AVILA RINGSIDE Too Strong Fonfara Beats Blown Up Chavez Jr in CA

Andrzej Fonfara showed that a good big man beats a good smaller man most of the time as he stopped Julio Cesar Chavez Jr.’s light heavyweight bid by knockout on Saturday before a near sold out crowd.

With most of the 8,636 fans wearing the traditional Chavez red head bands and screaming support for Mexico’s Chavez (48-2-1, 32 Kos) at the StubHub Center, it was Poland’s Fonfara (27-3, 16 Kos) who shut down the crowd and the blown up middleweight with a dominating performance.

Fonfara showed bigger man talent in the opening round as he fired leather at the crouching Chavez with impunity. Some hard shots landed but Chavez took them and along with some left elbows. He complained and Fonfara was warned by the referee.

“I knew the first time he hit me I knew I was going to win,” said Fonfara. “Chavez didn’t hit as hard as they said he did.”

After three rounds of feeling Fonfara’s punches Chavez took the fight inside and seemed to turn things around in close quarters. Hooks to the body and head could be heard from Chavez’ punches. But Fonfara was able to continue doing his thing inside too.

Fonfara’s shorter punches and combinations gave him an edge. Chavez continued to work the body with pounding shots but it didn’t seem to slow down Fonfara who returned with chopping blows to the head and body.

A pivotal point came in the seventh round when Chavez lowered his head and burrowed into Fonfara who retaliated by using a shoulder block to shove the Mexican fighter back. He was immediately deducted a point by referee Jerry Cantu for the illegal action. It didn’t really matter.

Chavez was more successful inside fighting but despite having better success toe to toe, Fonfara was just too big and strong. He caught Chavez along the ropes and blasted him down with a left hook in the ninth round. Chavez beat the count and tried to rally and lasted until the end of the round but he did not look good. The referee signaled the fight was over at the end of round nine. (TV replays caught what was said in the corner, Chavez told all he was done.) It was the first time Chavez had ever tasted the canvas.

“I wanted to prove myself,” said Chavez. “Fonfara is a good, tough fighter.”

Fonfara said he was a little surprised the fight was stopped, but took it in stride.

“This is a dream,” said Fonfara about winning a marquee televised fight. “I have things to work on.”

The Polish light heavyweight wants to pursue a rematch against WBC light heavyweight titlist Adonis Stevenson, to whom he lost by decision.

Other bouts

Junior welterweight phenom Amir Imam (17-0, 14 Kos) thoroughly dominated Nicaragua’s Walter Castillo (25-3, 18 Kos) for 10 round rounds but a refusal to shake hands and instead spit and utter some seemingly negative words to his opponent at the end of the fight stirred the crowd against him.

“I don’t understand English but I don’t think it was very classy,” said Castillo after losing by unanimous decision 100-90, 99-91, 98-92. “They didn’t give me any credit for my punching. For one judge to score it 100 to 90 I had no chance of winning in this place.”

Imam only had problems when he stayed against the ropes. But when he was in the center of the ring he dominated with his jab and movement and sizzling right hands.

“I was very happy with my performance. I thought I was in control the whole fight. He was a really tough fighter,” said Imam, who also added he wants to fight Terence Crawford next.

Omar Chavez (33-3-1, 22 Kos) won a hard fought unanimous decision over Colombia’s Richar Gutierrez (28-16-1, 17 Kos) after 10 rounds in a junior middleweight contest. Chavez, the younger brother of Julio and son of Julio Cesar Chavez Sr., earned a well-deserved win against a former contender. It could lead to top 10 contender status. The scores were 78-74, and 77-75 twice on the judge’s cards.

Mexico’s Moises Flores (23-0, 16 Kos) took the WBA super bantamweight interim title from Colombia’s Oscar Escandon (24-2, 16 Kos) by split decision after 12 rounds. Both fighters won alternate rounds with the taller Flores working his uppercuts and Escandon working his pressure style. In the end two judges scored it for Flores 116-112 twice and one for Escandon 115-113.

Flores fights out of Guadalajara, Mexico.

Argentina’s Fabian Maidana (6-0, 5 Kos) scored a knockout over Cory Von Bauer (2-3) at 31 seconds into round two in their welterweight match. After a first round knockdown it was clear Von Baur wanted to get out of that ring somehow. Finally, his corner stopped the fight in the second round to give Maidana the knockout win. Maidana is the younger brother of Marcos Maidana.

Photo Credit: Ricky Horne

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COMMENTS

-Radam G :

Nice, Slicky-slick headline. The son of a legend needs to blow dat arse down. It makes no sense for he to eat himself away from greatness. Holla!


-Froggy :

Chavez has a good chin and some heart, but not much else that qualifies him to fight world class competition !


-brownsugar :

I was surprised that Chavez even wanted to fight a slick, always well prepared and highly resilient pro like Fonfara (did he watch the Stevenson fight?) I wonder who chose the earnstwhile Pole as Chavez's next opponent? Daddy made it very clear that he didnt approve. Chavez can make 168 with proper weight lost protocols but he still chooses to drop down from the mid 190's and crash diet/boil down to make weight. It was reported Chavez was well over 200lbs during his hiatus from the ring. I imagine Arum will be chiming in after Chavez's initial wounds have healed. He's too used to rehydrating 25 lbs the day of the fight and leaning on his smaller opponents while throwing the heavier punches. Chavez can't eat and have an advantage over bigger guys too ....it just doesnt work that way. He wasn't even fazing Fonfara with his best punches...even though they looked good....when he finally decided to throw. The most bizarre part of the fight was afterwards during the interview when Chavez Jr seemed to suggest that he won the fight even though he quit on his stool amid total pandemonium....dude what planet are you from! Chavez is not 22yrs old anymore where he can abuse his body and it'll snap right back like elastic,...Jr needs to make up his mind.... And put down the cheba.


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

I agree with the sentiments of some of the posters that have already commented. Chavez jr. has a poor work ethic and to make matters worst he doesn't have many skills or very much athleticism. He couldn't punch Fonfara unless he planted his feet and could put his head on him so he could dig to the body. Fonfara took his heart and I fear that he won't be the same. Unlike Mexican-American or Mexican boxers such as Mikey Garcia and Juan Manuel Marquez that can box or bang when necessary, Chavez jr. is from the Mexican school of boxing based on "machismo," I will take your best punches and walk you down, eventually making you succumb to the pressure. Fonfara beat Chavez's a$$ like he stole something by boxing beautifully. He threw punches in bunches but was also defensively responsible. Chavez is done and will never be an elite boxer. Stick a fork in him, he is done!


