Golovkin: From Man to Beast, to Monster

gennady-golovkin

OVER / UNDER : 6.5 ROUNDS – There’s no doubt that as of February 2015, Gennady Golovkin is one of the most formidable boxers in the game.

Whether or not he is truly more than an exceptional talent, let alone an all time great, remains unproven.

32-year old Golovkin is still at least a couple steps away from the very top of the game, but from the looks of things it may not be too much longer before he gets there. Time and a strong international reputation are on his side.

Golovkin attempts to add further accolades to his resume, facing Martin Murray in Monte Carlo today.

Golovkin is indeed a star, at the threshold of PPV headlining with potential for fame beyond boxing like Floyd Mayweather, Jr or Manny Pacquiao have achieved. Golovkin has done a good job establishing his brand in a relatively short period of US market exposure time.

Still, whatever transpires within the strands this weekend in Monaco won’t change Golovkin’s overall slugging status, unless Murray makes a dramatic stand and exposes some flaws.

A quick splattering may add to Golovkin’s HBO highlight reel, but it really won’t improve his status in boxing’s hierarchy. He needs to beat a proven champion, if that man is undefeated so much the better.

As of today, the 31-0 (28) Golovkin is a beast. He’s not yet a full-tilt monster, though the designation has already been applied throughout major media.

Monsters destroy undefeated fighters, as in the case of Mike Tyson versus Michael Spinks.

Tyson was a monster. Marvin Hagler and Thomas Hearns were monsters, as was Michael Carbajal at times. Golovkin does not currently have that vibe, and that has nothing to do with his calm, cheerful countenance.

Whether Golovkin completes the progression will, of course, depend on the men across the ring come fight nights. Golovkin has only been in with one undefeated fighter, scoring a 2nd round KO over Mikail Makarov, then 10-0, in November of 2009.

I watched Golovkin box twice in Dusseldorf during the German phase of his development. The first time was in January ’09, an immediate blow out of Javier Alberto Mamani on Ina Menzer’s undercard. Mamani was 35-7-1, with solid experience against decent opposition, so it was a good win for Golovkin, who was 15-0 with 12 stoppages then.

The second time was when he blasted out Laujan Simon in the initial defense of the vacant WBA belt earned against Kassim Ouma, in what may have been the last time Golovkin was tested. The 1st round flattening of Simon was impressive, but youthful Golovkin still didn’t look like a monster.

I remain unconvinced Golovkin could beat a prime John Mugabi (3 round fight either way) or make the step up past Iran Barkley or Mike McCallum (there will be blood). We won’t think about Ray Leonard, Hearns or Hagler yet.

I do, however, assume Golovkin would knock out Roberto Duran something like Hearns did, without the face-first fall. Like it or not, that’s the only call I can make after watching Duran lose all eight times I saw him fight.

We’ll never know how Golovkin would stack up against glorious monsters from the past but there are plenty of potential, present day foes regarding current credibility.

With catch weights becoming more of a trend, the most likely foes to present problems for Golovkin are probably fellows from a higher weight class than 160 pounds.

It doesn’t make much sense for Golovkin to stay at middleweight much beyond his stated preference for a Miguel Cotto fight. That’s a blockbuster natural pairing for Barclays, though quite likely a fight most venues would gladly pursue. It’s also a very winnable unification fight for Golovkin, as is Andy Lee, who will be in Monaco and could be next in line.

The super –middleweight to light heavyweight ranks hold other great match-ups, Las Vegas worthy pay-per-view attractions.

Carl Froch seeks a big Vegas finale. Golovkin has never appeared in boxing’s greatest locale. It would be a huge event for wagering, with rowdy fans from around LA and the UK known for well-worn pilgrimages. A betting favorite could depend on the contract weight. The winner gains serious, top pound for pound consideration.

Or, what a comeback fight Golovkin could be for Andre Ward. It’s another situation like a Froch fight presents, but probably much less likely to occur any time soon.

A mix of “Cinnamon” Alvarez and “GGG” gunpowder could be the most explosive fight of 2016. Both guys seem sincere about wanting to face the best, and there would likely be enough cash to fuel fruitful negotiations. A natural Southern California or Texas stadium fight.

