KHAN IS KING, Downs Devon Alexander Easily

On Saturday night at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, former two division champion at light and super light welterweight, Amir Khan (29-3, 19 KOs) and former light and welterweight champion, Devon Alexander (26-2, 14 KOs) met at welterweight in the main event. While you might not say the two fighters are at a crossroads, both were at a bit of a fork in the road in terms of big fight marketability. Khan showcased his superior length and hand speed in taking a lopsided unanimous decision (120-108, 119-109, 118-110).

Khan outlanded Alexander by a 152 margin (243-91) and his power shots found a home 54% of the time. Alexander was never hurt, but he was not able to take advantage of any of Khan’s perceived weaknesses (chin and stamina). You could argue this was Khan’s best night as a “boxer.”

On to the rounds.

Round One: Khan starts out throwing the harder punches. Khan’s speed and range are already causing Alexander trouble. Amir looks very quick tonight. Alexander lands a wicked combination, but Alexander comes back with fire of his own and seemed to unsteady Khan near the end of the round with a hard right behind Khan’s ear. Khan landed more punches and should have taken the round, but the final moments found Alexander making an impression of his own.

Round Two: Both fighters are active from the start. Khan’s hands are clearly faster than Alexander’s. Alexander keeps moving into Khan’s left, making it easier for the Brit to score. Alexander begins to come forward more, but it isn’t very effective. Khan, who is 6-0 against southpaws, repeatedly steps on Alexander’s foot when coming forward.

Round Three: Khan’s reach and speed are making Alexander uncomfortable. Being the natural counter puncher, Alexander is having difficulty finding punching range with regularity. Khan lands a strong counter left hook, but Alexander takes it pretty well. The superior punch output by Amir Khan is carrying the fight. Alexander appeared stung by a flurry at the end of the round.

Round Four: Khan lands three quick blows, but Alexander responds with two solid blows of his own. The 3:2 ratio is emblematic of the fight and increasingly problematic for Alexander though. Khan scores a sharp left to the body. A straight right by Khan down the middle punctuates another strong round for Amir.

Round Five: Another right behind the ear knocks Khan off balance, but doesn’t hurt him. I knew Khan would have the hand speed advantage, but it’s almost glaring at this point. Strong overhand left by Alexander as Devon forces the action, but still can’t match the punch output of Khan. Khan’s jab is starting to find a home with regularity. Alexander heads to his corner looking a bit dispirited.

Round Six: Alexander needs Khan to either tire or get careless. Both of those things are possible, but thus far not in evidence. Alexander is starting to come forward more, which is not his game. He’s losing the fight moving in both directions. Another round for Khan.

Round Seven: Alexander comes out firing, then settles back as a boxer. Alexander is landing a little more in this round, but still not catching up to Khan. At this point, Devon has to know the score cards require more aggressiveness and he’s trying, but Khan just keeps landing more. Khan wobbles Alexander momentarily at the end of the round with a left hook.

Round Eight: Khan lands a straight right and a left hook. You would be hard pressed to justify a single round for Alexander at this point, although you could call it a competitive shutout. Alexander lands a solid left and a strong right hook. A hard left to the body lands for Khan. This might have been Alexander’s best round. Still not sure if he won it.

Round Nine: Both fighters came out with a little bit of hesitancy then Khan lands a superb combination. Alexander takes it well, but simply isn’t coming back with enough. Khan’s hand speed is carrying into the later rounds. Once again, Alexander heads to his corner looking dejected. Very little fire in his corner either. Trainer Kevin Cunningham tells Alexander “all these rounds are starting to look the same.”

Round Ten: Khan is firing off combinations throughout the round. Alexander’s head snaps back twice due to consecutive straight right hands. Khan is fighting a very disciplined fight.

Round Eleven: Paulie Malinaggi points out this is “a terrible match up for Alexander.” It’s hard to argue. Khan’s superior hand speed maintains a tempo that Alexander just can’t match. Alexander needs to land something huge and that’s not his game. Alexander hits Khan with a few solid punches, but he needs a game changer and Khan is not allowing it. He’s both getting off and countering better.

Round Twelve: Khan starts fast as if to let Alexander know it’s not going to happen tonight. Khan lands a sharp combo that blisters Alexander mid-round. Khan has controlled this fight from stem to stern. Alexander hasn’t been embarrassed, but he has been schooled. The round ends and both fighters raise their arms, which is curious.

This was a very good night for Amir Khan. If a Mayweather-Pacquiao fight can’t be made (and well, you know…) then Khan has put himself in an excellent fallback position. He’s skilled, marketable, and has won four fights in a row since losing to Danny Garcia. The future for Alexander is much less certain. He’s going to need to regroup with his team and get a good win on his ledger before he will be considered for a big fight any time soon.

WATCH RELATED VIDEOS ON BOXINGCHANNEL.TV

COMMENTS

-SouthPawFlo :

I've said it before and I'll say it again. ANYBODY who tries to Outbox Amir Khan at 147 is in for a long night, he's too fast, to rangy, too hard to counter and most importantly he knows how to fight tall... If you're gonna beat him you got punch when he punches like Garcia did, force him to fight on the inside like Petterson Did, or constantly swarm him and hope to land something big like Maidana & Prescott.. Devon had no shot or anyone else who tries to box him from the outside has no shot.... Don't let the 3 losses Fool you Amir Khan is one of the most Skilled Welterweights in the world...


-Radam G :

I've said it before and I'll say it again. ANYBODY who tries to Outbox Amir Khan at 147 is in for a long night, he's too fast, to rangy, too hard to counter and most importantly he knows how to fight tall... If you're gonna beat him you got punch when he punches like Garcia did, force him to fight on the inside like Petterson Did, or constantly swarm him and hope to land something big like Maidana & Prescott.. Devon had no shot or anyone else who tries to box him from the outside has no shot.... Don't let the 3 losses Fool you Amir Khan is one of the most Skilled Welterweights in the world...
Ditto! It is a fact that you can only beat him with a swarming style. Holla!


-stormcentre :

Fast hands mean a lot in boxing. Even more when they're connected to fast feet and mind.


-Radam G :

Fast hands mean a lot in boxing. Even more when they're connected to fast feet and mind.
No doubt! That is a kick-arse combo. Holla!


-ericfarrell85 :

Fast hands mean a lot in boxing. Even more when they're connected to fast feet and mind.
Storm, Does he trouble Mayweather? I never understood the seasaw opinions on Amir Khan. When he's winning, he's a top 10 P4P, but as soon as he tastes the canvas he's an overhyped glass jaw. Since when is a boxer held to the impossible standard of being unbeatable? Seems the boxing public is growing more demanding and less forgiving every year. Did anyone hear the boos following the Thurman fight? I was incredulous. I guess appreciation for tactical boxing has also gone by the wayside.


