It’s More Dangerous For Roy Jones To Fail Compared To Manning And Bryant

oy-jones-jr

In 1998 Peyton Manning was a rookie quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts. Manning, who will turn 40 this coming March, is now the backup quarterback, due to injury and sub-par play, for the Denver Broncos. In 1996 Kobe Bryant, who turned 37 four months ago, was a second string rookie shooting guard for the Los Angeles Lakers. Bryant announced earlier this month that he'll be retiring at the end of this season and Manning's future is still undecided as to whether he'll play during the 2016 NFL season. This coming January Roy Jones 62-9 (45), who made his professional boxing debut on May 6th of 1989, will turn 47. On the 12th of this month Roy was brutally knocked out in the fourth round by former fringe title holder Enzo Maccarinelli in Roy's 71st bout.

If you follow sports you must know that Manning hasn't been able to complete a pass to anyone but the defensive players of the Broncos opponents – and Bryant can't hit the back of the rim let alone make a jump shot. At one time Manning played the quarterback position in the NFL perhaps better than any quarterback who has ever lived. Today you cringe every time he drops back to throw the ball knowing that the defensive player on the other team has as much of a chance to catch it as his favorite receiver and target Demaryius Thomas. These days when Bryant takes a shot the other players on the court step back and look to grab the rebound off of what most on the floor believe is a certain miss. And to think the player who most believe is greatest NBA player since Michael Jordan entered the league can no longer hit an uncontested jump shot is mind boggling. But father time catches up to everybody, that's the surest bet in the world.

On November 8th 2003, Roy Jones won a controversial majority decision over WBC light heavyweight title holder Antonio Tarver in their first meeting to bring his record to 49-1. For the record, I had Jones edging out Tarver in the last two rounds to secure the decision legitimately. In fact Roy's gallant stand during the final two rounds of the bout impressed me as much as anything Jones had ever done in a light heavyweight bout. Simply because he was weakened by the dramatic weight loss he'd been force to endure after beating John Ruiz for the WBA heavyweight title eight months earlier — and the outcome rode on the final two rounds and Roy was forced to suck it up like never before in his career and he did to eek past Tarver.

Had Jones decided to retire after beating Tarver, today he'd be considered one of the top-5 pound-for-pound greatest fighters in boxing history. In between the years 1989 and 2003, with the exception of Sugar Ray Leonard, Jones was the most gifted fighter/boxer I've seen since Muhammad Ali. Roy could do it all, box, punch with both hands, put punches together in blinding succession to the head and body and he was impossible to touch with a clean shot.

When fans even attempt to compare Floyd Mayweather to Roy Jones from a skill and talent vantage point, it's a joke. Roy did everything better than Floyd but pick and choose his opposition. He beat Bernard Hopkins and James Toney, two first ballot hall of famers and all-time greats when they were in their prime, and in 24 rounds against them, maybe he lost five. Mayweather doesn't own a single win on his record that equals Jones beating Hopkins let alone both he and Toney. And to think Roy dominated a quality heavyweight like Ruiz, who went 1-1-1 in three consecutive bouts with Evander Holyfield, and who was 50 pounds heavier than any other opponent Jones ever fought to capture a piece of the heavyweight title….was a career defining accomplishment

Now that I've made the case attesting to Jones greatness, it's come to the point to where he could get seriously hurt and perhaps die if he continues to fight, something neither Peyton Manning or Kobe Bryant risk by continuing to embarrass themselves throwing interceptions and missing shots during games. Roy has been stopped five times during his boxing career and all five times he either was devastated or took a bad beating. Ever since Jones dropped the weight (nearly 20 pounds of muscle) he put on to fight Ruiz and went back down to light heavyweight, his punch resistance has been basically non-existent. At the conclusion of his last bout versus Enzo Maccarinelli, 35, he looked to be left for dead on the ring canvas. Roy was down for more than five minutes and his legs tapped the canvas. The knockout was so devastating that Maccarinelli dropped to one knee in the ring as if he were saying a prayer that Jones would be okay.

Getting beat up and knocked out looks much worse than a washed up quarterback or shooting guard missing the target. ESPN, in fun for a joke, splices tapes together of Manning getting intercepted and Kobe missing shots, but they never do that regarding washed up fighters taking punches and getting knocked out – and that's because their lives aren't in jeopardy of ending when they walk onto the football field or basketball court.

Roy failing in the ring looks much worse than a former great football or basketball player not getting it done. Worse than that, Roy Jones' life is at stake and he could get killed! Hopefully someone will find a way to save Roy from himself before it's too late, because he cannot be counted on to save himself and the result of that could be tragic. We’re talking brain damage at the least or a crippling injury or death at the other end of the scale.

