Viktor Postol Rallies to Score Stunning KO of Matthysse in Cali

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CARSON, CALIF.—It was an ugly, frustrating fight for the fans, but Ukraine’s Viktor Postol rallied from behind to score a stunning knockout in the 10th round against Argentina’s powerful Lucas Matthysse to win the vacant WBC junior welterweight title on Saturday.

A loud, mostly pro-Matthysse crowd was shut down to silence when Postol (28-0, 12 Kos) scored a knockout of Matthysse (37-4, 34 Kos) to win the world title before more than 7,500 at the StubHub Center. It was a shocking ending to a fight infested with holding.

For most of the junior welterweight world title fight Matthysse was the aggressor as Postol moved around the ring and held whenever the Argentine fighter closed in. Matthysse tried again and again to fire blows while Postol held.

Referee Jack Reiss warned Postol in the third round and again in the fifth round. Fans became increasingly angry at the Ukrainian fighters’ willingness to hold instead of fight. Meanwhile Matthysse was piling up points.

Postol made his move in the fourth round with two combinations. But he then resorted to holding again.

In the 8th round Postol began unleashing quick combinations that scored. Matthysse seemed arm weary and shook his hands a few times. Postol won the ninth round too with some more pinpoint combinations. Matthysse fired some shots to the body and a left hook to the head, but Postol seemed to win the round.

The referee informed both fighters that it was the 10th round. Matthysse should have heeded the warning. He ran into a right cross to the eye and went to the floor. The referee counted to 10 and Matthysse was ruled knocked out though he was conscious at 2:58 of round 10.

“I felt a pop in my eye,” said Matthysse, adding that he could have got up, but did not want to risk further eye damage. “He had his night.”

Postol credited trainer Freddie Roach for the victory.

“I used the right uppercut and left hook over and over again at the Wild Card,” said Postol. “It was a combination I worked on over and over.”

Orozco

San Diego’s Antonio Orozco (23-0, 15 Kos) out-maneuvered former world champion Humberto Soto (65-9-2, 35 Kos) of Tijuana over 10 rounds with a varied attack against the veteran from Mexico in their junior welterweight clash.

Despite faking a low blow in the ninth round, Soto was unable to keep up with Orozco’s fast pace, though he did have some good moments in the first, fourth and sixth round.

Soto showed his experience and world class chin early in the fight. Some well-timed counters caught Orozco, especially in the second round toward the end. Orozco seemed stunned by a right uppercut.

Soto was able to land combos, especially the right uppercut early in the fight. But Orozco made adjustments in the fight to take away that punch and maneuvered into strafing Soto with body and head shots.

Orozco pummeled the body throughout the fight. Most of the boxing world knows Soto can take a head shot, but the body of the former Mexican champion no longer absorbs body shots after so many years. Orozco dropped Soto with a left to the liver and Soto feigned a low blow in the ninth round. Referee Jerry Cantu erroneously ruled it a low blow and deducted a point from Orozco, who protested. Soto used the same tactic against John Molina in his last fight with success. This time, one point would not be enough.

Despite the deduction, Orozco had piled up enough points with his varied attack of inside fighting and outside fighting. The jab proved effective in the last three rounds. Orozco did not allow Soto to trap him against the ropes. The Mexican fighter never could land the knockout blow though he tried often to set it up.

After 10 rounds the judges scored it 97-92 twice and 98-91 for Orozco.

Other bouts

Julian “El Camaron” Ramirez (15-0, 8 Kos) proved too polished and smart for Mexican veteran Hugo Partida (20-6-2, 15 Kos) in winning almost every round in their 10-round featherweight clash. Ramirez connected early with hard combinations that seemed to change Partida’s plan of attack. After the third round Ramirez was forced to initiate the action while Partida chose to counter with body shots. It was the only location he could connect.

“I felt like I dominated the fight throughout,” said Ramirez. “Although I hurt my hand in the second round and felt comfortable using my left hand.”

Ramirez, a southpaw, was effective with combinations and showed off good footwork in evading Partida’s attacks. It wasn’t a complete one-sided fight, but each round saw the fighter from East L.A. just land more accurate punches in combinations. Partida showed a good chin throughout the fight. He was caught with right uppercuts early, then straight left cross bombs. None could make him stumble.