-SouthPawFlo :

I think Khan can Trouble Floyd for the first 4-5 rounds and possible beat Floyd by Decision, but Khan with all his gifts and abilities still makes a lot of "mistakes" in the ring and I'm not sure if he doesn't get caught by a Ricky Hatton KO like Check Hook, and once Khan gets hurt once he fights with he heart and not his head and that's when the bad things happen to him.


-stormcentre :

I know what you mean Eric. I'm not sure I am the one to ask your questions after (me) hyping Matvey Korobov and then him tanking the way he did. I had heard he was in excellent shape heading into the fight. Still these things happen, and Matty looked like he hadn't prepared properly unless he has become just complacent with a sub-par exercise/preparation routine these days.
Thurman: aside from calling Mayweather out, he did sound off a fair bit before this fight. Firstly, about how he was going to "roll" his opponent. And, secondly he called other fighters out, including Floyd Jr. So perhaps the spectators were expecting better because of that, and as such held him to this; as they booed him. Still, boxing fans/spectators have always been a very hard to please and quick to turn bunch - no secret there. Part of that comes from how sensational and emotional a fight can be even for those not directly involved. The critique (in my opinion) often comes later, with the harsh and perhaps unreasonable quotients coming from those who have experienced the event and possibly even felt the above-mentioned emotion run through their veins; accepting it as a substitute for the pressure, training and adrenalin associated with the actual act of boxing on the big stage where everyone is good, perhaps even brilliant. Anyway, I'll have a go at your comments/question(s).
Kahn: Bredis Prescott (have I got that name right? I mean his first KO successor) aside, usually when Kahn loses or gets KO'd . . he's being reckless, caught in shootouts, and timed/caught. When he does that he throws away his advantages and exposes his vulnerabilities; as he's not fighting in a way were he's not using his natural advantages. Sure he has not got the best set of whiskas. But, he probably has the fastest hands in the business at the moment. Plus he knows (from being at the Wildcard gym) how to fight lefties. So there's a few attributes there to even the ledger up provided he understands his weaknesses, develops a decent defence and continues to implement excellent speed, combinations and other punching/moving attributes. Pernell Whitakker also (supposedly) had a glass jaw, but he worked out how to work around it, and was brilliant at doing so. Looks like Kahn is working out how to work around his chin too. I think Roger Mayweather gave a pretty good assessment of how Kahn would fare against Alexander; before they fought. Kahn bothering Mayweather: It's hard to know whether Kahn meaningfully troubles Mayweather if they fight. Because Mayweather has the potential to match Kahn's speed (if not better it under the bright lights of a marquee fight, where Kahn might tighten up with pressure), be unpredictable, and time Kahn. If that pressure gets to Khan; once Kahn diverts from his assumed game plan - which ordinarily would have to involve utilising his skills/advantages which include speed, to set the pace - Mayweather's approach of not (fundamentally) boxing but instead single power-shotting and/or power/pot shotting with serious speed . . . and closing all (counter) doors on the way out - except for those that were deliberate traps set; would probably prove to be a rubic's cube thatwas too complex/far for Kahn. However, until that happened, if Kahn were too effectively use his speed and movement, and set a decent work rate; Matthew probably would present issues for Mayweather. I mean, who has Mayweather fought in the last 5 years that's as fast as Kahn. That said, Floyd has - even aside from his excellent defence - enough skills and tools at his disposal to deal with guys that have fast hands/feet. Put Mayweather's defence into the picture and both how it; A) Serves as a good offence also. B) Would present as something unfamiliar/problematic to Khan - perhaps in equal quantities to how it (Floyd's defence) has the potential to nullify Khan's speed whilst also making him pay (how many counter right hands off Floyd's shoulder roll would Matthew walk into). And you begin to see how an opponent usually needs more than speed to beat Floyd. Most people think it's Floyd's own speed advantage that allows him to beat most guys. But aside from his familiarity with the big lights, excellent fundamentals, experience and stamina; usually the fact that Floyd has an excellent multi-purpose defence combined with the fact that Floyd's opponents have no meaningful defence system; is why Floyd always looks a cut above the rest. A good offence must only come from a good defence - the people that say the best defence is offence - in my opinion - either don't know or haven't fought at a level where everyone brings something good to the table. A good defence - amongst other things - allows you to; set up power shots in close, have a break when you want, dictate the pace of the fight, hit your opponents when they're committed, and also make your opponent miss. The big equaliser may be the fact that Kahn's chin combined with Floyd's ability to be accurate and get to it, would probably mean not only that Floyd (typically not a big puncher) could seriously hurt Matthew - but also that there was no way Kahn could get through all the rounds without Floyd giving him a little "touch up". But yes, short answer is that . . . . . given how Jab Judah's speed obviously troubled Mayweather (for a while); Kahn's speed and other skills - one would reasonably assume - also would.


-stormcentre :

