Countdown To Mayweather-Pacquiao: MayPac Compares To Leonard-Duran I

With the much anticipated super fight between welterweights Floyd Mayweather 47-0 (26) and Manny Pacquiao 57-5-2 (38) nearing, it’s been hard to find another super fight that it is most analogous to.

And that’s mainly because the dynamics that are bringing Mayweather and Pacquiao together are unlike any other super fight of my time following the sport of boxing.

In terms of anticipation and seeing two fighter’s names together on a marquee, I suppose Frazier-Ali I and Hagler-Leonard work best. From a style perspective, Ali 31-0 (25) was more offensive minded than Mayweather, and Frazier 26-0 (23) was much more aggressive and applied sustained bell-to-bell pressure, in contrast to Pacquiao, whose pressure is more sporadic. In addition to that, Joe, 27, and Muhammad, 29, were at or near their physical prime the first time they fought. And prior to the fight it was impossible to picture either Frazier or Ali losing, and that certainly doesn’t apply to Mayweather or Pacquiao.

Hagler-Leonard shares some interesting parallels because you have an aggressive southpaw (Hagler) fighting as the attacker going after a superstar boxer (Leonard). It also works because both Marvin, 32, and Ray, 30, were past their prime when they finally tangled back in 1987. The problem is, Leonard 33-1 (24) the boxer was moving up in weight to challenge the bigger man in Hagler 62-2-2 (52), who like Pacquiao is viewed as the bigger puncher. That doesn’t fit the Mayweather-Pacquiao template because Mayweather the boxer is clearly the bigger framed man compared to Pacquiao, the presumed aggressor and bigger puncher.

I suppose you have to go back 35 years to find the super fight that is most analogous to the upcoming welterweight clash between Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao. And that would be the WBC welterweight title bout between title holder Sugar Ray Leonard 27-0 (18) and former undisputed lightweight champ Roberto Duran 71-1 (55) on June 20th 1980. No, it’s not a perfect match because Ray, 24, and Roberto, 29 were close to their prime, as opposed to Floyd, 38, and Manny, 36, who are slightly on the decline……but it comes the closest regarding their personalities, boxing styles and the anticipated style clash between them. Also, the superstar boxer went into both bouts as the betting favorite. Leonard was 9-5 over Duran and Mayweather is between 13-5 and 3-1 over Pacquiao.

Let’s start with the similarities and contrast in their personalities. Sugar Ray Leonard was a superstar who exuded almost Muhammad Ali-like natural charisma, and he was covered like a rock star the moment he announced he was turning pro. As for Floyd Mayweather, he had to wait 11 years before he transformed himself into boxing’s biggest star. No, he’s not the media darling that Leonard was and he certainly doesn’t have the charm or magnetism that Ray still has, but he is the superstar in this fight and has called the shots accordingly. Also, it’s never mentioned but another difference between Ray and Floyd is Leonard went out of his way to be entertaining in the ring, which is something Mayweather really only pays lip service to.

As for Duran and Pacquiao, despite being foreigners both had/have a huge fan base in the United States and their fighting is what is most captivating about them. They aren’t the talkers or promoters that Leonard and Mayweather were/are, but the way they handle their business in the ring draws fans out to watch them whenever they fight.

Another correlation between Duran and Pacquiao is they’re both the smaller framed man and started their careers way below welterweight when they turned pro. Duran skipped the junior welterweight division and went right from lightweight to welterweight when he challenged Leonard. Pacquiao turned pro as a flyweight and has never weighed more than 145 for a welterweight title bout, two pounds below the maximum allowed for the division limit. Mayweather turned pro as a junior lightweight but as it was the case with Leonard, is a full-fledged welterweight by the time of the big fight.

