Shane Mosley Contemplating Return: “I Can Beat Anybody”

shane-mosley

Shane Mosley is contemplating a return to the ring.

“It’s a possibility,” said Mosley. “I’ve been in the gym training a lot and working out. I feel real good.”

Mosley said he’s been working out with current and future world champions, and he feels he can still compete at the highest levels of the sport.

“At this point, I think I can beat anybody. I’ve been in the ring working with world champions, guys who are world champions right now as we speak, and I feel very comfortable with what I can do [in the ring] and against anybody.”

Mosley, age 43, retired in December 2013 after a six-round TKO loss to Anthony Mundine in Sydney, Australia the previous month.

“It’s a young man’s game. It’s time to step aside and let some of these young guys do their thing,” Mosley told the press then.

But Mosley, who has spent the past 11 months focused on training his son as a professional prizefighter, Shane Mosley Jr., said the prolonged period of rest has done his body good.

“I’m healthier now than I was when I was fighting…so I feel good. To fight without injuries is a lot better for me, so people would see a different part of me. I’m excited about that part, if it does happen that way.”

Mosley’s father and longtime trainer, Jack, said his son finally feels healthy again after a long and arduous ring career that included world championships in the lightweight, welterweight and junior middleweight divisions.

“Shane would never tell you this, but the losses came as a result of injuries and being sick.”

Mosley retired in December 2013 after winning only two of his last seven fights. Mosley went 2-4-1 over that time span, including a knockout win over Antonio Margarito in January 2009.

Mosley defeated Pablo Cesar Cano in May 2013, but suffered losses to Floyd Mayweather, Pacquiao, Canelo Alvarez and Mundine. Mosley earned a draw against Sergio Mora in September 2010.

But Jack Mosley believes his son’s losses were not because of age or a diminished skill set.

“When he fought Pacquiao, he had a severed Achilles tendon that he had operated on the day after the fight [and the injury] popped up the day before the fight.”

His father said he might have taught his son too well to keep things to himself after losses.

“He’s pulled groin muscles, had hernia operations and other things that led to some losses. Nobody knows that, because I always taught Shane not to complain about a loss, and to let the other fighter have the glory. He’s always upheld that. That’s something about Shane most people like.”

Mosley has always prided himself in fighting the very best, something that led to tough fights and the losses that come with the territory.

“But there were reasons why he lost. I know it, but the people don’t know it.”

His father, who turns 70 on November 7, said he believes his son would be a different fighter coming out of retirement.

“He’s healthy now.”

If Mosley returns, this will be the second time he’s come out of retirement. Mosley first retired in June 2012 but returned one year later to defeat Cano.

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COMMENTS

-The Shadow :

Sure you can, buddy.


-the Roast :

We have read this story a hundred times before. Shane will come back and take a one sided beating. He will then repeat his young mans game speech and retire again. As long as there is boxing there will be great and not so great fighters who don't know when to quit. There's no shame in that. It's hard to walk away and give up on something you love.


-Radam G :

Nobody should be surprised about the Sugarman or any of the nowadays come backers. Back in the day, the Commish can holla, pugs were forced into retirement. Nowadays, commissions don't have the teeth to force them now. Boxers will and have sued for all types of discriminations and won. This is one reason that amateur boxing has moved its post to forced retirement from 36-years old to 42-years old. Don't get it twisted. Commissions forced retirement on Jack Johnson, Bob FitzSimmons, Archie Moore, Bob Foster, Saul Mamby, Jimmy Young and Jerry Ouarry, just to name a few out of boxing. I say go back to that legend deal that boxing tried a few years ago. It an old-farts-fighting-old-farts tour. Holla!


-Froggy :

Mosely has had a great career, he is a sure first ballot hall of famer I should think he is fine financially, why make a comeback ? His father should be talking him out of it, but it is of course up to "Sugar Shane" ! Look at ancient Archie, the King of the seniors tour, in my mind, had perhaps his most famous fight with Durelle at the age of 45 depending on who you believe and was stripped of his light heavyweight title in 1962, at the age of 48 !


