DEONTAY WILDER AND THE PHYSIOLOGY OF POWER-PUNCHING

Repeat after me: Power punchers are born, not made. Power punchers are born, not made. Power punchers are born, not made …

There is no specific body type, musculature or ring style that is the prototype for special punchers, the kind who elicit cold, stark fear in opponents. Oh, sure, there are training methods and exercise regimens that can marginally improve a fighter’s knockout ratio, but the force with which a punch is delivered is contingent on factors that seem to come naturally to some and not to others. The great Thomas Hearns was tall for a welterweight, a bit spindly and decidedly skinny-legged. It sometimes seemed like a stiff breeze might lift him airborne, like a kite. Joe Frazier and Mike Tyson were human fire hydrants, short and squatty with low centers of gravity. Earnie Shavers looked as if he had been carved out of granite. And George Foreman, particularly the older incarnation, was thick as a brick; his fortysomething physique lacked the sculpted definition of a Ken Norton or an Evander Holyfield. But if Big George in either phase of his career nailed you flush, as was the case with the aforementioned heavy hitters, it was off to la-la land for a 10-count nap.

WBC heavyweight champion Deontay Wilder, 6-7 and surprisingly sleek at 228 or so pounds (veteran fight writer Norm Frauenheim once opined that he “looks like a big Tommy Hearns”), is in no way a prototype of the young Tyson who terrorized the heavyweight division on his rise to superstardom. It is hardly a certainty that the Tuscaloosa, Ala., native will eventually be cloaked in that sort of transcendent aura. But it is the quality, not necessarily the quantity, of many of his knockouts that have stamped Wilder (33-0, 32 KOs), who defends his title against 50-1 longshot Eric Molina (23-2, 17 KOs) Saturday night in Birmingham, Ala., as the possessor of something that lies at the primal core of boxing. It is the same thing that separates baseball’s biggest boppers from slap hitters who consistently bat .300 but seldom go yard. They say chicks dig the long ball and, truth be told, guys do, too.

Wilder’s first ring appearance as the WBC champ will be televised by Showtime Championship Boxing.

“I don’t go in there trying for the knockout,” Wilder, 29, said of the 32-bout KO streak he pieced together at the outset of his professional career before it came to an end with a workmanlike, 12-round unanimous decision over then-WBC champ Bermane Stiverne on Jan. 17. “I let my hands go and if I get the knockout, I get it.

“I would prefer the knockout, of course. This is the heavyweight division. It’s all based on power. When people get dressed up and come out at night to a fight, they come to see knockouts.”

Should Wilder begin a new streak of swift, emphatic finishes against Molina – whose two previous defeats came on first-round blitzes– it won’t do much to move the needle on what the public already believes. But if “The Bronze Bomber” demonstrates he can continue to win while taking out a higher grade of opponents, the perception of him as a manufactured creation with no real bona fides will begin to change. There is a still-sizable group of skeptics who believe that Wilder has made his reputation by whacking out has-beens and never-weres, that his title is of the paper variety, that he will be exposed as fraudulent when he comes up against someone who is capable of truly fighting back and isn’t cowed by the his reputation as a dangerous dude.

Molina, the lottery-sized odds against him notwithstanding, believes he’s the fighter who will take Wilder to that place where the comfortable becomes the uncomfortable, where tables are turned and the hunter becomes the hunted.

“The pressure’s all on him,” Molina said of his perceived assignment of designated victim. “It’s not on me. Everybody in the world thinks I’m going to get blasted. So, he has to go in there and blast me, right? If he does, so what? It’s just what was expected. It’s his state, his commission, his everything. I got nothing to lose, and I’m coming in stronger than ever.

“Other than Stiverne, everybody Wilder has fought went in there thinking mostly that they didn’t want to get knocked out. It was almost like they were afraid to try to hurt him. I’m going to try to hurt him, and I know I can. I’ve hurt everybody I’ve fought, even in the two fights I lost. Wilder hasn’t dealt with anyone with the mentality I’m coming with. I’m going to put pressure on him. I’m going to try to knock him out. How will he react when he gets hurt? We don’t know. It hasn’t happened yet.”