Golovkin was previously based in Stuttgart but it would be treading water for him to return to Germany for conceivable cakewalks against Felix Sturm or Arthur Abraham, unless the Kazakhstan conker misses European cuisine or blazing along the autobahn. Juergen Braehmer’s WBA light heavyweight title is an interesting stay busy option, but very unlikely.

Can you imagine Golovkin – Pacquiao in Macao at 154?

Golovkin – Mayweather in Dubai at 152?

Are Marco Huck and Manuel Charr somewhere in Moscow racing to get down to 165 while Shannon Briggs plans to crash la boxe with bellowing offers to fight in his straightjacket?

Sooner or later, some top dog will either perceive an exploitable flaw, get a payday-offer substantial enough to alleviate the risk, have a cruiserweight’s size advantage or just man up for the hell of it.

Until then, it will be more of the same for Golovkin, brave but outgunned underdogs like Murray, faced with accurate, double-digit odds against them. Most will be chasing a payday more than chasing a dream. Better odds on the payday.

At this point in his career, Golovkin’s biggest challenge is likely to remain that of finding an appropriate opponent to fully validate his championship stature.

Staying great, while awaiting the chance to prove said greatness, is sometimes more challenging than the achievement itself.

For now, Gennady Golovkin is merely human. Probably, before their fight is halfway finished, he’ll look like a monster to Martin Murray.

This evening in the lavish, bayside casinos of Monte Carlo, you can bet that the house money is probably pretty safe.

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COMMENTS

-The Commish :

Mayweather will NEVER face GGG. Not for $200 million. But then, Bob Arum doesn't have GGG, so maybe Mayweather WILL actually think about it after beating Manny Pacquiao. -Randy G.


-brownsugar :

Mayweather shouldn't even consider Golovkin any more than Marvin Hagler should have been expected to fight at light heavy or supper middle. Or any more than Pac should be expected fight him. He's got enough unfinished business in his own division. In addition to one worthy challenge at 168 should Golovkin choose to accept the assignment. After Golovkin has removed the last brave contender (Murray) from further contention we should see him against the cream of the crop... If there is such a commodity in the rest of the middleweight division. The fun is just beginning for Triple G.


-Froggy :

eather will NEVER face GGG. Not for $200 million. But then, Bob Arum doesn't have GGG, so maybe Mayweather WILL actually think about it after beating Manny Pacquiao. -Randy G.
That sounds like Floyd will be so surprised if he beats Manny that his confidence will go thru the roof, and then proceed to make a huge mistake ! I don't think anyone has to worry about that scenario happening !


-Froggy :

I just watched the fightand in a previous most I said Murray had everything to go the distance except a punch ! That's the way I seen it tonight ! In another earlier post I gave my opinion he, Golovkin would lose to most great middleweights ! How does anyone think he would do against a former middleweight named John Mugabi, the one who fought Hagler ! The Beast vs the Monster, what do you think ? My money would say Mugabi would become a champ !


-ericfarrell85 :

I'm not ready to say Mugabi, great as he was on that night, would become the champ. Golovkin appears to have a true A-tier chin. Until I see him take a shot that demonstrably takes something out of him, I cannot say that his approach is too reckless. Murray only landed 28% of his shots, which is surprising considering what we have just seen. It seems the holes in Golovkin's defense is exacerbated on television and a product of his relentless pursuit more so than a blatant deficiency in his abilities. Murray is tougher than I previously thought and has turned me into a fan. This was no cake-walk.


-Froggy :

I'm not ready to say Mugabi, great as he was on that night, would become the champ. Golovkin appears to have a true A-tier chin. Until I see him take a shot that demonstrably takes something out of him, I cannot say that his approach is too reckless. Murray only landed 28% of his shots, which is surprising considering what we have just seen. It seems the holes in Golovkin's defense is exacerbated on television and a product of his relentless pursuit more so than a blatant deficiency in his abilities. Murray is tougher than I previously thought and has turned me into a fan. This was no cake-walk.
I agree Golovkin has a great chin, he doesn't try to protect it most of the time ! But he has never fought anyone who could hit anyway near as hard as Mugabi and Mugabi had a far better chin than Murray, no disrespect to Murray ! My money says Mugabi would beat Golovkin easy !