-The Commish :

Nobody should be surprised about the Sugarman or any of the nowadays come backers. Back in the day, the Commish can holla, pugs were forced into retirement. Nowadays, commissions don't have the teeth to force them now. Boxers will and have sued for all types of discriminations and won. This is one reason that amateur boxing has moved its post to forced retirement from 36-years old to 42-years old. Don't get it twisted. Commissions forced retirement on Jack Johnson, Bob FitzSimmons, Archie Moore, Bob Foster, Saul Mamby, Jimmy Young and Jerry Ouarry, just to name a few out of boxing. I say go back to that legend deal that boxing tried a few years ago. It an old-farts-fighting-old-farts tour. Holla!
I had guys coming out of the woodwork trying to get me to license them after 8, 9, 10 and even 15 years out of the sport. I had a businessman try to get a friend of his licensed. The friend was 60. They said they'd sue me for discrimination if I turned them down. I told the friend I wanted to watch him spar a few rounds at Gleason's Gym. They agreed, but only if they could supply the sparring partner. Yeh, right! I told them I would pick the sparring partner. I picked a young, undefeated stud. I told him to move around, take body shots, use the jab--but lightly--and to work a bit from the outside and a bit from the inside. The kid did phenomenal. The 60-year-old did not. I told him to train hard and come back in another year. I never heard from him again. On many other instances, I simply said, "You haven't boxed in (number of years) and you have lost (#) fights in a row. I must respectfully turn your application for a license." On several occasions, I was taken to court. On each occasion, the plaintiff lost. The judge did not want to force me to give a license to the said applicant. Why? Because, if anything negative should have happened to the fighter, the blame would have fallen on the judge, who forced the commission to grant a license to someone who had been turned down by the state agency which regulates boxing. Against these lawsuits, I was undefeated. For Mosley's own good, I hope he stays retired. I believe he was sick and/or injured going into many of his recent fights. But I don't believe he is going to come back a better fighter. Only George Foreman could do that! -Randy G.


-Radam G :

Mosely has had a great career, he is a sure first ballot hall of famer I should think he is fine financially, why make a comeback ? His father should be talking him out of it, but it is of course up to "Sugar Shane" ! Look at ancient Archie, the King of the seniors tour, in my mind, had perhaps his most famous fight with Durelle at the age of 45 depending on who you believe and was stripped of his light heavyweight title in 1962, at the age of 48 !
Actually Archibald Lee Wright was six year older than he claimed according to his auntie, who lived to be 106 year old. The boxing powers that be added three years to the "Old Mongoose(')s age because of a 1920 census that reported him to be six years old. The aunties insisted that the census inadvertently wrote the number nine as a six "because white folks back then didn't care about making mistakes about colored people...." Colored people is the ethnic name for African AmerKanos back then. B-Hop has apparently benefited from those times of none caring and fighter putting their ages back. The late, great Archie Moore could be the oldest guy to win a belt and hold onto a belt, but the truth may always be protected by those big ugly bodyguards of lies. Holla!


-Froggy :

Thanks for the info Radam G, Archie said he was 3 years old when he was born but maybe he should have said he was 6 years old when he was born ! ATG either way !


-Radam G :