Storm, Does he trouble Mayweather? I never understood the seasaw opinions on Amir Khan. When he's winning, he's a top 10 P4P, but as soon as he tastes the canvas he's an overhyped glass jaw. Since when is a boxer held to the impossible standard of being unbeatable? Seems the boxing public is growing more demanding and less forgiving every year. Did anyone hear the boos following the Thurman fight? I was incredulous. I guess appreciation for tactical boxing has also gone by the wayside.
I know what you mean Eric. I'm not sure I am the one to ask your questions after (me) hyping Matvey Korobov and then him tanking the way he did. I had heard he was in excellent shape heading into the fight. Still these things happen, and Matty looked like he hadn't prepared properly unless he has become just complacent with a sub-par exercise/preparation routine these days.
Thurman: aside from calling Mayweather out, he did sound off a fair bit before this fight. Firstly, about how he was going to "roll" his opponent. And, secondly he called other fighters out, including Floyd Jr. So perhaps the spectators were expecting better because of that, and as such held him to this; as they booed him. Still, boxing fans/spectators have always been a very hard to please and quick to turn bunch - no secret there. Part of that comes from how sensational and emotional a fight can be even for those not directly involved. The critique (in my opinion) often comes later, with the harsh and perhaps unreasonable quotients coming from those who have experienced the event and possibly even felt the above-mentioned emotion run through their veins; accepting it as a substitute for the pressure, training and adrenalin associated with the actual act of boxing on the big stage where everyone is good, perhaps even brilliant. Anyway, I'll have a go at your comments/question(s).
Kahn: Bredis Prescott (have I got that name right? I mean his first KO successor) aside, usually when Kahn loses or gets KO'd . . he's being reckless, caught in shootouts, and timed/caught. When he does that he throws away his advantages and exposes his vulnerabilities; as he's not fighting in a way were he's not using his natural advantages. Sure he has not got the best set of whiskas. But, he probably has the fastest hands in the business at the moment. Plus he knows (from being at the Wildcard gym) how to fight lefties. So there's a few attributes there to even the ledger up provided he understands his weaknesses, develops a decent defence and continues to implement excellent speed, combinations and other punching/moving attributes. Pernell Whitakker also (supposedly) had a glass jaw, but he worked out how to work around it, and was brilliant at doing so. Looks like Kahn is working out how to work around his chin too. I think Roger Mayweather gave a pretty good assessment of how Kahn would fare against Alexander; before they fought.
Kahn bothering Mayweather: It's hard to know whether Kahn meaningfully troubles Mayweather if they fight. Because Mayweather has the potential to match Kahn's speed (if not better it under the bright lights of a marquee fight, where Kahn might tighten up with pressure), be unpredictable, and time Kahn. If that pressure gets to Khan; once Kahn diverts from his assumed game plan - which ordinarily would have to involve utilising his skills/advantages which include speed, to set the pace - Mayweather's approach of not (fundamentally) boxing but instead single power-shotting and/or power/pot shotting with serious speed . . . and closing all (counter) doors on the way out - except for those that were deliberate traps set; would probably prove to be a rubic's cube thatwas too complex/far for Kahn. However, until that happened, if Kahn were too effectively use his speed and movement, and set a decent work rate; Matthew probably would present issues for Mayweather. I mean, who has Mayweather fought in the last 5 years that's as fast as Kahn. That said, Floyd has - even aside from his excellent defence - enough skills and tools at his disposal to deal with guys that have fast hands/feet. Put Mayweather's defence into the picture and both how it; A) Serves as a good offence also. B) Would present as something unfamiliar/problematic to Khan - perhaps in equal quantities to how it (Floyd's defence) has the potential to nullify Khan's speed whilst also making him pay (how many counter right hands off Floyd's shoulder roll would Matthew walk into). And you begin to see how an opponent usually needs more than speed to beat Floyd. Most people think it's Floyd's own speed advantage that allows him to beat most guys. But aside from his familiarity with the big lights, excellent fundamentals, experience and stamina; usually the fact that Floyd has an excellent multi-purpose defence combined with the fact that Floyd's opponents have no meaningful defence system; is why Floyd always looks a cut above the rest. A good offence must only come from a good defence - the people that say the best defence is offence - in my opinion - either don't know or haven't fought at a level where everyone brings something good to the table. A good defence - amongst other things - allows you to; set up power shots in close, have a break when you want, dictate the pace of the fight, hit your opponents when they're committed, and also make your opponent miss. The big equaliser may be the fact that Kahn's chin combined with Floyd's ability to be accurate and get to it, would probably mean not only that Floyd (typically not a big puncher) could seriously hurt Matthew - but also that there was no way Kahn could get through all the rounds without Floyd giving him a little "touch up". But yes, short answer is that . . . . . given how Jab Judah's speed obviously troubled Mayweather (for a while); Kahn's speed and other skills - one would reasonably assume - also would.


-stormcentre :

Storm, Does he trouble Mayweather? I never understood the seasaw opinions on Amir Khan. When he's winning, he's a top 10 P4P, but as soon as he tastes the canvas he's an overhyped glass jaw. Since when is a boxer held to the impossible standard of being unbeatable? Seems the boxing public is growing more demanding and less forgiving every year. Did anyone hear the boos following the Thurman fight? I was incredulous. I guess appreciation for tactical boxing has also gone by the wayside.
I know what you mean Eric. I'm not sure I am the one to ask your questions to after (me) hyping Matvey Korobov and then him tanking the way he did. I had heard he was in excellent shape heading into the fight. Still these things happen, and Matty looked like he hadn't prepared properly unless he has become just complacent with a sub-par exercise/preparation routine these days.
Thurman: aside from calling Mayweather out, he did sound off a fair bit before this fight. Firstly, about how he was going to "roll" his opponent. And, secondly he called other fighters out, including Floyd Jr. So perhaps the spectators were expecting better because of that, and as such held him to this; as they booed him. Still, boxing fans/spectators have always been a very hard to please and quick to turn bunch - no secret there. Part of that comes from how sensational and emotional a fight can be even for those not directly involved. The critique (in my opinion) often comes later, with the harsh and perhaps unreasonable quotients coming from those who have experienced the event and possibly even felt the above-mentioned emotion run through their veins; accepting it as a substitute for the pressure, training and adrenalin associated with the actual act of boxing on the big stage where everyone is good, perhaps even brilliant. Anyway, I'll have a go at your comments/question(s).
Kahn: Bredis Prescott (have I got that name right? I mean his first KO successor) aside, usually when Kahn loses or gets KO'd . . he's being reckless, caught in shootouts, and timed/caught. When he does that he throws away his advantages and exposes his vulnerabilities; as he's not fighting in a way were he's not using his natural advantages. Sure he has not got the best set of whiskas. But, he probably has the fastest hands in the business at the moment. Plus he knows (from being at the Wildcard gym) how to fight lefties. So there's a few attributes there to even the ledger up provided he understands his weaknesses, develops a decent defence and continues to implement excellent speed, combinations and other punching/moving attributes. Pernell Whitakker also (supposedly) had a glass jaw, but he worked out how to work around it, and was brilliant at doing so. Looks like Kahn is working out how to work around his chin too. I think Roger Mayweather gave a pretty good assessment of how Kahn would fare against Alexander; before they fought.
Kahn bothering Mayweather: It's hard to know whether Kahn meaningfully troubles Mayweather if they fight. Because Mayweather has the potential to match Kahn's speed (if not better it under the bright lights of a marquee fight, where Kahn might tighten up with pressure), be unpredictable, and time Kahn. If that pressure gets to Khan; once Kahn diverts from his assumed game plan - which ordinarily would have to involve utilising his skills/advantages which include speed, to set the pace - Mayweather's approach of not (fundamentally) boxing but instead single power-shotting and/or power/pot shotting with serious speed . . . and closing all (counter) doors on the way out - except for those that were deliberate traps set; would probably prove to be a rubic's cube thatwas too complex/far for Kahn. However, until that happened, if Kahn were too effectively use his speed and movement, and set a decent work rate; Matthew probably would present issues for Mayweather. I mean, who has Mayweather fought in the last 5 years that's as fast as Kahn. That said, Floyd has - even aside from his excellent defence - enough skills and tools at his disposal to deal with guys that have fast hands/feet. Put Mayweather's defence into the picture and both how it; A) Serves as a good offence also. B) Would present as something unfamiliar/problematic to Khan - perhaps in equal quantities to how it (Floyd's defence) has the potential to nullify Khan's speed whilst also making him pay (how many counter right hands off Floyd's shoulder roll would Matthew walk into). And you begin to see how an opponent usually needs more than speed to beat Floyd. Most people think it's Floyd's own speed advantage that allows him to beat most guys. But aside from his familiarity with the big lights, excellent fundamentals, experience and stamina; usually the fact that Floyd has an excellent multi-purpose defence combined with the fact that Floyd's opponents have no meaningful defence system; is why Floyd always looks a cut above the rest. A good offence must only come from a good defence - the people that say the best defence is offence - in my opinion - either don't know or haven't fought at a level where everyone brings something good to the table. A good defence - amongst other things - allows you to; set up power shots in close, have a break when you want, dictate the pace of the fight, hit your opponents when they're committed, and also make your opponent miss. The big equaliser may be the fact that Kahn's chin combined with Floyd's ability to be accurate and get to it, would probably mean not only that Floyd (typically not a big puncher) could seriously hurt Matthew - but also that there was no way Kahn could get through all the rounds without Floyd giving him a little "touch up". But yes, short answer is that . . . . . given how Jab Judah's speed obviously troubled Mayweather (for a while); Kahn's speed and other skills - one would reasonably assume - also would.