-DaveB :

GGG is really good. Good match making too. Bigger fighters need to stop calling out smaller guys. If GGG can call out Mayweather (who in turn will fight smaller guys in a heartbeat) then GGG should call out Ward. Wards should call out Kovalev and Kovalev can call out heavyweights. Then they can see how it feels to be the smaller guy and be at a disadvantage. But that will not happen. I am getting tired of these no drama fights. GGG fights guys that are limited or with no punching power. Cotto is the only guy that it is fair to call out because he put himself in the position of being the lineal champ. The other guys need to stop. Smaller can call out bigger not the other way around. However big guys are not obligated to accept.


-ericfarrell85 :

I agree Golovkin has a great chin, he doesn't try to protect it most of the time ! But he has never fought anyone who could hit anyway near as hard as Mugabi and Mugabi had a far better chin than Murray, no disrespect to Murray ! My money says Mugabi would beat Golovkin easy !
I'm with you in saying Mugabi was truly a terror. If I remember right, Hagler was taking more punishment in that fight than GGG has in his last three collectively. Suffice to say Mugabi would give anyone fits, particularly the one that tried to decapitate Hagler.


-ericfarrell85 :

GGG is really good. Good match making too. Bigger fighters need to stop calling out smaller guys. If GGG can call out Mayweather (who in turn will fight smaller guys in a heartbeat) then GGG should call out Ward. Wards should call out Kovalev and Kovalev can call out heavyweights. Then they can see how it feels to be the smaller guy and be at a disadvantage. But that will not happen. I am getting tired of these no drama fights. GGG fights guys that are limited or with no punching power. Cotto is the only guy that it is fair to call out because he put himself in the position of being the lineal champ. The other guys need to stop. Smaller can call out bigger not the other way around. However big guys are not obligated to accept.
Just curious Dave, you didn't enjoy this fight? Maybe not the last word in drama, but a very entertaining fight, where both guys really showed something I thought.


-Froggy :

I'm with you in saying Mugabi was truly a terror. If I remember right, Hagler was taking more punishment in that fight than GGG has in his last three collectively. Suffice to say Mugabi would give anyone fits, particularly the one that tried to decapitate Hagler.
Right on the money,that had to be Mugabi's best fight and one of Haglers very best fights !


-DaveB :

Just curious Dave, you didn't enjoy this fight? Maybe not the last word in drama, but a very entertaining fight, where both guys really showed something I thought. GGG always brings his best. I can't fault him. I do like him as a fighter and as a man. I like the fact that he is an active champion. Murray, as Roy Jones said, is a man that he wouldn't be ashamed to have in his stable. The problem I have is that all of GGG's fights are predictable. They are all one sided (I know people are going to say GGG has a lot to do with that). The guys that fight him are guys with guts (and no I wouldn't want to fight them). They are the type of guys you would want on your side if you were going to war and I have nothing but respect for them. I respect fighters in general because they have to face down their fears and perform in spite of them, especially when they know they have little hope of winning and most likely are going to get knocked out. So my knock is that it isn't a question of if, but when and what round GGG wins. I do like that he brings everything and does what he is supposed to do but it is always to just another hopeless victim.


-ericfarrell85 :

Just curious Dave, you didn't enjoy this fight? Maybe not the last word in drama, but a very entertaining fight, where both guys really showed something I thought. GGG always brings his best. I can't fault him. I do like him as a fighter and as a man. I like the fact that he is an active champion. Murray, as Roy Jones said, is a man that he wouldn't be ashamed to have in his stable. The problem I have is that all of GGG's fights are predictable. They are all one sided (I know people are going to say GGG has a lot to do with that). The guys that fight him are guys with guts (and no I wouldn't want to fight them). They are the type of guys you would want on your side if you were going to war and I have nothing but respect for them. I respect fighters in general because they have to face down their fears and perform in spite of them, especially when they know they have little hope of winning and most likely are going to get knocked out. So my knock is that it isn't a question of if, but when and what round GGG wins. I do like that he brings everything and does what he is supposed to do but it is always to just another hopeless victim.
Fair enough, but factoring in that the man has to eat and therefore has to fight, who would you pair GGG with of the viable candidates out there? When I say viable I am referring to fighters that would sign the paperwork. When you consider that Chavez Jr., Cotto, Alvarez would all conscientiously sit this one out, Murray is a consolation prize I would, on most days, gladly take. After all, he never was called a hopeless victim before. I guess I would rather see the man fight with each passing season and risk the inevitability of the outcome, than have him sit on the sidelines waiting for the more hopeful contender to grow a pair...


