amir-khan-greatest-hits-3009282-35-512 b721e 

 

Amir Khan is an extremely gifted athlete and a supremely confident one, too. He’s won world alphabet titles at 140, made lots and lots of money and, along the way, has become one of the sport’s most recognizable stars.

Khan is a very good fighter. But is he really as good as he thinks he is?

He should hope so. While Canelo Alvarez isn’t a fighter of Floyd Mayweather or Manny Pacquiao’s caliber (at least not at the present), it doesn’t seem out of line that he will be heavily favored over Khan when the two fight for Canelo’s lineal middleweight championship on Saturday night in Las Vegas.

Khan told The Sweet Science he will shock the world this weekend. If anything, I admire his courage and confidence headed into what will very likely be a one-sided fight for Canelo.

Khan told me he feels like he got a head start in training for the fight. He said he was staying in shape for hopeful bouts against Mayweather and Pacquiao, so when they didn’t materialize, it left him heading into the fight against Alvarez having been in camp for four or five months. In short, he feels sharper than ever.

Was he miffed he missed out on Mayweather and Pacquiao fights before they retired?

“I was. I would have been happy to fight them. I would have been strong. That would have been the perfect weight for me.”

Like Khan, Mayweather and Pacquiao are naturally welterweights, while Alvarez is more a junior middleweight plus. Khan told me he believes he would have beaten both Mayweather and Pacquiao if he had been able to convince either man to fight him.

“Styles make fights in boxing, and I think both of their styles would definitely have suited me, and both would have been great fights for the fight fans.”

Khan is sincerely disgruntled he didn’t get Mayweather or Pacquiao in the ring. In fact, he seems genuinely offended by it.

“Both guys I respect. They’re both great guys. But they didn’t treat me right by not fighting me.”

I admit I don’t really understand what he means. Yes, Khan has some excellent physical attributes, and he is very skilled as a boxer in many ways. But is he on the level of Mayweather or Pacquiao? Heck, I’m not even that sure he’s as good as Kell Brook.

Unlike Khan, Brook has actually won a world title at 147. And while Khan has fought bigger names over the course of his longer career, he certainly doesn’t project a huge favorite should the two men ever fight each other.

Khan, by the way, told me not to count on it.

“One thing with Kell Brook is that we offered that fight to them before this one, and instead of playing games like he did [in the negotiations], he needs to focus on taking some good fights.”

True to form, Khan said he considered Brook inferior to him. In his mind, Khan is a Mayweather or a Pacquiao, and Brook is just another contender-type people will forget someday.

“He’s won a world title but he hasn’t fought anyone decent. I think it’s time for him to prove himself. I’m way ahead of him in the sport of boxing, so it’s pointless to put my name next to his. He’s not proven himself since he beat Shawn Porter, and that was a very close fight anyway.”

Ironically, it’s Brook who is undefeated and Khan who has suffered three losses, two by devastating knockout. And Khan has had his fair share of close wins over lackluster competition, too. Still, the brash 29-year-old from Bolton is on a five fight win streak, and has been able to fight (and talk) his way into a bigtime pay-per-view bout against Alvarez.

You have to tip your hat to the guy. He wanted a big fight, and he made it happen.

“I’ve always wanted to be in a big fight. I want to give all my fans around the UK and around the world a big fight and this is the time.”

Does anyone out there give Khan a real chance in this one? I suppose I could see him fighting better than I’ve ever seen, boxing brilliantly and keeping Alvarez at the end of his punches while not making any major mistakes over 12 full rounds, to win a decision. But it seems very unlikely he’ll be able to pull it off. If Chris Algieri’s punches can make their mark on Khan, I’m pretty sure Canelo’s will, too.

Still, stranger things have happened in our sport.

For argument’s sake, let’s say he does win against Canelo. Is he foolhardy enough to defend his newly acquired lineal middleweight championship against 160-pound monster Gennady Golovkin?

“I think it just depends, really. I know I have a lot left to do at 147, so I think I’d like to drop down and win a world title at 147 and then maybe move up to light middleweight. Or maybe I consider 160. It just depends. I’ll have to see how my body feels after this fight and see what options I have and we’ll take it from there.”

So at least he’s not crazy. He didn’t outright say it, but he didn’t even dare utter Golovkin’s name in the response. Khan knows he’s not really a middleweight, so if he beats Canelo, expect him to drop back down in weight.

“I’m just going to make sure I’m at 100 percent, and I’m going to win this fight against Canelo.”

In the end, I suppose it doesn’t really matter what I think about it. If Khan really is as good as he thinks he is, he should be able to beat Alvarez on Saturday night, or minimally it should be a very close fight. If Khan’s extreme confidence in himself is truly warranted, this won’t be the blockbuster blowout many expect it to be.

