THE LOTIERZO LOWDOWN Why Cotto Should Fight Mayweather Next

I know it’s not a fight that fans are on the edge of their seats waiting to see again, but the two best fighter/boxing managers (excluding Bernard Hopkins) in the sport, Floyd Mayweather 47-0 (26) and Miguel Cotto 39-4 (32), may just end up facing each other again in their next bout.

Floyd and Miguel are only interested in partaking in big winnable PPV fights at this point of their careers. Floyd, he wants to control everything regarding the negotiations pertaining to a fight with Manny Pacquiao 57-5-2 (38)…..and one gets the same feeling towards Miguel regarding his on again off again showdown with Mexican Saul Alvarez 44-1-1 (31). No doubt this is why the negotiations for both fights have stalled.

At this time neither Mayweather nor Cotto have their next fight set, and it’s been made clear that they both want to fight sometime this coming May or June. Everyone wants to see Mayweather-Pacquiao in May but that’s still not finalized. There’s talk of Cotto possibly meeting Timothy Bradley 31-1-1 (12) in June, which makes absolutely no sense on Cotto’s part, none what so ever. If Cotto were to fight Bradley, even if he wins, he will have wasted the capital he gained beating Sergio Martinez 51-3-2 (28) last year.

It’s coming up on three years since Mayweather and Cotto fought for Miguel’s WBA super welterweight title. Floyd won the title via a 12-round unanimous decision in what turned out to be a competitive bout. That said, there’s no reason to believe, based on their previous fight or their style clash, that a rematch would produce a different result. Yes, I know Freddie Roach now trains Cotto, but that won’t make a bit of difference. If Cotto fights Mayweather again and uses the same boxing style he did in his last fight against Sergio Martinez, he’ll lose by an even wider margin this time.

On June 9th of last summer after Cotto defeated Martinez to win the lineal middleweight title, I wrote a column titled “Cotto’s Perfect Exit Strategy: Offer Mayweather Shot At Middleweight Title.” In it, I stated the following:

“If Cotto is smart, and all indications based on how he’s managed his career say that he is, he should be campaigning and challenging Mayweather to meet him for the middleweight title. As long as Floyd doesn’t try to get over too much regarding the terms and conditions for the fight, and it’s not like Cotto doesn’t have any leverage, because he does. All that it’ll take is for Miguel to issue the challenge and for Floyd to accept it. Promotional contracts can be put aside for business. It happens every day.

“Mayweather-Cotto for the lineal middleweight championship would be huge. Mayweather can go for his sixth title in a different weight division against a fighter he already defeated and no doubt is certain that he can do it again, thus further enhancing his legacy. And Cotto can accumulate a fortune while having a great chance to add to his legacy against a fighter who he put up a great fight against, and must feel things would turn out differently in his favor if they were to fight again.”

Think about it. Cotto, if he really wanted to prove he’s the middleweight champ, he’d fight Gennady Golovkin 31-0 (28), but everyone, including Miguel, knows that he’d get destroyed. And there’s not enough money in the fight for him to take that chance and retire from boxing like that. As for Mayweather, if he really wanted to prove he’s all that and really harbors no reservation about touching gloves with Pacquiao, he’d fight Golovkin in a non-catchweight bout for the title and shut everybody up. But the odds of that happening are about as good as Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll giving Marshawn Lynch the ball on second and goal from the one yard line with the Super Bowl championship on the line.

If Mayweather and Cotto were to fight again, they both have a ton to gain, aside from money, without much risk. For Mayweather, he can gain the lineal middleweight title, giving him six titles in six different weight divisions, something legends Sugar Ray Leonard and Thomas Hearns can’t even say. He already knows that he has the style and strength to match-up favorably with Cotto. He’d make another $40 million-plus easily, and if he were to lose, he certainly wouldn’t take a beating or be unrecognizable after the fight. As for Cotto, being the first fighter to officially defeat Mayweather would pave the road the rest of his life in anything he did. And if he were to lose again, it’s not like he’d be embarrassed or physically hurt or beat up, and nobody would admonish him for losing to Mayweather twice.