-Domenic :

Props to Murray for a game and gritty performance. GGG is the pinnacle of the sport right now, P4P #1.


-stormcentre :

Floyd would seriously embarrass 3G in a sparring session.. But a fight??? Once the power started to flood in . . things may change. Golovkin did well, got a little ragged and defensively liable here/there - but by and large - along with yet another stoppage - he also revealed a lot about what kind of fighter will give him issues. Championship form, Froch, Kessler, Ward and maybe even Dirrell would trouble him. Harry Greb would go through him like a dose of salts mixed down with laxatives; but that's another era. Still, take nothing from him. The Kazak powerhouse gave Murray - a very tough and well match-practiced customer - a smack-down that let's you know why some of those cats Murray previously fought, and others in Super/middleweight are not mentioning Gennady Golovkin's name at the dinner table. I mean look at the contrast between how Strum handled Murray to 3G. Shout out to Murray - hang in there and keep chugging along. Perhaps, shoot for some of the other middleweight cats out there, and don't be ashamed of it. After all, there's a reason they're quiet about 3G when it comes time to call out the next opponents. Finally, I may do an assessment on Murray's effectiveness off/on the ropes against 3G - just to be a *anker and also to give my British man Skibbz (who initially forecasted Murray's hardcore determination correctly) a call out. Here's a tribute to Murray and Africa, where Murray prepared for this "show". Zimbabwe baby . . . . .
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4oOvv_pMVM


-DaveB :

Fair enough, but factoring in that the man has to eat and therefore has to fight, who would you pair GGG with of the viable candidates out there? When I say viable I am referring to fighters that would sign the paperwork. When you consider that Chavez Jr., Cotto, Alvarez would all conscientiously sit this one out, Murray is a consolation prize I would, on most days, gladly take. After all, he never was called a hopeless victim before. I guess I would rather see the man fight with each passing season and risk the inevitability of the outcome, than have him sit on the sidelines waiting for the more hopeful contender to grow a pair... Agreed, he does have to make money. I do like the fact that he is an active champion. But I believe that there is no intrigue to his recent fights as far as the outcome. It is just a matter of how and when. They are showcase fights, imo. In the Sweet Science poll how many picked Golovkin and how many picked Murray? It was some where along the lines of 85% picked GGG. That is a hopeless victim. I realize GGG is that good. I respect him and the way he carries himself. He should stay busy and if this is all he can get then these are the people he has to fight but I would like to see him fight Andy Lee or David Lemiux. I wouldn't expect either of those guys to win either but at least they have some pop. I could be a whole other story if he challenges at 168. There is no need for him to if he doesn't want to but he said he would be willing to do it, save Andre Ward.


-The Commish :

Every fighter knows his limits. He/she knows there are fighter's out there who would beat them, not matter what the circumstances. All willmtalkma good game, but run and hide when the person's name is brought up who can beat them or even leave them in a demolished heap. You can't tell me Adonis Stevenson, who shows a burning desire to fight just about anyone, showed that same burning desire to face Sergei Kovalev. When he heard the footsteps of Kovalev approaching, Stevenson bailed on HBO and jumped ship to the protective covering of Al Haymon. For him, it was a great move. More title defenses, more money, no Kovalev. By the time he does face Kovalev, at least Stevenson will be a wealthy man. Backmin the early-mid 1980's, I used to watch film in Jim Jacob's office with his young heavyweight prospect, Mike Tyson. Although Tyson had not yet thrown a punch as a professional, he was insistent on watching every heavyweight champion, then told me how he'd beat them. Young Tyson told me he thinks often of being in the ring against JackmJohnson, Rocky Marciano. Joe Louis, Muhammad Ali and every other heavyweight champ. There was only one he was afraid of, even though the match would never take place. That man was Sonny Liston. "There's nothing I can do to ever beat Liston," Tyson used to literally cry to me. "Nothing!" The point is, every fighter knows his limits. Floyd Mayweather doesn't need a GGG for any reason. Why should he take it? In that same breath, GGG doesn't need to face Andre Ward, Carl Froch, James DeGale, George Groves or any other 168 pounder to prove himself. Was Marvelous Marvin Hagler forced to move upwards in weight? Was Carlos Monzon forced to move up? The fact is, some fighters move up because the see something in the champion in the weight class above them which tells them "I can beat this guy." That's why Michael Spinks moved up. That's why Sugar Ray Leonard moved up. That's why Roberto Duran moved up (along with weight issues). That's why Miguel Cotto moved up. Fighters move up because they feel they can. GGG is a middleweight. Leave him alone. Let him defend his Middleweight Championship. What would happen if he fought--and defeated Andre Ward and Carl Froch? What's next? Sergei Kovalev? Wladimir Klitschko? -Randy G.