What drove Roy Jones to be a great pound-for-pound fighter during his prime is now detrimental to his health. Unlike Peyton Manning and Kobe Bryant, Roy Jones doesn't have to make the team in order to box. All he has to do is pass a state physical and his license is good. Unless someone in power figures out a way to deny Jones a boxing license, even on some sort of a technicality, I'm afraid Roy's career may end under the saddest of circumstances.

Never have I wanted to be more wrong about a fighter!

Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at GlovedFist@Gmail.com

WATCH RELATED VIDEOS ON BOXINGCHANNEL.TV

Comment on this article

COMMENTS

-Radam G :

[br] title="The Sweet Science - Boxing News"[/br][br][/br] In 1998 Peyton Manning was a rookie quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts. Manning, who will turn 40 this coming March, is now the backup quarterback, due to injury and sub-par play, for the Denver Broncos. In 1996 Kobe Bryant, who turned 37 four months ago, was a second string rookie shooting guard for the Los Angeles Lakers. Bryant announced earlier this month that he'll be retiring at the end of this season and Manning's future is still undecided as to whether he'll play during the 2016 NFL season. This coming January Roy Jones 62-9 (45), who made his professional boxing debut on May 6th of 1989, will turn 47. On the 12th of this month Roy was brutally knocked out in the fourth round by former fringe title holder Enzo Maccarinelli in Roy's 71st bout.[br][/br] If you follow sports you must know that Manning hasn't been able to complete a pass to anyone but the defensive players of the Broncos opponents - and Bryant can't hit the back of the rim let alone make a jump shot. At one time Manning played the quarterback position in the NFL perhaps better than any quarterback who has ever lived. Today you cringe every time he drops back to throw the ball knowing that the defensive player on the other team has as much of a chance to catch it as his favorite receiver and target Demaryius Thomas. These days when Bryant takes a shot the other players on the court step back and look to grab the rebound off of what most on the floor believe is a certain miss. And to think the player who most believe is greatest NBA player since Michael Jordan entered the league can no longer hit an uncontested jump shot is mind boggling. But father time catches up to everybody, that's the surest bet in the world.[br][/br] On November 8th 2003, Roy Jones won a controversial majority decision over WBC light heavyweight title holder Antonio Tarver in their first meeting to bring his record to 49-1. For the record, I had Jones edging out Tarver in the last two rounds to secure the decision legitimately. In fact Roy's gallant stand during the final two rounds of the bout impressed me as much as anything Jones had ever done in a light heavyweight bout. Simply because he was weakened by the dramatic weight loss he'd been force to endure after beating John Ruiz for the WBA heavyweight title eight months earlier -- and the outcome rode on the final two rounds and Roy was forced to suck it up like never before in his career and he did to eek past Tarver.[br][/br] Had Jones decided to retire after beating Tarver, today he'd be considered one of the top-5 pound-for-pound greatest fighters in boxing history. In between the years 1989 and 2003, with the exception of Sugar Ray Leonard, Jones was the most gifted fighter/boxer I've seen since Muhammad Ali. Roy could do it all, box, punch with both hands, put punches together in blinding succession to the head and body and he was impossible to touch with a clean shot.[br][/br] When fans even attempt to compare Floyd Mayweather to Roy Jones from a skill and talent vantage point, it's a joke. Roy did everything better than Floyd but pick and choose his opposition. He beat Bernard Hopkins and James Toney, two first ballot hall of famers and all-time greats when they were in their prime, and in 24 rounds against them, maybe he lost five. Mayweather doesn't own a single win on his record that equals Jones beating Hopkins let alone both he and Toney. And to think Roy dominated a quality heavyweight like Ruiz, who went 1-1-1 in three consecutive bouts with Evander Holyfield, and who was 50 pounds heavier than any other opponent Jones ever fought to capture a piece of the heavyweight title....was a career defining accomplishment[br][/br] Now that I've made the case attesting to Jones greatness, it's come to the point to where he could get seriously hurt and perhaps die if he continues to fight, something neither Peyton Manning or Kobe Bryant risk by continuing to embarrass themselves throwing interceptions and missing shots during games. Roy has been stopped five times during his boxing career and all five times he either was devastated or took a bad beating. Ever since Jones dropped the weight (nearly 20 pounds of muscle) he put on to fight Ruiz and went back down to light heavyweight, his punch resistance has been basically non-existent. At the conclusion of his last bout versus Enzo Maccarinelli, 35, he looked to be left for dead on the ring canvas. Roy was down for more than five minutes and his legs tapped the canvas. The knockout was so devastating that Maccarinelli dropped to one knee in the ring as if he were saying a prayer that Jones would be okay.[br][/br] Getting beat up and knocked out looks much worse than a washed up quarterback or shooting guard missing the target. ESPN, in fun for a joke, splices tapes together of Manning getting intercepted and Kobe missing shots, but they never do that regarding washed up fighters taking punches and getting knocked out - and that's because their lives aren't in jeopardy of ending when they walk onto the football field or basketball court.[br][/br] Roy failing in the ring looks much worse than a former great football or basketball player not getting it done. Worse than that, Roy Jones' life is at stake and he could get killed! Hopefully someone will find a way to save Roy from himself before it's too late, because he cannot be counted on to save himself and the result of that could be tragic. We?re talking brain damage at the least or a crippling injury or death at the other end of the scale.[br][/br] What drove Roy Jones to be a great pound-for-pound fighter during his prime is now detrimental to his health. Unlike Peyton Manning and Kobe Bryant, Roy Jones doesn't have to make the team in order to box. All he has to do is pass a state physical and his license is good. Unless someone in power figures out a way to deny Jones a boxing license, even on some sort of a technicality, I'm afraid Roy's career may end under the saddest of circumstances.[br][/br] Never have I wanted to be more wrong about a fighter![br][/br] Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at [url=http://www.thesweetscience.com/mailto:GlovedFist@Gmail.com]GlovedFist@Gmail.com[br][/br]
To Russia with love -- I mean back-from-Russia-with-hate Roy is going to be fine. He has aged like wine. And is just getting and shook up. And no powers that be -- by hook, crook or book -- will step in and deny him a boxing license. That will violate his employment rights. He is going to have a couple more scraps and maybe win a major paper alphabet-sanctioning title designed especially for him. And then, he will call it quits. Holla!