When it comes to boxing styles, Mayweather, as it was the case with Leonard, is the more conventional boxer in the match-up. However, other than being fast and flashy, that’s where the similarity ends. Leonard could really punch to the head and body with both hands, and he went into the Duran fight thinking he could beat Roberto going toe-to-toe with him. On the other hand Mayweather will most likely only engage Pacquiao if he’s forced to. Mayweather is better than Leonard was defensively, but a lot of that has to do with Leonard being more offensively driven and that he sought to win by knockout, whereas Floyd is most content going the distance. This makes him less vulnerable to getting hit during exchanges because he usually only engages on his terms when he deems that it’s safe. Another thing Ray and Floyd share is both were physically stronger than they get credit for being, and neither had a shortage of confidence.

Pacquiao, as it was when Duran fought Leonard, is the perceived aggressor and puncher. But that’s where the similarity ends between them. Pacquiao is a southpaw who fights in spurts and is more prone to his feet sometimes being off the canvas when he attacks in spurts and waves. On the other hand, Duran of the lightweight/welterweight vintage, applied non-stop sustained pressure and cut the ring off much better than Pacquiao. Manny has quicker hands and feet than Duran did but he’s easier to hit and is nowhere near the inside fighter or body puncher Roberto was. Duran was a brilliant defensive fighter and his chin was much better than Pacquiao’s. Even though both of their high profile kayo losses were similar, there’s a big difference, and that is Duran got knocked out way over his best weight by one of the hardest one-shot punchers in boxing history, Thomas Hearns, not by a fighter who was chasing him up in weight who never dropped him once in their three previous fights, Juan Manuel Marquez.

There’s also an x-factor that was in play before the first Leonard-Duran bout that I don’t think is in play between Mayweather and Pacquiao, and that was Duran’s intense dislike of Leonard. Call it a hunch, but I don’t believe Manny could conjure up the borderline hatred for Floyd that Roberto harbored for Ray. Duran didn’t want to just beat Leonard, he wanted to humiliate and embarrass him in front of his wife and fans, and I don’t think Pacquiao is built like that. Duran was fiercely driven by his want to take Leonard down, because in his eyes Ray was receiving undue and unearned star treatment over him, on top of being further insulted that Leonard was earning roughly five times more money than he was for their fight. This is opposed to Pacquiao, who is getting a 40/60 split with Mayweather.

I’ve always maintained that I’ve never seen a fighter more prepared mentally, emotionally, physically and strategically who was on more of a mission to beat a particular opponent than “Smokin” Joe Frazier was to beat Muhammad Ali on March 8th, 1971….but if I had to pick a runner-up to Frazier it would be Roberto Duran of the first Leonard fight on June 20th, 1980.

As for the fight, if Mayweather-Pacquiao turns out to be half as good as Leonard-Duran I, it will be talked about for years to come. But that’s a high bar for it to clear. Leonard was awesome during that fight, and that’s because Duran wasn’t to be denied. Roberto’s sustained aggression along with his ability to never really let up for 15 fast paced rounds forced the young Leonard to raise his game, and he did. There were some tremendous exchanges during the bout and every time you started to think one of them was seizing control of the action, the other roared back and turned the tide.

The key to Duran’s unanimous decision victory was his ability to get Leonard to fight his fight. Duran taunting Leonard before the bout, insinuating that he wasn’t tough and how he would be forced to run, made it easier for him to lure Leonard into fighting more and boxing less. In addition to that, Leonard learned as the fight progressed just how versatile and slippery Duran was, something he wasn’t prepared for. It was a great fight and it was very close, but Duran nudged it out and both were the better for it.

If Pacquiao’s trainer Freddie Roach can somehow get Manny to fight with the same non-stop aggression and tenacity that Roberto Duran did during the first Leonard fight, then Floyd Mayweather will be in for the toughest fight of his life and may depart the ring 47-1. But Manny Pacquiao is no Roberto Duran, but then again he won’t have to be because Floyd Mayweather is no Sugar Ray Leonard.

Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at GlovedFist@Gmail.com

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COMMENTS

-Froggy :

I think after May 2, everyone will agree it was indeed the toughest fight of Mayweather's career !