“Now it’s time for me to show how good I really am, and where I belong.”

Check out The Boxing Channel video “TBC Looks At Saul Alvarez vs Amir Khan”.

COMMENTS

-SouthPawFlo :

The short answer, No....... In my opinion he hasn't looked good but two times in his last 8 fights and that was against Zab and against Devin... Maidana Lamont Danny C Algeri Paulie Julio Diaz Are all fights where he didn't look like an elite fighter to me.... Let's see how he looks agains canelo


-Yogo :

Amir thinks he's as good as Roberto. Disillusioned is 'tha lad' as they might say in parts of Lancashire. Good fighter though, nice hands and feet, he'll take his whipping like a champ and we'll all be proud. Then Kel for another 10 mill. Reet savvy as they might say round here..


-Kid Blast :

In a word, no!


-Radam G :

The short answer, No....... In my opinion he hasn't looked good but two times in his last 8 fights and that was against Zab and against Devin... Maidana Lamont Danny C Algeri Paulie Julio Diaz Are all fights where he didn't look like an elite fighter to me.... Let's see how he looks agains canelo
I'm riding shotgun witcha! Amir (Kingless) Khan is aight, not good or great. Dude is a drop shot for Canelo. Ev'ybodee and dey momma oughta quit pitching that Khan has a chance. Dude might get beat so badly that this may be his last dance. I'm reminded of old news clippings that I read about the late, very good Floyd Patterson getting ready to dance with the late, great, unaccepted by much of the Yank public, Sonny "The Night Train" Liston. A lot of people and pundits, including the late, great U.S. Prez John F. Kennedy, a lot of fanboys, a couple, or so, boksing journalists and a ton of celebrities were hoping and smoking syet that Patterson was going to score an upset. In addition, they were all talking about how good that Patterson was looking in training. GTFOH! In the infamous words of Uncle Roger: "Most people don't know syet 'bout boksin!'" China chinned Patterson was looking like Capt. American in training camp because the late great Encyclopedia of pugilism Cus D'aMato by design warned sparringmates to stay off Patterson's jaw. I have no doubt that trainer V-Hunt has told sparringmates, even the weak ones, to stay off Khan's weak chin. Trainer V-Hunt is an arch-master trainer who knows the powers of optical illusions in training camps. Khan is going into the scrap with Canelo being lied to and buttered up, but Canelo is going to hit him and drop him similar to how The Night Train did Patterson 55 odd years ago. The Khan-Canelo Scrap can and should end in the first minute of the first round. Nonetheless, Canelo might wanna play a cat teasing a mouse for a while before the BIG KILL! And trainer V-Hunt has Khan psych up on the myth that all is possible when it is not so. Holla!


-DaveB :

Once again this fight is a fight hyped on what could happen not what's gonna happen. Don't believe just watch. Going to be a mismatch. He should be fighting Brook.


-The Good Doctor :

To answer the question................. Absolutely not. However, no fighter is as good as they think they are so it really makes him no different from anyone to lace them up. In every sport, especially this one, extreme ego is necessary to even approach the highest levels. The ego may be the thing that psych's someone up for fight, while for another it may mask some fear or insecurity. On top of that for some, it is a result of continuous success. I once heard Bert Sugar say that the one shot that no fighter can come back from is a solid one square on the ego. You also gotta think, if Amir doesn't believe that he really is superior, we are not having this fight or discussion.


-Radam G :

To answer the question................. Absolutely not. However, no fighter is as good as they think they are so it really makes him no different from anyone to lace them up. In every sport, especially this one, extreme ego is necessary to even approach the highest levels. The ego may be the thing that psych's someone up for fight, while for another it may mask some fear or insecurity. On top of that for some, it is a result of continuous success. I once heard Bert Sugar say that the one shot that no fighter can come back from is a solid one square on the ego. You also gotta think, if Amir doesn't believe that he really is superior, we are not having this fight or discussion.
Aficionados and gurus of the sweet science consider boksing ego as simply eager to go, ready to go and knowing that you can. True dat that the ego is the thing that psychs a pug up and helps him/her to use fear as whup-@$$ skills-to-pay-the-bills drive. In other words, fear is a major weapon of consciousness of fire to torch and scorch an arse. I've said this a million times -- being one of the on da real real pugs here -- boxing savvy is what most readers apparently mean. But they use it interchangeable with "ego" and "IQ." And when it comes to IQ that simply means that you know da syet, not that you can do da syet. Boxing savvy is adroitedly doing da syet and overcoming all adversities, including a China chin. The great "Terrible" Terry Norris was an example of that. He'd get KTFO, and then adjust in the rematch and knock you da double fudge out. Amir Khan has a lot of ego, because he is on da quick quick to go and fight. And he has a monster IQ about da game. Dude knows just about da whole 9 of da game. He started boksing at eight years old at a competent gym. Dude's boxing IO is a monster for certain, but da dude has a small amount of boxing savvy. He is robotic, easy to trick and has absolutely no natural thinking in putting it together with fluidity or stealthily. OMFG! He still moves around the ring like an amateur and throws most of his punches like one. No trainer has been able to get him away from the robotic rough edges and calm him down to a smooth-scrapping pro. In boxing, we call the likes of Khan "mechanical." No hate! He is just plain, old mechanical, not natural. And this is why Canelo will beat the stuffing out of him at Canelo's pleasure. Holla!