Miguel Cotto’s career is winding down. He’s the only Puerto Rican fighter ever to win a world title in four different weight divisions. Right now he’s fighting mostly for his family’s financial future. The three biggest money fights for Cotto are Mayweather, Alvarez and Golovkin, in that order. He would be a prohibitive underdog in all three. However, in two of them he would most likely get beaten up. Alvarez would work him over good before the fight was stopped and for even less money, Golovkin would beat him up worse. And if by chance he scored an upset over either of them, it wouldn’t be as monumental historically as beating Mayweather would be. If Cotto beat Alvarez, the next day most would say that Mayweather exposed him and he wasn’t really all that. If he beat Golovkin, it would be huge and further cement his legacy. But there would a faction who would say Golovkin really never fought a special or elite fighter before and maybe like other past KO artist, he was a little overrated – and they might even be right, it’s too early to say for sure.

This leads back to Miguel fighting Mayweather again. Among the three most lucrative fights for Cotto, Mayweather would be the most lucrative, and it’s also the one in which he’d probably have the best chance to win. Alvarez, and especially Golovkin would probably stop him, unlike Mayweather, who in the worst-case scenario wins every round but never drops or stops him. For Cotto, fighting Mayweather in his next fight makes the most sense. Floyd is smaller, older and nowhere near the puncher that Alvarez and Golovkin are. Sure, he has a master’s degree in experience, but then so does Cotto.

A rematch with Mayweather would be for the most money and the risk-reward factor couldn’t be more in Cotto’s favor, as opposed to his other plausible options.

Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at GlovedFist@Gmail.com

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COMMENTS

-deepwater2 :

no way. It probably will happen but it is not what most fans want. Fans do want Floyd vs Manny and Cotto vs Canelo. Cotto should at least defend the middleweight crown against a middleweight before he ruins it with catch-weights and negotiations. If Floyd fights Cotto at any thing less than 160 lbs than its a crock. Even though Cotto is the lineal, the number 1 160 lb man is GGG. Why not move up and fight the man for all the prestige? Why doesn't Floyd defend his so called 154lb belt against Lara? Any way this is one reason boxing sucks sometimes.


-Froggy :

If they can't get the Mayweather/Pacqiao fight made, then go ahead, but if it catchweight, fine but it should not be sanctioned as a title fight ! I know, it will be sanctioned, but it shouldn't be !


-amayseng :

Floyd vs Cotto was a fantastic fight. I enjoyed it and it was very competitive. However the fight has to be Floyd vs Pac, nothing before


-Radam G :

Watch what you wish for? M-Co has to wait. Money May maybe has grown a pair. Off Money May, Da Manny is going to beat the hair. The dance is on like a good song. And Money May will realize that in the same squared jungle with Da Manny, he did not belong. Holla!


-Carmine Cas :

Rumors of this fight have been spinning like a merry-go-round for the last couple of months. I'm starting to believe Mayweather-Pacquiao is finally going to happen but I'm not holding my breath. Cotto-Mayweather doesn't seem likely, in fact I've been hearing rumors not only about Cotto-Bradley but also Cotto-Lara as well. I like the Lara fight.


-stormcentre :

