“About Business” Broner Takes Care Of It, Stops Allahkverdiev

Talk, so cheap.

Easy to promise, swear up, down, all around, I’ve changed.

I’ve learned. I’ve smartened up, chilled down..

But the proof, we need to see it, need to see if deeds match words, if promises are kept…or a talented talker is still better at talking the talk than the walking part.

Adrien Broner told us this week he’d changed. Become a better man. Learned from mistakes and was determined not to be a fast-rising, faster-fading punchline, a guy whose memory would elicit head shakes, and talk of wasted potential.

He made weight, for his Saturday night fight versus Khabib Allahkverdiev, so he got some benefit from some doubters. But how would he look in the ring, and on Showtime? Would Khabib make good on his vow to smack the grin off the clown, take it to Broner, make him flash back to the last fight, a loss to Shawn Porter…and the one before, to Marcos Maidana?

Or would a “new” Broner be birthed, one who treated the sport as more than a lark, but instead invested proper energy and respect for the craft? Well, can’t say “new” being that Khabib isn’t on Porter level, but so far it was pretty good for the Cincy boxer. He had Khabib’s face puffed bad, and finished the job in round 12. Looking to close the show with some bang, Broner mixed lefts and rights and uppers and the ref, before the bell, halted the scrap in front of friends and neighbors and Ohioans who’d love to latch on to a Buckeye ring-ace.

He snagged a fourth crown, at a fourth division, becoming the second youngest to do so, after Oscar De La Hoya. And for you fans of his Barnum side, he showed post-fight to Jim Gray the goofball side, making a Bruce Jenner crack, while calling out Ashley Theophane (Wuh?) but then made amends, maybe, admitting that he’d gotten too big for his britches after getting out-sized checks at a young age.

Here is the release Showtime sent out, talking about the win and the scraps they showed:

CINCINNATI, Ohio — (Oct. 3, 2015) – Cincinnati’s Adrien Broner won a world title in his fourth weight division with an impressive 12-round TKO over Khabib Allakhverdiev fighting in front of 5,932 of his hometown fans at the U.S. Bank Arena and live on SHOWTIME CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING®\. Broner (now 30-2, 22 KOs) put his fast hands, thudding power and love of showmanship on display in an exciting performance.

Allakhverdiev (now 19-2, 9 KOs) took Broner’s best shots without going down, but with an in-shape Broner, but with upping the punishment in the last round, Referee Harvey Dock decided to mercifully wave the fight over at 2:23.

Broner looked sharp in his return to the super lightweight division. He landed 50 percent of his power punches, with the right uppercut being his most effective tool.

“Honestly, a young guy like me, they just threw me a lot of cash at a young age. It was hard to adjust to the fame, to the lights. After my last fight I said I wasn’t putting my all into it,” said Broner. “It’s definitely all up to me. After that bell, no one can help me. I’m still AB, but this next half of my career I’m going to be about boxing and about business. Nothing has changed. I’m comfortable at whatever weight my opponent is comfortable at. But I’m getting wiser, I’m getting older.”

“No question Broner won the fight. He is the real thing and tonight he showed it,” said Allakhverdiev’s promoter Vlad Hrunov.

In the opening bout of the telecast, IBF Junior Lightweight World Champion Jose Pedraza (21-0, 12 KOs) stayed undefeated and successfully defended his championship via 12-round split decision over Florida’s Edner Cherry (34-7-2, 19 KOs).

Pedraza prevailed in the closely contested and difficult-to-judge battle, by scores of 117-111 Pedraza, 116-112 Cherry and the deciding 117-111 Pedraza.

Cherry landed the harder punches and pressed the attack, while the southpaw Pedraza was very elusive and countered well with quick combinations.

“I won the fight. It was a very tight fight and very hard fight, but I definitely won the fight,” said Pedraza. “I was very calm when they were reading the scores because I knew I won. I’m very happy. We did a great job and started strong, but Edner had his moments. With my team, we used our intelligence to get the victory. I was able to change my style, switch to southpaw and Cherry couldn’t handle the left hand.”

Cherry was gracious in defeat saying, “I just left it in the judges’ hands. If I knocked him out it wouldn’t be up to the judges. It’s them. That’s the judges. That’s what happens when you leave it to the judges. I’m not taking anything away from him. It was a good fight.”