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

Nobody is Superman and it is just a matter of time before GGG cleans out the middleweight division and moves up. From what I have seen of GGG thus far, a supreme boxer with a chin beats him. Andre Ward would win by unanimous decision and GGG's handlers know this. On the other hand, Cotto is game but would be chopped down by GGG in fashion similar to the first Margarito fight. Cotto doesn't do well fighting off his back foot.


-King Beef :

1st I have to give big props to Murray, he showed huge heart in the fight, actually fought back quite well, but with his lack of power he was still just a "brave lamb" lead to the ring for slaughter.


-Froggy :

1st I have to give big props to Murray, he showed huge heart in the fight, actually fought back quite well, but with his lack of power he was still just a "brave lamb" lead to the ring for slaughter.
Agreed, and nobody, I should say middleweight, beats him without having at least a punch that gets GGG's respect !


-Shoulder Roll Defense :

1st I have to give big props to Murray, he showed huge heart in the fight, actually fought back quite well, but with his lack of power he was still just a "brave lamb" lead to the ring for slaughter.
Roy Jones jr. kept saying, "if Murray had power we would be in for a real fight." He landed some beautiful punches on GGG, but as his KO percentage illustrates he couldn't break a hard boiled egg. GGG's chance to be truly great will come at 168. Besides Ward, I would love to see him face the iron bearded Chavez jr. at 168.


-King Beef :

Roy Jones jr. kept saying, "if Murray had power we would be in for a real fight." He landed some beautiful punches on GGG, but as his KO percentage illustrates he couldn't break a hard boiled egg. GGG's chance to be truly great will come at 168. Besides Ward, I would love to see him face the iron bearded Chavez jr. at 168.
Roy was right, and I saw this morning Chavez Jr. called him out at 168, so I suppose Jr has totally given up on 160. I think they keep him away from Ward, even though I might have the mind to jump on Ward before his gets his boxing legs back and shakes off any ring rust....if he has any. It almost a no lose situation, if you win, you just moved up and beat the arguably #1ish P4P guy, an if you lose, you lost to a bigger guy who happens to be the P4P guy in some peoples mind.


-Domenic :