I had guys coming out of the woodwork trying to get me to license them after 8, 9, 10 and even 15 years out of the sport. I had a businessman try to get a friend of his licensed. The friend was 60. They said they'd sue me for discrimination if I turned them down. I told the friend I wanted to watch him spar a few rounds at Gleason's Gym. They agreed, but only if they could supply the sparring partner. Yeh, right! I told them I would pick the sparring partner. I picked a young, undefeated stud. I told him to move around, take body shots, use the jab--but lightly--and to work a bit from the outside and a bit from the inside. The kid did phenomenal. The 60-year-old did not. I told him to train hard and come back in another year. I never heard from him again. On many other instances, I simply said, "You haven't boxed in (number of years) and you have lost (#) fights in a row. I must respectfully turn your application for a license." On several occasions, I was taken to court. On each occasion, the plaintiff lost. The judge did not want to force me to give a license to the said applicant. Why? Because, if anything negative should have happened to the fighter, the blame would have fallen on the judge, who forced the commission to grant a license to someone who had been turned down by the state agency which regulates boxing. Against these lawsuits, I was undefeated. For Mosley's own good, I hope he stays retired. I believe he waas sick and/or injured going into many of his recent fights. But I don't believe he is going to come back a better fighter. Only George Foreman could do that! -Randy G.
Hehehehe! Funny as heck! You were cold. "Come back in another year." Why not make it two years? At 60 -- NOTHING! But at 61 and 62, dude could probably shake up the world. Haha! I think that a lot of Comedy Central is in the Commish. Holla!


-stormcentre :

Shane and Jack, looking to comeback. Neither want to say it's over and I understand that. Shane (and I do respect his overall body of work and fight anyone attitude) for quite a long time has had no meaningful defence or jab, and that combined with minimal head movement and a slightly diminished stamina has caused him issues. His counterpunching reflexes are also obviously slower. And when you add it all up with the level that Shane will almost immediately try and get back to, it won't be too good for Shane unless he choses his opponents carefully - which he could successfully do for a while. Mosley would be (at least) a light middleweight now, and as such a "name" for 3G. There you go. If not then imagine Shane Mosley V Joshua Clottey.


-brownsugar :

The thing that is so bizarre is that Shane's own father is encouraging the move. Sometimes a fighter loses...But To find an excuse for every loss is an extremely irresponsible form of denial that will have negative consequences if Shane continues to fight. From the outside looking in... it makes Shane's father look like a delusional parasite. Like a Hollywood mom pushing her offspring into show business to benefit their own bank account The fighter.... I can understand. Its human nature for men to lie to themselves when their best days have sailed past the rearview mirror. You would expect Jack Mosley to argue on the side of common sense. Boxers like Mayweather Paq, Bhop, and WK have all adapted their styles to coincide with their physical capabilities. As long as they can keep the fight within those parameters they almost appear to get better with age....unless of course they get a Maidana like challenge....someone who pushes them to the extreme which doesn't happen too often. But Shane has not made any such adaptations ... His jab is still a pawing jingly afterthought and when he finishes unloading the right hand it takes another round or two for it to fully recharge. He's replaced good lateral movement with excessive holding and his once inpenetrable chin has more dents than a wrecked ford Pinto.(with the bad fuel tank) When a fighter of his former HOF calibur gets clowned by Anthony Mundine who himself was easily defeated by a comebacking Clottey...he should know what time it is.


-stormcentre :

Yes, you're right BS, especially about Jack. He should be a little more cautious, but then I guess time will tell. I suppose another significant loss on Shane's record to really signpost that his time has passed will not (hopefully) hurt Shane in a permanent sense too much. One thing though; I am really surprised that Shane never developed a fighting style more like Toney, Bernard or Floyd. One that both, has more defensive attributes to it, and is not almost totally reliant upon reflexes.


-brownsugar :

Yes, you're right BS, especially about Jack. He should be a little more cautious, but then I guess time will tell. I suppose another significant loss on Shane's record to really signpost that his time has passed will not (hopefully) hurt Shane in a permanent sense too much. One thing though; I am really surprised that Shane never developed a fighting style more like Toney, Bernard or Floyd. One that both, has more defensive attributes to it, and is not almost totally reliant upon reflexes.
Exactly... Shane's offense is looking pretty feeble theses days...at one time his formidable offense was his defense.


-Radam G :

Never believe these I-am-not-going-to-fight-anymore-lying-arse pugs. The pugvine is buzzing with a scenario of why the Sugarman is scrapping again. There are mad rumors of he and changed-his-mind-from-retiring Sam "King" Soliman hooking up for a zombiefest. And the winner -- if all his body parts don't shake off -- will get damaged-brained IBF champion Jermain "Bad Intentions" Taylor in a Frankenstein affair. The "theatre of unexpected" is darn expected with bullspit scraps if this rumor becomes a living tumor. Hehehe! Holla!