-Skibbz :

Khan seriously troubles Floyd and has a good shot at beating him. He showed incredible patience, focus, and abundant speed with his hands and his feet. This was the performance of his career so far and was an absolute treat to watch. He really is one of the best welterweights in the world right now, top 3 easily and you wonder why he doesn't feature on the P4P rankings... His chin? Well with the performance last night you can forget about him being clipped again, Virgil has worked a miracle. And I agree you won't beat Khan on the back foot, but now Virgil has him using his feet and his head so he's become an even greater boxer than before to a point where I think he won't let you swarm him, you'll find yourself on the end of some serious leather. Only way to beat him is with a well timed jab and a follow up. It's got to be disciplined and have enough to stop Khan in his tracks. I can't see it being done any other way.


-The Commish :

I truly enjoyed the boxing mastery turned in by Amir Khan. I mean, this was a masterpiece against a fine, world-class fighter, who elected to try to outbox a master boxer. It just wasn't going to happen. With the win, Amir Khan has put himself on a short list to face $$$May. On Saturday night, Khan had to sell his talents and believability as a threat to TBE. I think he did what he had to do. -Randy G.


-ericfarrell85 :

I know what you mean Eric. I'm not sure I am the one to ask your questions to after (me) hyping Matvey Korobov and then him tanking the way he did. I had heard he was in excellent shape heading into the fight. Still these things happen, and Matty looked like he hadn't prepared properly unless he has become just complacent with a sub-par exercise/preparation routine these days.
Thurman: aside from calling Mayweather out, he did sound off a fair bit before this fight. Firstly, about how he was going to "roll" his opponent. And, secondly he called other fighters out, including Floyd Jr. So perhaps the spectators were expecting better because of that, and as such held him to this; as they booed him. Still, boxing fans/spectators have always been a very hard to please and quick to turn bunch - no secret there. Part of that comes from how sensational and emotional a fight can be even for those not directly involved. The critique (in my opinion) often comes later, with the harsh and perhaps unreasonable quotients coming from those who have experienced the event and possibly even felt the above-mentioned emotion run through their veins; accepting it as a substitute for the pressure, training and adrenalin associated with the actual act of boxing on the big stage where everyone is good, perhaps even brilliant. Anyway, I'll have a go at your comments/question(s).
Kahn: Bredis Prescott (have I got that name right? I mean his first KO successor) aside, usually when Kahn loses or gets KO'd . . he's being reckless, caught in shootouts, and timed/caught. When he does that he throws away his advantages and exposes his vulnerabilities; as he's not fighting in a way were he's not using his natural advantages. Sure he has not got the best set of whiskas. But, he probably has the fastest hands in the business at the moment. Plus he knows (from being at the Wildcard gym) how to fight lefties. So there's a few attributes there to even the ledger up provided he understands his weaknesses, develops a decent defence and continues to implement excellent speed, combinations and other punching/moving attributes. Pernell Whitakker also (supposedly) had a glass jaw, but he worked out how to work around it, and was brilliant at doing so. Looks like Kahn is working out how to work around his chin too. I think Roger Mayweather gave a pretty good assessment of how Kahn would fare against Alexander; before they fought.
Kahn bothering Mayweather: It's hard to know whether Kahn meaningfully troubles Mayweather if they fight. Because Mayweather has the potential to match Kahn's speed (if not better it under the bright lights of a marquee fight, where Kahn might tighten up with pressure), be unpredictable, and time Kahn. If that pressure gets to Khan; once Kahn diverts from his assumed game plan - which ordinarily would have to involve utilising his skills/advantages which include speed, to set the pace - Mayweather's approach of not (fundamentally) boxing but instead single power-shotting and/or power/pot shotting with serious speed . . . and closing all (counter) doors on the way out - except for those that were deliberate traps set; would probably prove to be a rubic's cube thatwas too complex/far for Kahn. However, until that happened, if Kahn were too effectively use his speed and movement, and set a decent work rate; Matthew probably would present issues for Mayweather. I mean, who has Mayweather fought in the last 5 years that's as fast as Kahn. That said, Floyd has - even aside from his excellent defence - enough skills and tools at his disposal to deal with guys that have fast hands/feet. Put Mayweather's defence into the picture and both how it; A) Serves as a good offence also. B) Would present as something unfamiliar/problematic to Khan - perhaps in equal quantities to how it (Floyd's defence) has the potential to nullify Khan's speed whilst also making him pay (how many counter right hands off Floyd's shoulder roll would Matthew walk into). And you begin to see how an opponent usually needs more than speed to beat Floyd. Most people think it's Floyd's own speed advantage that allows him to beat most guys. But aside from his familiarity with the big lights, excellent fundamentals, experience and stamina; usually the fact that Floyd has an excellent multi-purpose defence combined with the fact that Floyd's opponents have no meaningful defence system; is why Floyd always looks a cut above the rest. A good offence must only come from a good defence - the people that say the best defence is offence - in my opinion - either don't know or haven't fought at a level where everyone brings something good to the table. A good defence - amongst other things - allows you to; set up power shots in close, have a break when you want, dictate the pace of the fight, hit your opponents when they're committed, and also make your opponent miss. The big equaliser may be the fact that Kahn's chin combined with Floyd's ability to be accurate and get to it, would probably mean not only that Floyd (typically not a big puncher) could seriously hurt Matthew - but also that there was no way Kahn could get through all the rounds without Floyd giving him a little "touch up". But yes, short answer is that . . . . . given how Jab Judah's speed obviously troubled Mayweather (for a while); Kahn's speed and other skills - one would reasonably assume - also would.
Thanks Storm and certainly you are the one to ask (about many things in my opinion). I agree absolutely with what you said, particularly in the segments about Floyd's psychological advantages and the likelihood that Amir may be a little tight in a mega fight. I think Amir is still VERY conscious of his knockout defeats and Virgil Hunter has taken on the near impossible task of repropgramming a fighter completely. This is psychological training as much as phsyical training and one fight is not enough to prove Khan has abandoned his former ways. Did you hear Hunter shouting at Khan at the end of the fight? "Next time you do what I ask!". Still a lot of work to be done if you ask Virgil. Even more important than this, I think Khan can be timed. There was a round in last nights fight (6-8 somewhere) where Alexander was throwing with Khan and landed a couple of solid right hooks and straight lefts. I think Mayweather can do much better. As Khan is long and rangy and always attacking from a set outside position, I see Mayweather eventually mastering the timing (unlike a more erratic Pacquiao, who varies his tempo and movements far more). I hope I'm wrong; I've been a Khan fan for a long time. Hopefully we'll found out before May exits (or is shown the exit by a certain someone).