Every fighter knows his limits. He/she knows there are fighter's out there who would beat them, not matter what the circumstances. All willmtalkma good game, but run and hide when the person's name is brought up who can beat them or even leave them in a demolished heap. You can't tell me Adonis Stevenson, who shows a burning desire to fight just about anyone, showed that same burning desire to face Sergei Kovalev. When he heard the footsteps of Kovalev approaching, Stevenson bailed on HBO and jumped ship to the protective covering of Al Haymon. For him, it was a great move. More title defenses, more money, no Kovalev. By the time he does face Kovalev, at least Stevenson will be a wealthy man. Backmin the early-mid 1980's, I used to watch film in Jim Jacob's office with his young heavyweight prospect, Mike Tyson. Although Tyson had not yet thrown a punch as a professional, he was insistent on watching every heavyweight champion, then told me how he'd beat them. Young Tyson told me he thinks often of being in the ring against JackmJohnson, Rocky Marciano. Joe Louis, Muhammad Ali and every other heavyweight champ. There was only one he was afraid of, even though the match would never take place. That man was Sonny Liston. "There's nothing I can do to ever beat Liston," Tyson used to literally cry to me. "Nothing!" The point is, every fighter knows his limits. Floyd Mayweather doesn't need a GGG for any reason. Why should he take it? In that same breath, GGG doesn't need to face Andre Ward, Carl Froch, James DeGale, George Groves or any other 168 pounder to prove himself. Was Marvelous Marvin Hagler forced to move upwards in weight? Was Carlos Monzon forced to move up? The fact is, some fighters move up because the see something in the champion in the weight class above them which tells them "I can beat this guy." That's why Michael Spinks moved up. That's why Sugar Ray Leonard moved up. That's why Roberto Duran moved up (along with weight issues). That's why Miguel Cotto moved up. Fighters move up because they feel they can. GGG is a middleweight. Leave him alone. Let him defend his Middleweight Championship. What would happen if he fought--and defeated Andre Ward and Carl Froch? What's next? Sergei Kovalev? Wladimir Klitschko? -Randy G.
Interesting story about Tyson. Liston at his peak was a wrecking ball. That's why I'm fascinated by Marty Marshall, a guy who managed to break Liston's jaw and beat him early on (and then lose two subsequent rematches). Harold Johnson, whom a piece was written about here the other day, beat Marty Marshall and was scheduled to fight Liston at one point. He was unable to due to injury, and Marty stepped in. I'd not put Mugabi in Golovkin's class. He fought great against Hagler in a losing effort, but was never the same after that fight. And Hagler was past his prime at the time. Indeed, Ray Leonard, in attendance for the fight, eagerly agreed to fight Hagler after witnessing it. No tune-up after 3 years off, just right to Hagler. Mugabi would get knocked out in the first round by Terry Norris and Gerald McClellan in later years. Remember, a prime Floyd could've fought a damaged-goods, deteriorating, and vulnerable Kelly Pavlik back in 2007/2008 for the true middleweight title, and went nowhere near it (Floyd had a 154 pound strap after beating De La Hoya). I think Floyd would have outboxed that version of Pavlik, and if he had gotten caught and lost, so be it. No shame, as he was in with a much bigger man and the then elite of the division. But I'm with Randy. Let guys fight at their optimum weight and clean house. When their body mandates a move, then sure, but bouncing around in weight is a dangerous move (see Roy Jones versus Tarver 1 when he shed 25 pounds to return to LH and was never the same).


-ericfarrell85 :

Is there even a shred of validity to the thought of Hopkins, coming back to MW (or offering at 168), and facing Golovkin in his farewell fight?


-oubobcat :

One thing that goes underlooked about Golovkin's game is his ability to cut off the ring. He anticipates where his opponent will move and slides to that position before his opponent gets there. If you rewatch this fight, it is a perfect example of Golovkin's ability to cut the ring down. He often trapped Murray and unloaded when he got him trapped. This pressure also broke Murray down and zapped his energy. Golovkin's ability to cut the ring down is one reason why he has so much success in the ring and get so many knockouts. And a big reason why I think he'd beat Andre Ward.


-Pazuzu :

One thing that goes underlooked about Golovkin's game is his ability to cut off the ring. He anticipates where his opponent will move and slides to that position before his opponent gets there. If you rewatch this fight, it is a perfect example of Golovkin's ability to cut the ring down. He often trapped Murray and unloaded when he got him trapped. This pressure also broke Murray down and zapped his energy. Golovkin's ability to cut the ring down is one reason why he has so much success in the ring and get so many knockouts. And a big reason why I think he'd beat Andre Ward.
Bobcat, how do you think GGG would handle Ward's power and counterpunching? I think Golovkin is "the" top pressure fighter in boxing, but after he walks Ward into a corner, he'll find he's trapped rather more dangerous prey. Speaking of overlooked, I was also impressed with G's head and torso movement during this fight. The best I've seen from him so far. He slipped and dodged entire combinations from Murray. However, he also, in the later rounds, walked straight in with his hands down and ate flush three-punch combinations to the face. Didn't phase him a bit. I suspect that if we peeled Golovkin's skin back, we'd find a stainless steel Terminator endo-skeleton underneath. Yes. Terminator Style.


-Pazuzu :

Also, a Cleveland shout-out: during the fight I enjoyed a Great Lakes Brewing Co. "Burning River Pale Ale". Straight up one of the best beers around.