-michaelabii :

Franks on target again. I thought Leonard/Hearns 1 was comparable but in reality Leonard/Hearns 1 was indeed an authentic super fight between two athletes in their absolute prime. A fighters super fight. Duran was peerless as a lighter weight fighter and his defense and ability to slip punches effortlessly was vastly underrated. However, that was then and this is now. When Mayweather and Pacqiaou step into the ring May 2 and are announced by Michael Buffer they will be ready to give us the fight of their lives because they are the best of this era. As much as some hate Floyd Mayweather he has never demonstrated anything other than a fighters instinct especially when he is hurt. As Freddie Roach puts it he will fight back when pushed and in my opinion Floyd fights better as an aggressor in spite of his near flawless defense. I think this is the key question: Will Floyd throw more punches in combination just like he had to when pushed by Ricky Hatton and Miguel Cotto. We already know the answer to some questions: Pacman is the harder puncher: Floyd is the better technician/boxer: Pacman is faster throwing those volume combinations: Floyd is more accurate and is better at placing his punches: I would contend they are equal in the stamina department although I think Floyds slowing down in this area: Floyd is the better body puncher when he decides to and he is underrated in this area: I also think Floyd is physically stronger: Floyd, believe it or not cuts off the ring brilliantly when he decides to walk an opponent down - he does not just follow you around.


-mortcola :

Only problem I see is Frank's characterization of Pac as fighting more in episodes. Pac HAS fought fights in which he has maneuvered and picked his shots; he was also a non-stop buzzsaw in many of his fights. And though he is a gentleman leading up to fights, it is only since his religious conversion that he has stopped punching through the opponent, and constantly....and in this case, I believe that Pac's real feelings for Mayweather will be expressed in a strategy of never letting Floyd rest or get set. Pac has no difficulty bringing the tornado, unless he regrettably becomes god's servant yet again and mixes mercy with mayhem...I doubt he would allow himself to do this, or Freddie would against the guy who has frustrated and disparaged him in public for the better part of a decade. Pac will be much more like Duran, or like the Pac who decimated Barrera, Hatton, or even DLH, than the guy who eased off against Mosley, Margarita, and even Cotto. Let's not mistake Pac's piousness for having lost the anger that allowed a hungry street kid to get to the top - something that unites him with Duran.


-SuperLight :

Thanks as ever, Frank. Good point about Duran's resentment (borderline hatred) of Leonard, which Hagler might have shared, and which few could imagine Pacquiao harbouring. Looking at personalities from another angle, it seems to me that Manny is a national icon and well-known throughout south-east Asia. How does Mayweather compare in that regard?


-Pazuzu :

Looking at personalities from another angle, it seems to me that Manny is a national icon and well-known throughout south-east Asia. How does Mayweather compare in that regard?
Well, Mayweather's a narcissist and woman-beater, so there's really not much comparison at all.


-Brad :

I would put Duran's Montreal performance "mentally,emotionally, physically and strategically"ahead of Frazier's simply because Ali was come off a long layoff (I know he fought Quarry and Ringo before Joe) and Joe was peaking. I'm not sure Joe got the very best version Ali that night. The Leonard that Duran faced was as good a welterweight as there ever was and Duran had to be an artist to pull it off. He was. It's the best fight I ever saw live (in a closed circuit theater). We can only hope MayPac is kind-of-close to being as entertaining as The Brawl in Montreal. But the pre fight build up sure seems to be lacking. For Leonard Duran I we had Duran punching Leonard to hard with the oversized promotional glove at the first press conference, we had Leonard saying he'd "kill" Duran and Duran trying to "kill" him in response. We had Duran throwing the bird at Leonard and his wife. We had Duran failing a heart exam and putting the fight in jeopardy. We had Duran training and sparring open to the public (in New York at Gleason's, then in the Catskills at Grossinger's)So far in this one we have private work outs. Two fighters that are silents. Two trainers that are talking like they are the fighters and endless stories about money. How much Floyd can earn, how much tickets are, how much ppv will cost, etc. Hope we get closer to Leonard-Duran I, but we got a ways to go.