-brownsugar :

Never believe these I-am-not-going-to-fight-anymore-lying-arse pugs. The pugvine is buzzing with a scenario of why the Sugarman is scrapping again. There are mad rumors of he and changed-his-mind-from-retiring Sam "King" Soliman hooking up for a zombiefest. And the winner -- if all his body parts don't shake off -- will get damaged-brained IBF champion Jermain "Bad Intentions" Taylor in a Frankenstein affair. The "theatre of unexpected" is darn expected with bullspit scraps if this rumor becomes a living tumor. Hehehe! Holla!
In the famous raspy words of Marlon Brando in Apocalypse Now: " The Horror ".


-The Commish :

As Radam constantly says, boxing is the "theatre of the unexpected." Did you ever think you were gonna' hear Shane Mosley announce he was going to launch--yet another--comeback? I didn't. Especially after Mosley's clobbering at the hands of Anthony Mundine. Now, he's ready to put his body back into the race. I didn't figure he'd be coming back to fight. I figured he was gonna' do like Papa Jack--train and manage young pugs. Then came this announcement. Time off, he says, has healed his banged-up body. The hurt has been replaced by a return of a youthful feeling. The love and passion for boxing has returned. The tediousness of heading to the gym and the negative thoughts of pain and soreness have been replaced by excitement and positive thoughts of his youth recaptured. It's a feeling and a stage that most older fighters go through, especially former champions. They miss the roar of the crowd. The adulation. The feeling of supremacy. I saw it with so many of the greats: Sugar Ray Robinson. Sugar Ray Leonard. Muhammad Ali. Joe Frazier. Larry Holmes. Roy Jones is begging to be KO'd again. And maybe again after that. Now, it's Mosley's turn. His son probably doesn't have the heart to tell him "No" and his father, also lonely out of the spotlight, doesn't have the heart to tell Shane that it's over, that's it's been over for a few years. Do you remember May 7, 2011? I do. I'm sure Mosley remembers. I'm sure Mosley wants to forget. He was pushing 40. His opponent was Manny Pacquiao. Mosley told us all what great shape he was in...that he felt strong...that he felt fast...that he felt tireless. The result was Pacquiao winning 35 out of a possible 36 rounds on the scorecards of all three judges. In his last seven fights, going back to his loss to Floyd Mayweather, Mosley is 1-4-1. He is now 43. He's an antique. A highly-polished, refurbished antique. But he's still an antique. You don't put antiques into the Indy 500. -Randy G.


-amayseng :

Never believe these I-am-not-going-to-fight-anymore-lying-arse pugs. The pugvine is buzzing with a scenario of why the Sugarman is scrapping again. There are mad rumors of he and changed-his-mind-from-retiring Sam "King" Soliman hooking up for a zombiefest. And the winner -- if all his body parts don't shake off -- will get damaged-brained IBF champion Jermain "Bad Intentions" Taylor in a Frankenstein affair. The "theatre of unexpected" is darn expected with bullspit scraps if this rumor becomes a living tumor. Hehehe! Holla!
If this madness happens I would take Shane over JT even at 160. At least Shane has intentions of landing shots.


-stormcentre :

If this madness happens I would take Shane over JT even at 160. At least Shane has intentions of landing shots.
Good point. You got me thinking, maybe I should reconsider my above stated position on Shane's comeback. After all, if Taylor can get a world title shot and go forward; then Shane probably can too (particularly with Haymon's match fixing . . whoops I mean matchmaking assistance). Probably best to let Shane go anyway, after all some things you need to experience yourself to know they're real. In one of my current roles I advise businesses on how/when to transform themselves. It never ceases to amaze me how often businesses will think, because it's their business and they operationally run it, they know project activity and transformations. 90% of the times they get it drastically wrong, and also both underestimate the complexity and at the same time dismiss risks. The results are almost always catastrophic, costly and painful, and from this repetitious mess and endless lesson in human ego and nature I have arrived at a saying I authored that applies also to Shane's situation and the thousands of other fighters like him . . . . . . Sometimes you need to feel the potholes under the wheels and the suspension jarring your back, before you realise and admit that the road taken is not quite as smooth/suitable as you first anticipated.