-stormcentre :

To add to what I have already written about the Fonfara V Chavez disaster (from Chavez' perspective) . . . . ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79911&viewfull=1#post79911
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79979&viewfull=1#post79979
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80004&viewfull=1#post80004
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80005&viewfull=1#post80005 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To me, as soon as Junior was in the ring and the fight started, it didn't look like he really wanted to be in there. The kinds of punches he was throwing were as if he was preoccupied with showing the majority of the Mexican fans in attendance that the very opposite of what he was feeling (concern, intimidation, and under-confidence) was happening. His constant look to the referee (essentially, also an implicit call to his Mexican fans to remember, at the end of the fight, how Fonfara gained the advantage) was telling, disappointing, and a sign that he wasn't up for true Mexican fight and as such didn't really want to be in there. Perhaps we shouldn't be too hard on Julio Cesar Chavez Junior. After all it wasn't like he really chose this career path. Not unless (as you're a child) having your father offer others money to fight you in the street; fits your definition of choice. Still, as if all this is not bad enough; Junior still may have to contend with a *legal contest via Top Rank yet, as - from what has been written - it seems that Top Rank and Bob were not all that happy with; A) Chavez Junior before the Fonfara bout. B) The Fonfara bout itself; in terms of the contract as they interpret it. And, it's never a good idea to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract - even worse to do so and lose in a way that potentially destroys your career and ability to service any existing and future (legal or otherwise) debts that may be coming your way. I can only imagine how well *that would be received by Chavez Jr. and Sr. now after this. To Fonfara . . . . He did what he had to. The guy had more than 100 amateur fights if I remember correctly. And, Fonfara also has quite a few knockout wins in his last 15 or so fights; of which almost all (save for the Stevenson bout, possibly another and also a NC due to a positive test for banned substances) he has won handily of not by KO. If not the above, then his fight with Stevenson (even in a loss) should have rang some serious alarm bells for someone, if not the cash strapped and poorly disciplined fighter himself; Chavez. After all Fonfara had Stevenson down in their fight and even though he lost, I thought the scores were a little optimistic for Adonis. Regardless of all that, the Stevenson V Fonfara bout showed - at least to me - that Fonfara was certainly not the kind of light heavyweight to tap on the shoulder for your first fight at that weight division. The guy has a style and "power" (pertaining to how he throws and delivers punches only) that is not entirely dissimilar to Kelly Pavlik, although it is (when viewed overall) a touch more refined in some ways; particularly footwork and sense of distance/pace. Nevertheless, any light heavyweight with the above, boxing pedigree, KO wins, attributes, and one that can drop Stevenson, is really not a safe opponent for any fighter's first, dangerous and virginal experience at light heavyweight - let alone a fighter like Chavez Jr. that is - reasonably undisciplined - with a new trainer/corner for their first fight together - hasn't fought in a over a year - has (whether or not the bong and/or a joint is nearby) been known to find it very difficult to get off the couch come training time - has struggled with the few big names he been given - and has even struggled with the few average names he been given (at a constantly changing weight that suited Chavez); Vera. Chavez has always been a household name in Mexican families that love the sport of 2 handed boxing. So, therefore it stands Chavez Jr. will probably always represent a marketable (and possibly exploitable) commodity. The real problem is that he may also, now, if it hasn't happened already, begin to represent yet another symbolic illustration of a fighter treating the decision of when it is finally time to say no, simply as if it were a call from Freddie Roach enquiring if he was thinking about turning the TV off and attending training. If Chavez makes it back to genuine contention (read; works his way through the others as most fighters do) and into a legitimate championship match after this, and wins; he will truly own the Chavez name in its highest esteemed fighting sense.


-stormcentre :

To add to what I have already written about the Fonfara V Chavez disaster (from Chavez' perspective) . . . . ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79911&viewfull=1#post79911
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79979&viewfull=1#post79979
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80004&viewfull=1#post80004
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80005&viewfull=1#post80005 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To me, as soon as Junior was in the ring and the fight started, it didn't look like he really wanted to be in there. The kinds of punches he was throwing were as if he was preoccupied with showing the majority of the Mexican fans in attendance that the very opposite of what he was feeling (concern, intimidation, and under-confidence) was happening. His constant look to the referee (essentially, also an implicit call to his Mexican fans to remember, at the end of the fight, how Fonfara gained the advantage) was telling, disappointing, and a sign that he wasn't up for true Mexican fight and as such it reinforced the perception I had that he didn't really want to be in there. Perhaps we shouldn't be too hard on Julio Cesar Chavez Junior. After all it wasn't like he really chose this career path. Not unless (as you're a child) having your father offer others money to fight you in the street; fits your definition of choice. Still, as if all this is not bad enough; Junior still may have to contend with a *legal contest via Top Rank yet, as - from what has been written - it seems that Top Rank and Bob were not all that happy with; A) Chavez Junior before the Fonfara bout. B) The Fonfara bout itself; in terms of the contract as they interpret it. And, it's never a good idea to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract - even worse to do so and lose in a way that potentially destroys your career and ability to service any existing and future (legal or otherwise) debts that may be coming your way. I can only imagine how well *that would be received by Chavez Jr. and Sr. now after this. To Fonfara . . . . He did what he had to. The guy had more than 100 amateur fights if I remember correctly. And, Fonfara also has quite a few knockout wins in his last 15 or so fights; of which almost all (save for the Stevenson bout, possibly another and also a NC due to a positive test for banned substances) he has won handily of not by KO. If not the above, then his fight with Stevenson (even in a loss) should have rang some serious alarm bells for someone, if not the cash strapped and poorly disciplined fighter himself; Chavez. After all Fonfara had Stevenson down in their fight and even though he lost, I thought the scores were a little optimistic for Adonis. Regardless of all that, the Stevenson V Fonfara bout showed - at least to me - that Fonfara was certainly not the kind of light heavyweight to tap on the shoulder for your first fight at that weight division. The guy has a style and "power" (pertaining to how he throws and delivers punches only) that is not entirely dissimilar to Kelly Pavlik, although it is (when viewed overall) a touch more refined in some ways; particularly footwork and sense of distance/pace. Nevertheless, any light heavyweight with the above, boxing pedigree, KO wins, attributes, and one that can drop Stevenson, is really not a safe opponent for any fighter's first, dangerous and virginal experience at light heavyweight - let alone a fighter like Chavez Jr. that is - reasonably undisciplined - with a new trainer/corner for their first fight together - hasn't fought in a over a year - has (whether or not the bong and/or a joint is nearby) been known to find it very difficult to get off the couch come training time - has struggled with the few big names he been given - and has even struggled with the few average names he been given (at a constantly changing weight that suited Chavez); Vera. Chavez has always been a household name in Mexican families that love the sport of 2 handed boxing. So, therefore it stands Chavez Jr. will probably always represent a marketable (and possibly exploitable) commodity. The real problem is that he may also, now, if it hasn't happened already, begin to represent yet another symbolic illustration of a fighter treating the decision of when it is finally time to say no, simply as if it were a call from Freddie Roach enquiring if he was thinking about turning the TV off and attending training. If Chavez makes it back to genuine contention (read; works his way through the others as most fighters do) and into a legitimate championship match after this, and wins; he will truly own the Chavez name in its highest esteemed fighting sense.