I know it's not a fight that fans are on the edge of their seats waiting to see again, but the two best fighter/boxing managers (excluding Bernard Hopkins) in the sport, Floyd Mayweather 47-0 (26) and Miguel Cotto 39-4 (32), may just end up facing each other again in their next bout. Floyd and Miguel are only interested in partaking in big winnable PPV fights at this point of their careers. Floyd, he wants to control everything regarding the negotiations pertaining to a fight with Manny Pacquiao 57-5-2 (38).....and one gets the same feeling towards Miguel regarding his on again off again showdown with Mexican Saul Alvarez 44-1-1 (31). No doubt this is why the negotiations for both fights have stalled. At this time neither Mayweather nor Cotto have their next fight set, and it's been made clear that they both want to fight sometime this coming May or June. Everyone wants to see Mayweather-Pacquiao in May but that's still not finalized. There's talk of Cotto possibly meeting Timothy Bradley 31-1-1 (12) in June, which makes absolutely no sense on Cotto's part, none what so ever. If Cotto were to fight Bradley, even if he wins, he will have wasted the capital he gained beating Sergio Martinez 51-3-2 (28) last year. It's coming up on three years since Mayweather and Cotto fought for Miguel's WBA super welterweight title. Floyd won the title via a 12-round unanimous decision in what turned out to be a competitive bout. That said, there's no reason to believe, based on their previous fight or their style clash, that a rematch would produce a different result. Yes, I know Freddie Roach now trains Cotto, but that won't make a bit of difference. If Cotto fights Mayweather again and uses the same boxing style he did in his last fight against Sergio Martinez, he'll lose by an even wider margin this time. On June 9th of last summer after Cotto defeated Martinez to win the lineal middleweight title, I wrote a column titled "Cotto's Perfect Exit Strategy: Offer Mayweather Shot At Middleweight Title." In it, I stated the following: "If Cotto is smart, and all indications based on how he's managed his career say that he is, he should be campaigning and challenging Mayweather to meet him for the middleweight title. As long as Floyd doesn't try to get over too much regarding the terms and conditions for the fight, and it's not like Cotto doesn't have any leverage, because he does. All that it'll take is for Miguel to issue the challenge and for Floyd to accept it. Promotional contracts can be put aside for business. It happens every day. "Mayweather-Cotto for the lineal middleweight championship would be huge. Mayweather can go for his sixth title in a different weight division against a fighter he already defeated and no doubt is certain that he can do it again, thus further enhancing his legacy. And Cotto can accumulate a fortune while having a great chance to add to his legacy against a fighter who he put up a great fight against, and must feel things would turn out differently in his favor if they were to fight again." Think about it. Cotto, if he really wanted to prove he's the middleweight champ, he'd fight Gennady Golovkin 31-0 (28), but everyone, including Miguel, knows that he'd get destroyed. And there's not enough money in the fight for him to take that chance and retire from boxing like that. As for Mayweather, if he really wanted to prove he's all that and really harbors no reservation about touching gloves with Pacquiao, he'd fight Golovkin in a non-catchweight bout for the title and shut everybody up. But the odds of that happening are about as good as Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll giving Marshawn Lynch the ball on second and goal from the one yard line with the Super Bowl championship on the line. If Mayweather and Cotto were to fight again, they both have a ton to gain, aside from money, without much risk. For Mayweather, he can gain the lineal middleweight title, giving him six titles in six different weight divisions, something legends Sugar Ray Leonard and Thomas Hearns can't even say. He already knows that he has the style and strength to match-up favorably with Cotto. He'd make another $40 million-plus easily, and if he were to lose, he certainly wouldn't take a beating or be unrecognizable after the fight. As for Cotto, being the first fighter to officially defeat Mayweather would pave the road the rest of his life in anything he did. And if he were to lose again, it's not like he'd be embarrassed or physically hurt or beat up, and nobody would admonish him for losing to Mayweather twice. Miguel Cotto's career is winding down. He's the only Puerto Rican fighter ever to win a world title in four different weight divisions. Right now he's fighting mostly for his family’s financial future. The three biggest money fights for Cotto are Mayweather, Alvarez and Golovkin, in that order. He would be a prohibitive underdog in all three. However, in two of them he would most likely get beaten up. Alvarez would work him over good before the fight was stopped and for even less money, Golovkin would beat him up worse. And if by chance he scored an upset over either of them, it wouldn't be as monumental historically as beating Mayweather would be. If Cotto beat Alvarez, the next day most would say that Mayweather exposed him and he wasn't really all that. If he beat Golovkin, it would be huge and further cement his legacy. But there would a faction who would say Golovkin really never fought a special or elite fighter before and maybe like other past KO artist, he was a little overrated - and they might even be right, it's too early to say for sure. This leads back to Miguel fighting Mayweather again. Among the three most lucrative fights for Cotto, Mayweather would be the most lucrative, and it's also the one in which he'd probably have the best chance to win. Alvarez, and especially Golovkin would probably stop him, unlike Mayweather, who in the worst-case scenario wins every round but never drops or stops him. For Cotto, fighting Mayweather in his next fight makes the most sense. Floyd is smaller, older and nowhere near the puncher that Alvarez and Golovkin are. Sure, he has a master’s degree in experience, but then so does Cotto. A rematch with Mayweather would be for the most money and the risk-reward factor couldn't be more in Cotto's favor, as opposed to his other plausible options. Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at [url=http://www.thesweetscience.com/mailto:GlovedFist@Gmail.com]GlovedFist@Gmail.com
Good piece Frank. But then I got to say that, as you have pretty much added to and/or supported what I said here . . .
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?19763-Floyd-Mayweather-Can’t-Win&p=76046&viewfull=1#post76046 Although, in my above post, I forgot to add that the Mayweather V2 Cotto fight makes sense for Mayweather, also, because of Cotto's middleweight strap. Moving on, yep you're right Frank - in June last year - you did mention that it would be wise for Cotto to use his middleweight strap to lure Floyd into another fight. Clever forecasting - I seriously thought that at the time. But, in due fairness (and I am not trying to pull you down to my humble level with these comments, but . . .) for those with good insight into the fight game (as you clearly have) it was not a premonition of Nostradamus proportions. I say that because - as you say and/or infer - most of those at Middleweight really are too big, powerful and dangerous for Cotto; so you had to wonder what was he doing campaigning up there. The answer was (as you knew) Sergio Martinez. Martinez, (from Cotto and many other's perspective) was really a wounded seal flailing about naively and aimlessly within shark-infested waters just off the South African coastline, that also serve as feeding/mating grounds for white-pointers.
->http://cdn.grindtv.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/CATERS_Great_White_Shark_Seal_Sequence_11-1024x682.jpg
->http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2xybDb1K1U8/TosdQdu7aWI/AAAAAAAAJg8/5fMdvVL52O8/s1600/White_shark_hunting-06.jpg
->http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Wy6h7gDCPJs/TLhWx-2EnYI/AAAAAAAAADw/Yzd4IZUVyd0/s1600/twip_100715_08_ss_full.jpg
->http://barbarashdwallpapers.com/wp-content/uploads/blogger/-SIm9cyX2AjU/Tw10P7-z_hI/AAAAAAAAWqA/IBXJUN53ht8/s1600/Animal-pictures-sharks-wallpapers-hd-photos-shark-wallpaper-2.jpg
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCWT-tBLnD8 Strategically, it was quite smart as Cotto and Roach knew both, that negotiations for Floyd's fights always have the potential to get drawn out - just as he also usually runs out of "worthy" opponents that fit his/the multi-faceted selection criteria. I think also, in some ways, you're comments about Floyd being the most financially rewarding and also at the same time appearing as the least physically and otherwise risky proposition; ring reasonably true. It's not often that the least perceived danger and the most money are synonymous in boxing/prizefighting. Golovkin (at middleweight and not a {painful} catch-weight) probably would - as you infer - embarrass and/or murder Cotto, and that's not a good way for Cotto to go out on such a great career; particularly for a fight where Cotto would earn less money than Floyd and probably elevate Gannady to a true PPV and MSG star. Canelo, (at middleweight and not a {painful} catch-weight) - as you also infer - would probably also rough Miguel up too - but only if we ignore the glaring fact that Cotto fared much better against Floyd than Canelo did. It's just so hard to know how much (serious fight) Cotto has left after his showings with Rodruigez, Trout, and Martinez. As those fights, the one with Floyd, leave you with ammunition to argue for and against; when it comes to how much Cotto has left in the tank. Smart money and most recent pictures of Miguel without a t-shirt on, seem to suggest Miguel has slipped a bit - after all, it's only natural after all he's done in the sport. That said, I'm not so sure that Floyd wont beat on him a bit (more) if they fight again - a second time. Floyd knows all Cotto's moves, and Cotto is no chameleon; he is the same almost always; regardless of what Roach says. And, Floyd not only feasts on fighters that are slower than him, have no active defence, and do their best work flat-footed - but he also (usually) finds it incredibly easy to control distance, pace, and pot-shot guys like that. And, with all that comes Floyd's control/execution of game-plan, timing, anticipated shoulder roll, and in general his safety-first-points fight-plan approach. And since Cotto (when he's in with Floyd and Floyd makes him move) often telegraphs when he's going to punch, I can see a possible beat down of Miguel - perhaps a little more than expected - if he starts to run out of steam in the latter rounds. Cotto is a legend and remember when he turned Pro. I also remember when he fought Muhammad Abdullaev, as not only do I recall their amateur fight (where I think Abdullaev won) -but I was there in NY when they fought and Cotto won. I wonder if Cotto retires after Floyd?