-Froggy :

Also, a Cleveland shout-out: during the fight I enjoyed a Great Lakes Brewing Co. "Burning River Pale Ale". Straight up one of the best beers around.
You enjoyed one beer during the fight ? The fight went 11 rounds ! You must have had 2 anyhow !


-Pazuzu :

You enjoyed one beer during the fight ? The fight went 11 rounds ! You must have had 2 anyhow !
...didn't say how many I had before the fight. : )


-Froggy :

...didn't say how many I had before the fight. : )
Ha, ha, ha, ha, that's right you didn't, very good !


-oubobcat :

Being from Cleveland, I am a huge fan of Great Lakes Brewing Company myself. Burning River is an excellent beer as is my personal favorite from the year round selection Commodore Perry. And they make the all-time best beer in my opinion in Great Lakes Christmas Ale (just bought out a store in Rochester's remaining supply yesterday).


-oubobcat :

Bobcat, how do you think GGG would handle Ward's power and counterpunching? I think Golovkin is "the" top pressure fighter in boxing, but after he walks Ward into a corner, he'll find he's trapped rather more dangerous prey. Speaking of overlooked, I was also impressed with G's head and torso movement during this fight. The best I've seen from him so far. He slipped and dodged entire combinations from Murray. However, he also, in the later rounds, walked straight in with his hands down and ate flush three-punch combinations to the face. Didn't phase him a bit. I suspect that if we peeled Golovkin's skin back, we'd find a stainless steel Terminator endo-skeleton underneath. Yes. Terminator Style.
I think GGG would handle Ward's power. I think the biggest issue for GGG against Ward would be how Ward likes to often tie his opponents up on the inside. The referee could play a huge factor in that fight. What I don't think Ward could handle is GGG's relentless pressure and ability to cut the ring down. I see a fight in which Ward wins four of the first five rounds but GGG's pressure just slows him down in the 2nd half of the fight. I don't think GGG stops Ward but carries the 2nd half of the fight clearly enough to win a decision.


-Pazuzu :

Being from Cleveland, I am a huge fan of Great Lakes Brewing Company myself. Burning River is an excellent beer as is my personal favorite from the year round selection Commodore Perry. And they make the all-time best beer in my opinion in Great Lakes Christmas Ale (just bought out a store in Rochester's remaining supply yesterday).
Thanks, I'll have to check out the Commodore Perry. I've been drinking Great Lakes for years back home in Chicagoland, but I've just started seeing it out here in DC recently. Great brew.


-Pazuzu :

I think GGG would handle Ward's power. I think the biggest issue for GGG against Ward would be how Ward likes to often tie his opponents up on the inside. The referee could play a huge factor in that fight. What I don't think Ward could handle is GGG's relentless pressure and ability to cut the ring down. I see a fight in which Ward wins four of the first five rounds but GGG's pressure just slows him down in the 2nd half of the fight. I don't think GGG stops Ward but carries the 2nd half of the fight clearly enough to win a decision.
Sounds about right. Murray clinched and held pretty effectively in the first few rounds, to which Gennady frequently countered by driving the top of his head into Murray's face. The man knows the inside tricks. Anyway, once those body shots and uppercuts started ripping, the clinching stopped.


-Chris L :

I think a lot of the talk about Golovkin moving up is because his camp has floated the idea in front of the fans, which means that naturally we are going to dream of match-ups. He's been well managed and to this point looks like a monster, but people want to see him face a legitimate challenge before comparing him to all time greats. His fights at the moment are just givens; it's a matter of which round the challenger falls in. There aren't really many middleweights who could/would give him a stern test, so naturally we look at the next division up.


-Pazuzu :

Also: it's not often a fighter's stock goes up after a TKO loss, but Martin Murray's sure did. Excellent boxing skills, ring intelligence galore, and the heart of a champion. He just happened to be in deep water with an apex predator. I'm looking forward to Murray's next outing. Just hope he didn't leave to much of himself in that ring last night.


-Glass Joe :

What impresses me the most, aside from GGG's obvious power, is his patience. He calmly stalks his prey, rather than swinging for the rafters like so many other guys with huge power. And I gotta say for the record that Martin Murray is as courageous as they come. GJ


-#1 PacFan :

Triple G will carry on the torch once the Great Manny Pacquiao and Floyd hangs up the gloves.