-Gabrielito :

Amir Khan is damn good, and he will jump several tax brackets (13 million PLUS!! congrats champ!) win or lose vs Canelo. He's the sympathetic little guy now, as poor Marco Antonio Barrera was when Khan wiped him out years ago. If the lad survives past 4 rounds he will have exceeded expectations. If he wins, he's a hero all over again. It's Canelo's fight to lose.


-Radam G :

Wow! Hoping and hating crazily never ends in da game. There are one too many pugs who are crazily hating Canelo and believing that Khan is going to upset Canelo, and they say that they will not be surprised. YUP! RIGHT! Prince Martin had a better chance of upsetting Anthony Joshua. T-Brad had a better chance of upsetting Da Manny. Khan doesn't even have a chance to last a few rounds, unless Canelo does the cat and mouse thing. Wow! Khan is so terrible that his punches don't cut. Who has he ever beat on cuts? That is what I thought -- NOBODY!!! Beating Canelo on cuts is the only prayer that Khan has. And khan's prayers won't be answered for this scrap -- if they have ever been answered for any scrap of his scraps. Holla!


-dino da vinci :

@Radam. A: Versus Marco Antonio Barrera.


-Radam G :

@Radam. A: Versus Marco Antonio Barrera.
Holla at the summary of that scrap on Boxrec and/or FightFax, and you will see that the cut was caused by "...headbutt." Khan does not turn most of his punches over. And he has no effect of rip-and- zip. But just a bunch of lip. Great pugs often cut opponents with razor shots. I stand by it that delusional, sometime-fibbing Khan has never cut a pug's face with a punch. Canelo is going to have him for a late night lunch. Holla!


-stormcentre :

I might write something here soon. Not sure . . . just thinking about it. :) :)


-amayseng :

Holla at the summary of that scrap on Boxrec and/or FightFax, and you will see that the cut was caused by "...headbutt." Khan does not turn most of his punches over. And he has no effect of rip-and- zip. But just a bunch of lip. Great pugs often cut opponents with razor shots. I stand by it that delusional, sometime-fibbing Khan has never cut a pug's face with a punch. Canelo is going to have him for a late night lunch. Holla!
I noticed that, he is fast and swift to the target but not through the target. Against 140lbers he had buzz, against 147s he had pop and knockout power was gone, against Canelo who will weigh 175 he will not have much of anything and no way to keep Canelo off of him. Props to Khan for taking a big fight, props for having courage, though he is just physically outgunned from the get go. Good luck to him but I wont be surprised if Canelo gets him out in 2


-stormcentre :

I actually think that even Hunter is not quite as sure of a Khan win, as it (and Hunter) might seem. Khan is quick. But the way he reels off fast combinations . . . that are arguably faster than Floyd's (whom seems to serve as the common benchmark) . . . doesn't really - in my opinion - mean Khan;


A) Is faster in the real world.
B) Is going to use his (superior?) speed to be effective and/or win.