-brownsugar :

Excellent comments ... Leonard could have made things much easier by following Dundee's instructions. Duran did a masterful job of getting Leonard primed to fight instead of using his better boxing skills and he paid the price. ... Duran was never again able to repeat the process and Leonard learned a valuable lessen of how NOT to fight the opponents fight which helped him against fighters who were even greater threats than Duran (Hearns and Hagler) but that win will forever be cemented into the record books ... To me it was a crossroads fight that despite losing. would serve to propel Leonard to unimaginable heights.


-SuperLight :

Well, Mayweather's a narcissist and woman-beater, so there's really not much comparison at all.
From the little I know about their lives outside the ring, Manny would win the personality contest. Their boxing skills notwithstanding, I'm interested in the trash-talking games each camp is or isn't playing, the effect that fight fans, the media and the home/away crowd might have on the respective boxers' psyche and strategy for the bout. One can read any number of "gayweather/chickenweather" comments on any boxing video on YouTube, and some wild accusations in this very forum among other places. That's not really what I mean. Frank pointed out the fact that no love was lost between Duran and Leonard. When we look at the "four kings", besides their different respective strengths, we could say Leonard was shrewd, sly or whatever, waiting until Duran piled on some weight and Hagler slowed a bit in reaction time. On the flip side, we can say that Duran and Hagler were especially embittered. From what I understand, Hagler was over-confident going into his fight with Leonard, manifest in his concessions to ring size, etc., and possibly in his early rounds in orthodox stance. We saw brilliance from each of the Kings in a few weight divisions, and conversely saw at some point each man not fight his fight, whether he later learned from the experience or not. As to pre-fight psychology, heading away from the Kings, I think of Ali casting Joe Frazier as a gorilla and "Uncle Tom", Foreman as a sullen brute, and himself as a champion of Africans around the world. By design (and a bit of luck) he won the contests in the ring, and managed to get a whole lot of votes in the personality contest. So back to Floyd and Manny, how much of the above has happened or will happen, and what will be the effect on their preparation and their strategy on the night? I really don't feel the air as heavy as those mega fights of yore; rather that the bout has been a long time coming and that each guy is striving to prove that he's still young and good enough to move the hands and feet and/or to KO the other.


-Brad :

I never bought Leonard's story that Duran's insults to him and his wife made him scrap his fight plan and punch it out toe-to-toe with Roberto. Leonard was too smart and understood mind games. I think Leonard thought he could and would KO Duran. He said as much days before the fight.He predicted a KO inside of 5. So did Dundee. Sugar had just about took Davey Boy Green's head off in March of 1980 and looked as big,fast and strong as any welterweight. Duran, not so much. His only impressive fight as a welterweight going into Montreal was the Palomino fight a year earlier. He seemed to have left his power in the lightweight division. I think this is why Leonard figured he could get Duran out earlier. What he didn't realize was Duran approach to fights and performance fall into two categories: the ones he cared about and the ones he didn't. He looked brilliant against Palomino (cared about that one). He looked slow and lacking power against Zeffy Gonzales a few months later (didn't care about that one). Leonard real miscalculation was he didn't understand what he represented to Duran. Leonard was the Golden Boy American. Duran came from the slums of Panama. His mother worked in the Canal Zone where Americans lived behind fences in well kept colonial houses. For fun Duran said he use to like to wait outside the fences of the Canal Zone at night and beat up drunk American soldiers who wondered out looking for whores. Leonard was a symbol to Duran of everything he and his country didn't and would never have: extreme wealth, power, international attention,etc. To beat him was everything. He wasn't going to lose that fight in Montreal regardless of how Leonard fought. The big mistake Duran's handlers made was not realizing what effort and sacrifice he had to make to win that fight. He need more than a few months off after that performance. In this fight I hope there is some of that Duran fire burning inside of Manny.