-stormcentre :

To add to what I have already written about the Fonfara V Chavez disaster (from Chavez' perspective) . . . . ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79911&viewfull=1#post79911
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79979&viewfull=1#post79979
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80004&viewfull=1#post80004
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80005&viewfull=1#post80005 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To me, as soon as Junior was in the ring and the fight started, it didn't look like he really wanted to be in there. The kinds of punches he was throwing were as if he was preoccupied with showing the majority of the Mexican fans in attendance that the very opposite of what he was feeling (concern, intimidation, and under-confidence) was happening. His constant look to the referee (essentially, also an implicit call to his Mexican fans to remember, at the end of the fight, how Fonfara gained the advantage) was telling, disappointing, and a sign that he wasn't up for true Mexican fight and as such it reinforced the perception I had that he didn't really want to be in there. Perhaps, though, we shouldn't be too hard on Julio Cesar Chavez Junior. After all it wasn't like he really chose this career path. Not unless (when you're a child) having your father offer others money to fight you in the street; fits your definition of choice. To Fonfara . . . . He did what he had to. The guy had more than 100 amateur fights if I remember correctly. And, Fonfara also has quite a few knockout wins in his last 15 or so fights; of which almost all (save for the Stevenson bout, possibly another, and also a NC due to a positive test for banned substances) he has won handily if not by KO. If not the above, then Fonfara’s fight with Stevenson (even in a loss) should have rang some serious alarm bells for someone. Even if they didn’t resonate loudly within the ears of the cash strapped and poorly disciplined fighter himself; Chavez - whom reportedly got paid within the vicinity of $2.5M for his part of the fight, whilst Fonfara’s purse was less than half a million. Not sure what Dan Goosen (whom may or may have not heard the light heavyweight alarm bells) got paid. After all Fonfara had Stevenson down in their fight and even though he lost, I thought the scores were still a little optimistic for Adonis. Even ignoring the divisional and other many weight issue(s); just putting both Chavez and Fonfara’s records side by side should have presented reasons for someone to ask; can Chavez really pull this off in his 1st fight after more than a year layoff? My bet is that Chavez $2.5M purse and any other “incentives” for newly placed; promoters, advisors, trainers, and managers, and whatever other job-titles there are out there for someone to pick up cash from, is behind why these questions were not meaningfully asked. That, and the most likely inevitable fact that Chavez was obstinate and single minded about the decision to go through with the Fonfara fight anyway; as his Top Rank contractual dispute had - rightly or wrongly - frozen him out of any decent earnings for more than a year. Those Lamborghini Aventadors (that Chavez drives) chew through a lot of fuel - gotta pay the bills baby. Regardless of all this, the Stevenson V Fonfara bout showed - at least to me - that Fonfara was certainly not the kind of light heavyweight to tap on the shoulder for your first (successful) fight in light heavyweight weight division. Fonfara has a style and "power" (pertaining to how he throws and delivers punches only) that is not entirely dissimilar to Kelly Pavlik, although it is (when viewed overall) a touch more refined in some ways; particularly footwork and sense of distance/pace. Nevertheless, any light heavyweight with the above; boxing pedigree, KO wins, attributes, and one that can drop Stevenson, is really not a safe opponent for any fighter's first, dangerous and virginal foray up to light heavyweight - let alone a fighter like Chavez Jr. that is - reasonably undisciplined - with a new trainer/corner for their first fight together - hasn't fought in a over a year - has (whether or not the bong and/or a joint is nearby) been known to find it very difficult to get off the couch come training time - has struggled with those few big names he has been given - and has even struggled with the few average names he been given (at a constantly changing weight that suited Chavez); such as Vera. All of this above may be why Fonfara not only knew how to judge an opponent before he fought him - but also why, within minutes (if not seconds) he sensed Chavez was not ready and/or his light heavyweight equal. Still, Chavez has always been a household name in Mexican families that fastidiously love the sport of 2 handed boxing. So, therefore it stands Chavez Jr. will probably continue to represent a marketable (and possibly exploitable) commodity in the sport. The real problem is that he may, now - that is, if it hasn't happened already - also begin to represent yet another symbolic illustration of a fighter treating the decision of “when it is finally time to say no”, simply as if it were a call from Freddie Roach enquiring if he was thinking about turning the TV off and attending training. “Gee, dunno Freddie - Days of our lives are on - can't we do it another day?” If Chavez makes it back to genuine contention (read; works his way through the other contenders, the hard way, as most fighters do) and into a legitimate championship match after this, and he wins that championship match; he will truly own the Chavez name in its highest esteemed fighting sense. Still, as if all this is not bad enough; Junior still may have to contend with a *legal contest via Top Rank yet. As - from what has been written - it seems that Top Rank and Bob were not all that happy with; A) Chavez Junior before the Fonfara bout. B) The Fonfara bout itself; in terms of the contract as they interpret it. So, even aside from (or perhaps it’s related to) how that all most likely means that both Top Rank and Bob probably (still) won’t be all that happy with Chavez, now, after the aforementioned Fonfara bout; it's never a good idea to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract. It’s even worse to do so and lose in a way that potentially destroys your career and therefore your ability to easily service any existing and future (*legal or otherwise) debts that may be coming your way. And it’s even “worserer” (please excuse the “Dumb and Dumberer Too” style English) to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract organized by/with a nemesis promoter/advisor; to that of an existing promoter that; a) You may have a legal dispute with. b) Whom believes you're contracted to them and therefore have no right to enter the match. I can only imagine how well all that would be received by both Chavez Jr. and Sr. now after this. If someone didn’t pull the chain and cash out, it sure looks, smells and sounds like it happened.