Khan - despite how talented he is - is also somewhat disjointed in how he uses his overall elasticity and ability to move, in order to spring attacks and counters. He may be able to punch an object, and hit the pads, fast. But overall (say, in the context - for just 1 example - of evading and launching a counter to a right cross) he is not as fast as Floyd. And - especially when you're carrying liabilities/vulnerabilities that you must work with and around - it's these real world considerations that really matter when you talk about speed. To some extent Pernell Whitakker showed us that. His ability to stay in the trenches and not be concerned about his punch resistance was not something he could simply disregard to the same extent that say a prime Mayorga could and did. As such he developed other skills to offset such liabilities; which (for the modern day boxing era) seemed to manifest themselves in (at least prior to Naseem Hamed) an exclusive level of dexterity and defensive skills wrapped up with a healthy portion of velocity. The real key was that, for Pernell, all those attributes were well integrated and almost seamless. Not so with Khan. Not even at 147. I watched a video of Khan on the pads the other day . . . . And I thought - whilst he was not slow - he pushed his punches, was not as coordinated as previous, fluidity was lacking, and he looked unimpressive to me. Furthermore, all his shots didn't seem to carry the power he was clearly interested in attempting to invest. If Khan can't hurt Canelo, get his respect, and make him think twice about walking in; it will be akin to the Cat amongst the pigeon(s). And Khan won't be able to back-peddle fast enough, and consequently he may just stink the joint out (by turning it into a track/field event). There are other issues to consider also . . . . . Khan, really has no active defence. About all he has (aside from moving away) is holding his hands/arms up, when he expecting incoming fire that he doesn't intend to exchange with. Floyd (since he seems to serve as the common benchmark for not only Khan and this fight - but also discussions of boxing defence) would probably be - at least in the context of his "Money May" career - probably half as successful if he had the same defence. In fact - if Floyd had the same defence as Khan - he may have even taken a loss to Maidana, Oscar (appreciate this may be borderline "Pretty Boy"/"Money May"), and also a few others. (A complete) defence doesn't just give you the ability to not get hit. It does a lot of things. Sometimes it let's you (safely) take stock of the situation, to see what's going on, and then test the waters for what your opponent doesn't like; whilst he's open and committed. But staying true to the matter at hand, and also Khan and Canelo . . . (And this is what is really clever about Floyd and both his style and approach to fighting) Defence gives (him and) you (and possibly Khan; if he had the skills) the ability to control the pace of a fight to such a point where you're most effective; and (as stated earlier) Khan has very little of this skill. And just as it's a skill that has recently allowed Ward to confidently move up and beat Barrera - it's also a skill that has allowed Floyd to move up in weight and also fight a range of different styles.

Imagine if Barrera got Ward on the ground or mugged him on the streets up close?

Or, (staying with boxing) imagine if Barrera managed to lure Ward into a slugfest? Same for Floyd and the guys he's beaten that are bigger and probably (generally and in a non boxing sense) stronger than him; such as Maidana, Canelo, Oscar . . et al.

What would probably happen is that the contest (for Andre or Floyd) would more than likely gravitate towards one where physical strength and other attributes (that may perhaps be better suited to closing down and/or marginalizing a physically weaker and/or smaller person) could possibly become an increasingly obvious factor. Imagine if - in their first fight and when Marcus was really on Floyd's case - Floyd was without that complete shoulder roll and all he does with; all as Maidana moved in and maintained the pressure. That would then be like instantly clicking your fingers and replacing Floyd with Berto for those sections of the fight; due to the fact that Berto has some - but not all - defensive aspects of the shoulder roll down pat, and he also has some good, dynamic, and fast . . reflexes and punches. On that case, we all know what would happen. Floyd would probably lose, at least on points. Defence is probably one of the best feathers in your cap to have, in order to resolve these above-mentioned liabilities and deficits; that do not decrease as you move up in weight. And, especially if not taking on more risk as you seek to maintain and/or gain control of the contest is a requirement, then a complete defence is also one of the best feathers in your cap to have in order to combat the above-mentioned liabilities and deficits. And for the clever boxer, not taking on more risk as you seek to maintain and/or gain control of the contest, always is and/or should be a requirement. And, just to give myself the best chance of no-one disagreeing with me (I don't really mind if you do) . . . this is usually why you see a predominance of overly muscular guys in MMA; where physicality is considered way more important than the defensive skills I mention here. Still, don't agree? (To simulate the above circumstances related to where Ward and/or Floyd are on the ground and/or mugged up close - in a way where their boxing defence may not be quite so successfully/easily implemented - by the bigger/stronger guys they have beaten) do an hour, or even half an hour, of BJJ on the floor, attempting to switch-out, gain guard, and break locks, then . . jump into the cage or ring and start sparring. See how your arms and lungs feel. See how messed up your face ends up if you get straight into it and have no defence. If nothing else it will educate on where, why, and how muscularity is advantageously used - just as much as it will enlighten on the benefits of an active defence; including the beneficial ability it provides within contests that are (not based on just pure strength, but) predominantly cardiovascular, reflex, coordination, and strike oriented movements.