-amayseng :

I never bought Leonard's story that Duran's insults to him and his wife made him scrap his fight plan and punch it out toe-to-toe with Roberto. Leonard was too smart and understood mind games. I think Leonard thought he could and would KO Duran. He said as much days before the fight.He predicted a KO inside of 5. So did Dundee. Sugar had just about took Davey Boy Green's head off in March of 1980 and looked as big,fast and strong as any welterweight. Duran, not so much. His only impressive fight as a welterweight going into Montreal was the Palomino fight a year earlier. He seemed to have left his power in the lightweight division. I think this is why Leonard figured he could get Duran out earlier. What he didn't realize was Duran approach to fights and performance fall into two categories: the ones he cared about and the ones he didn't. He looked brilliant against Palomino (cared about that one). He looked slow and lacking power against Zeffy Gonzales a few months later (didn't care about that one). Leonard real miscalculation was he didn't understand what he represented to Duran. Leonard was the Golden Boy American. Duran came from the slums of Panama. His mother worked in the Canal Zone where Americans lived behind fences in well kept colonial houses. For fun Duran said he use to like to wait outside the fences of the Canal Zone at night and beat up drunk American soldiers who wondered out looking for whores. Leonard was a symbol to Duran of everything he and his country didn't and would never have: extreme wealth, power, international attention,etc. To beat him was everything. He wasn't going to lose that fight in Montreal regardless of how Leonard fought. The big mistake Duran's handlers made was not realizing what effort and sacrifice he had to make to win that fight. He need more than a few months off after that performance. In this fight I hope there is some of that Duran fire burning inside of Manny.
Excellent write up. My dad had explained this to me before when I was younger.


-brownsugar :

That's interesting.... Leonard and Dundee going after the easy ko and the prideful Leonard not caring that Duran had abused him and his wife publically?....never heard that before. Especially when there is stock file footage of Dundee exorting Leonard to box and not brawl. Dundee almost went hoarse in that fight yelling at Leonard. But Leonard had made it personal and got himself stuck in a mode. The rematch was so easy Duran was virtually given a pass. Well, he wasnt feeling good....etc... But in boxing you don't get days off in the ring and Leonard would forever separate himself from Duran after that point. There is no doubt Leonard played right into Duran's hands ...which is what good fighters can make you do. Leonard himself said he would have felt like a punk if he didnt stand his ground and face Duran head on. In later years Leonard having ascended the top of the sport.....Leonard would become much more magnanimous with his praise toward his closest rivals...agreeing with what ever versions of the fights Hearns Duran and Hagler could come up in order to squash whatever bitter feelings still remained. Leonard was generous that way. Which is why he's still so widely loved to this very day. Still no one can take away Duran's victory. And no one can deny Leonard's subsequent success as a result of that loss. The difference being Duran had reached the pinnacle of his career....Leonard was just getting started to build upon his uncomparable legacy.


-Brad :

I'm not saying Leonard "didn't care" that Duran insult his wife, I'm saying he's has been around bad dudes his entire life saying nasty sh@t to get under his skin. It certainly pissed him off but he wasn't going to scrap his strategy for prefight bs. He said he was going to KO Duran from the first press conference on. That was the plan. You can find the prefight stories on-line at Sports Illustrated vault, Inside Sports, Newsweek,etc. Leonard talked about "killing" Duran. Point is the "I did it for my wife's honor" was something that came after the fight. After he learned that Roberto wasn't just an undersized street brawler. He was as highly skilled as any fighter ever, and Leonard learned that the hard way. But, Sugar Ray came out stronger. Leonard never beats Hearns without first going to school against Mano de Piedra.


-brownsugar :

