Andre Berto KOs Josesito “Riverside Rocky” Lopez; Chris Arreola Wins

Andre-Berto-KOs-Josesito-Lopez

Ontario, CALIF.—It was a homecoming for two Riverside fighters but only one emerged with a victory on Friday.

Andre Berto (30-3, 23 Kos) spoiled Josesito Lopez’s (33-7, 19 Kos) party with a single punch knockout to remain a viable welterweight contender. But Chris Arreola had better luck in winning a rough one against Curtis Harper at the Citizens Business Bank Arena before more than 5,700 fans.

Lopez opened up with a body attack in the first round as Berto seemed content with defense. Lopez’s long arms could be a factor but he attacked the body early on.

Berto opened up with jabs and one-twos in the second. Lopez countered with a few uppercuts and more body shots in a close second round.

In a round that saw little action Berto connected with a solid right hand and Lopez ended the round with a right-left-right combination in round three.

The fourth round saw Berto opting to hold and wrestle. But Lopez is strong despite his thin frame and was able to land blows while Berto held on. Berto connected with a pretty right uppercut that caused Lopez to invite Berto in for more.

A three punch combination by Berto in the opening seconds of round six hurt Lopez whose hands went down as he kept upright. Another right connected solidly and down went Lopez hard. He got up and was hit with a right to the jaw and down he went. Referee Raul Caiz Jr. stopped the fight without a count at 1:03 of the round.

“It was a flash knockdown,” said Lopez. “I wasn’t buzzed. I wasn’t hurt.”

It was a good win for Berto who was behind on two score cards but rallied and caught Lopez with a good shot.

“I just stayed calm,” said Berto. “He’s the kind of guy who’s always coming at you.”

Chris-The-Nightmare-Arreola

Nightmare

Hometown heavyweight contender Chris “The Nightmare” Arreola returned in a fight against Curtis Harper that did not look competitive on paper when it was announced. But after an early knockdown of Harper, things got tough.

Arreola floored Harper early with a right and left hook in the first round. It didn’t look good for Florida’s Harper who held on desperately trying not to go down. A few times in the first round the referee could have ruled a knockdown when the ropes were the only thing holding him up. But he survived.

Harper showed resiliency and was able to exchange some serious blows with Arreola, who seemed to have problems with his right hand from the second round on. The Riverside heavyweight kept shaking his arm and did not use it much in the third and fourth rounds.

Finally, after Harper had some good connections especially in the third and fourth rounds, Arreola stormed back with right leads that seemed to catch the Florida heavyweight by surprise. Arreola used a barrage of punches at the end of the sixth round to turn things around for good.

Arreola hurt Harper with a left hook but the heavyweight hung on in the seventh round. The Riverside heavyweight could not land that finishing blow and Harper survived until the eighth and final round.

All three judges scored it for Arreola 76-75, 78-73, 77-74.

“I wasn’t throwing enough punches,” said Arreola. “I caught him with a lot of good shots.”

Harper said he waited too long to kick into gear.

“I came in sluggish. I got to get better from the start,” said Harper. “He’s a good strong kid.”

Shawn-Porter

Porter wins

Former welterweight champion Shawn Porter (25-1-1, 16 Kos) had no idea what to expect against last-minute replacement Erick Bone (16-2, 8 Kos) of Ecuador. But as soon as the initial bell rang it was bombs away for both fighters. Neither was looking to out-box the other, it was knockout or nothing. Bone had the earlier connections but Porter caught the Ecuadorian with a left hook to the body to send him to the floor on both knees. Bone tried to keep Porter off him but was caught with a one-two combination and down he went for good.

Prelims

Heavyweight prospect Gerald “El Gallo Negro” Washington (16-0, 11 Kos) scored two knockdowns against veteran Jason Gavern in a boring eight round bout. Washington nearly stopped Gavern in the opening stanza but kept smothering his own punches and allowed the cagey veteran to hold on throughout the fight. The judges scored it 79-70 twice and 78-71 for Washington. 

Hanzel Martinez (21-2, 17 Kos) defeated fellow Mexican veteran German Meraz (48-34-1, 26 Kos) to an unpopular unanimous decision after eight rounds of a bantamweight clash. Meraz has more than 80 pro fights in only 10 years. That’s an accomplishment.