So, what's all this crap about "going to the ground", "being mugged", and "raw strength", have to do with both the matter at hand and defence; you may well ask? The point here is that - even if the way Khan currently works around his liabilities was integrated and seamless - he doesn't have a defence that emulates that above described, and nor does he have a defence that seems capable of helping him control the pace, tempo, and style of the fight - so that it suits his best abilities. Of course that doesn't necessarily mean Khan will automatically lose. But, it does then mean that - statistically - Khan then must be able to trade out with Canelo, not be afraid of the trenches, and also be the type of style/guy that (pound for pound) Marciano was. Otherwise statistically Khan will have virtually so little of the attributes that have allowed previous fighters to move up and be successful (against bigger guys that have fought decent opponents whom {in Canelo's case} appear either equal to or better than Khan) that it would paint a dire picture of risk that is the polar opposite of, not just all the marketing associated with this fight - but also that Oscar says with respect to Khan's chances. I appreciate that Khan has bulked up, but this doesn't mean he will have power (as it translates in boxing); especially when fatigued. Add to the equation . . . Khan has had issues with guys at 147 and below; so I don't know how he's going to handle a guy that manages middleweights and even guys that are (a little) heavier. Usually fighters only manage that if moving up has shown to be something they have previously had no issues with. But, as hinted at, Khan previously (got) hit (with serious) issues when he moved to 147; Maidana, Garcia, and arguably Algieri. Khan, against Canelo, will be almost entirely reliant upon his feet and hand-speed. This means he will be (nervously?) conscious of his stamina. And, it's not like we haven't seen Khan fight with nervous angst before. Ah, well, at least he's getting paid more than $10M for it. Even if you don't implement the caveat of excluding those speaking with UK pride and support; it's reasonably hard to find a respected former champion and/or decent fighter/trainer that has fought Canelo/Khan that confidently/genuinely thinks Khan will win this. I appreciate Ward and Garcia are saying positive things about Matthew's chances. However, aside from the fact that Ward is understandably biased, most (including Danny Garcia) seem to fall back on the position of stating that Khan has the (theoretical) style to beat Khan. Well, of course he does. As . . . . Notwithstanding the above concerns; Khan has reach, speed, and a few other attributes, and - particularly if you assess those attributes without the above liabilities and considerations - that looks a lot more favorable for Khan. The summary is - for me - I don't think Khan can work around his liabilities and also - at the same time - pull his non-integrated (but really good) skills together so that they are adequately grouped and acting as one single seamless/integrated system; under the pressure of moving up in weight and also fighting a guy like Canelo - who has fought guys like Cotto, Kirkland, Angulo, Lara, and Trout. Anyway, that's my thoughts on it all. To close . . . Aside from the expression on Shane's face as video starts when he's asked about Khan's chances . . . Shane Mosley's advice for Khan is both apt and funny. For a giggle; check the advice/comment about (avoiding being KO'd a and) doing neck exercises.


-King Beef :

I actually think that even Hunter is not quite as sure of a Khan win, as it (and Hunter) might seem. Khan is quick. But the way he reels off fast combinations . . . that are arguably faster than Floyd's (whom seems to serve as the common benchmark) . . . doesn't really - in my opinion - mean Khan;


A) Is faster in the real world.
B) Is going to use his (superior?) speed to be effective and/or win.

Khan - despite how talented he is - is also somewhat disjointed in how he uses his overall elasticity and ability to move, in order to spring attacks and counters. He may be able to punch an object, and hit the pads, fast. But overall (say, in the context - for just 1 example - of evading and launching a counter to a right cross) he is not as fast as Floyd. And - especially when you're carrying liabilities/vulnerabilities that you must work with and around - it's these real world considerations that really matter when you talk about speed. To some extent Pernell Whitakker showed us that. His ability to stay in the trenches and not be concerned about his punch resistance was not something he could simply disregard to the same extent that say a prime Mayorga could and did. As such he developed other skills to offset such liabilities; which (for the modern day boxing era) seemed to manifest themselves in (at least prior to Naseem Hamed) an exclusive level of dexterity and defensive skills wrapped up with a healthy portion of velocity. The real key was that, for Pernell, all those attributes were well integrated and almost seamless. Not so with Khan. Not even at 147. I watched a video of Khan on the pads the other day . . . . And I thought - whilst he was not slow - he pushed his punches, was not as coordinated as previous, fluidity was lacking, and he looked unimpressive to me. Furthermore, all his shots didn't seem to carry the power he was clearly interested in attempting to invest. If Khan can't hurt Canelo, get his respect, and make him think twice about walking in; it will be akin to the Cat amongst the pigeon(s). And Khan won't be able to back-peddle fast enough, and consequently he may just stink the joint out (by turning it into a track/field event). There are other issues to consider also . . . . . Khan, really has no active defence. About all he has (aside from moving away) is holding his hands/arms up, when he expecting incoming fire that he doesn't intend to exchange with. Floyd (since he seems to serve as the common benchmark for not only Khan and this fight - but also discussions of boxing defence) would probably be - at least in the context of his "Money May" career - probably half as successful if he had the same defence. In fact - if Floyd had the same defence as Khan - he may have even taken a loss to Maidana, Oscar (appreciate this may be borderline "Pretty Boy"/"Money May"), and also a few others. (A complete) defence doesn't just give you the ability to not get hit. It does a lot of things. Sometimes it let's you (safely) take stock of the situation, to see what's going on, and then test the waters for what your opponent doesn't like; whilst he's open and committed. But staying true to the matter at hand, and also Khan and Canelo . . . (And this is what is really clever about Floyd and both his style and approach to fighting) Defence gives (him and) you (and possibly Khan; if he had the skills) the ability to control the pace of a fight to such a point where you're most effective; and (as stated earlier) Khan has very little of this skill. And just as it's a skill that has recently allowed Ward to confidently move up and beat Barrera - it's also a skill that has allowed Floyd to move up in weight and also fight a range of different styles.