-deepwater2 :

Shane can beat anybody except the boxers he lost to and the divorce lawyer that took his belts also. Shane should fight Mayorga or Taylor . Maybe Shane can give a young fighter a shot? Luis Arias just got released by Floyd Mayweather promotions for saying hi to the Rahman brothers. Maybe Oscar can step in and sign him. The kid was the best prospect in that illegal Mayweather gym. Floyd had his new CEO j Leon love fire the kid. What a class guy.


-stormcentre :

Was Arias contractually tied to Mayweather promotions D2?


-The Shadow :

Was Arias contractually tied to Mayweather promotions D2?
What was Floyd to do? They have a lawsuit going on so the lines are drawn. It's either one side or the other. Especially when it's a case of a close family friend -- the Rahmans have been close with the Mayweathers for many, many years -- so there's the element of betrayal also. And to answer your question, according to Arias, he wasn't contractually tied to them. (I get the feeling you knew that hehe.)


-stormcentre :

It's interesting. I was pretty sure that once Miss Jackson led the way on how to get money/lifestyle from Floyd without (necessarily and/or always) dropping to your knees, others would consider the risk/reward and follow. Floyd just made it easier for them by his "All Access" (excuse the lame pun) antics. In boxing gyms, usually you have to have not just people that understand boxing, but also good teachers that know how/when to impart knowledge. I think it will be a while before the Mayweather gym produces (not just takes over) any serious champions of note. It may even not happen until the next generation of Mayweathers. Does anybody know? Was D2 serious about Love being TMT's new CEO? Surely that's a joke.


-Skibbz :

It's interesting. I was pretty sure that once Miss Jackson led the way on how to get money/lifestyle from Floyd without (necessarily and/or always) dropping to your knees, others would consider the risk/reward and follow. Floyd just made it easier for them by his "All Access" (excuse the lame pun) antics. In boxing gyms, usually you have to have not just people that understand boxing, but also good teachers that know how/when to impart knowledge. I think it will be a while before the Mayweather gym produces (not just takes over) any serious champions of note. It may even not happen until the next generation of Mayweathers. Does anybody know? Was D2 serious about Love being TMT's new CEO? Surely that's a joke.


-Radam G :

Hehehehe! Awesome music and very truthful lyrics, Skibbz. Holla!


-deepwater2 :