Fighting in the main event of the SHOWTIME BOXING on SHO EXTREME® portion of the night, Toledo, Ohio lightweight Robert Easter Jr. moved his undefeated record to 16-0, 13 KOs with a three-round demolition of Argentinean veteran Juan Ramon Solis (now 25-10, 9 KOs).

Easter Jr. made it look easy as he dug thudding body shots at Solis and rocked him with hard, accurate shots to the head. Easter threw 177 total punches and landed 68 of them. Solis threw 44 and landed just nine.

By the third round, Solis’ corner had seen enough and requested a stoppage at the :45 second mark.

“You prepare for the worst in the gym, with these kinds of fights you never know, said Easter Jr. “With a performance like this, you know you’re onto the next level. I showed that tonight.”

To open the telecast, 2012 U.S. Olympian and undefeated lightweight Jamel Herring (14-0, 8 KOs) went 10 rounds for the first time in his career while scoring a dominant unanimous decision over durable Ghanaian Yakubu “Black Mamba” Amidu (19-8-2, 19 KOs).

Herring showed his tremendous speed and superior strength while firing rapid-fire combinations to Amidu’s head and body. To his credit, Amidu hung tough for the duration and never stopped trying.

“I knew he was good. I respected what his experience and what he was putting down,” said Herring. “I showed my skill and went the distance with a veteran that had never been down. It’s a blessing to showcase my talent on a world stage. I’ve worked hard to get here and good things come to those who wait.”

The judges’ scores (99-91, 100-90, and 100-90) reflected Herring’s dominance.

In non-televised action, Cincinnati’s own Jamontay Clark moved to 7-0, 4 KOs with a brutal two-round stoppage of Hartford’s Joe Wilson Jr. (now 3-3).

Using an accurate and powerful left hand as his primary weapon, Clark had Wilson down twice in the first and once more to begin the second before the merciful stoppage at :28.

WATCH RELATED VIDEOS ON BOXINGCHANNEL.TV

COMMENTS

-brownsugar :

Broner shocked me by coming in at 138.5, I was beginning to wonder if he were a lost cause, no excessive talking .....and finally making weight! .....wow, is this the end of the world? ..... is Broner's return to form a way for God to signal the Apocalypse? Broner doesn't irritate me the way most seem to be offended because its not like he's running for president, he's only a young jock from a poor neighborhood doing the only thing he knows how,.....to make a buck. This was a decent reboot for AB, ..... his opponent was an awkward fellow who can take advantage of a lot of fighters if they're not on their game, but Broner will have to turn in more performances like this one against better competition if he wants to realize his dream of obtaining PPV status. ...good effort.


-brownsugar :

Broner also gets style points for remembering to wear his Holloween themed gear.


-SouthPawFlo :

Broner is as offensively gifted as anyone in boxing.... If he is really "serious" about boxing and stays at 140 I think I'll be ok... He still needs to work on not getting trapped on the ropes and work on keepin this punch volume up....


-Radam G :

If Broner scraps with Postol or T-Craw, aka Bud, he gets knocked da double fudge out and gets his jaw broken. What is da puck wrong with him always opening his mug hole as if he hinting to perform fellatio on an opponent? I would not put that pass Broner for always punching with his mug hole wide open. After all, referees have warned him umpteen times for dog-like humping his opponents. Holla!


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

If Broner scraps with Postol or T-Craw, aka Bud, he gets knocked da double fudge out and gets his jaw broken. What is da puck wrong with him always opening his mug hole as if he hinting to perform fellatio on an opponent? I would not put that pass Broner for always punching with his mug hole wide open. After all, referees have warned him umpteen times for dog-like humping his opponents. Holla!
He definitely doesn't beat Imam, Crawford, or Postol. Al Haymon better match him very carefully. I am fiending for a Crawford vs. Imam or a Postol vs. Imam fight. Imam needs kick Don King to the side, his promotional outfit is the only thing holding him back.


-brownsugar :

He definitely doesn't beat Imam, Crawford, or Postol. Al Haymon better match him very carefully. I am fiending for a Crawford vs. Imam or a Postol vs. Imam fight. Imam needs kick Don King to the side, his promotional outfit is the only thing holding him back.
Crawford is a big, strong and talented Jr welter, Postol is a long , rangy boxer with good stamina, Imam remids me of a 140lbs version of Javier Fortuna, dynamic, explosive, but prone to get wild sometimes, .... Broner is a precise boxer puncher who is always dangerous, I have no picks or favorites,.....at least until the fights are made but I agree ShoulderRollD,....the division has become super exciting again.