Imagine if Barrera got Ward on the ground or mugged him on the streets up close?

Or, (staying with boxing) imagine if Barrera managed to lure Ward into a slugfest? Same for Floyd and the guys he's beaten that are bigger and probably (generally and in a non boxing sense) stronger than him; such as Maidana, Canelo, Oscar . . et al.

What would probably happen is that the contest (for Andre or Floyd) would more than likely gravitate towards one where physical strength and other attributes (that may perhaps be better suited to closing down and/or marginalizing a physically weaker and/or smaller person) could possibly become an increasingly obvious factor. Imagine if - in their first fight and when Marcus was really on Floyd's case - Floyd was without that complete shoulder roll and all he does with; all as Maidana moved in and maintained the pressure. That would then be like instantly clicking your fingers and replacing Floyd with Berto for those sections of the fight; due to the fact that Berto has some - but not all - defensive aspects of the shoulder roll down pat, and he also has some good, dynamic, and fast . . reflexes and punches. On that case, we all know what would happen. Floyd would probably lose, at least on points. Defence is probably one of the best feathers in your cap to have, in order to resolve these above-mentioned liabilities and deficits; that do not decrease as you move up in weight. And, especially if not taking on more risk as you seek to maintain and/or gain control of the contest is a requirement, then a complete defence is also one of the best feathers in your cap to have in order to combat the above-mentioned liabilities and deficits. And for the clever boxer, not taking on more risk as you seek to maintain and/or gain control of the contest, always is and/or should be a requirement. And, just to give myself the best chance of no-one disagreeing with me (I don't really mind if you do) . . . this is usually why you see a predominance of overly muscular guys in MMA; where physicality is considered way more important than the defensive skills I mention here. Still, don't agree? (To simulate the above circumstances related to where Ward and/or Floyd are on the ground and/or mugged up close - in a way where their boxing defence may not be quite so successfully/easily implemented - by the bigger/stronger guys they have beaten) do an hour, or even half an hour, of BJJ on the floor, attempting to switch-out, gain guard, and break locks, then . . jump into the cage or ring and start sparring. See how your arms and lungs feel. See how messed up your face ends up if you get straight into it and have no defence. If nothing else it will educate on where, why, and how muscularity is advantageously used - just as much as it will enlighten on the benefits of an active defence; including the beneficial ability it provides within contests that are (not based on just pure strength, but) predominantly cardiovascular, reflex, coordination, and strike oriented movements.