-stormcentre :

I know it's not a fight that fans are on the edge of their seats waiting to see again, but the two best fighter/boxing managers (excluding Bernard Hopkins) in the sport, Floyd Mayweather 47-0 (26) and Miguel Cotto 39-4 (32), may just end up facing each other again in their next bout. Floyd and Miguel are only interested in partaking in big winnable PPV fights at this point of their careers. Floyd, he wants to control everything regarding the negotiations pertaining to a fight with Manny Pacquiao 57-5-2 (38).....and one gets the same feeling towards Miguel regarding his on again off again showdown with Mexican Saul Alvarez 44-1-1 (31). No doubt this is why the negotiations for both fights have stalled. At this time neither Mayweather nor Cotto have their next fight set, and it's been made clear that they both want to fight sometime this coming May or June. Everyone wants to see Mayweather-Pacquiao in May but that's still not finalized. There's talk of Cotto possibly meeting Timothy Bradley 31-1-1 (12) in June, which makes absolutely no sense on Cotto's part, none what so ever. If Cotto were to fight Bradley, even if he wins, he will have wasted the capital he gained beating Sergio Martinez 51-3-2 (28) last year. It's coming up on three years since Mayweather and Cotto fought for Miguel's WBA super welterweight title. Floyd won the title via a 12-round unanimous decision in what turned out to be a competitive bout. That said, there's no reason to believe, based on their previous fight or their style clash, that a rematch would produce a different result. Yes, I know Freddie Roach now trains Cotto, but that won't make a bit of difference. If Cotto fights Mayweather again and uses the same boxing style he did in his last fight against Sergio Martinez, he'll lose by an even wider margin this time. On June 9th of last summer after Cotto defeated Martinez to win the lineal middleweight title, I wrote a column titled "Cotto's Perfect Exit Strategy: Offer Mayweather Shot At Middleweight Title." In it, I stated the following: "If Cotto is smart, and all indications based on how he's managed his career say that he is, he should be campaigning and challenging Mayweather to meet him for the middleweight title. As long as Floyd doesn't try to get over too much regarding the terms and conditions for the fight, and it's not like Cotto doesn't have any leverage, because he does. All that it'll take is for Miguel to issue the challenge and for Floyd to accept it. Promotional contracts can be put aside for business. It happens every day. "Mayweather-Cotto for the lineal middleweight championship would be huge. Mayweather can go for his sixth title in a different weight division against a fighter he already defeated and no doubt is certain that he can do it again, thus further enhancing his legacy. And Cotto can accumulate a fortune while having a great chance to add to his legacy against a fighter who he put up a great fight against, and must feel things would turn out differently in his favor if they were to fight again." Think about it. Cotto, if he really wanted to prove he's the middleweight champ, he'd fight Gennady Golovkin 31-0 (28), but everyone, including Miguel, knows that he'd get destroyed. And there's not enough money in the fight for him to take that chance and retire from boxing like that. As for Mayweather, if he really wanted to prove he's all that and really harbors no reservation about touching gloves with Pacquiao, he'd fight Golovkin in a non-catchweight bout for the title and shut everybody up. But the odds of that happening are about as good as Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll giving Marshawn Lynch the ball on second and goal from the one yard line with the Super Bowl championship on the line. If Mayweather and Cotto were to fight again, they both have a ton to gain, aside from money, without much risk. For Mayweather, he can gain the lineal middleweight title, giving him six titles in six different weight divisions, something legends Sugar Ray Leonard and Thomas Hearns can't even say. He already knows that he has the style and strength to match-up favorably with Cotto. He'd make another $40 million-plus easily, and if he were to lose, he certainly wouldn't take a beating or be unrecognizable after the fight. As for Cotto, being the first fighter to officially defeat Mayweather would pave the road the rest of his life in anything he did. And if he were to lose again, it's not like he'd be embarrassed or physically hurt or beat up, and nobody would admonish him for losing to Mayweather twice. Miguel Cotto's career is winding down. He's the only Puerto Rican fighter ever to win a world title in four different weight divisions. Right now he's fighting mostly for his family’s financial future. The three biggest money fights for Cotto are Mayweather, Alvarez and Golovkin, in that order. He would be a prohibitive underdog in all three. However, in two of them he would most likely get beaten up. Alvarez would work him over good before the fight was stopped and for even less money, Golovkin would beat him up worse. And if by chance he scored an upset over either of them, it wouldn't be as monumental historically as beating Mayweather would be. If Cotto beat Alvarez, the next day most would say that Mayweather exposed him and he wasn't really all that. If he beat Golovkin, it would be huge and further cement his legacy. But there would a faction who would say Golovkin really never fought a special or elite fighter before and maybe like other past KO artist, he was a little