-kidcanvas :

"Roy did everything better than Floyd but pick and chose his opposition " lmfao !! Thats one of the truest lines ever put on paper frank ...that was good


-mortcola :

Except, re "just getting shook up", that he is literally brain damaged from multiple severe concussions - the clinical signs don’t often show up until later. By definition, he is now brain damaged, and the MRIs will START to show small bleeds and shearing injuries, plus gradual signs of change in his functioning that we all recognize from this sport. He can’t avoid punches, he can’t take them without being KTFO - completely - and, his own family has laughed that Roy can’t play basketball at all anymore except to shoot around, because his knees are completely shot, so he can’t move in the ring. He is stationary and relies on ear muff gloves for defense, which doesn’t really work and leaves more dangerous areas of his head exposed, which happen to leave him unconscious, over and over. How long ago did one ordinary punch from Glen Johnson have Jones falling like TIMBER, paralyzed on the mat as his head lolled around? Not just a monster shot that leaves you bravely climbing back into the fight, like can happen to any champ or contender. One ordinary right hand from a modestly-powered, volume pressure fighter without much speed, and Jones was like tissue paper. One main point of the article was that in any other sport, he would have to be of sufficient value to the team to even be hired. He isn’t healthy enough to be a sparring partner, regardless of the vestiges of offensive skill he shows in flashes. He wouldn’t serve a “team” in any way. And as for employment rights - most jobs, particularly those that involve physical competency, require that you have no medical deficit that would prevent you from performing your duties or put you or someone else at undue risk. Boxing is a hurt sport - but it presumes that you are at least on a level playing field in terms of health to prove that you can handle the challenge of defending yourself, withstanding the blows in competition, and trying to win. If you lose, you lose. But if you are crippled, or unable to compete going in, you have to make the argument that a man can do what he wants and no power can intervene in order to justify his going on. But what he does for himself is different from what multiple other organization, governing bodies, individual businessmen, etc, pay you to do. In a civilization, there are standards. If he wants to spar at the gym, let him sign a waiver and ignore the owner/trainer’s warnings, or let him, stupidly, spar in his home ring without boxing and medical supervision. You can make the argument that he has the right to decide for himself. But other people are involved, we as a society usually try to prevent suicides, self-cutting, people whose delusions endanger self or others, and there are other people who profit from, or are apathetic about, anything other than “the show”. It is not all Roy’s business - there are dozens, if not hundreds, of people whose money and jobs are involved in every one of his fights. Lastly, Jones has no chance of winning or defending a legitimate championship, without putting himself at risk against far more dangerous fighters than china-chinned Maccarinelli of the other neighborhood journeymen he’s been up against. He WILL be harmed or killed. You will see symptoms shortly, or read about behind the scenes things are are falling apart in his life, depression, personality changes, crippling headaches, as well as soft but increasing signs of ordinary punch-drunk syndrome. Medical standards, boxing as a regulated sport rather than a 19th century traveling side show with freaks, geeks, and mistreated animals - what do we believe in?


