
Storm. :) :)


-Skibbz :

If you combined all the good and relevant (particularly to how Brook has approached the fight) attributes of, Daniel Geale, Curtis Stevens, Matthew Macklin, and Martin Murray; that would probably represent a good approximation to whom Brook is either, said, or trying, to be. And, aside from Kassim Ouma, they are all guys that perhaps also stand out from being the usual fodder Triple feasts on too.

Stevens and Murray were pretty muscular and strong; probably to the equivalent of Brook. Geale and Macklin were, I think, previous legitimate champions and they both had some great technical skills. In fact Geale's technical approach to the Triple V Geale fight was pretty spot on.

At the end of the day none of it mattered. Because Triple has the experience, stamina, and armory to go with his big guns; and he knows how to get close and land. Add to it all Triple's style is a bit unusual and not one that most other fighters encounter and/or can easily prepare for. Not in the least, as he doesn't always commit to fluent combinations and punching when expected, and such he can be difficult to get a good counterpunch read off of. But at the same time Triple's opponents soon learn the same can't be said for them. Which, may just be something that Triple's apparent (or tactically interesting) lack of defense also serves him well with. Its interesting that each and everyone of those above-mentioned Triple opponents all at one stage or another - after their fight with Gennady - said this guy's power is real and/or the most they have ever felt. Everyone - including competent light heavyweights and cruisers - at the Summit gym also say the same. That means no matter how good Brook has become and/or is - which is itself hard to quantify - he will either need to keep away from shots all night and/or have developed freakish punch resistance and composure beyond what all those above-mentioned Triple opponents and sparring partners had. Even if Brook can easily come in at super/middleweight without necessarily bulking up any more than he would by simply not cutting down to welter weight; that's still a big ask. Being bigger than you normally are doesn't always help you. Especially if Brook has not regularly competed in that form and weight class. I agree with you, it's hard to see whom Brook has fought that has prepared him for this. Remember Kell's (was it his first?) fight with Carson Jones? That was pretty well contested and Gennady would walk through that version of Jones on any day. You could probably say the same for Porter. And, Porter probably constitutes Brook's best chance of being a signature fight to show us how he can handle Triple. So all up I can see how bulking up and being stronger may suit both Kell and a fight approach of staying off the ropes, smothering, and throwing individual shots with enough space between them (as Brook sometimes does) to assess what to do next. I also think Brook has the skills and ability to make something of Triple's poor active defense too. But I am still not sure that any of that will be enough when Triple's bombs and supinated hooks to the temple, jaw, and body start to land. Triple is a freakish puncher. And that is usually the most dominating and overriding factor of any his fights. Furthermore, even if you could get your punch resistance ready for that, not many gyms would prepare you well for the delivery style Triple exhibits. It's a problem for his opponents and those that regularly train with him. Brook moving up a few divisions to light/middleweight has been compared to Sugar Ray Leonard moving up and fighting Hagler. But aside from whether Triple represents Marvin Hagler well or not . . . . . I doubt Brook's accomplishments at welterweight (as good as they are) are really comparable to Sugar Ray Leonard and/or sufficient to successfully underpin this move in the same way that Leonard's were. That said, I hope I am wrong. As this would be a sensational win for Kell Brook if he pulls it off. Big up to Kell for stepping up to the challenge. Cheers,
Storm. :) :)
Thing is Gennady isn't even huge. Like he is in my opinion a small middleweight.. Looks closer to a welterweight when you look at him close in person, or maybe super welter.. Brook on the otherhand had huge arms, huge legs. The difference was that Golovkin was wiry, with a wide back bulging with muscles. He has longer arms anyway, but when you factor in the width of his back and the force he gets from it too, its going to be tough for Brook to negate. The longer it lasts the more it favours Golovkin in my opinion. In the early rounds Golovkin will have no problems setting a pace that suits him, and it will be for Brook to disrupt and set a higher tempo. Golovkin sits back, watches and moves with his jab cocked in position ready to let loose at the right moment. Once he lands that first jab, he's so intelligent that he'll through decades of honing his skill have registered subconciously the distance and land a second or third behind it. If I remember rightly Ouma was able to evade a few jabs with head movement but he's not skillfull enough to do it for long, also his height and reach isn't comparable to brook.. Now if Brook tries to fence with GGG in a battle of jabs, it will be hard for him as GGG has the reach and also loves that type of contest. The best thing for Brook to do is attack the body with uppercuts and stay with him. You have to beat Golovkin, there's no other way.