overrated - and they might even be right, it's too early to say for sure. This leads back to Miguel fighting Mayweather again. Among the three most lucrative fights for Cotto, Mayweather would be the most lucrative, and it's also the one in which he'd probably have the best chance to win. Alvarez, and especially Golovkin would probably stop him, unlike Mayweather, who in the worst-case scenario wins every round but never drops or stops him. For Cotto, fighting Mayweather in his next fight makes the most sense. Floyd is smaller, older and nowhere near the puncher that Alvarez and Golovkin are. Sure, he has a master’s degree in experience, but then so does Cotto. A rematch with Mayweather would be for the most money and the risk-reward factor couldn't be more in Cotto's favor, as opposed to his other plausible options. Frank Lotierzo can be contacted at [url=http://www.thesweetscience.com/mailto:GlovedFist@Gmail.com]GlovedFist@Gmail.com
Good piece Frank. But then I got to say that, as you have pretty much added to and/or supported what I said here . . .
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?19763-Floyd-Mayweather-Can’t-Win&p=76046&viewfull=1#post76046 Although, in my above post, I forgot to add that the Mayweather V2 Cotto fight makes sense for Mayweather, also, because of Cotto's middleweight strap. Moving on, yep you're right Frank - in June last year - you did mention that it would be wise for Cotto to use his middleweight strap to lure Floyd into another fight. Clever forecasting - I seriously thought that at the time. But, in due fairness (and I am not trying to pull you down to my humble level with these comments, but . . .) for those with good insight into the fight game (as you clearly have) it was not a premonition of Nostradamus proportions. I say that because - as you say and/or infer - most of those at Middleweight really are too big, powerful and dangerous for Cotto; so you had to wonder what was he doing campaigning up there. The answer was (as you knew) Sergio Martinez. Martinez, (from Cotto and many other's perspective) was really a wounded seal flailing about naively and aimlessly within shark-infested waters just off the South African coastline, that also serve as feeding/mating grounds for white-pointers.
->http://cdn.grindtv.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/CATERS_Great_White_Shark_Seal_Sequence_11-1024x682.jpg
->http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-2xybDb1K1U8/TosdQdu7aWI/AAAAAAAAJg8/5fMdvVL52O8/s1600/White_shark_hunting-06.jpg
->http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Wy6h7gDCPJs/TLhWx-2EnYI/AAAAAAAAADw/Yzd4IZUVyd0/s1600/twip_100715_08_ss_full.jpg
->http://barbarashdwallpapers.com/wp-content/uploads/blogger/-SIm9cyX2AjU/Tw10P7-z_hI/AAAAAAAAWqA/IBXJUN53ht8/s1600/Animal-pictures-sharks-wallpapers-hd-photos-shark-wallpaper-2.jpg
->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCWT-tBLnD8 Strategically, it was quite smart as Cotto and Roach knew both, that negotiations for Floyd's fights always have the potential to get drawn out - just as he also usually runs out of "worthy" opponents that fit his/the multi-faceted selection criteria. I think also, in some ways, you're comments about Floyd being the most financially rewarding and also at the same time appearing as the least physically and otherwise risky proposition; ring reasonably true. It's not often that the least perceived danger and the most money are synonymous in boxing/prizefighting. Golovkin (at middleweight and not a {painful} catch-weight) probably would - as you infer - embarrass and/or murder Cotto, and that's not a good way for Cotto to go out on such a great career; particularly for a fight where Cotto would earn less money than Floyd and probably elevate Gannady to a true PPV and MSG star. Canelo, (at middleweight and not a {painful} catch-weight) - as you also infer - would probably also rough Miguel up too - but only if we ignore the glaring fact that Cotto fared much better against Floyd than Canelo did. It's just so hard to know how much (serious fight) Cotto has left after his showings with Rodruigez, Trout, and Martinez. As those fights, the one with Floyd, leave you with ammunition to argue for and against; when it comes to how much Cotto has left in the tank. Smart money and most recent pictures of Miguel without a t-shirt on, seem to suggest Miguel has slipped a bit - after all, it's only natural after all he's done in the sport. That said, I'm not so sure that Floyd wont beat on him a bit (more) if they fight again - a second time. Floyd knows all Cotto's moves, and Cotto is no chameleon; he is the same almost always; regardless of what Roach says. And, Floyd not only feasts on fighters that are slower than him, have no active defence, and do their best work flat-footed - but he also (usually) finds it incredibly easy to control distance, pace, and pot-shot guys like that. And, with all that comes Floyd's control/execution of game-plan, timing, anticipated shoulder roll, and in general his safety-first-points fight-plan approach. And since Cotto (when he's in with Floyd and Floyd makes him move) often telegraphs when he's going to punch, I can see a possible beat down of Miguel - perhaps a little more than expected - if he starts to run out of steam in the latter rounds. Cotto is a legend and remember when he turned Pro. I also remember when he fought Muhammad Abdullaev, as not only do I recall their amateur fight (where I think Abdullaev won) -but I was there in NY when they fought and Cotto won. I wonder if Cotto retires after Floyd?