It's interesting. I was pretty sure that once Miss Jackson led the way on how to get money/lifestyle from Floyd without (necessarily and/or always) dropping to your knees, others would consider the risk/reward and follow. Floyd just made it easier for them by his "All Access" (excuse the lame pun) antics. In boxing gyms, usually you have to have not just people that understand boxing, but also good teachers that know how/when to impart knowledge. I think it will be a while before the Mayweather gym produces (not just takes over) any serious champions of note. It may even not happen until the next generation of Mayweathers. Does anybody know? Was D2 serious about Love being TMT's new CEO? Surely that's a joke.
I was joking but some toady has to replace Ellerbe why not Love? He just got knocked out and will do whatever Floyd tells him. What does Arias talking to Rahmans have to do with any lawsuits? A video is out there with Arias confronting Floyd.Here is an article on it: Following the heated argument, Arias spoke about what transpired in the video : "Basically on Saturday night, I was at home sleeping with my baby. I received a phone call in the middle of the night from J'Leon Love, saying that I was about to get released from Mayweather Promotions. Mind you it's the middle of the night. I was like 'okay, until i hear it from Floyd's mouth I'm going to continue doing what I've been doing,'" Arias said. "I went to the gym on Monday, Floyd is there and I was going there to work out," Arias continued. "I went up to him and said ?what's up.' He said ?what's up' and looked away. He was leaving on his way out to the gym and you can see in the video that I approached him. I felt that the way he handled releasing me was very unprofessional. How are you going to have someone that I've been cool with, since I was a kid, tell me some foul sh*t like that. I felt that was bogus." "To make things clear, how are you going to release me when you don't have me on contract and I'm clearly the best fighter you got. You give me no explanation on why you're releasing me and I approached him. I said 'you're not going to say nothing to me, you're just going to ignore me.' I thought that was real foul. He owns the company and this is his show and I thought that was real foul." "When J'Leon approached me, I told him 'this has nothing to do with you.' I just felt Floyd should have called me himself. He should have called me and said 'I'm mad at this, this and this and I'm going to release you' and then I can't say nothing. All I can say is 'Floyd, I respect you' and thank him for the opportunity. All I've done is thank him for the last two years. I've taken all these fights and not complained. I haven't always got the best opponents and I never complained. I should have been on TV and I never complained. I've been quiet and winning for him. I got the most wins for this company since the very beginning. I've been playing my role." Arias then went on to explain that he attributes his release to his close relationship with the Rahman's, who are currently suing Mayweather over that infamous 31-minute sparring session. "Honestly, I think it [does have to do with the Rahmans]," he said. "There is no other reason behind it. That has to be what it is... When I had no money, when I had no place to stay, when I had no food, when I was trying to find my way into the game - they was taking care of me. I'm literally a part of their family. I can't turn my back on them when they helped me when I had no food and Floyd wasn't even [in the equation]. That's what it came down to, my relationship with the Rahmans. I understand Floyd doesn't want me associating with them, but I can't turn my back on them. That is over something that I have no control over. That whole situation has nothing to do with me."


-stormcentre :

I was joking but some toady has to replace Ellerbe why not Love? He just got knocked out and will do whatever Floyd tells him. What does Arias talking to Rahmans have to do with any lawsuits? A video is out there with Arias confronting Floyd.Here is an article on it: Following the heated argument, Arias spoke about what transpired in the video : "Basically on Saturday night, I was at home sleeping with my baby. I received a phone call in the middle of the night from J'Leon Love, saying that I was about to get released from Mayweather Promotions. Mind you it's the middle of the night. I was like 'okay, until i hear it from Floyd's mouth I'm going to continue doing what I've been doing,'" Arias said. "I went to the gym on Monday, Floyd is there and I was going there to work out," Arias continued. "I went up to him and said ‘what's up.' He said ‘what's up' and looked away. He was leaving on his way out to the gym and you can see in the video that I approached him. I felt that the way he handled releasing me was very unprofessional. How are you going to have someone that I've been cool with, since I was a kid, tell me some foul sh*t like that. I felt that was bogus." "To make things clear, how are you going to release me when you don't have me on contract and I'm clearly the best fighter you got. You give me no explanation on why you're releasing me and I approached him. I said 'you're not going to say nothing to me, you're just going to ignore me.' I thought that was real foul. He owns the company and this is his show and I thought that was real foul." "When J'Leon approached me, I told him 'this has nothing to do with you.' I just felt Floyd should have called me himself. He should have called me and said 'I'm mad at this, this and this and I'm going to release you' and then I can't say nothing. All I can say is 'Floyd, I respect you' and thank him for the opportunity. All I've done is thank him for the last two years. I've taken all these fights and not complained. I haven't always got the best opponents and I never complained. I should have been on TV and I never complained. I've been quiet and winning for him. I got the most wins for this company since the very beginning. I've been playing my role." Arias then went on to explain that he attributes his release to his close relationship with the Rahman's, who are currently suing Mayweather over that infamous 31-minute sparring session. "Honestly, I think it [does have to do with the Rahmans]," he said. "There is no other reason behind it. That has to be what it is... When I had no money, when I had no place to stay, when I had no food, when I was trying to find my way into the game - they was taking care of me. I'm literally a part of their family. I can't turn my back on them when they helped me when I had no food and Floyd wasn't even [in the equation]. That's what it came down to, my relationship with the Rahmans. I understand Floyd doesn't want me associating with them, but I can't turn my back on them. That is over something that I have no control over. That whole situation has nothing to do with me."
Wow, sounds like Arias got a little burnt there and found out what was really expected of him in terms of "loyalty". The next 6 months will be interesting in terms of what it means for TMT and all the termites running through all their member's and groupies' heads.