-DaveB :

The thing is Floyd is not going to follow Khan around like Alexander. Floyd will make Khan come to him. Alexander kept going to his Alexander's left all night never cutting the ring, fighting in the center of the ring. Floyd will make Khan come to him if he wants to win the fight. And the thing is Khan was missing a lot of those punches and a lot were not landing solidly, although they were impressive just not as impressive as they looked. He will miss more going after Mayweather. Those timed punches from Mayweather will catch up to Khan in some fashion. I think Floyd will be a nightmare for Khan even more than Khan is for him. Mayweather would need about three rounds to get him figured out. Khan isn't an awkward fighter so that would make things easier in that aspect. I wouldn't mind seeing that fight happen.


-Radam G :

I'm on the swarming bus about Khan. He's easy breezy for that style. And to my amazement in a pleasurable way, trainer Virgil Hunter hasn't change Khan that much. V-Hunt has slowed him down from jittery prancing and hopping straight back and straight in with those fast hands not in the position to punch or block incoming shots. Khan is still stiff in upward body movement, and is robotic with no head movement and his chin is never tucked in. But V-Hunt has definitely counter the problems of that and taught Khan to parry and ride shots to stop them from finding their way to his chin, and blasting him to smithereens. Money May could beat him up with a walking-down-swarming style, similarly to the way that the shorter, longer arms Money May beat the late, great Diego Corrales. Nonetheless, the nowadays, older, hormone replacement therapy, vampire-facial blood-doping, xylocaine-using Money May does not ( and probably cannot) swarm at no time the way young he did against Corrales. A scrap between Khan and Money May will be a coaching affair. And V-Hunt out coaches the ?o?ksure Pops Joy May any day of the week and a thousand-and-one times on Sunday. Smart money says that Money May will keep on avoiding scrapping with Khan. Holla!


-DaveB :

Oh no. The two biggest fights left for May are Khan and Pac and you're saying he doesn't want neither? There is no body left. At least nobody worth him fighting for $32,000,000. LOL Of course on free Showtime he can fight anyone he wants.


-brownsugar :

I pesonally think Floyd would handle Paq easier than Khan... I have believed for years that Khan would be a nightmare for anybody except a Prime Mayweather. Mayweather is no longer in prime shape but his movement would frustrate Manny. Manny can leap from five feet away with a straight lethal left at blinding speeds but his general lateral movement is not as impressive. Anyway It doesn't look like Arum wants anything to do with Floyd after his public tirade on Showtime Friday last night...it looks like King Khan will most likely be next The plot thickens. Good comments


-Radam G :

The thing is Floyd is not going to follow Khan around like Alexander. Floyd will make Khan come to him. Alexander kept going to his Alexander's left all night never cutting the ring, fighting in the center of the ring. Floyd will make Khan come to him if he wants to win the fight. And the thing is Khan was missing a lot of those punches and a lot were not landing solidly, although they were impressive just not as impressive as they looked. He will miss more going after Mayweather. Those timed punches from Mayweather will catch up to Khan in some fashion. I think Floyd will be a nightmare for Khan even more than Khan is for him. Mayweather would need about three rounds to get him figured out. Khan isn't an awkward fighter so that would make things easier in that aspect. I wouldn't mind seeing that fight happen.
Figuring out a pug means nothing if you have lost or never had the ability to get to him. Or as you said, get him to come to you. A scrap between Lil' Floyd and Amir would be a coaching affair. The listening fighter to his trainer/coach will win. As of now, the advantages lie with Khan. The Mayweather fam is dysfunctional, as ev'ybodee and dey momma know. Money May might kick both his pops and uncle Roger out of his corner, and let beloved Granny Mayweather run the show for that scrap. Money May is closer to his granny than he is anyone else in his fam. Don't forget that we are dealing with boxing -- the "theatre of the unexpected" and da d@mn crazy. Hehehe! Holla!


-oubobcat :

I truly enjoyed the boxing mastery turned in by Amir Khan. I mean, this was a masterpiece against a fine, world-class fighter, who elected to try to outbox a master boxer. It just wasn't going to happen. With the win, Amir Khan has put himself on a short list to face $$$May. On Saturday night, Khan had to sell his talents and believability as a threat to TBE. I think he did what he had to do. -Randy G.
That was a tremendous performance by Khan. Overall, probably the best of his career. He completely took Alexander out of his rhythm. Alexander could not get into range and could not get off his punches. When he did, they either missed or landed with minimal effect. I must say too that the work Khan is putting in with Virgil Hunter is paying off as defensively he was much improved in this fight. Khan has natural gifts. He showcased his hand speed along with much improved technique in the ring. If we don't get Pac-Mayweather, and frankly I don't think its happening, a Mayweather-Khan fight is not too bad especially if say we get a nice undercard (Thurman-Maidana?).


-Radam G :

Oh no. The two biggest fights left for May are Khan and Pac and you're saying he doesn't want neither? There is no body left. At least nobody worth him fighting for $32,000,000. LOL Of course on free Showtime he can fight anyone he wants.
Da Manny kayos Lil' Floyd like the last Pinoy mestizo Rocky Lockridge did Uncle Roger. Neither nor Lil'Floyd and Pops Joy May want that work. And Lil' Floyd, by his Uncle Floyd's advice, has avoided langy welterweights with snap, crackle, POP! With Amir Khan, he will continue too. Lil Floyd does not aim to end his career as some many greats have -- with two or three straight losses. Holla!


-Carmine Cas :

There are a lot of factors to consider if Khan and Mayweather dance in the square jungle. I am off the opinion that Khan's speedy rangy busy style gives Floyd issues early in the fight. I also believe that Floyd will be employing all pre-fight tactics to get under Amir's skin to get an easy chin check. It's an interesting fight because of Khan's skill set and Floyd's perceived vulnerabilities to his particular style. I'd like to see Mayweather-Pacquiao then Mayweather-Khan.