Oscar Molina (11-0, 9 Kos) slipped into high gear in the third round and stopped Jose Leal (9-7-1) with a body shot at 2:15 of round four of their junior middleweight bout.

Lanell Bellows (11-1-1, 7 Kos) dominated Mexico’s Juan Rojas (7-10-1) but couldn’t stop the tall super middleweight. After six rounds Bellows won by unanimous decision 60-53 on all three cards.

Tugs Nyambayan (1-0) knocked out Gabriel Braxton (2-9) to win his pro debut by knockout at 2:10 of the first round in a bantamweight bout.

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COMMENTS

-Radam G :

WOW! Andre "The Beast" Berto looked pretty sharp and lethal. "The "Whisperer" has done a great job. And thanks to heaven that The Beast has halted that bootlegged shoulder-rolling nonsense. Holla!


-the Roast :

The Arreola fight was an unexpected war. I don't know if Chris took that guy lightly or what but after he got out of the first round it was a war. Good chin showed by Arreola but you have to figure if he gets hit with shots like that from a top fighter he is getting knocked out. If I was working for Wilder I would give Chris a title fight ASAP. He is a name fighter and he is right there to be hit. Not impressed by Porter or Berto in those fights. I did like the Ref cam angle. They should have used it more. Surprising that no one thought to do that before.


-The Commish :

Interesting card...fun opening in boxing's TV resurgence. What is up with Arreola? He looks like he hit the refrigerator more than he hit the heavy bag. He ate tons of punches (he ate tons of just about everything else leading up to the fight!!!!). While his weight was announced at 262 pounds, that's what "The Nipple" weighed at the weigh-in the day before. By fight time he was 272. Within a week, he'll be close to 300 pounds. The ghost of James "Broadaxe" Broad is smiling at Arreola, proud of seeing a talented heavyweight eat his way right out of the title picture. Deontay Wilder? I hear what you're saying about the Bronze Bomber giving Arreola a shot, but it's scary to think how bad Arreola would get his out of shape body pounded in a fight like that. It's time Arreola took a long look at where he's going in the sport. Judging by his appearance the other night, his mind is more on the buffet line than on his next sparring session. I'm glad he wasn't on the recent cruise I was just on. There would have been no food left for any of us! -Randy G.


-brownsugar :

I enjoyed the card...hard fought all the way. Especially Berto vs Lopez. Although the announcers were totally clueless in that fight... Still very much stuck on Berto vs Geurerro.


-brownsugar :

I enjoyed the card...hard fought all the way. Especially Berto vs Lopez. Although the announcers were totally clueless in that fight... Still very much stuck on Berto vs Geurerro.


-stormcentre :

Disappointingly the commentators, including the usually good Dave Bontempo failed to read the "play/fight" (with the Berto V Lopez) and with that gaping oversight misinterpreted what Berto was doing; as he deliberately let Lopez blow his own fuse for the first half of the fight. The oversight (even without the desperate comments/attempts to appear experienced in spotting fighting patterns, via the assumed similarities between Guerrero's moves on Berto, and Lopez on the night; but only whilst the commentary though Berto was getting dominated in ways he hadn't considered and/or planned for) made the commentary sound "B" class and, to some extent, look stupid. Particularly when Berto finally unhinged Lopez and made him pay for; bad habits, sloppy work, predictable fatigue, and overconfidence - all of which the commentary missed as they sung its author's praises. In my opinion Berto's fight approach with Lopez was a smart tactic. He was desperate, determined, and dangerous in those early rounds; even though it was also clear that he was not, relaxed, loose, punching without nerves, capable of holding it all together for 12, and the technical equivalent of Andre. All of which should have, also, served as clues to an experienced commentary team. I do (sincerely) feel sorry for Lopez though, as the kid - like so many fighters these days - has been moved along way too quickly. Still, despite how much I wish you could (just like Lopez' hand placement after punching) it doesn't seem that anyone can stop that practice. Now the guy probably has too many stoppages embedded in his psychology to make it to the upper echelons of this terribly difficult and tough game.