-Radam G :

Except, re "just getting shook up", that he is literally brain damaged from multiple severe concussions - the clinical signs don?t often show up until later. By definition, he is now brain damaged, and the MRIs will START to show small bleeds and shearing injuries, plus gradual signs of change in his functioning that we all recognize from this sport. He can?t avoid punches, he can?t take them without being KTFO - completely - and, his own family has laughed that Roy can?t play basketball at all anymore except to shoot around, because his knees are completely shot, so he can?t move in the ring. He is stationary and relies on ear muff gloves for defense, which doesn?t really work and leaves more dangerous areas of his head exposed, which happen to leave him unconscious, over and over. How long ago did one ordinary punch from Glen Johnson have Jones falling like TIMBER, paralyzed on the mat as his head lolled around? Not just a monster shot that leaves you bravely climbing back into the fight, like can happen to any champ or contender. One ordinary right hand from a modestly-powered, volume pressure fighter without much speed, and Jones was like tissue paper. One main point of the article was that in any other sport, he would have to be of sufficient value to the team to even be hired. He isn?t healthy enough to be a sparring partner, regardless of the vestiges of offensive skill he shows in flashes. He wouldn?t serve a ?team? in any way. And as for employment rights - most jobs, particularly those that involve physical competency, require that you have no medical deficit that would prevent you from performing your duties or put you or someone else at undue risk. Boxing is a hurt sport - but it presumes that you are at least on a level playing field in terms of health to prove that you can handle the challenge of defending yourself, withstanding the blows in competition, and trying to win. If you lose, you lose. But if you are crippled, or unable to compete going in, you have to make the argument that a man can do what he wants and no power can intervene in order to justify his going on. But what he does for himself is different from what multiple other organization, governing bodies, individual businessmen, etc, pay you to do. In a civilization, there are standards. If he wants to spar at the gym, let him sign a waiver and ignore the owner/trainer?s warnings, or let him, stupidly, spar in his home ring without boxing and medical supervision. You can make the argument that he has the right to decide for himself. But other people are involved, we as a society usually try to prevent suicides, self-cutting, people whose delusions endanger self or others, and there are other people who profit from, or are apathetic about, anything other than ?the show?. It is not all Roy?s business - there are dozens, if not hundreds, of people whose money and jobs are involved in every one of his fights. Lastly, Jones has no chance of winning or defending a legitimate championship, without putting himself at risk against far more dangerous fighters than china-chinned Maccarinelli of the other neighborhood journeymen he?s been up against. He WILL be harmed or killed. You will see symptoms shortly, or read about behind the scenes things are are falling apart in his life, depression, personality changes, crippling headaches, as well as soft but increasing signs of ordinary punch-drunk syndrome. Medical standards, boxing as a regulated sport rather than a 19th century traveling side show with freaks, geeks, and mistreated animals - what do we believe in?
Danggit, Doc! That was hard to read. But I read it and retread it. Why don't you break up your fine writing into a few paragraphs? That would make your whole 9 super scribing easy breezy to holla at. You made some great points. But there are always exceptions to the rules. Hopefully, Superman Roy is one of those. The talk and written stories will (and are) always about damaged pugs. And never about the bionic ones. The human brain, mind and body for most people can repair themselves with the correct foods, minerals and vitamins. But medical doctors of western nations are not going to post that because of an agenda of making BIG BUCKS for the pharmaceutical giants. Beside medicine is not to heal, but to made suffering more tolerable or to cover up the uglies of hurt and pain with bandages and band-Aid effects. Holla!


-Kid Blast :

Geeks? That dates you. They were around until about 1957. Scary, very scary.


-deepwater2 :

Roy wants what Roy wants. It is his life to do what he wants with. Ban Roy from boxing and the man will not be around much longer. I would like Roy to stop boxing but who am I to tell Roy? What if Roy emailed me that he doesn't like that I smoke a few Cuban cigars a month. I would light one up and say , shove it Roy. Roy will hang up the gloves when he wants to, if he gets hurt in the ring then that is the way things are. Boxing is dangerous. A young kid just died right after his pro debut. If you sign on the dotted line than you know the risks.