-DaveB :

Da Manny kayos Lil' Floyd like the last Pinoy mestizo Rocky Lockridge did Uncle Roger. Neither nor Lil'Floyd and Pops Joy May want that work. And Lil' Floyd, by his Uncle Floyd's advice, has avoided langy welterweights with snap, crackle, POP! With Amir Khan, he will continue too. Lil Floyd does not aim to end his career as some many greats have -- with two or three straight losses. Holla!
Okay, that sounds fair. His uncle got starched very good by Rocky Lockridge and his father got pasted pretty good by Sugar Ray Leonard so I can see why ducking could be smart. But who is left anymore?


-Froggy :

There are a lot of factors to consider if Khan and Mayweather dance in the square jungle. I am off the opinion that Khan's speedy rangy busy style gives Floyd issues early in the fight. I also believe that Floyd will be employing all pre-fight tactics to get under Amir's skin to get an easy chin check. It's an interesting fight because of Khan's skill set and Floyd's perceived vulnerabilities to his particular style. I'd like to see Mayweather-Pacquiao then Mayweather-Khan.
Mayweather - Pacquiao and Mayweather - Khan would be great fights to see, but you have to decide which one, because after Mayweather loses to either one he is out of the picture to fight the other one !


-Radam G :

Okay, that sounds fair. His uncle got starched very good by Rocky Lockridge and his father got pasted pretty good by Sugar Ray Leonard so I can see why ducking could be smart. But who is left anymore?
There are always no-chance pugs around that promotion will build up and turn the typical fan in a believer. Holla!


-stormcentre :

Money May might kick both his pops and uncle Roger out of his corner, and let beloved Granny Mayweather run the show for that scrap. Money May is closer to his granny than he is anyone else in his fam.
Of course. And it's silly to think these things wont happen. You're outrageous RG!


-stormcentre :

There are always no-chance pugs around that promotion will build up and turn the typical fan in a believer. Holla!
A very true quote.


-stormcentre :

Thanks Storm and certainly you are the one to ask (about many things in my opinion). I agree absolutely with what you said, particularly in the segments about Floyd's psychological advantages and the likelihood that Amir may be a little tight in a mega fight. I think Amir is still VERY conscious of his knockout defeats and Virgil Hunter has taken on the near impossible task of repropgramming a fighter completely. This is psychological training as much as phsyical training and one fight is not enough to prove Khan has abandoned his former ways. Did you hear Hunter shouting at Khan at the end of the fight? "Next time you do what I ask!". Still a lot of work to be done if you ask Virgil. Even more important than this, I think Khan can be timed. There was a round in last nights fight (6-8 somewhere) where Alexander was throwing with Khan and landed a couple of solid right hooks and straight lefts. I think Mayweather can do much better. As Khan is long and rangy and always attacking from a set outside position, I see Mayweather eventually mastering the timing (unlike a more erratic Pacquiao, who varies his tempo and movements far more). I hope I'm wrong; I've been a Khan fan for a long time. Hopefully we'll found out before May exits (or is shown the exit by a certain someone).
Agree with what you have said there. Kahn is still a little (justifiably) conscious of his KO losses. Virgil Hunter has taken on an interesting task, and a lot of the training will be psychological. Khan, or anyone, can be timed. But - unless they hang around and look at their work like Fernando Vargas and Nate Campbell (against Peden) did - generally the rule is; the faster they punch, and get in/out, the harder it is to be timed. Mayweather is probably the best out there at timing guys. He does it all the time, from various ranges, and both before and after traps are set. It's his stock in trade.


-amayseng :

Khan's speed, length and pop could give this Floyd a lot of trouble. The fight is intriguing especially since Floyd is not very active with his punch output. Amir has a good chance to beat him on activity alone. Throw combinations and get out quick, dont stick around ever, not once for a straight right hand. In and out controlling the pace and activity, and Floyd will be challenged. I dont see Floyd fighting Khan or Pac. I see him sitting out the May date


-stormcentre :

Floyd (comes out after - for years - being quiet and refusing to meaningfully talk about Pacquaio V Mayweather) claims Pacquaio V Mayweather is the fight he craves for. Sounds a little like he is trying to hijack the May date by (humorously) calling out Pacquaio for that weekend. When/if Arum shuns it (due to investments in Cotto V Alvarez) Floyd gets to say that Pakcow avoided him again. Let the psychological games begin (again).


-Radam G :

Of course. And it's silly to think these things wont happen. You're outrageous RG!
Hehehe! Life is life. Holla!


-the Roast :

Khan had the most impressive win of the weekend. His speed will be tough to deal with. Bring on Floyd or Manny.


-Radam G :

Khan had the most impressive win of the weekend. His speed will be tough to deal with. Bring on Floyd or Manny.
He was Da Manny's sparringmate. And his speed was no problema. Da Manny knocked him on his arse four times. And had to stop nuking him silly twice. But with Trainer Virgil Hunter, Amir is a tad better. But Da Manny will still catch him late, and put him too sleep. Amir still carries his chin too high and forget to bend his knees. Da Manny would eventually catch Amir with da Pinoy Whuppa Whop. And the canvas of the squared jungle, Amir's whole body would mop. Hehehe! Holla!


-King Beef :

Khan looked good against a game Alexander, I think he could give "any " 147 fighter some headaches. As someone said earlier he has a very good chance to outwork a 38 yr old May, whose output is not very active, but very accurate. Khan probably has a couple of good rounds and then Money takes over. I still dont think Khan has done enough in the division to warrant a fight with the 2 big dogs, but it would be some good scraps if they happen.


-ericfarrell85 :

Sometimes I really wonder about Khan's power. At times he appears very sharp and powerful and reduces his opponents to an absolute state of helplessness (see Malignaggi, Judah, Salita). Then there are his other fights, where his power is more smoke and mirrors and his opponents swarm him with impunity (see Maidana, Peterson *especially evident in round 3, Diaz, Garcia). Does Khan have a powerful enough counter to keep swarmers at bay, keep them pussyfooting and not molesting him senselessly? Take Peterson for instance. I like the guy and feel he is vastly unappreciated, but Hagler he is not; yet he was eating Khan's shots like a piece of cake, very casually. So, where does Khan stand on a punchers scale?