After 10 rounds, two judges scored it 100-90 and one 99-91 for Ramirez.

Mercito Gesta defeated Mexico’s Miguel Mendoza by unanimous decision despite suffering a knockdown in the second round that should have been ruled a slip. It took the Filipino southpaw a few rounds to figure out the awkward fighting Mendoza, who fired over-hand rights that sounded like they landed, but did not. More often Mendoza’s punches were not landing with knuckles but with the inside of the glove. It sounded nice but it was mere sound, not effect.

Gesta was the much faster fighter but found it confusing to adjust to the weird crouching style of Mendoza who fired looping shots that fired up the crowd, but seldom landed flush. Early in the fight Mendoza did catch Gesta with some good blows but they were far from common.

After 10 rounds, the junior welterweight fight ended, with all three judges scoring it for Gesta 96-93, and 97-92.

“I kind of adjusted my style,” Gesta said after the fight.

Other results

Nick Arce (5-0) remained undefeated and handed Tijuana’s Juan Hernandez (3-1) his first defeat. After three competitive rounds Arce ended the discussion with a knockout at 29 seconds into round four in their super featherweight contest.

Argentina’s Marcelino Lopez (32-1-1, 17 Kos) defeated David Rodela (17-12-4) of Oxnard by knockout to win their junior welterweight match.

D’Mitrius Ballard (10-0) of D.C. defeated Northern California’s Juan Rojas (8-13-1) by decision in a light heavyweight clash.

Alejandro Ochoa (7-10-2) upset Kevin Rivers (12-1, 9 Kos) of Maryland by decision after six rounds in a super featherweight fight.

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Comment on this article

COMMENTS

-Radam G :

Matthysse was never that good anyway. People talked syet about him being diz, dat and da third! WORD! But now he has gotten kayoed by a Da Manny sparringmate. Holla!


-SouthPawFlo :

Styles make fights... This guy was bigger, longer, in better condition, had a better gameplan and a better person in the corner.... Congrats on the win, hopefully he gets Terrance Crawford early 2016... Matthysse only looks good against guys who stand in front of him, Zab, Danny G and Postol all used the same formula to beat him.... He'll be back, just Oscar has to match him with Guys better suited for his style


-amayseng :

Matthysse was never that good anyway. People talked syet about him being diz, dat and da third! WORD! But now he has gotten kayoed by a Da Manny sparringmate. Holla!
LM has looked pretty sharp with good boxing ability on top of his power the last few fights. Maybe Ruslan took something out of him, even though you beat the Russian it takes something out of you. Though Postol can fight, that last in and out footwork and jab feint to set up the right hand is no accident, Freddie can train!!


-SuperLight :

I only saw the highlights so far. Is Postol still as bouncy on his feet as I remember? Looked like he took a couple of hooks to the head, too, something I noticed in his fight against Corley.


-amayseng :

I only saw the highlights so far. Is Postol still as bouncy on his feet as I remember? Looked like he took a couple of hooks to the head, too, something I noticed in his fight against Corley.
it was an atrocious first half of the fight because Postol would not stop holding, the referee did a good job to stop it and Postol had to punch to keep LM off of him instead of hold and the action improved and Postol started landing more and more..


-brownsugar :

Well at least we know now why he gave up. Eye damage is serious business.


-Froggy :

Well at least we know now why he gave up. Eye damage is serious business.
No shame in that, especially after his eye took a beating in Garcia fight !


-Radam G :

Well at least we know now why he gave up. Eye damage is serious business.
A fearing imagination is far serious business. Dude's eye was fine, his brain was frighten. And let his mind play tricks on him. Matthysse never was and will not be a super top-gun pug because he is easily what is known in boksing by da real reals: "mind f**ked." It was more something wrong with his mind over his mug light. Holla!


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

Matthysse is a good fighter but as already mentioned, styles make fights. If you follow boxing, you already knew that Lucas could be out boxed (Judah, Alexander, Garcia fights). I knew that Matthysse was in trouble when he couldn't "Bob and weave" his way in to close the distance on Postol. Instead, he walked straight in and allowed himself to be clinched, his only answer being rabbit punches to the back of Postol's head. Lucas may win a title some day, just not anytime soon. I don't even know if he beats Broner. Let's see Postol, Crawford, Broner, and Imam fight and see who is still standing when the dust settles. I love Crawford, but Imam may be the best in the 140 division.


