Zab Judah and Promoter Roy Englebrecht Ask For Leniency At Their Disciplinary Hearing

 judah 8fa20

By Arne K. Lang

Zab Judah and promoter Roy Englebrecht appeared before the Nevada Athletic Commission this morning (Wednesday, March 23) for a preliminary hearing on their suspended licenses. Judah, a former world champion in the 140 and 147 pound weight classes, was to headline a card promoted by Englebrecht at the outdoor Downtown Las Vegas Events Center on March 12. The entire show was cancelled with little advance warning when it was determined that Judah provided false information on his license application form. Englebrecht, a longtime fixture on the Southern California boxing scene, signed Judah’s name to the document, a well-established practice in boxing, notwithstanding the fact that it constitutes an act of forgery.

On the form, Judah/Englebrecht answered “no” to the question of whether there were any liens against the fighter. To the contrary, there are at least three separate court orders against Judah for back child support. According to information provided at today’s hearing, the total amount that is currently owed is $240,000.

Zab Judah did not speak at the hearing, other than answering “yes” or “no” to perfunctory questions. Attorney Jay Brown was his spokesman.

Brown noted that Judah is in a catch-22. To satisfy the courts, he must have a way to earn money and boxing is the only “job” that he has ever held. Noting that Judah is now 38 years old, Brown said “the clock is ticking here” and that if Judah’s license isn’t reinstated in a reasonable amount of time “that would further narrow his narrowing time frame.” Brown asserted that Judah paid $249,712 in child support payments between July 2010 and July 2013 and mentioned that he has performed volunteer work mentoring at-risk youth at Nevada’s Spring Mountain Youth Center.

Roy Englebrecht appeared without counsel and spoke eloquently without the benefit of notes. “I made a mistake,” said Englebrecht. “I used poor judgment…I damaged the trust you placed in me…I accept full responsibility….I’m sorry.”

Englebrecht noted that he is now 70 years old, that his career as a boxing promoter spans 31 years, that he has never bounced a check despite promoting mostly club shows without TV or casino money, that he is licensed in five states, and that this is the first occasion of its kind for him. “I would hope that the commission takes into consideration my full body of work,” he said.

The licenses of Judah and Englebrecht remain suspended. No resolution was made at today’s hearing other than extending the suspensions until the matter is adjudicated. A vote is expected at the May meeting of the commission. At that time, Judah and Englebrecht will be able to provide additional information. Speaking to reporters, Englebrecht alluded to facts that haven’t yet been made public, facts that he will bring to light at his next hearing.

 

 

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COMMENTS

-Radam G :

The book should be thrown at them. But they will get their wishes, and get off with hand slaps. Holla!


-miguel1 :

Zab owes a lot of money and he is absorbing legal fees. Bad news. Roy probably should get off with a short susp and a stern warning


-stormcentre :

Hmm . . . . . $240K is a lot of lien for someone to overlook and say there's none. That's like forgetting you're not a world champion and then doing a 180 degree phase shift and saying you're one. :) And - despite how "others" may respond to the "opportunity" differently - Judah probably wouldn't do that. At a guess, I would say . . . . . . Say ""goodbye"" to working with Roy and that license for a long time Zab. And - instead - say ""hello"" to fighting;

A) As a Pro for a lot longer than you (probably already) want to. B) Opponents that may not always suit your interests.

:) :)


-Kid Blast :

But there is a catch 22 here. There really is. I can see Zab's point to some degree.


-deepwater2 :

But there is a catch 22 here. There really is. I can see Zab's point to some degree.
Zab has to work or he cant pay what is due. He better come up with an agreement with his children's mothers and put 80% of all earnings into an account for them.The minimum won't do. He might as well fight for free a couple fights and stay out of jail and keep his license. He should of pulled out if he didn't want to pay. He better act quick. Time to make amends with the women and get a damn accountant.


-Kid Blast :

He is f--k.


-miguel1 :

Storm, I bet it probably went more like this. The commission woke up the week of the fight and started asking for their forms. These bureaucracies love their paperwork. Now he last fought in Las Vegas in 2011, so it is likely a lot of his paperwork on file is expired. It looks like he last fought in NY, license probably active through 2013. A quick call to NYC means they can get some documents and med exams faxed over. That will leave some forms. Most of the commissions in the states specifically ask the question about child support and back debt. If I understand the structure correctly, the Commissioner's boss is the state's Lieutenant Governor, and the LT Guv also runs a few of the relevant state agencies. So somene figured out that by sharing data they might catch a few delinquent fathers. Now, if I am not mistaken, if Zab signs the form himself, there is no reason to pull in Englebrecht at all, or cancel the rest of the show. It then is Judah v the Commission, and the promoter can go his merry way. Not every promoter gets suspended when a fighter submits forged documents. But here, Englebrecht let his guard down He needed to get the form in and finish the paperwork, and he either: - Put NO on the form on his own, thinking Judah was licensed in NY and it is low risk. - Asked Judah and Judah said NO, and he took him at his word. Either way, Englebrecht took a shortcut and I bet he regrets it. As for Judah, my guess is he must have accrued that debt in the two years since his last active license. Perhaps he can bcome a Russian citizen? Clear this mess right up.


-stormcentre :

Storm, I bet it probably went more like this. The commission woke up the week of the fight and started asking for their forms. These bureaucracies love their paperwork. Now he last fought in Las Vegas in 2011, so it is likely a lot of his paperwork on file is expired. It looks like he last fought in NY, license probably active through 2013. A quick call to NYC means they can get some documents and med exams faxed over. That will leave some forms. Most of the commissions in the states specifically ask the question about child support and back debt. If I understand the structure correctly, the Commissioner's boss is the state's Lieutenant Governor, and the LT Guv also runs a few of the relevant state agencies. So somene figured out that by sharing data they might catch a few delinquent fathers. Now, if I am not mistaken, if Zab signs the form himself, there is no reason to pull in Englebrecht at all, or cancel the rest of the show. It then is Judah v the Commission, and the promoter can go his merry way. Not every promoter gets suspended when a fighter submits forged documents. But here, Englebrecht let his guard down He needed to get the form in and finish the paperwork, and he either: - Put NO on the form on his own, thinking Judah was licensed in NY and it is low risk. - Asked Judah and Judah said NO, and he took him at his word. Either way, Englebrecht took a shortcut and I bet he regrets it. As for Judah, my guess is he must have accrued that debt in the two years since his last active license. Perhaps he can bcome a Russian citizen? Clear this mess right up.
Fair enough. I hadn't thought of whether Englebrecht needed to get the form in and also finish the paperwork in extreme haste, and as such completed the form inaccurately; in any other sense than how such explanations would probably provide a good legal defence. I mean, if I were their (unscrupulous) lawyer I would advise them that - in the circumstance where the above explanation was correct (then pause so they can look at each other and digest the meaning of that :) ) - then neither of them may be completely liable for the situation; and Zab would probably almost completely mitigate his liability. But I suspect that - even if both parties' (Zab/Roy) signature is not on the forms - there is a clause in there that either compels full disclosure from both parties and/or empowers the authorities to assume that - with any signed application - the same is in effect. Do you have any more on how the matter unfolded M1? :) :)


-miguel1 :

That is all I know from what I ave seen. NOw they just wait for the commission?s followup meeting.