-Radam G :

Wow, sounds like Arias got a little burnt there and found out what was really expected of him in terms of "loyalty". The next 6 months will be interesting in terms of what it means for TMT and all the termites running through all their member's and groupies' heads.
What people don't understand and is apparently not being informed about, is elite boxers, promoters and a lot of the media have big insurance regarding lawsuits. And since Money May kept up his installment payments, not a single penny is coming out of his pockets. Those rotten Rock heads -- I mean Rahman brothers' -- pops Hisham Rahman know this. And I know that his informed his sons. After Rahman beat Lennox back in the day, Rahman betrayed his promoter/manager and ran off to Da Don K for more in the rematch than by his then present manager/promoter. Lawsuit insurance that Rahman had came in dandy. The manager/promoter was paid nicely by the insurance firm. And Hi sham got he kayoed in the rematch and short-changed and out by the wolves by Da Don K. Habitual lawsuiting pencil necks are down because of the insurance money, not boxers' money. More pugs don't have the type of money that you believe because of short-changed purses, bad spending habits and expenses for the team and hanger-ons. There are optical illusions all up in the game's grill. Money May, advised by tsAH, has some mad insurance that pay off all types of syet. And beat the heck outta frivious lawsuits and/or make them settle cheaply. Holla!


-stormcentre :

I'm going to b surprised if the insurance companies pay out in full for a client that is actually deemed/found liable. If so the underwriters costs and policies' premiums woud potentially be more than the writ to which they may apply. Holla. :)


-Radam G :

I'm going to b surprised if the insurance companies pay out in full for a client that is actually deemed/found liable. If so the underwriters costs and policies' premiums woud potentially be more than the writ to which they may apply. Holla. :)
In America, the underwriters pay it all. Just as in a car accident, they pay. It is a guaranteed thing until the end of your agreement, then maybe they will increase your cost or drop you. Athletes and entertainers have this type of insurance to guard against a rash of damaging lawsuits. America is a frivious sue-you-for-any-type-of-thing culture. The underwriters have superbad arse attorneys, who win nearly 100-percent the time. Ms. Jackson and the Rahman brothers won't get more than a $100-thousand dollars. They are trifling, rachet hood rats. And the more that I think about it, they will get closer to $25,000. They have just pull a stunt and are side showing hoping to enhance their going-nowhere careers. Holla!


-stormcentre :

In America, the underwriters pay it all. Just as in a car accident, they pay. It is a guaranteed thing until the end of your agreement, then maybe they will increase your cost or drop you. Athletes and entertainers have this type of insurance to guard against a rash of damaging lawsuits. America is a frivious sue-you-for-any-type-of-thing culture. The underwriters have superbad arse attorneys, who win nearly 100-percent the time. Ms. Jackson and the Rahman brothers won't get more than a $100-thousand dollars. They are trifling, rachet hood rats. And the more that I think about it, they will get closer to $25,000. They have just pull a stunt and are side showing hoping to enhance their going-nowhere careers. Holla!
What, even if you go out and blatantly mislead commissions abut their concerns and in the process of doing so bring about writs for blatantly lying about - therefore defaming - others? As Floyd appears to have done. Happy to be wrong on this one, but I'd like to see an underwriting policy that covers all that, that is not itself a ponzi scheme.