I'm not saying Leonard "didn't care" that Duran insult his wife, I'm saying he's has been around bad dudes his entire life saying nasty sh@t to get under his skin. It certainly pissed him off but he wasn't going to scrap his strategy for prefight bs. He said he was going to KO Duran from the first press conference on. That was the plan. You can find the prefight stories on-line at Sports Illustrated vault, Inside Sports, Newsweek,etc. Leonard talked about "killing" Duran. Point is the "I did it for my wife's honor" was something that came after the fight. After he learned that Roberto wasn't just an undersized street brawler. He was as highly skilled as any fighter ever, and Leonard learned that the hard way. But, Sugar Ray came out stronger. Leonard never beats Hearns without first going to school against Mano de Piedra.
I probably wouldnt feel so strongly Brad... If i hadnt seen the hype and the fight live. I watched the entire build up to the event and was at the newstand regularly inhaling every scintilla of minutae i could find on the subject. Leonard knew who Duran was and how good he he was as a fighter... they had met several times at pressers and promotional events and saw each other at ringside..... Size didnt faze either boxer but Duran was pushing all the right buttons. Duran got Leonard into fight a street fight but that wasnt how Dundee advised him to fight Duran. I guess were are agreeing on the same thing just expressing it different ways. Thanks for your input and keep it coming Brad.


-Brad :

I probably wouldnt feel so strongly Brad... If i hadnt seen the hype and the fight live. I watched the entire build up to the event and was at the newstand regularly inhaling every scintilla of minutae i could find on the subject. Leonard knew who Duran was and how good he he was as a fighter... they had met several times at pressers and promotional events and saw each other at ringside..... Size didnt faze either boxer but Duran was pushing all the right buttons. Duran got Leonard into fight a street fight but that wasnt how Dundee advised him to fight Duran. I guess were are agreeing on the same thing just expressing it different ways. Thanks for your input and keep it coming Brad.
I remember the build up myself. it was incredible. The week of the fight Duran was on the cover of Sports Illustrated "No Way Sugar Ray." Leonard was on the cover of Newsweek. Both were on the cover of Inside Sports. Richard Pryor who nearly died a few weeks earlier from an accident while freebasing had a closed circuit broadcast in his hospital room thanks to Marlon Brando. Pryor had burns over 60% of his body but he had to see the fight. Norman Mailer, Budd Schulberg and many other top writers were in Montreal's bars the days before the fight debating how it would turn out. I still have the New York Post from the day after the fight and here are a few details from it: "19,000 people showed up at Madison Square Garden for the closed circuit viewing. 25,000 at Shea including 4,000 gatecrashers. Monticello Raceway set an all-time attendance record as an estimated 17,495 backed up traffic for three miles along Route 17 for a chance to watch the fight. A full house of 1765 paid $100 each to dine on a salad of artichokes and mushrooms al grecque at a screening at the Waldorf-Astoria. Many wearing black ties and gowns. More than 30,000 tickets were sold at Aqueduct. Every closed circuit venue was sold out in the city." It was like that in my hometown Detroit also. Closed Circuit tickets were $20 and the night of the fight if you didn't have one you had to wait over month to see it. ABC showed the delay telecast in late July.


-michaelabii :

Great comments all around. Shows the wealth of boxing knowledge in this forum is unrivaled ! I thought this might be an interesting footnote/question for you guys. Whats the most memorable super fight of your time/era to date ?? Meanwhile, I am extremely underwhelmed by the prefight publicity for May/Pac. The fights 3 weeks away and you hear nothing from the fighters ?? Jeez ! The whole thing about super-fights is the prefight build up. Thats the juice :). I will say that there was hardly any time to build in publicity time due to the extremely long negotiations and this might be the trade off. The fighters barely had 7 weeks of real training time and the publicity for this one would have needed at least 3 months. The assumption is the fight sells itself. Back to superfights: I was 12 or 13 in September 1981 and boxing amateurs at the all stars boxing gym in North London UK. Leonard/Hearns I was a beast of a fight. Everyone in the gym had their opinion. Ray Leonard was always my favorite especially after watching him annihilate Dave Boy Green ( a local favorite at the time). By the way I thought that was Ray Leonard's best performance as a fighter - some may contend this but do go back and watch the final sequence of punches. Pure brilliance - much like Cassius Clays fight ending sequence of punches against the "big cat" Cleveland Williams while moving backwards ! Both fighters were in thier physical primes and Hearns had looked awesome stopping Pipino Cuevas. Leonard appeared to struggle against Ayub Kalule, a strong rugged Ugandan light middleweight titleholder. But Leonard was moving up in weight and I personally thought he looked a bit small for that fight. He did stop kalule though but took some shots. This was a fighters fight - however most of the fighters I knew were rooting for Hearns as most still thought Leonard was a Howard Cosell media creation. The fight itself was a contrast of styles and was captivating right until the end. I though the key was Leonard's will and toughness and his body punching. Dundee himself at the time said Leonard was an incredible body puncher and when you watch him punching to Hearns body in that fight you'd think he was aiming to break the hit man in half ! So for me its unquestionably Leonard/Hearns I.