Jay Deas, who along with former WBA welterweight champion Mark Breland is honing and refining Wilder’s skill-set, is cognizant of the thin line that sometimes separates acceptance and doubt. He insists that the path being followed by his fighter isn’t that all that different from the one trod by the young, emerging Tyson, with the exception, of course, of an obvious physical disparity and the vicissitudes of the times in which they rose to prominence.

“Deontay’s opponents are every bit as good as Mike Tyson’s opponents were at that stage, person-for-person and record-for-record, all the way up the chain,” Deas insisted. “Deontay has fought a very good level of competition coming up. People just didn’t want to believe it.”

Make that people with word processors and Smart phones who have the ability to influence public opinion, and are more prone to find fault than was the case when boy-wonder Tyson presumably didn’t face nearly as harsh a level of capricious scrutiny.

“I think the main difference between Deontay and that Tyson is in the eras they came up in,” Deas continued. “Back then, you actually had to have credentials to be a writer. You had to have gone to school, passed the courses, gotten the degree and had somebody think you were worthy of hiring before you could go and report on the fights. There was a level of vetting that is not so common these days. Anybody with a phone and a keyboard can call themselves a writer. They don’t need to have any training whatsoever. They can invent something called `badlefthooktotheliver.com’ or whatever, and all of a sudden they’re a reporter. But they’re probably living in their mom’s basement and typing away in their underwear.

“I had to deal with a lot of that stuff early in Deontay’s career. I was like a fish swimming upstream. I couldn’t get anybody to believe how good he is. But I was right, and I knew I was right.”

Without question, there has been a proliferation of social media, and often what is authored tends to be gossip, innuendo and speculation. But that doesn’t necessarily make the punditry inaccurate or unfair. It does bother Deas, however, when it is reported as fact that Wilder has made his reputation solely against a string of fall-down guys.

“Most punchers are born, but you can improve anybody with proper technique, timing, snap and an understanding of distance,” Deas said. “Those are things that can accentuate what’s already there.

“Deontay came to the table with remarkable power, no question about that. He’s always been able to punch. But it comes down to finding the right moment for the right punch at the right situation. That’s what he’s learned to do really well.”

There is another significant difference between Wilder and the young Tyson: the intent to scare the hell out of opponents who are mentally destroyed even before the first punch is thrown. The late-1980s Tyson spoke of driving nose bones into fighters’ brains, of taking their hearts and their manhood, of the satisfaction he derived from hearing them whimper like a little girl after they’d been hit to the body.

“You can see apprehension on some of their faces,” Deas said when asked if Wilder generated that sort of terror in the other corner prior to the opening bell. “But intimidation is not as big a thing as it used to be when Tyson was coming up. Guys now are, like, `I don’t care who you are. I’m bringing it.’

“I mean, so much of Tyson’s persona was about being a bully. Like a lot of bullies, once somebody stood up to them, and didn’t back down, you saw chinks in his armor. Deontay is not a bully. He’s a good guy and a smart fighter. He sees what’s happening in the ring and adjusts to it.”

One more difference between Wilder and the early Tyson: that Tyson could starch anybody with either hand; Wilder, for the most part, has relied on the overhand right, a devastating weapon that not only put former WBO heavyweight titlist Siarhei Liakhovich down and out in their fight on Aug. 9, 2013, but had his left leg twitching uncontrollably, like a hooked fish flopping on the deck of a boat.

Asked about Wilder’s less-dominant hand, Deas said, “He has no left hand at all. We’ve tried, but it is completely useless. No, just kidding.

“We actually hope people think that because Deontay is very gifted with his left hand. A lot of times he just hasn’t had the opportunity to show it off, like he did against Stiverne with his jab. But he has a tremendous left hook and a tremendous left uppercut. When the time is right, somebody is going to find that out.”