-stormcentre :

To add to what I have already written about the Fonfara V Chavez disaster (from Chavez' perspective) . . . . ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79911&viewfull=1#post79911
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79979&viewfull=1#post79979
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80004&viewfull=1#post80004
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80005&viewfull=1#post80005 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To me, as soon as Junior was in the ring and the fight started, it didn't look like he really wanted to be in there. The kinds of punches he was throwing were as if he was preoccupied with showing the majority of the Mexican fans in attendance that the very opposite of what he was feeling (concern, intimidation, and under-confidence) was happening. His constant look to the referee (essentially, also an implicit call to his Mexican fans to remember, at the end of the fight, how Fonfara supposedly gained the advantage) was telling, disappointing, and a sign that he wasn't up for true Mexican fight and as such it reinforced the perception I had that he didn't really want to be in there. Perhaps, though, we shouldn't be too hard on Julio Cesar Chavez Junior. After all it wasn't like he really chose this career path. Not unless (when you're a child) having your father offer others money to fight you in the street; fits your definition of choice. To Fonfara . . . . He did what he had to. The guy had more than 100 amateur fights if I remember correctly. And, Fonfara also has quite a few knockout wins in his last 15 or so fights; of which almost all (save for the Stevenson bout, possibly another, and also a NC due to a positive test for banned substances) he has won handily if not by KO. If not the above, then Fonfara’s fight with Stevenson (even in a loss) should have rang some serious alarm bells for someone. Even if they didn’t resonate loudly within the ears of the cash strapped and poorly disciplined fighter himself; Chavez - whom reportedly got paid within the vicinity of $2.5M for his part of the fight, whilst Fonfara’s purse was less than half a million. Not sure what Dan Goosen (whom may or may have not heard the light heavyweight alarm bells) got paid. After all Fonfara had Stevenson down in their fight and even though he lost, I thought the scores were still a little optimistic for Adonis. Even ignoring the divisional and other many weight issue(s); just putting both Chavez and Fonfara’s records side by side should have presented reasons for someone to ask; can Chavez really pull this off in his 1st fight after more than a year layoff? My bet is that Chavez $2.5M purse and any other “incentives” for newly placed; promoters, advisors, trainers, and managers, and whatever other job-titles there are out there for someone to pick up cash from, is behind why these questions were not meaningfully asked. That, and the most likely inevitable fact that Chavez was obstinate and single minded about the decision to go through with the Fonfara fight anyway; as his Top Rank contractual dispute had - rightly or wrongly - frozen him out of any decent earnings for more than a year. Those Lamborghini Aventadors (that Chavez drives) chew through a lot of fuel - gotta pay the bills baby. Regardless of all this, the Stevenson V Fonfara bout showed - at least to me - that Fonfara was certainly not the kind of light heavyweight to tap on the shoulder for your first (successful) fight in light heavyweight weight division. Fonfara has a style and "power" (pertaining to how he throws and delivers punches only) that is not entirely dissimilar to Kelly Pavlik, although it is (when viewed overall) a touch more refined in some ways; particularly footwork and sense of distance/pace. Nevertheless, any light heavyweight with the above; boxing pedigree, KO wins, attributes, and one that can drop Stevenson, is really not a safe opponent for any fighter's first, dangerous and virginal foray up to light heavyweight - let alone a fighter like Chavez Jr. that is - reasonably undisciplined - with a new trainer/corner for their first fight together - hasn't fought in a over a year - has (whether or not the bong and/or a joint is nearby) been known to find it very difficult to get off the couch come training time - has struggled with those few big names he has been given - and has even struggled with the few average names he been given (at a constantly changing weight that suited Chavez); such as Vera. All of this above may be why Fonfara not only knew how to judge an opponent before he fought him - but also why, within minutes (if not seconds) he sensed Chavez was not ready and/or his light heavyweight equal. Still, Chavez has always been a household name in Mexican families that fastidiously love the sport of 2 handed boxing. So, therefore it stands Chavez Jr. will probably continue to represent a marketable (and possibly exploitable) commodity in the sport. The real problem is that he may, now - that is, if it hasn't happened already - also begin to represent yet another symbolic illustration of a fighter treating the decision of “when it is finally time to say no”, simply as if it were a call from Freddie Roach enquiring if he was thinking about turning the TV off and attending training. “Gee, dunno Freddie - Days of our lives are on - can't we do it another day?” If Chavez makes it back to genuine contention (read; works his way through the other contenders, the hard way, as most fighters do) and into a legitimate championship match after this, and he wins that championship match; he will truly own the Chavez name in its highest esteemed fighting sense. Still, as if all this is not bad enough; Junior still may have to contend with a *legal contest via Top Rank yet. As - from what has been written - it seems that Top Rank and Bob were not all that happy with; A) Chavez Junior before the Fonfara bout. B) The Fonfara bout itself; in terms of the contract as they interpret it. So, even aside from (or perhaps it’s related to) how that all most likely means that both Top Rank and Bob probably (still) won’t be all that happy with Chavez, now, after the aforementioned Fonfara bout; it's never a good idea to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract. It’s even worse to do so and lose in a way that potentially destroys your career and therefore your ability to easily service any existing and future (*legal or otherwise) debts that may be coming your way. And it’s even “worserer” (please excuse the “Dumb and Dumberer Too” style English) to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract organized by/with a nemesis promoter/advisor; to that of an existing promoter that; a) You may have a legal dispute with. b) Whom believes you're contracted to them and therefore have no right to enter the match. I can only imagine how well all that would be received by both Chavez Jr. and Sr. now after this. If someone didn’t pull the chain and cash out, it sure looks, smells and sounds like it happened.