-michigan400 :

I really don't want this fight, obviously. But Cotto is a true warrior at heart and in the ring. I would not count him out should this fight happen. Floyd isn't springing around on his feet like he used to or showing matrix like upper body movement like he used to either. It's not a big drop but it doesn't need to be. Those tight, wicked left hooks that would have missed him by 3 or 4 inches 3 years ago, may just find their mark in 2015.


-leon30001 :

Nothing interests me about watching Mayweather dodge Pacquiao so he can rematch a guy Manny beat the brakes off of 6 years ago! All due respect to Miguel but this fight leaves me cold.


-brownsugar :

Cotto seems to have gotten his groove back since humbling Martinez, he's looked as dangerous and thirsty as a hell-hound in his last two fights. I think Floyd vs Cotto is a very challenging and entertaining fight. A fight worthy of a man with the epic sized clout, distinction, and status of Floyd Mayweather Jr. Usually the internet holds very extreme opinions about Floyd that have to taken with a grain of salt. But when it's all said and done, those who are not as "obsessed" (I mean that in a good way) with the sport as we are...... are far more forgiving and a little less empirical with their demands. However in this case,....... I suspect that even the more casual fans will sigh a collective moan if Floyd vs Pac doesn't happen. With the fight the world has been waiting to see for five years, being this close. I think a significant number of fans, maybe 15%- 25% will just decide to overlook boxing for a while.... wring their hands of it and just walk away. All things considered, it's definitely the second best fight Floyd could make, however ...sometimes... second best just isn't good enough.


-michigan400 :

I agree brownsugar. Since these 2 have been flirting with a fight, the best each has done is second best,, at best. If they would just do it, then both would get a lot more goodwill regarding their opponent choices from here on out.