So, what's all this crap about "going to the ground", "being mugged", and "raw strength", have to do with both the matter at hand and defence; you may well ask? The point here is that - even if the way Khan currently works around his liabilities was integrated and seamless - he doesn't have a defence that emulates that above described, and nor does he have a defence that seems capable of helping him control the pace, tempo, and style of the fight - so that it suits his best abilities. Of course that doesn't necessarily mean Khan will automatically lose. But, it does then mean that - statistically - Khan then must be able to trade out with Canelo, not be afraid of the trenches, and also be the type of style/guy that (pound for pound) Marciano was. Otherwise statistically Khan will have virtually so little of the attributes that have allowed previous fighters to move up and be successful (against bigger guys that have fought decent opponents whom {in Canelo's case} appear either equal to or better than Khan) that it would paint a dire picture of risk that is the polar opposite of, not just all the marketing associated with this fight - but also that Oscar says with respect to Khan's chances. I appreciate that Khan has bulked up, but this doesn't mean he will have power (as it translates in boxing); especially when fatigued. Add to the equation . . . Khan has had issues with guys at 147 and below; so I don't know how he's going to handle a guy that manages middleweights and even guys that are (a little) heavier. Usually fighters only manage that if moving up has shown to be something they have previously had no issues with. But, as hinted at, Khan previously (got) hit (with serious) issues when he moved to 147; Maidana, Garcia, and arguably Algieri. Khan, against Canelo, will be almost entirely reliant upon his feet and hand-speed. This means he will be (nervously?) conscious of his stamina. And, it's not like we haven't seen Khan fight with nervous angst before. Ah, well, at least he's getting paid more than $10M for it. Even if you don't implement the caveat of excluding those speaking with UK pride and support; it's reasonably hard to find a respected former champion and/or decent fighter/trainer that has fought Canelo/Khan that confidently/genuinely thinks Khan will win this. I appreciate Ward and Garcia are saying positive things about Matthew's chances. However, aside from the fact that Ward is understandably biased, most (including Danny Garcia) seem to fall back on the position of stating that Khan has the (theoretical) style to beat Khan. Well, of course he does. As . . . . Notwithstanding the above concerns; Khan has reach, speed, and a few other attributes, and - particularly if you assess those attributes without the above liabilities and considerations - that looks a lot more favorable for Khan. The summary is - for me - I don't think Khan can work around his liabilities and also - at the same time - pull his non-integrated (but really good) skills together so that they are adequately grouped and acting as one single seamless/integrated system; under the pressure of moving up in weight and also fighting a guy like Canelo - who has fought guys like Cotto, Kirkland, Angulo, Lara, and Trout. Anyway, that's my thoughts on it all. To close . . . Aside from the expression on Shane's face as video starts when he's asked about Khan's chances . . . Shane Mosley's advice for Khan is both apt and funny. For a giggle; check the advice/comment about (avoiding being KO'd a and) doing neck exercises.
Nice post Storm, I was kinda thinking the same thing, Its seems like all I hear Khan talking about is relying on is his speed; impressive as it may seem, it reminds me of the baseball talk of the pitcher with the 100mph fastball and nothing else...once he gets timed...its bombs away. I think your right about the Mayweather thing as well, aside from a superior defense, Floyds reaction time to throw a shot when he sees a opening is waaaaay better. As crazy as it sounds, I still think Khan might do better than people think, especially if he goes into point fighting mode, but like I said before it will probably end up a replay of the Garcia fight. How do you think these extra pounds will affect Khans power...good, or indifferent?? It seems like he does have the frame to support and benefit from the extra size, but no enough time for this fight.


-stormcentre :

Not sure about the extra pounds KB. I mean Kahn is definitely bigger now, but he has put those pounds/muscles on rather quickly, & extra muscles require extra oxygen. .. Extrapolating you get to the point where Khan could end up slower & more gassed earlier. ... speachlly if he hasn't acclimatized to it all. Even aside from the fact that Saul's chin is tested & proven, whilst Kahn's is not; it's hard to envisage Khan mounting a tougher attack than Kirkland & Trout... & I can't see him being more crafty than Lara or Floyd either. Not at this weight .... Or that which Canelo will arrive at on the night.


-SuperLight :

Not sure about the extra pounds KB. I mean Kahn is definitely bigger now, but he has put those pounds/muscles on rather quickly, & extra muscles require extra oxygen. .. Extrapolating you get to the point where Khan could end up slower & more gassed earlier. ... speachlly if he hasn't acclimatized to it all. Even aside from the fact that Saul's chin is tested & proven, whilst Kahn's is not; it's hard to envisage Khan mounting a tougher attack than Kirkland & Trout... & I can't see him being more crafty than Lara or Floyd either. Not at this weight .... Or that which Canelo will arrive at on the night.
Besides all in your previous post, the above is a great point. Even if Khan is heavier than usual, and managaes to retain speed and power, as it were, he'll be facing a guy who's really good at playing the weight game. With all respect to Jeff Fenech, Alvarez likely does much more than lay into Mum's lasagne after weigh-in. I agree that speed can be a bit of an illusion, whether Mayweather's pad routine or Khan's water bottle as speed bag party trick. It's impressive but it doesn't tell the full story. What is proactive and reactive, how is the accuracy, balance and power when executing fast moves? For me, Whitaker and Hamed were really impressive in terms of structure and proactive/evasive defence. Compare not so "fast" fighters such as Marvelous or Chocolatito who'd position the feet just right to very effectively set up more traditional shots. And to expand on the importance of active defence, look at Tyson, who is still often underestimated in this regard. His high hands would be largely useless if not coupled with almost constant head and upper body movement. Those hours with the slip bag helped hone his art of not getting hit, and hitting in return, often finding a gap, with optimum leverage on hooks, rips and uppercuts. Punished, returned with interest, as Jim Courier used to say when commentating the Aus Open. As those who've sparred and/or fought will know, getting just out of the way can drain and demoralise your opponent as much as taking a few stiff straight shots without reacting. Let alone returning with a power shot while your guy has possibly over-extended himself. So, all that said, size/weight notwithstanding, does Khan possess or display these attributes? From what I have seen, no, but I'll be happy to watch a bout anyone can recommend to suggest otherwise.