-SouthPawFlo :

Other than Peterson, Nobody has been in more "Big fights" than AB in the 140lb division, because of promotional issues he won't get in with Crawford but I think Broner would give Crawford a good scrap.. Crawford for all his skills and length has never been in with anyone remotely close to the talent of Broner other than Gamboa and he was a weight division too small and gave Crawford fits in beginning of their fight.. Skill for Skill Adrien Broner is as talented and as fast as anybody at 140, if he comes in shape and is 100% locked in and focused he can't compete with anybody.... The problem is HIM and his life outside the ring..


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

Other than Peterson, Nobody has been in more "Big fights" than AB in the 140lb division, because of promotional issues he won't get in with Crawford but I think Broner would give Crawford a good scrap.. Crawford for all his skills and length has never been in with anyone remotely close to the talent of Broner other than Gamboa and he was a weight division too small and gave Crawford fits in beginning of their fight.. Skill for Skill Adrien Broner is as talented and as fast as anybody at 140, if he comes in shape and is 100% locked in and focused he can't compete with anybody.... The problem is HIM and his life outside the ring..
It's hard to change temperament. As a father and amateur coach you can see what type of fighter (boxer-puncher, technician, brawler, etc.) a kid is going to be early on based on their temperament. AB is a low volume counter puncher by nature and will never be Terry Norris when it comes to "letting his hands go." He would be more successful if he was more offensive but it simply isn't him. He gets out worked and out hustled by all the aforementioned boxers (Postol, Crawford, Imam). Too low volume and not enough power at 140 to compensate for the low volume.


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

Crawford is a big, strong and talented Jr welter, Postol is a long , rangy boxer with good stamina, Imam remids me of a 140lbs version of Javier Fortuna, dynamic, explosive, but prone to get wild sometimes, .... Broner is a precise boxer puncher who is always dangerous, I have no picks or favorites,.....at least until the fights are made but I agree ShoulderRollD,....the division has become super exciting again.
You are cold Brownsugar, comparing Imam to Fortuna lol. Fortuna is a very poor man's version of his former southpaw stable mate Sergio Martinez. On the other hand Imam is a skilled "boxer-puncher" out of the orthodox stance. He can fight on the ropes, has an educated jab, and utilizes different looks defensively (high guard, philly shell). I also believe that he is 5'9 or 5'10 if I am not mistaken. The only fighter I see giving him problems and possibly beating him at jr. welterweight is Crawford.


-brownsugar :

You are cold Brownsugar, comparing Imam to Fortuna lol. Fortuna is a very poor man's version of his former southpaw stable mate Sergio Martinez. On the other hand Imam is a skilled "boxer-puncher" out of the orthodox stance. He can fight on the ropes, has an educated jab, and utilizes different looks defensively (high guard, philly shell). I also believe that he is 5'9 or 5'10 if I am not mistaken. The only fighter I see giving him problems and possibly beating him at jr. welterweight is Crawford.
Lol.... I've only seen a little bit of Imam, but I've heard you raving about his abilities on other posts several times. I'll take another look at Imam before I comment on him again because you have piqued my interest, But Javier isnt that bad is he? I just thought he was a little raw. If you think Imam is a better fighter, .... then a second look is mandatory. I don't want to underestimate any futur potential P4P superstar.


-stormcentre :

It's hard to change temperament. As a father and amateur coach you can see what type of fighter (boxer-puncher, technician, brawler, etc.) a kid is going to be early on based on their temperament. AB is a low volume counter puncher by nature and will never be Terry Norris when it comes to "letting his hands go." He would be more successful if he was more offensive but it simply isn't him. He gets out worked and out hustled by all the aforementioned boxers (Postol, Crawford, Imam). Too low volume and not enough power at 140 to compensate for the low volume.
Boner - usually - likes to wait and see that his opponents are psychologically dejected and/or reduced before racking up decent points, taking risks, and letting his hands go. That's why Broner mouths off before fights and doesn't usually have a high output in them until his defensive moves that (sometimes are not completely capitalized on and therefore bore) often have an element of their design spec deeply rooted in humiliating the opponent - as evidenced by how Broner can often be seen verbally promoting them in real time - seem to have set in and are producing the goods. It was good to see Broner weigh in at a decent weight. Now we need to see him do that again whilst fighting a really decent light/welterweight. :) :) :)