-stormcentre :

Disappointingly the commentators, including the usually good Dave Bontempo, failed to read the "play/fight" (with the Berto V Lopez) and with that gaping oversight they collectively misinterpreted what Berto was really doing; as he deliberately let Lopez blow his own fuse for the first half of the fight. Even without the desperate commentary and/or attempts to appear experienced in the game and spotting fighting patterns - via the assumed/claimed similarities between what Lopez was said to be doing to Berto {on the night in question} with Guerrero's previous moves on Berto when they actually fought - which itself represented a commentary-theory that all but flew out the commentary window in round 6, despite prior to that point the commentary themselves openly holding firm to the misguided belief that Berto was getting dominated in ways he hadn't considered and/or planned for; the oversight made the commentary (and therefore the PBC production) not only sound "B" class and inexperienced with strategic boxing - but to some extent also look stupid. Particularly when Berto finally unhinged Lopez and made him pay for; bad habits, sloppy work, predictable fatigue, and overconfidence. All of which the commentary sadly missed as they sung its author's praises. In my opinion Berto's fight approach with Lopez was a very smart tactic. Lopez was clearly desperate, determined, and dangerous in those early rounds; even though it was also clear that he was not, relaxed, loose, punching without nervous tension, capable of holding it all together for 12, and also the technical equivalent of Andre Berto. All of which - these indicators - should have, also, served as clues to an experienced commentary team. Sure Berto has some balance, timing and accuracy issues, that occasionally manifest themselves as misguided right hand missiles; that featured in the fight in question. But, the thing with Berto is that he has most of the fundamentals down pat and seems to be able to work quite nicely within the framework of his technical skills and inherent limitations. Moving on; I do (sincerely) feel sorry for Lopez though. As the kid - like so many fighters these days - has been moved along way too quickly. Still, despite how much I wish you could do something about that (just like Lopez' hand placement after punching) it doesn't seem that anyone can stop that practice. Now, as a result, the guy probably has too many stoppages embedded deep within his psychology to make it to the upper echelons of this terribly difficult and tough game.


-brownsugar :

Disappointingly the commentators, including the usually good Dave Bontempo, failed to read the "play/fight" (with the Berto V Lopez) and with that gaping oversight they collectively misinterpreted what Berto was really doing; as he deliberately let Lopez blow his own fuse for the first half of the fight. Even without the desperate commentary and/or attempts to appear experienced in the game and spotting fighting patterns - via the assumed/claimed similarities between what Lopez was said to be doing to Berto {on the night in question} with Guerrero's previous moves on Berto when they actually fought - which itself represented a commentary-theory that all but flew out the commentary window in round 6, despite prior to that point the commentary themselves openly holding firm to the misguided belief that Berto was getting dominated in ways he hadn't considered and/or planned for; the oversight made the commentary (and therefore the PBC production) not only sound "B" class and inexperienced with strategic boxing - but to some extent also look stupid. Particularly when Berto finally unhinged Lopez and made him pay for; bad habits, sloppy work, predictable fatigue, and overconfidence. All of which the commentary sadly missed as they sung its author's praises. In my opinion Berto's fight approach with Lopez was a very smart tactic. Lopez was clearly desperate, determined, and dangerous in those early rounds; even though it was also clear that he was not, relaxed, loose, punching without nervous tension, capable of holding it all together for 12, and also the technical equivalent of Andre Berto. All of which - these indicators - should have, also, served as clues to an experienced commentary team. Sure Berto has some balance, timing and accuracy issues, that occasionally manifest themselves as misguided right hand missiles; that featured in the fight in question. But, the thing with Berto is that he has most of the fundamentals down pat and seems to be able to work quite nicely within the framework of his technical skills and inherent limitations. Moving on; I do (sincerely) feel sorry for Lopez though. As the kid - like so many fighters these days - has been moved along way too quickly. Still, despite how much I wish you could do something about that (just like Lopez' hand placement after punching) it doesn't seem that anyone can stop that practice. Now, as a result, the guy probably has too many stoppages embedded deep within his psychology to make it to the upper echelons of this terribly difficult and tough game.
You nailed it sir.... Blind as bats.


-stormcentre :


It's time Arreola took a long look at where he's going in the sport. -Randy G.
Absolutely.


-stormcentre :

You nailed it sir.... Blind as bats.
Ta. Yes, it was a tad embarrassing for them in my opinion. They embarrassingly hung their hat and coat on an obviously misguided theory, and then had to - again embarrassingly - abandon that at the 11th hour. The black ropes are a good idea as they don't contrast with the fighters and action.