-amayseng :

Nice post Storm, I was kinda thinking the same thing, Its seems like all I hear Khan talking about is relying on is his speed; impressive as it may seem, it reminds me of the baseball talk of the pitcher with the 100mph fastball and nothing else...once he gets timed...its bombs away. I think your right about the Mayweather thing as well, aside from a superior defense, Floyds reaction time to throw a shot when he sees a opening is waaaaay better. As crazy as it sounds, I still think Khan might do better than people think, especially if he goes into point fighting mode, but like I said before it will probably end up a replay of the Garcia fight. How do you think these extra pounds will affect Khans power...good, or indifferent?? It seems like he does have the frame to support and benefit from the extra size, but no enough time for this fight.
not many can "time" a 100mph fastball, not many have the eyes, coordination and reaction time to time 100mph fastballs. Even if that is all that is thrown. Your analogy would have worked better with just "fastball". Baseball was my game to the elite level, coming from my ability to "time" ha, or hit 100mph baseballs it is an insult to me and others.....ha sorry I can't accept it..... good point though


-Radam G :

not many can "time" a 100mph fastball, not many have the eyes, coordination and reaction time to time 100mph fastballs. Even if that is all that is thrown. Your analogy would have worked better with just "fastball". Baseball was my game to the elite level, coming from my ability to "time" ha, or hit 100mph baseballs it is an insult to me and others.....ha sorry I can't accept it..... good point though
Also a decent baseball pitcher can change up. Meaning that he can throw a slider, a knuckle ball, a curve ball, a straight ball. Khan doesn't' have that type of creativity with his punches. Dude is simple and straight forward. He has no angles, no change up, no nuffin' [sic]. Besides, Khan is not smooth or stealth. He is so animated with a lot of wasteful moving and punching. Holla!


-King Beef :

not many can "time" a 100mph fastball, not many have the eyes, coordination and reaction time to time 100mph fastballs. Even if that is all that is thrown. Your analogy would have worked better with just "fastball". Baseball was my game to the elite level, coming from my ability to "time" ha, or hit 100mph baseballs it is an insult to me and others.....ha sorry I can't accept it..... good point though
Lol, I will take fastball then, your game= elite, mine...I was told as a kid in PE, "your gonna break a wrist from hitting crosshanded!!!


-amayseng :

Lol, I will take fastball then, your game= elite, mine...I was told as a kid in PE, "your gonna break a wrist from hitting crosshanded!!!
hahaha poor guy, hope they switched your hands ha... Hope Khan is ok, he took a brutal shot.


-stormcentre :

Now Kahn can get ready for Triple. .. . after all he did say prior to Canelo that he didn't rule out a fight with 3G


-Kid Blast :

IMO, He will never ever really recover from that shot. Lots of brain cells might have been destroyed. It's like being mugged and suffering a concussion. You don't want to have that experience repeated. It might be one of the reasons Khan's Ring IQ is so low. He has taken a lot of head shots over the years. He needs to think about his health right now and look at the options with a "clear head."


-dollar bond :

His major issue is that he is not very intelligent in my opinion.


-stormcentre :

He tried. He did well and exposed some of Canelo's limitations - just as Canelo exposed Kahn's main (and predictable) limitation. Basically, it was a money grab wrapped up and (poorly) sold (by Oscar) as a competitive fight (as a means of preserving GBP's one and only main Mexican cash cow). Oscar knew Khan would never win (and also agree to the strange weight/rehydration clauses). So did Hunter. That's why Matthew was chosen. Khan had, for a long time, been so desperate for a big time and well publicized money fight that the actual contest's outcome became an increasingly distant thought and secondary consideration to other matters. Particularly matters of payment and popularity. At the end of the day (Oscar knew that) both Hunter and Khan (like not too many others) could not afford to say "no" to that kind of cash. Who can? I am not sure what Saul weighed on the night, but I reckon it was probably (at least) around 174. Khan, at best (or, depending on your view, worst) could not have been more than 160. Imagine what Floyd would have done to Khan (had Matty got what he wanted when he was calling for a Floyd fight); given how Floyd utterly dominated Canelo? When it's all said/done, and at the end of the day . . . Canelo's destruction of Khan proves very little in the big and middleweight scheme of things. Unforeseen contractual and weight related clauses/considerations aside . . . And, despite Canelo's victory speech and cries . . . My view remains, and is that Triple will punish Canelo "if" they fight. Oscar has not avoided Triple and looked for easier pickings, for no reason. :) :) :)