-stormcentre :

To add to what I have already written about the Fonfara V Chavez disaster (from Chavez' perspective) . . . . ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79911&viewfull=1#post79911
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79979&viewfull=1#post79979
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80004&viewfull=1#post80004
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80005&viewfull=1#post80005 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To me, as soon as Junior was in the ring and the fight started, it didn't look like he really wanted to be in there. The kinds of punches Chavez was throwing were as if he was preoccupied with showing the majority of the Mexican fans in attendance that the very opposite of what he was feeling (concern, intimidation, and under-confidence) was happening. Chavez' constant look to the referee (essentially, also an implicit call to his Mexican fans to remember, at the end of the fight, how Fonfara supposedly gained the advantage) was telling, disappointing, and a sign that he wasn't up for a true Mexican fight and as such it reinforced the perception I had that he didn't really want to be in there. Perhaps, though, we shouldn't be too hard on Julio Cesar Chavez Junior. After all it wasn't like he really chose this career path. Not unless (when you're a child) having your father offer others money to fight you in the street; fits your definition of choice. To Fonfara . . . . He did what he had to. The guy had more than 100 amateur fights if I remember correctly. And, Fonfara also has quite a few knockout wins in his last 15 or so fights; of which almost all (save for the Stevenson bout, possibly another, and also a NC due to a positive test for banned substances) he has won handily if not by KO. If not the above, then Fonfara’s fight with Stevenson (even in a loss) should have rang some serious alarm bells for someone. Even if they didn’t resonate loudly within the ears of the cash strapped and poorly disciplined fighter himself; Chavez - whom reportedly got paid within the vicinity of $2.5M for his part of the fight, whilst Fonfara’s purse was less than half a million. Not sure what Dan Goosen (whom may or may have not heard the light heavyweight alarm bells) got paid. After all Fonfara had Stevenson down in their fight and even though he lost, I thought the scores were still a little optimistic for Adonis. Even ignoring the divisional and other many weight issue(s); just putting both Chavez and Fonfara’s records side by side should have presented reasons for someone to ask; can Chavez really pull this off in his 1st fight after more than a year layoff? My bet is that Chavez $2.5M purse and any other “incentives” for newly placed; promoters, advisors, trainers, and managers, and whatever other job-titles there are out there for someone to pick up cash from, is behind why these questions were not meaningfully asked. That, and the most likely inevitable fact that Chavez was obstinate and single minded about the decision to go through with the Fonfara fight anyway; as his Top Rank contractual dispute had - rightly or wrongly - frozen him out of any decent earnings for more than a year. Those Lamborghini Aventadors (that Chavez drives) chew through a lot of fuel - gotta pay the bills baby. Regardless of all this, the Stevenson V Fonfara bout showed - at least to me - that Fonfara was certainly not the kind of light heavyweight to tap on the shoulder for your first (successful) fight in light heavyweight weight division. Fonfara has a style and "power" (pertaining to how he throws and delivers punches only) that is not entirely dissimilar to Kelly Pavlik, although it is (when viewed overall) a touch more refined in some ways; particularly footwork and sense of distance/pace. Nevertheless, any light heavyweight with the above; boxing pedigree, KO wins, attributes, and one that can drop Stevenson, is really not a safe opponent for any fighter's first, dangerous and virginal foray up to light heavyweight - let alone a fighter like Chavez Jr. that is - reasonably undisciplined - with a new trainer/corner for their first fight together - hasn't fought in a over a year - has (whether or not the bong and/or a joint is nearby) been known to find it very difficult to get off the couch come training time - has struggled with those few big names he has been given - and has even struggled with the few average names he been given (at a constantly changing weight that suited Chavez); such as Vera. All of this above may be why Fonfara not only knew how to judge an opponent before he fought him - but also why, within minutes (if not seconds) he sensed Chavez was not ready and/or his light heavyweight equal. Still, Chavez has always been a household name in Mexican families that fastidiously love the sport of 2 handed boxing. So, therefore it stands Chavez Jr. will probably continue to represent a marketable (and possibly exploitable) commodity in the sport. The real problem is that he may, now - that is, if it hasn't happened already - also begin to represent yet another symbolic illustration of a fighter treating the decision of “when it is finally time to say no”, simply as if it were a call from Freddie Roach enquiring if he was thinking about turning the TV off and attending training. “Gee, dunno Freddie - Days of our lives are on - can't we do it another day?” If Chavez makes it back to genuine contention (read; works his way through the other contenders, the hard way, as most fighters do) and into a legitimate championship match after this, and he wins that championship match; he will truly own the Chavez name in its highest esteemed fighting sense. Still, as if all this is not bad enough; Junior still may have to contend with a *legal contest via Top Rank yet. As - from what has been written - it seems that Top Rank and Bob were not all that happy with; A) Chavez Junior before the Fonfara bout. B) The Fonfara bout itself; in terms of the contract as they interpret it. So, even aside from (or perhaps it’s related to) how that all most likely means that both Top Rank and Bob probably (still) won’t be all that happy with Chavez, now, after the aforementioned Fonfara bout; it's never a good idea to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract. It’s even worse to do so and lose in a way that potentially destroys your career and therefore your ability to easily service any existing and future (*legal or otherwise) debts that may be coming your way. And it’s even “worserer” (please excuse the “Dumb and Dumberer Too” style English) to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract organized by/with a nemesis promoter/advisor; to that of an existing promoter that; a) You may have a legal dispute with. b) Whom believes you're contracted to them and therefore have no right to enter the match. I can only imagine how well all that would be received by both Chavez Jr. and Sr. now after this. If someone didn’t pull the chain and cash out, it sure looks, smells and sounds like it happened.


-stormcentre :

