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Randy Caballero and Frankie Gomez have a lot in common: both are undefeated Southern California fighters that failed to make weight the last time they entered the boxing ring.

No matter how mighty, one of the cruelest endeavors in all individual combat sports is making weight.

Whether it’s a flyweight or a heavyweight, getting on those scales can be the most revealing aspect in prizefighting.

So many past champions were defeated on the weight scales; guys like Jose Luis Castillo, Joan Guzman or the late Diego Corrales had problems with those mindless evil weight measurements.

Ex-world titlist Caballero suffered the same fate three months ago. Slated to defend the IBF bantamweight title against England’s Lee Haskins, those scales did what 22 opponents failed to do. Caballero lost the title on the scales.

Gomez, 23, ranked as a super lightweight, has zipped through 19 opponents like a sword ripping through water. But those scales have ripped him on several occasions. Even fighting at the 147-pound welterweight division proved too daunting. Not too long ago his fighting weight was 135.

On Friday, Feb. 5, Caballero and Gomez co-headline a Golden Boy Promotions fight card at Fantasy Springs Casino. The co-main events will be televised by Estrella TV. Both contenders face solid competition. The bigger question comes during the weigh-in.

Caballero (22-0, 13 Kos) faces Ruben Garcia (15-1-1) at a new weight class, the super bantamweight division. The four extra pounds should make a difference.

“Doctors are telling me I can’t make that weight (118) anymore; that 122 pounds is my natural weight because of age. I’m going to win a title in this weight class too,” Caballero said.

Caballero, 25, just out-grew the 118-pounders. But can he deal with the extra four pounds and the extra power they yield?

“Of course it’s my dream to win titles in different weight classes. I told everybody let’s not risk it and my body can’t take it no more at 118,” Caballero said. “I’m not looking back no more. I’m just looking forward at 122. Lot of tough guys there that have titles, like the two guys from England (Carl Frampton and Scott Quigg) and Nonito Donaire. Lot of action packed fighters. I’m ready to make a name for myself at 122.”

This is that first important step for the Coachella desert fighter.

Check out this interview with Randy Caballero at The Boxing Channel

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