-stormcentre :

Sometimes I really wonder about Khan's power. At times he appears very sharp and powerful and reduces his opponents to an absolute state of helplessness (see Malignaggi, Judah, Salita). Then there are his other fights, where his power is more smoke and mirrors and his opponents swarm him with impunity (see Maidana, Peterson *especially evident in round 3, Diaz, Garcia). Does Khan have a powerful enough counter to keep swarmers at bay, keep them pussyfooting and not molesting him senselessly? Take Peterson for instance. I like the guy and feel he is vastly unappreciated, but Hagler he is not; yet he was eating Khan's shots like a piece of cake, very casually. So, where does Khan stand on a punchers scale?
Average - he (usually) needs to bamboozle his opponents and force errors from the first few (fast) punches in order to land the telling blow. Experienced and/or really tough fighters know and see this, and that (in addition to my earlier comments) is how/why he gets beat and/or knocked out. In essence, one of the things that Hunter will probably be trying to address (in Khan's arsenal) is the (assumed) need for Khan to scare or try to limit his opponents with combinations that are fast - but don't always have a purpose. If Khan can't bother his opponents with his speed, then Khan himself is bothered and often comes undone. A lot of fighters are like this . . . once their main weapon is disarmed they don't know what to do. Big punchers, always rely on the hook and/or cross. Take that away (like Hopkins and Mayweather can/does; with their great defences and reflexes), and they're left in a boxing match they may not feel comfortable about. If you have a guy across the ring from you that has speed, and you are not bothered about it and actually looking to time him; once that (loaded) counter lands he will think twice about running of that razzle dazzle again; if he's still standing. This is why Khan has potential and also liabilities. This is also why Khan, against Floyd, could easily appear to be a close fight (on paper) but actually end up being a serious risk for Matthew as he could find himself swimming in the dark, deep, shark infested waters; where holding your head up high (as you throw not always meaningful combinations) may not get you any oxygen - instead it may just get him KTFO.


-brownsugar :

Sometimes I really wonder about Khan's power. At times he appears very sharp and powerful and reduces his opponents to an absolute state of helplessness (see Malignaggi, Judah, Salita). Then there are his other fights, where his power is more smoke and mirrors and his opponents swarm him with impunity (see Maidana, Peterson *especially evident in round 3, Diaz, Garcia). Does Khan have a powerful enough counter to keep swarmers at bay, keep them pussyfooting and not molesting him senselessly? Take Peterson for instance. I like the guy and feel he is vastly unappreciated, but Hagler he is not; yet he was eating Khan's shots like a piece of cake, very casually. So, where does Khan stand on a punchers scale?
In reference to Khan's power,...in my opinion Devon Alexander is probably not the perfect gauge by which to measure another fighters punching power. Alexander is one of the few boxers who has walked straight through Randall Bailey's 50 megaton right hand missiles and didn't suffer the slightest disturbance of equilibrium. Alexander devoured Maidana's power shots like he was snacking on Hostess Ho - Ho's during a Sunday stroll thru the park. The only time I have truly seen Alexander hurt was when he was gored by Bradley's brazen head butts several years ago. Also Khan was maintaining his distance, ...he was catching Alexander at the end of his punches in many instances. Any one who throws punches with Khan's velocity is dangerous, especially if he can follow through. Speed/velocity = power in my opinion. And again this is only my humble opinion. Someone else may have resached another conclusion. I'm not an expert, just an enthusiast.


-stormcentre :

Sometimes I really wonder about Khan's power. At times he appears very sharp and powerful and reduces his opponents to an absolute state of helplessness (see Malignaggi, Judah, Salita). Then there are his other fights, where his power is more smoke and mirrors and his opponents swarm him with impunity (see Maidana, Peterson *especially evident in round 3, Diaz, Garcia). Does Khan have a powerful enough counter to keep swarmers at bay, keep them pussyfooting and not molesting him senselessly? Take Peterson for instance. I like the guy and feel he is vastly unappreciated, but Hagler he is not; yet he was eating Khan's shots like a piece of cake, very casually. So, where does Khan stand on a punchers scale?
Average - he (usually) needs to bamboozle his opponents and force errors from the first few (fast) punches in order to land the telling blow. Experienced and/or really tough fighters know and see this, and that (in addition to my earlier comments) is how/why he gets beat and/or knocked out. In essence, one of the things that Hunter will probably be trying to address (in Khan's arsenal) is the (assumed) need for Khan to scare or try to limit his opponents with combinations that are fast - but don't always have a purpose. If Khan can't bother his opponents with his speed, then Khan himself is bothered and often comes undone. A lot of fighters are like this . . . once their main weapon is disarmed they don't know what to do. Big punchers, always rely on the hook and/or cross. Take that away (like Hopkins and Mayweather can/does; with their great defences and reflexes), and they're left in a boxing match they may not feel comfortable about. If you have a guy across the ring from you that has speed, and you are not bothered about it and actually looking to time him; once that (loaded) counter lands he will think twice about running off that razzle dazzle combo again; if he's still standing. This is why Khan has both potential and also, not insignificant, liabilities. This is also why Khan, against Floyd, could easily appear to be a close fight (on paper) - but actually end up being a serious risk for Matthew. As he could find himself swimming in the dark, deep, shark infested waters; where holding your head up high (as you throw not always meaningful combinations) may not necessarily get you any much needed oxygen - instead it may just get him KTFO.


-brownsugar :

Amir Khan was awesome in this match. His power, speed and body movement, he completely outclassed Alexander.
I though so too... His time Ward's trainer has finally sunken in and has allowed Khan to fight with a better balance of a offence and defense.


-SouthPawFlo :

I think the Pacquiao fight is easier for Mayweather than Khan... Khan at this point is faster, taller and more rangier than Manny, and he can fight on the outside and score points... I'm not sure if Khan is strong enough mentally for the bright lights and can stay discipline and not make fight ending mistakes... Khan for all his gifts still doesn't move his head much and still leaves his chin in a very reachable position when he punches... I'll pick Khan Over Pacquaio right now because he'll be able to score points and hopefully use his longs well enough not to let the smaller Pac catch him with a fight ending shot.... But with Amir Khan vs anybody you gotta wonder what happens when he gets caught with a big shot.....


-Radam G :

I think the Pacquiao fight is easier for Mayweather than Khan... Khan at this point is faster, taller and more rangier than Manny, and he can fight on the outside and score points... I'm not sure if Khan is strong enough mentally for the bright lights and can stay discipline and not make fight ending mistakes... Khan for all his gifts still doesn't move his head much and still leaves his chin in a very reachable position when he punches... I'll pick Khan Over Pacquaio right now because he'll be able to score points and hopefully use his longs well enough not to let the smaller Pac catch him with a fight ending shot.... But with Amir Khan vs anybody you gotta wonder what happens when he gets caught with a big shot.....
Imma take that bet from you. Because I personal know that Da Manny has Amir Khan's number. And even trainer Virgil Hunter cannot change that number, so he will tell Amir Khan to stay away from Da Manny. Because Da Manny will knock him da double fudge OUT. Amir might go the distance with Money May, but Da Manny kayo them both of. Da Manny is to Money May and Amir Khan what Rev. George Foreman was to the late, greats "Smokin' Joe Frazier and "Jawbreaker" Kenny Norton. You guys ought to get off that Fairy Tail of range and reach and syet. From the armpit to the balled-up fist, Da Manny's reach was longer than Big Money Oscar, Morales, Margarito and Algieri. And his reach is longer than Khan and Money May's too when you count it that way. You are getting a false sense of reach when the TV talking heads shout out the total reach from the left extended-middle finger across the shoulder width to right extended middle finger. People who have wide shoulders and a long middle finger appear to have octopus-length reach. It is just a darn the trick of the trade for promotions. There are optical illusions everywhere up in da game. Believe nothing that you hear, and 10 percent of what you see. Your eyes lie BIG TIME.
->http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZflIMBxyIak. Holla!