To add to what I have already written about the Fonfara V Chavez disaster (from Chavez' perspective) . . . . ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79911&viewfull=1#post79911
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79979&viewfull=1#post79979
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80004&viewfull=1#post80004
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80005&viewfull=1#post80005 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To me, as soon as Junior was in the ring and the fight started, it didn't look like he really wanted to be in there. The kinds of punches Chavez was throwing were as if he was preoccupied with showing the majority of the Mexican fans in attendance that the very opposite of what he was feeling (concern, intimidation, and under-confidence) was happening. Chavez' constant look to the referee (essentially, also an implicit call to his Mexican fans to remember, at the end of the fight, how Fonfara supposedly gained the advantage) was telling, disappointing, and a sign that he wasn't up for a true Mexican fight and as such it reinforced the perception I had that he didn't really want to be in there. Perhaps, though, we shouldn't be too hard on Julio Cesar Chavez Junior. After all it wasn't like he really chose this career path. Not unless (when you're a child) having your father offer others money to fight you in the street; fits your definition of choice. To Fonfara . . . . He did what he had to. The guy had more than 100 amateur fights if I remember correctly. And, Fonfara also has quite a few knockout wins in his last 15 or so fights; of which almost all (save for the Stevenson bout, possibly another, and also a NC due to a positive test for banned substances) he has won handily if not by KO. If not the above, then Fonfara’s fight with Stevenson (even in a loss) should have rang some serious alarm bells for someone. Even if they didn’t resonate loudly within the ears of the cash strapped and poorly disciplined fighter himself; Chavez - whom reportedly got paid within the vicinity of $2.5M for his part of the fight, whilst Fonfara’s purse was less than half a million. Not sure what Dan Goosen (whom may or may have not heard the light heavyweight alarm bells) got paid. After all Fonfara had Stevenson down in their fight and even though he lost, I thought the scores were still a little optimistic for Adonis. Even ignoring the divisional and other many weight issue(s); just putting both Chavez and Fonfara’s records side by side should have presented reasons for someone to ask; can Chavez really pull this off in his 1st fight after more than a year layoff? My bet is that Chavez $2.5M purse and any other “incentives” for newly placed; promoters, advisors, trainers, and managers, and whatever other job-titles there are out there for someone to pick up cash from, is behind why these questions were not meaningfully asked. That, and the most likely inevitable fact that Chavez was obstinate and single minded about the decision to go through with the Fonfara fight anyway; as his Top Rank contractual dispute had - rightly or wrongly - frozen him out of any decent earnings for more than a year. Those Lamborghini Aventadors (that Chavez drives) chew through a lot of fuel - gotta pay the bills baby. Regardless of all this, the Stevenson V Fonfara bout showed - at least to me - that Fonfara was certainly not the kind of light heavyweight to tap on the shoulder for your first (successful) fight in the light heavyweight weight division. Fonfara has a style and "power" (pertaining to how he throws and delivers punches only) that is not entirely dissimilar to Kelly Pavlik, although it is (when viewed overall) a touch more refined in some ways; particularly footwork and sense of distance/pace. Nevertheless, any light heavyweight with the above; boxing pedigree, KO wins, attributes, and one that can drop Stevenson, is really not a safe opponent for any fighter's first, dangerous and virginal foray up to light heavyweight - let alone a fighter like Chavez Jr. that is - reasonably undisciplined - with a new trainer/corner for their first fight together - hasn't fought in a over a year - has (whether or not the bong and/or a joint is nearby) been known to find it very difficult to get off the couch come training time - has struggled with those few big names he has been given - and has even struggled with the few average names he been given (at a constantly changing weight that suited Chavez); such as Vera. All of this above may be why Fonfara not only knew how to judge an opponent before he fought him - but also why, within minutes (if not seconds) he sensed Chavez was not ready and/or his light heavyweight equal. Still, Chavez has always been a household name in Mexican families that fastidiously love the sport of 2 handed boxing. So, therefore it stands Chavez Jr. will probably continue to represent a marketable (and possibly exploitable) commodity in the sport. The real problem is that he may, now - that is, if it hasn't happened already - also begin to represent yet another symbolic illustration of a fighter treating the decision of “when it is finally time to say no”, simply as if it were a call from Freddie Roach enquiring if he was thinking about turning the TV off and attending training. “Gee, dunno Freddie - Days of our lives are on - can't we do it another day?” If Chavez makes it back to genuine contention (read; works his way through the other contenders, the hard way, as most fighters do) and into a legitimate championship match after this, and he wins that championship match; he will truly own the Chavez name in its highest esteemed fighting sense. Still, as if all this is not bad enough; Junior still may have to contend with a *legal contest via Top Rank yet. As - from what has been written - it seems that Top Rank and Bob were not all that happy with; A) Chavez Junior before the Fonfara bout. B) The Fonfara bout itself; in terms of the contract as they interpret it. So, even aside from (or perhaps it’s related to) how that all most likely means that both Top Rank and Bob probably (still) won’t be all that happy with Chavez, now, after the aforementioned Fonfara bout; it's never a good idea to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract. It’s even worse to do so and lose in a way that potentially destroys your career and therefore your ability to easily service any existing and future (*legal or otherwise) debts that may be coming your way. And it’s even “worserer” (please excuse the “Dumb and Dumberer Too” style English) to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract organized by/with a nemesis promoter/advisor; to that of an existing promoter that; a) You may have a legal dispute with. b) Whom believes you're contracted to them and therefore have no right to enter the match. I can only imagine how well all that would be received by both Chavez Jr. and Sr. now after this. If someone didn’t pull the chain and cash out, it sure looks, smells and sounds like it happened. :cool:


-stormcentre :