-Radam G :

What, even if you go out and blatantly mislead commissions abut their concerns and in the process of doing so bring about writs for blatantly lying about - therefore defaming - others? As Floyd appears to have done. Happy to be wrong on this one, but I'd like to see an underwriting policy that covers all that, that is not itself a ponzi scheme.
It is covered. On the mainland USA, you will be amazed of how the laws and payments work. I've grown to hate the Western USA. A fledgling camera man who -- I didn't know and had not hired -- was videoing some of my young relatives' entertainment events. Some knuckleheads came out of nowhere and started busting chops and taking filth about Asian XX-chromosomes types. I told the knuckleheads to leave. They decided that they rather fight me than leave. Faster than lightening, I accommodated the husky goons and had them all KTFO within 20 seconds. In the meantime, the camera man shot it all, and turned his videos over to the cops. So the dude felt like I owed him money for that. I didn't. So he sued. My insurance paid him $2,500 to go away and all rights to his video that some dirt bag among cops put on YouTube and Worldstarhiphop before it was handed over to my insurers. In the Western parts of the mainland, USA, it is still the Wild, Wild West with any ratchet behavior that you can think of. Sin City is in the West. And insurance bigwigs know what to expect and promise you a solution. "Just keep up on your payments." It is hell being in Sports and Entertainment in the West. And it has a culture of suing the bigshots, especially the loud, braggadocious Money May types. Holla!


-stormcentre :

OK - fair enough. Thanks for that RG. Can I ask who the insurer was and what your premiums roughly were?


-Radam G :

OK - fair enough. Thanks for that RG. Can I ask who the insurer was and what your premiums roughly were?
Not a chance for that because you will then have me ID-ed. Hehe! But my premiums are $360 a month. Holla!


-Radam G :

Insurance is not that much, based on how much you pay if you did not have it. Besides, you can deduct the payments from taxes as business expenses. Most things are exaggerated in pay for general public consumption. I doubt if Money May premiums are more than two or three thousand bucks a month. Holla!


-stormcentre :

Insurance is not that much, based on how much you pay if you did not have it. Besides, you can deduct the payments from taxes as business expenses. Most things are exaggerated in pay for general public consumption. I doubt if Money May premiums are more than two or three thousand bucks a month. Holla!
Surely there would be clauses in Mayweather's assumed policy that limits him from (willingly?) liable, misleading, illegal, and/or stupid behaviour; in the event he is to claim? I just can't see how an insurance company could find Floyd, and some other's, reported behaviour insurable in the litigation friendly world we live in now. I mean, how could he claim insurance on his writs from the female posse and the Rahmans, when - if what we're told is true - it not only all arose from misleading a commission - but was also untrue and defamatory/dangerous to them? If I am wrong, Floyd's premiums must be enormous and ever increasing. Perhaps I just haven't been to Vegas recently or enough. :)


-Radam G :

They find that behaviour insurable because that is the culture. In the Western USA, if you -- an insurance giant -- have people from say 30,000 billionaire and millionaire families acting up and running wide, and their insurance coverage for that nonsense is a combined 9-million dollars per month to 150-million, you can bet your arse that these/we idiots are going to be covered for every occasion and dumb-arse act. I can never forget the teenager Radam G and the payoffs and payouts for my then dumb wild arse. Thanks God for boarding school in Hong Kong. Besides, only the hawkish, savvy scumbag lawsuiting Rahman brothers and Miss Jackson -- I mean seekers -- come after you. Wow! I can't stand those sorry suckas anymore than I hate ambulance chasers and crooked funeral home directors. Holla!


-stormcentre :

They find that behaviour insurable because that is the culture. In the Western USA, if you -- an insurance giant -- have people from say 30,000 billionaire and millionaire families acting up and running wide, and their insurance coverage for that nonsense is a combined 9-million dollars per month to 150-million, you can bet your arse that these/we idiots are going to be covered for every occasion and dumb-arse act. I can never forget the teenager Radam G and the payoffs and payouts for my then dumb wild arse. Thanks God for boarding school in Hong Kong. Besides, only the hawkish, savvy scumbag lawsuiting Rahman brothers and Miss Jackson -- I mean seekers -- come after you. Wow! I can't stand those sorry suckas anymore than I hate ambulance chasers and crooked funeral home directors. Holla!
OK - noted, and point(s) taken.