-Carmine Cas :

Mayweather - Pacquiao and Mayweather - Khan would be great fights to see, but you have to decide which one, because after Mayweather loses to either one he is out of the picture to fight the other one !
Lol very true Froggy, but I am under the impression that Mayweather defeats Pacquiao and then fights Amir Khan in the fall around October/Novemebr so he can fast for Ramadan. But I can also see Pacquiao defeating Mayweather. And to address your point I would rather see that fight.


-amayseng :

Average - he (usually) needs to bamboozle his opponents and force errors from the first few (fast) punches in order to land the telling blow. Experienced and/or really tough fighters know and see this, and that (in addition to my earlier comments) is how/why he gets beat and/or knocked out. In essence, one of the things that Hunter will probably be trying to address (in Khan's arsenal) is the (assumed) need for Khan to scare or try to limit his opponents with combinations that are fast - but don't always have a purpose. If Khan can't bother his opponents with his speed, then Khan himself is bothered and often comes undone. A lot of fighters are like this . . . once their main weapon is disarmed they don't know what to do. Big punchers, always rely on the hook and/or cross. Take that away (like Hopkins and Mayweather can/does; with their great defences and reflexes), and they're left in a boxing match they may not feel comfortable about. If you have a guy across the ring from you that has speed, and you are not bothered about it and actually looking to time him; once that (loaded) counter lands he will think twice about running off that razzle dazzle combo again; if he's still standing. This is why Khan has both potential and also, not insignificant, liabilities. This is also why Khan, against Floyd, could easily appear to be a close fight (on paper) - but actually end up being a serious risk for Matthew. As he could find himself swimming in the dark, deep, shark infested waters; where holding your head up high (as you throw not always meaningful combinations) may not necessarily get you any much needed oxygen - instead it may just get him KTFO.
I would think it is above average. He may not be a one punch killer but he buzzes with the best of them.


-Carmine Cas :

Imma take that bet from you. Because I personal know that Da Manny has Amir Khan's number. And even trainer Virgil Hunter cannot change that number, so he will tell Amir Khan to stay away from Da Manny. Because Da Manny will knock him da double fudge OUT. Amir might go the distance with Money May, but Da Manny kayo them both of. Da Manny is to Money May and Amir Khan what Rev. George Foreman was to the late, greats "Smokin' Joe Frazier and "Jawbreaker" Kenny Norton. You guys ought to get off that Fairy Tail of range and reach and syet. From the armpit to the balled-up fist, Da Manny's reach was longer than Big Money Oscar, Morales, Margarito and Algieri. And his reach is longer than Khan and Money May's too when you count it that way. You are getting a false sense of reach when the TV talking heads shout out the total reach from the left extended-middle finger across the shoulder width to right extended middle finger. People who have wide shoulders and a long middle finger appear to have octopus-length reach. It is just a darn the trick of the trade for promotions. There are optical illusions everywhere up in da game. Believe nothing that you hear, and 10 percent of what you see. Your eyes lie BIG TIME.
->http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZflIMBxyIak. Holla!
Nice summation and realization RG, now is there a Ali to Pacquiao's Foreman? "Hulkuez" is sort of but not really.


-Radam G :

Nice summation and realization RG, now is there a Ali to Pacquiao's Foreman? "Hulkuez" is sort of but not really.
You almost nailed it. Marquez is a late, great Ken Norton to Da Manny. He will always nbe troublesome for Da Manny. But Hulkquez is just a full of dat syet cheat dat did da do on that night. And hit the boksing lotto. He could never repeat that night, IMHO. Holla!


-Carmine Cas :

You almost nailed it. Marquez is a late, great Ken Norton to Da Manny. He will always nbe troublesome for Da Manny. But Hulkquez is just a full of dat syet cheat dat did da do on that night. And hit the boksing lotto. He could never repeat that night, IMHO. Holla!
Yeah I was going to say Ken Norton, especially considering his physique....


-stormcentre :

Average - he (usually) needs to bamboozle his opponents and force errors from the first few (fast) punches in order to land the telling blow. Experienced and/or really tough fighters know and see this, and that (in addition to my earlier comments) is how/why he gets beat and/or knocked out. In essence, one of the things that Hunter will probably be trying to address (in Khan's arsenal) is the (assumed) need for Khan to scare or try to limit his opponents with combinations that are fast - but don't always have a purpose. If Khan can't bother his opponents with his speed, then Khan himself is bothered and often comes undone. A lot of fighters are like this . . . once their main weapon is disarmed they don't know what to do. Big punchers, always rely on the hook and/or cross. Take that away (like Hopkins and Mayweather can/does; with their great defences and reflexes), and they're left in a boxing match they may not feel comfortable about. If you have a guy across the ring from you that has speed, and you are not bothered about it and actually looking to time him; once that (loaded) counter lands he will think twice about running off that razzle dazzle combo again; if he's still standing. This is why Khan has both potential and also, not insignificant, liabilities. This is also why Khan, against Floyd, could easily appear to be a close fight (on paper) - but actually end up being a serious risk for Matthew. As he could find himself swimming in the dark, deep, shark infested waters; where holding your head up high (as you throw not always meaningful combinations) may not necessarily get you any much needed oxygen - instead it may just get him KTFO.
Clarification; many of my comments, particularly those aimed at championship level competition, are essentially that - championship level critique. I think it's both an important and grounding clarification. As, at the end of the day, Matthew Khan is an extremely popular, successful, and highly skilled British boxer that, aside from his standout amateur and Olympic experience, he also possesses good/bad traits that are reasonably unique for any era. Furthermore, the speed he possesses (particularly now), to nullify it as I describe . . . requires top level skill, reflexes, stamina, and determination. No, I haven't received any hate mail. But as I was driving along today I remembered/realised that both; A) I was seriously impressed with Khan (and his daunting task) when I first spotted him at the Olympics. B) The clarification is probably needed. As we all follow boxing, have fun, and hypothesise about what fighters and traits will outdo others, it's easy to speak in tones and tongues that may not inform the casual readers of this site that . . at the championship level of any sanction/weight . . . . . almost all of the fighters there are exceptionally good, and that the critique offered (at least by me) is critique that's both mindful of that, and therefore "championship level critique". Professional fighter/boxers take the biggest risk. The fear is not necessarily losing, more being publicly humiliated and beaten up in the process. One punch/loss can change a fighter's career and life. That said, whilst I am relatively confident of the theory and practice associated with the sport, predicting the future and various outcomes is clearly not my forte. Merry and safe Xmas Y'all.