To add to what I have already written about the Fonfara V Chavez disaster (from Chavez' perspective) . . . . ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79911&viewfull=1#post79911
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79979&viewfull=1#post79979
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80004&viewfull=1#post80004
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80005&viewfull=1#post80005 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To me, as soon as Junior was in the ring and the fight started, it didn't look like he really wanted to be in there. The kinds of punches Chavez was throwing were as if he was preoccupied with showing the majority of the Mexican fans in attendance that the very opposite of what he was feeling (concern, intimidation, and under-confidence) was happening. Chavez' constant look to the referee (essentially, also an implicit call to his Mexican fans to remember, at the end of the fight, how Fonfara supposedly gained the advantage) was telling, disappointing, and a sign that he wasn't up for a true Mexican fight and as such it reinforced the perception I had that he didn't really want to be in there. Perhaps, though, we shouldn't be too hard on Julio Cesar Chavez Junior. After all it wasn't like he really chose this career path. Not unless (when you're a child) having your father offer others money to fight you in the street; fits your definition of choice. To Fonfara . . . . He did what he had to. The guy had more than 100 amateur fights if I remember correctly. And, Fonfara also has quite a few knockout wins in his last 15 or so fights; of which almost all (save for the Stevenson bout, possibly another, and also a NC due to a positive test for banned substances) he has won handily if not by KO. If not the above, then Fonfara’s fight with Stevenson (even in a loss) should have rang some serious alarm bells for someone. Even if they didn’t resonate loudly within the ears of the cash strapped and poorly disciplined fighter himself; Chavez - whom reportedly got paid within the vicinity of $2.5M for his part of the fight, whilst Fonfara’s purse was less than half a million. Not sure what Dan Goosen (whom may or may have not heard the light heavyweight alarm bells) got paid. After all Fonfara had Stevenson down in their fight and even though he lost, I thought the scores were still a little optimistic for Adonis. Even ignoring the divisional and other many weight issue(s); just putting both Chavez and Fonfara’s records side by side should have presented reasons for someone to ask; can Chavez really pull this off in his 1st fight after more than a year layoff? My bet is that Chavez $2.5M purse and any other “incentives” for newly placed; promoters, advisors, trainers, and managers, and whatever other job-titles there are out there for someone to pick up cash from, is behind why these questions were not meaningfully asked. That, and the most likely inevitable fact that Chavez was obstinate and single minded about the decision to go through with the Fonfara fight anyway; as his Top Rank contractual dispute had - rightly or wrongly - frozen him out of any decent earnings for more than a year. Those Lamborghini Aventadors (that Chavez drives) chew through a lot of fuel. Gotta pay the bills to keep that ~500Kw V12 engine running baby. Regardless of all this, the Stevenson V Fonfara bout showed - at least to me - that Fonfara was certainly not the kind of light heavyweight to tap on the shoulder for your first (successful) fight in the light heavyweight weight division. Fonfara has a style and "power" (pertaining to how he throws and delivers punches only) that is not entirely dissimilar to Kelly Pavlik, although it is (when viewed overall) a touch more refined in some ways; particularly footwork and sense of distance/pace. Nevertheless, any light heavyweight with the above; boxing pedigree, KO wins, attributes, and one that can drop Stevenson, is really not a safe opponent for any fighter's first, dangerous and virginal foray up to light heavyweight - let alone a fighter like Chavez Jr. that is - reasonably undisciplined - with a new trainer/corner for their first fight together - hasn't fought in a over a year - has (whether or not the bong and/or a joint is nearby) been known to find it very difficult to get off the couch come training time - has struggled with those few big names he has been given - and has even struggled with the few average names he been given (at a constantly changing weight that suited Chavez); such as Vera. All of this above may be why Fonfara not only knew how to judge an opponent before he fought him - but also why, within minutes (if not seconds) he sensed Chavez was not ready and/or his light heavyweight equal. Still, Chavez has always been a household name in Mexican families that fastidiously love the sport of 2 handed boxing. So, therefore it stands Chavez Jr. will probably continue to represent a marketable (and possibly exploitable) commodity in the sport. The real problem is that he may, now - that is, if it hasn't happened already - also begin to represent yet another symbolic illustration of a fighter treating the decision of "“when it is finally time to say no”", simply as if it were a call from Freddie Roach enquiring if he was thinking about turning the TV off and attending training. "“Gee, dunno Freddie - Days of our lives are on - can't we do it another day?”" If Chavez makes it back to genuine contention (read; works his way through the other contenders, the hard way, as most fighters do) and into a legitimate championship match after this, and "if" he wins that championship match; he will, only then, truly own the Chavez name in its highest esteemed professional prizefighting sense. Still, as if all this is not bad enough; Junior still may have to contend with a *legal contest via Top Rank yet. As - from what has been written - it seems that Top Rank and Bob were not all that happy with; A) Chavez Junior before the Fonfara bout. B) The Fonfara bout itself; in terms of the contract as they interpret it. So, even aside from (or perhaps it’s related to) how that all most likely means that both Top Rank and Bob probably (still) won’t be all that happy with Chavez, now, after the aforementioned Fonfara bout; it's never a good idea to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract. It’s even worse to do so and lose in a way that potentially destroys your career and therefore your ability to easily service any existing and future (*legal or otherwise) debts that may be coming your way; courtesy of a Top Rank writ that not only seeks compensation for damages - but also defines Chavez Junior's above-mentioned fight's promotional revenue/income as an example of that loss, whilst referring to Junior's $2.5M purse as proof he has suffered no loss from any perceived contractual issues as perceived/claimed on his side. ("
Note: there is many a slip between a cup and a lip in the legal/contract game, and that's whether it applies to boxing contracts or not"). And it’s even “worserer” (please excuse the “Dumb and Dumberer Too” style English) to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract organized by/with a nemesis promoter/advisor; to that of an existing promoter that; a) You may have a legal dispute with. b) Whom believes you're contracted to them and therefore have no right to enter the match. I can only imagine how well all that would be received by both Chavez Jr. and Sr. now after this. If someone didn’t pull the chain and cash out, it sure looks, smells and sounds like it happened. It couldn't have happened more perfectly - in, of course, only my opinion - if Bob was not at arm's length (for this fight) and did it himself. In fact, it's almost as if he did do it himself. But of course he didn't. He couldn't. After all, he didn't organize the fight and design/sign that contract did he? Action at a distance anyone? MK Ultra? Which just so happens to be
StormCentre's DJ-ing alias. Cue the sound to the X-files . . . now. :cool:


-stormcentre :