-Radam G :

Matthysse is a good fighter but as already mentioned, styles make fights. If you follow boxing, you already knew that Lucas could be out boxed (Judah, Alexander, Garcia fights). I knew that Matthysse was in trouble when he couldn't "Bob and weave" his way in to close the distance on Postol. Instead, he walked straight in and allowed himself to be clinched, his only answer being rabbit punches to the back of Postol's head. Lucas may win a title some day, just not anytime soon. I don't even know if he beats Broner. Let's see Postol, Crawford, Broner, and Imam fight and see who is still standing when the dust settles. I love Crawford, but Imam may be the best in the 140 division.
Nobody is going to fight Imam anytime soon, SRD. This is prizefighting, not horse racing. In nowadays pugilism, the best stays away from the best and/or better for as long as heck. And then just maybe they will get it on for a big check. Their arses can then be old, and can barely peck. Holla!


-brownsugar :

No shame in that, especially after his eye took a beating in Garcia fight !
I'm with you 100% on that one Froggy, if it comes down to duty and honor or saving an eye, I'm going to elect ...saving the eye!!!!


-amayseng :

I'm with you 100% on that one Froggy, if it comes down to duty and honor or saving an eye, I'm going to elect ...saving the eye!!!!
I read an interview with LM after the fight and I believe he said after the pop he could not see out of it momentarily and for that I have no problem with taking the ten count. Lm strikes me as a character who walks into a burning building or towards gun fire so I believe him when he says he was temporarily worried about being blind in that eye... No shame in taking that count, undergoing testing, healing and making a few more paydays for his family before it is all said and over with.


-King Beef :

LM has looked pretty sharp with good boxing ability on top of his power the last few fights. Maybe Ruslan took something out of him, even though you beat the Russian it takes something out of you. Though Postol can fight, that last in and out footwork and jab feint to set up the right hand is no accident, Freddie can train!!
I think that fight with Danny G started the crack in his armor, he hasn't quite looked the "monster" since, but you are dead on; Provo definitely added to it.


-Scar :

Matthysse was never that good anyway. People talked syet about him being diz, dat and da third! WORD! But now he has gotten kayoed by a Da Manny sparringmate. Holla!
Everyone starts somewhere. Holmes was Ali's sparring partner, Marquez was Mayweather's sparring partner, Lewis was Tyson's sparring partner(even though they were both amateurs)...etc. This sparring partner talk is redundant and meaningless. No one is born walking you know.


-Radam G :

Everyone starts somewhere. Holmes was Ali's sparring partner, Marquez was Mayweather's sparring partner, Lewis was Tyson's sparring partner(even though they were both amateurs)...etc. This sparring partner talk is redundant and meaningless. No one is born walking you know.
Wow! Just as there have been four-legged animals walking within hours after birth, there have been rare occasions of two-legged ones -- humans and apes during the same. "No one is born walking..." is a presumious example. Humans have been born walking. Have been born with a full amount of teeth and even have been born with four legs and four arms. And born saying a few words. I get your point. But don't assume what has not been done. And what can be done. I don't know what "Marquez" that you are referring to, but if it is JuanManuel Hulkquez -- I mean Marquez -- he has never served as a Mayweather "sparring partner." Don't get rubbed the wrong way, but sparringmates are a chief part of da game. And only the exceptions become champions. Something like five percent. Tommy Hearns, the late, great Jimmy Ellis, the late Greg Page, the late Michael Dokes, Tim Witherspoon, Eddie Mustafa Muhammad, Tommy Tubbs and Tony Tucker were all sparring partners of GOAT Ali. So what is your point? The best hires the best to get sharpen. Iron sharpen iron. Holla!


-Radam G :

Oh, yea! If you are talking about Lennox Lewis, he and Iron Mike sparred as amateurs, not pros. Lewis never worked for Iron Mike as a pro. Besides, he could always do a job on IM. So the late, great trainer Cus D'aMato halted that work. There are always legends -- part myth and a lot of truth -- of diz, and dat and da third. And there are the d@mn harden, coming-out-of-nowhere myths and made-up-on-da-fly bullspit. Holla!