-Froggy :

I remember the build up myself. it was incredible. The week of the fight Duran was on the cover of Sports Illustrated "No Way Sugar Ray." Leonard was on the cover of Newsweek. Both were on the cover of Inside Sports. Richard Pryor who nearly died a few weeks earlier from an accident while freebasing had a closed circuit broadcast in his hospital room thanks to Marlon Brando. Pryor had burns over 60% of his body but he had to see the fight. Norman Mailer, Budd Schulberg and many other top writers were in Montreal's bars the days before the fight debating how it would turn out. I still have the New York Post from the day after the fight and here are a few details from it: "19,000 people showed up at Madison Square Garden for the closed circuit viewing. 25,000 at Shea including 4,000 gatecrashers. Monticello Raceway set an all-time attendance record as an estimated 17,495 backed up traffic for three miles along Route 17 for a chance to watch the fight. A full house of 1765 paid $100 each to dine on a salad of artichokes and mushrooms al grecque at a screening at the Waldorf-Astoria. Many wearing black ties and gowns. More than 30,000 tickets were sold at Aqueduct. Every closed circuit venue was sold out in the city." It was like that in my hometown Detroit also. Closed Circuit tickets were $20 and the night of the fight if you didn't have one you had to wait over month to see it. ABC showed the delay telecast in late July.
A friend of mine went to Montreal to watch the fight live and in person, he had too much to drink and slept through the whole thing, what a fight to miss !


-Radam G :

In so many minds, Lil Floyd's washed-up arse has not lost a beat. So many of his fateful are going to be weeping like willow trees when he is beat. For them, it is going to be a sad night. They won't be able to accept that Money May lost the fight. Those fateful of Lil Floyd who will be in Sin City, bring plenty of tissues to dry your tears and to blow your noses. Hehehe!


-brownsugar :

Michaelabii, Brad, I had no idea you guys were even alive during that era... Richard pryor watching the fight while recovering from 3rd degree burns is a priceless slice of history...as far as Leonards best....Had to be Hearns... Me and my buds bet on Hearns and lost a glorious sum of money. The action was slow at times but suspenseful as you could hear the gears of war grinding away in their heads as it appeared that a wounded Hearns would pull away except Leonard was baiting the trap. Most drama in a superfight ever...( hate to be so brief but lunchtime is so short here)


-Brad :

Michaelabii, Brad, I had no idea you guys were even alive during that era... Richard pryor watching the fight while recovering from 3rd degree burns is a priceless slice of history...as far as Leonards best....Had to be Hearns... Me and my buds bet on Hearns and lost a glorious sum of money. The action was slow at times but suspenseful as you could hear the gears of war grinding away in their heads as it appeared that a wounded Hearns would pull away except Leonard was baiting the trap. Most drama in a superfight ever...( hate to be so brief but lunchtime is so short here)
Well you have to give Hearns & Leonard a bit of a break for the action slowing at times. I recall them saying fight night was an incredibly hot night, even by Vegas standards. 90 some odds degrees I think George Kimball wrote,and that was the air temp outside the ring that night, not under the ring lights. Being from the Detroit area me and my buds were all convinced Hearns would get him. We were saying many of the things you hear about Floyd today: he's ducking Tommy, he doesn't want the fight, etc....first sign we were wrong came early that night. I'll never forget how relaxed and confident Leonard looked before the fight. Strutting around the ring. Animated, loose. Looking like he knows something we didn't. Contrast that to Montreal where he had a hard time even meeting Duran's eyes. In Montreal Sugar Ray looked like a man heading to face a firing squad. The September 1981 Leonard looked like a man that feared no one. Great times. Enjoyed reliving them with you guys.