To add to what I have already written about the Fonfara V Chavez disaster (from Chavez' perspective) . . . . ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79911&viewfull=1#post79911
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=79979&viewfull=1#post79979
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80004&viewfull=1#post80004
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?20668-Julio-Cesar-Chavez-Jr-Faces-Potential-Fonfara-Beatdown&p=80005&viewfull=1#post80005 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- To me, as soon as Junior was in the ring and the fight started, it didn't look like he really wanted to be in there. The kinds of punches Chavez was (initially) throwing were as if he was preoccupied with showing the majority of the Mexican fans in attendance that the very opposite of what he was feeling (concern, intimidation, and under-confidence) was happening. Chavez' constant look to the referee (essentially, also an implicit call to his Mexican fans to remember, at the end of the fight, how Fonfara supposedly gained the advantage) was telling, disappointing, and a sign that - at first - he wasn't really up for a true Mexican fight and as such it reinforced the perception I had that he didn't really want to be in there. Still, after he was hit a few times, he picked himself up, forged ahead in the fight, and tried his best. Unfortunately though, his best was not good enough. Perhaps, though, we shouldn't be too hard on Julio Cesar Chavez Junior. After all it wasn't like he really chose this career path. Not unless (when you're a child) having your father offer others money to fight you in the street; fits your definition of choice. To Fonfara . . . . He did what he had to. The guy had more than 100 amateur fights if I remember correctly. And, Fonfara also has quite a few knockout wins in his last 15 or so fights; of which almost all (save for the Stevenson bout, possibly another, and also a NC due to a positive test for banned substances) he has won handily if not by KO. If not the above, then Fonfara’s fight with Stevenson (even in a loss) should have rang some serious alarm bells for someone. Even if they didn’t resonate loudly within the ears of the cash strapped and poorly disciplined fighter himself; Chavez - whom reportedly got paid within the vicinity of $2.5M for his part of the fight, whilst Fonfara’s purse was less than half a million. Not sure what Joe Goosen (whom may or may have not heard the light heavyweight alarm bells) got paid. After all Fonfara had Stevenson down in their fight and even though he lost, I thought the scores were still a little optimistic for Adonis. Even ignoring the divisional and other many weight issue(s); just putting both Chavez and Fonfara’s records side by side should have presented reasons for someone to ask; can Chavez really pull this off in his 1st fight after more than a year layoff? My bet is that Chavez $2.5M purse and any other “incentives” for newly placed; promoters, advisors, trainers, and managers, and whatever other job-titles there are out there for someone to pick up cash from, is behind why these questions were not meaningfully asked. That, and the most likely inevitable fact that Chavez was obstinate and single minded about the decision to go through with the Fonfara fight anyway; as his Top Rank contractual dispute had - rightly or wrongly - frozen him out of any decent earnings for more than a year. Those Lamborghini Aventadors (that Chavez drives) chew through a lot of fuel. Gotta pay the bills to keep that ~500Kw V12 engine running baby. Regardless of all this, the Stevenson V Fonfara bout showed - at least to me - that Fonfara was certainly not the kind of light heavyweight to tap on the shoulder for your first (successful) fight in the light heavyweight weight division. Fonfara has a style and "power" (pertaining to how he throws and delivers punches only) that is not entirely dissimilar to Kelly Pavlik, although it is (when viewed overall) a touch more refined in some ways; particularly footwork and sense of distance/pace. Nevertheless, any light heavyweight with the above; boxing pedigree, KO wins, attributes, and one that can drop Stevenson, is really not a safe opponent for any fighter's first, dangerous and virginal foray up to light heavyweight - let alone a fighter like Chavez Jr. that is - reasonably undisciplined - with a new trainer/corner for their first fight together - hasn't fought in a over a year - has (whether or not the bong and/or a joint is nearby) been known to find it very difficult to get off the couch come training time - has struggled with those few big names he has been given - and has even struggled with the few average names he been given (at a constantly changing weight that suited Chavez); such as Vera. All of this above may be why Fonfara not only knew how to judge an opponent before he fought him - but also why, within minutes (if not seconds) he sensed Chavez was not ready and/or his light heavyweight equal. Still, Chavez has always been a household name in Mexican families that fastidiously love the sport of 2 handed boxing. So, therefore it stands Chavez Jr. will probably continue to represent a marketable (and possibly exploitable) commodity in the sport. The real problem is that he may, now - that is, if it hasn't happened already - also begin to represent yet another symbolic illustration of a fighter treating the decision of "“when it is finally time to say no”", simply as if it were a call from Freddie Roach enquiring if he was thinking about turning the TV off and attending training. "“Gee, dunno Freddie - Days of our lives are on - can't we do it another day?”" If Chavez makes it back to genuine contention (read; works his way through the other contenders, the hard way, as most fighters do) and into a legitimate championship match after this, and "if" he wins that championship match; he will, only then, truly own the Chavez name in its highest esteemed professional prizefighting sense. Still, as if all this is not bad enough; Junior still may have to contend with a *legal contest via Top Rank yet. As - from what has been written - it seems that Top Rank and Bob were not all that happy with; A) Chavez Junior before the Fonfara bout. B) The Fonfara bout itself; in terms of the contract as they interpret it. So, even aside from (or perhaps it’s related to) how that all most likely means that both Top Rank and Bob probably (still) won’t be all that happy with Chavez, now, after the aforementioned Fonfara bout; it's never a good idea to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract. It’s even worse to do so and lose in a way that potentially destroys your career and therefore your ability to easily service any existing and future (*legal or otherwise) debts that may be coming your way; courtesy of a Top Rank writ that not only seeks compensation for damages - but also defines Chavez Junior's above-mentioned fight's promotional revenue/income as an example of that loss, whilst referring to Junior's $2.5M purse as proof he has suffered no loss from any perceived contractual issues as perceived/claimed on his side. ("
Note: there is many a slip between a cup and a lip in the legal/contract game, and that's whether it applies to boxing contracts or not"). And it’s even “worserer” (please excuse the “Dumb and Dumberer Too” style English) to enter into a bout outside of your existing contract organized by/with a nemesis promoter/advisor; to that of an existing promoter that; a) You may have a legal dispute with. b) Whom believes you're contracted to them and therefore have no right to enter the match. I can only imagine how well all that would be received by both Chavez Jr. and Sr. now after this. If someone didn’t pull the chain and cash out, it sure looks, smells and sounds like it happened. It couldn't have happened more perfectly - in, of course, only my opinion - if Bob was not at arm's length (for this fight) and did it himself. In fact, it's almost as if he did do it himself. But of course he didn't. He couldn't. After all, he didn't organize the fight and design/sign that contract did he? Action at a distance anyone? MK Ultra? Which just so happens to be
StormCentre's DJ-ing alias. Cue the sound to the X-files . . . now. :cool:


-oubobcat :

Something not being discussed about this card was Amir Imam's performance against Walter Castillo. Imam looked brilliant against a very tough opponent. Castillo is a pressure fighter who brings it and carries some very heavy hands particularly with that left hook to the body. Imam used an excellent jab and boxed effectively against Castillo while withstanding his constant pressure. I think Imam is the real deal and he has beaten some very solid opponents in his last three fights. He has one punch power in that right hand and good boxing ability. His jab is becoming a real weapon and is almost a power punch in itself. Its not quite Ike Quartey level but not that far off either. He is really out of that prospect stage and I think can beat a lot of 140 pounders out there right now. I think this guy is going to be a star and a lot of people are overlooking him at the moment. But in 12 to 18 months expect him to have a belt and start getting mentioned for some real big time fights.


-stormcentre :

Something not being discussed about this card was Amir Imam's performance against Walter Castillo. Imam looked brilliant against a very tough opponent. Castillo is a pressure fighter who brings it and carries some very heavy hands particularly with that left hook to the body. Imam used an excellent jab and boxed effectively against Castillo while withstanding his constant pressure. I think Imam is the real deal and he has beaten some very solid opponents in his last three fights. He has one punch power in that right hand and good boxing ability. His jab is becoming a real weapon and is almost a power punch in itself. Its not quite Ike Quartey level but not that far off either. He is really out of that prospect stage and I think can beat a lot of 140 pounders out there right now. I think this guy is going to be a star and a lot of people are overlooking him at the moment. But in 12 to 18 months expect him to have a belt and start getting mentioned for some real big time fights.
I didn't see all of Imam's fight. I will have to check him out by the sounds of what you're saying.