-stormcentre :

"Gennady Golovkin V Kell Brook Be Careful What You Wish For"

Which appears to have gone AWOL now I wrote this . . . . . [QUOTE]Yep, no worries. I actually didn't even read your post before I published mine. As, since . . . . I had previously heard that Hearn and K2 were silently working on a Triple V Brook fight and (as the provided link in my above post shows) even then at that stage I thought it will be interesting to see whether Hearn lives up to his anti-doping talk . . . . I just logged on and dropped the post in The use of the word interesting was just a coincidence. Onto your questions and comments . . .

? I agree that we?re seeing more and more of the ?entrepreneur quality of savvy fighters who recognize the untapped financial potential of paring with recognizable names over genuine competition?. No argument from me there. I guess it makes sense considering that - behind the scenes - there is usually one, or a team of investors looking to recoup their investment; and it is this and these forces that run counterintuitively and in opposition to how a sport and competition usually work. Glad to hear you have a decent dental and health plan. Anyone fighting Triple, particularly from a weight below, will probably need it. Triple is big money, agreed. And, that?s clearly the main reason why Brook is about to tangle with him at such a disadvantage; that it almost screams ?I will lose (with a ready-made weight related excuse) if you pay me well enough?. Personally, I still, think there are quite a few other middleweight fighters out there that Triple can fight that offer up as fairer/better competition than Brook (Lara is one, as is Arum?s new Mexican middleweight); but they perhaps - with their risk - don?t bring quite the same name and money. Still, if you don?t like risk, then some may say . . . . ?why box, claim you?re the best middleweight around, and also say you will fight anyone from light middleweight to super middleweight, when what you really do is a little different from that?? Triple, (whom - if we look at what he does {not says} - seems afraid of moving up weight divisions and has not yet done it as a professional fighter, all whilst he often fights guys whom have a weight {and, in terms of ranking and otherwise, a skill/experience} disadvantage to him) has been fighting really easy and over-matched opponents for quite a while (few years?) now, and I for one find it really interesting how - to some extent - as he does this time and time again, he almost always gets a free pass. Whilst, on the other hand, guys like Floyd (whom have already moved up in quite a few weight divisions as a professional fighter) haven?t had that free pass. Triple V Brook, on paper, if at all, is only marginally more competitive than Floyd V Berto. Triple V Brook tells us nothing about Triple?s status as an all time great middleweight. ? Moving on . . . Agree with your comments about Quillin, too. ? Also, yes, you?re right; high altitude training is acceptable. My comments in that regard were mostly about the fact that high altitude training will induce hypoxia and in turn that increases the synthesis of hemoglobin and red blood cells within the body, that - in turn - then dramatically improves the bodies? overall ability to use/carry oxygen to the muscles and/or where it?s needed; making you both perform better and much, much, less resilient to fatigue. EPO, as a performance enhancing substance, does the same thing. The way that both EPO, and the combination of high altitude training and the hypoxia it induces ultimately behave (once the hypoxia has been induced) are extremely similar. As soon as any athlete familiar with high altitude training leaves that (high altitude) environment . . . their hemoglobin and red blood cell count will start to reduce down and take with it all the abovementioned advantages of high altitude training. As such EPO, other analogs of it, and/or other PEDs, (if they haven?t already) often then become popular for obvious reasons.
Summary, I see considerable difficulty for Triple in finding a natural environment - within London and/or nearby - to sustain the benefits of the high altitude training he has become accustomed to; therefore (aside from this, most likely being one {amongst several} reason why Triple is fighting a welterweight) managing the weeks before the fight and Triple acclimatizing to London will be both important, and also an opportunity for Hearn to show us his real worth on his anti-doping statements . . . . . As he can do that without testing for dope on the night of the fight; for which he claims is useless. In that way we get to see what Hearn?s real objectives on this important matter are, and whether he has the balls to ask K2 to agree to such contractual provisions as those that would accommodate what I have outlined above. Do I need to say; ?don?t hold your breath??

Cheers,
Storm.
Anyone notice that Triple has arrived in London only a week out of from the fight? There is a reason. Triple wants to ensure that, as much as possible he minimizes the reduction of his already obtained advantages - due to high altitude training - such as increased hemoglobin, erythropoietin, and red blood cell counts, and any other advantage he has attained at Big Bear. And the best way to do that is to minimize the time between when he leaves Big Bear and fights. Cheers,
Storm. :) :) :)