-Domenic :

This article was referenced somewhere on these pages, and it's a worthwhile read:
->http://thelab.bleacherreport.com/roy-jones-jr-s-br-long-goodbye/ I waffle on this one, but if Roy passes the prefight physical and neurological exams, and I presume he's undergoing these, then what else is there? The NFL, MLB, and NBA have a concussion protocol, which is fairly recent and still evolving, and in the past, guys would play with concussions routinely. Bernie Kosar, Jim McMahon, Junior Seau, and scores of others were found to have CTE years after retiring. Obviously medical advancements have been made since these guys were playing, and testing then was nonexistent. Reminds me of an old Taxi episode where Tony Banta had to fight under a pseudonym due to being knocked out too many times. This was the early 80's. I just don't know how you prevent RJJ from competing if he's conclusively passing the tests and deemed fit to fight. With him mainly fighting overseas, it's unlikely they'll invoke the Holyfield 'poor performance' clause that NY once did, which basically was a euphemism for saving a guy from getting killed. Other than watching YouTube videos of Roy being knocked out, I only hear him on HBO telecasts, and he doesn't sound like Terry Norris, Meldrick Taylor, or James Toney to me, yet. I read a thing about the actor Michael Fox, and he was showing signs of Parkinson's (a tremor in his finger), when he was young, in his 20's. Went to a specialist, battery of tests, they said he was fine. Then a couple years later, after symptoms persisted, he was properly diagnosed, although it wouldn't have been known to the naked eye at that time. We all know about Ali fighting Holmes and Berbick with PS. Speaking again of James Toney, should he be licensed to fight? He's not been knocked out the way Roy has, but put them side by side, and in a multiple choice test Toney is the guy exhibiting chronic brain injury. Just not sure how you properly administer and police this. There's an excellent piece on Norris that was on YouTube, still may be, and Margaret Goodman is interviewed. It's probably still there.


-mortcola :

Sorry Radam - I shoot my rant and I hit send. I don?t call my editor for TSS posts (he works hard to keep me sounding sane on paper). But I know its annoying. Re: geeks - I DID reference the 19th century! I?m only 51. I sound the alarmist alarm - but I think you can?t ignore it and only focus on the boxing cliches and libertarian ideals that feel good. Roy ain?t smoking? a cigar - he?s feeding a market and multiple staff, hired aides, and leeches, all under the approval stamp of some governing body or other. The market will bear the brand name RJJ on its beef until there is none left. And we?re down to the chitlin?s. Anyone wanna still talk about ?rights? when we see a guy on a corner letting people punch him in the head for ten bucks a shot? I mean, its his right to commit suicide by selling off his own body parts, isn?t it? Actually, no - if you buy the analogy, then we automatically declare a person incompetent to make decisions for himself and give the authority to someone who will be responsible to keep him safe. That?s not fascism. That?s institutionalized compassion, flawed, but better than just letting someone off themselves. And, in countries where assisted euthanasia exists, there are standards regarding a person?s reasons to want to end their life, and their mental soundness. Sorry, I?m not letting this go. I may be done ranting on it for now, but if I?m gonna enjoy boxing, in the ring, at ringside, or on TV, I have to believe in this too.


-Radam G :

Sorry Radam - I shoot my rant and I hit send. I don’t call my editor for TSS posts (he works hard to keep me sounding sane on paper). But I know its annoying. Re: geeks - I DID reference the 19th century! I’m only 51. I sound the alarmist alarm - but I think you can’t ignore it and only focus on the boxing cliches and libertarian ideals that feel good. Roy ain’t smoking’ a cigar - he’s feeding a market and multiple staff, hired aides, and leeches, all under the approval stamp of some governing body or other. The market will bear the brand name RJJ on its beef until there is none left. And we’re down to the chitlin’s. Anyone wanna still talk about “rights” when we see a guy on a corner letting people punch him in the head for ten bucks a shot? I mean, its his right to commit suicide by selling off his own body parts, isn’t it? Actually, no - if you buy the analogy, then we automatically declare a person incompetent to make decisions for himself and give the authority to someone who will be responsible to keep him safe. That’s not fascism. That’s institutionalized compassion, flawed, but better than just letting someone off themselves. And, in countries where assisted euthanasia exists, there are standards regarding a person’s reasons to want to end their life, and their mental soundness. Sorry, I’m not letting this go. I may be done ranting on it for now, but if I’m gonna enjoy boxing, in the ring, at ringside, or on TV, I have to believe in this too.
Just for you, Doc. RJJ said that he is taking a long break. However, I don't know if long for you and long for him match. Holla!