-deepwater2 :

The good old days! Does anyone know when they will release the closed circuit options for this fight? I hear it will only be at MGM properties in Vegas. It is nice to watch a fight from the comfort of your home wearing your sweats but this fight is an event. This is a fight to put on your best and go out and watch it on closed circuit. It will be a shame if they don't open some famous venues across the country for this one. I know I will be in Vegas wearing my tux no matter where I wind up that night.


-Radam G :

The good old days! Does anyone know when they will release the closed circuit options for this fight? I hear it will only be at MGM properties in Vegas. It is nice to watch a fight from the comfort of your home wearing your sweats but this fight is an event. This is a fight to put on your best and go out and watch it on closed circuit. It will be a shame if they don't open some famous venues across the country for this one. I know I will be in Vegas wearing my tux no matter where I wind up that night.
As I said on another Thread, don't worry, there will be geeky-with-it pirates to fix you up for a Jackson... Also for the purchase of one of their iTablets -- 7" to a 10"; you can holla at da haps that way from anywhere in Sin City. Those iTablets will cost from $25 to $50. And hotspots for internet is MASS all over Sin City. Nobody there has to miss the electronic telecast of this Da Manny-Manny May Scrap. You won't have to worry about the cops or a vice squard coming up and gettin you grill and throwing you in the slammer. Everything be legal eagle. And lawyers will be in the umpteen to remind oppressors and idiot about free enterprise zones of the USA. More than sexual whoring is legal in Nevada. Electronic business whoring is too. Holla!


-michaelabii :

@Brad - I guess my memories telegraph my age:). Hearns looked really wound up and tight while Leonard was loose and relaxed. For a guy that lean Hearns wingspan was awesome. He had a freakish build at 6'2 with stilt like legs, rock hard torso. We heard he was knocking out light heavy weights in sparring with that right hand. Hearns eventually developed an equally powerful left hook and probably had the most authoritative jab at the time. I remember an interview with former pro fighter Michael Olajide who said Hearns had a menacing aura once he stepped in the ring. You felt his presence - an attribute shared by Duran and Hagler. Hearns abandoned the "hitman" tag after that fight because it was thought it reflected poorly on high crime rates in Detroit at the time. The fight was slow at times but the suspense was unequalled because of the skill on display. Floyds defense trumps Leonards but Leonard was always a more offensive fighter and threw combinations with mean intentions especially early in his career. Many fighters including Larry Holmes had picked Hearns to win. My runner up super fight of all time is Hagler/ Hearns. More on that to follow.


-Radam G :

@Brad - I guess my memories telegraph my age:). Hearns looked really wound up and tight while Leonard was loose and relaxed. For a guy that lean Hearns wingspan was awesome. He had a freakish build at 6'2 with stilt like legs, rock hard torso. We heard he was knocking out light heavy weights in sparring with that right hand. Hearns eventually developed an equally powerful left hook and probably had the most authoritative jab at the time. I remember an interview with former pro fighter Michael Olajide who said Hearns had a menacing aura once he stepped in the ring. You felt his presence - an attribute shared by Duran and Hagler. Hearns abandoned the "hitman" tag after that fight because it was thought it reflected poorly on high crime rates in Detroit at the time. The fight was slow at times but the suspense was unequalled because of the skill on display. Floyds defense trumps Leonards but Leonard was always a more offensive fighter and threw combinations with mean intentions especially early in his career. Many fighters including Larry Holmes had picked Hearns to win. My runner up super fight of all time is Hagler/ Hearns. More on that to follow.
I was a toddler at that time. But I have a huge memory. Maybe with the help of films and videos. Tommy Hearns was knocking out light welterweights to heavyweights. Some of these heavies have died in the after years of those days. And I refuse to reveal pledges to them while they were among the living. So I cannot name them. Certain things that happened in sparring stays in the gym, unless that person give you the approval to holla. Holla!