Photo credit: Stephanie Trapp/SHOWTIME®

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COMMENTS

-stormcentre :

Yes, well, I am not sure I agree with the axiom that punchers are born. I think there's more evidence that they're made from years of hard work, sweat, dedication, and practice. I guess it's the old nurture V nature argument. I think the fact that there are so many different physiques and fighters that have (and have not) mastered punching, actually shows that punchers are made. If not, or perhaps better put; otherwise it seems we should see - as per the principles of natural selection and evolution - a typically and commonly structured and/or physiqued fighter that excels in punching. But this is not the case; despite boxing being a sport that - in some ways - not only redefines survival of the fittest axioms - but also lives by it. But, looking at current and past champions within any weight we can see that there are usually no set physical structures for successful fighters and champions. So, if punchers are born, then perhaps one thing that was can be certain of is that for the entirety of boxings' history it appears there is no trend to how born punchers look. Usually when an athlete (in any sport) is hailed as the best in his field (such as a born puncher in boxing) you can and will find associated with him/her a reasonably frequent and rigorous training/exercise regime; sometimes even one that goes back to their early childhood. But then (as if it is not already obvious from what I have written) the claim that "punchers are born" is itself can also, to some extent, be both a philosophical and subjective claim that's open to reasonably accurate interpretation; from sharp and trustworthy minds. As whilst some can "see" the claim that "punchers are born" as simply meaning that some fighters are better suited to learning the tricks of the trade - others actually "see" the claim to mean that being a born puncher actually means that, whether you properly learn the art of fighting and train or not, you will still be able to turn up to a professional fighting bout and (at least) successfully "punch" in a manner that woos both crowds and boxing aficionados. Surely a "born puncher" should be able to do - at least - that. That said, aside from these considerations I actually think the article is still good. Hopefully the
StormCentre gets a chance to complete the algorithm thread this year, as that will go a long way towards establishing whether punchers are born or made. Or maybe it wont. After all everything is - to some extent - subjective; even (sometimes) the amount of objectivity one applies. :) :)


-stormcentre :

Yes, well, I am not sure I agree with the axiom that punchers are born. I think there's more evidence that they're made from years of hard work, sweat, dedication, and practice. I guess it's the old nurture V nature argument. I think the fact that there are so many different physiques and fighters that have (and have not) mastered punching, actually shows that punchers are made. If not, or perhaps better put; otherwise it seems we should see - as per the principles of natural selection and evolution - a typically and commonly structured and/or physiqued fighter that excels in punching. But this is not the case; despite boxing being a sport that - in some ways - not only redefines survival of the fittest axioms - but also lives by it. But, looking at current and past champions within any weight we can see that there are usually no set physical structures for successful fighters and champions. So, if punchers are born, then perhaps one thing that was can be certain of is that for the entirety of boxings' history it appears there is no trend to how born punchers look. Usually when an athlete (in any sport) is hailed as the best in his field (such as a born puncher in boxing) you can and will find associated with him/her a reasonably frequent and rigorous training/exercise regime; sometimes even one that goes back to their early childhood. But then (as if it is not already obvious from what I have written) the claim that "punchers are born" is itself can also, to some extent, be both a philosophical and subjective claim that's open to reasonably accurate interpretation; from sharp and trustworthy minds. As whilst some can "see" the claim that "punchers are born" as simply meaning that some fighters are better suited to learning the tricks of the trade - others actually "see" the claim to mean that being a born puncher actually means that, whether you properly learn the art of fighting and train or not, you will still be able to turn up to a professional fighting bout and (at least) successfully "punch" in a manner that woos both crowds and boxing aficionados. Surely a "born puncher" should be able to do - at least - that. That said, aside from these considerations I actually think the article is still good. Hopefully the
StormCentre gets a chance to complete the algorithm thread this year, as that will go a long way towards establishing whether punchers are born or made. Or maybe it wont. After all everything is - to some extent - subjective; even (sometimes) the amount of objectivity one applies. :) :)


-Radam G :

Nice stuff! Power punchers are born, not made 90 percent of the time. Ten percent of the time -- maybe less -- they are indeed made from illusions, psych and the psychology of the Goliath belief. I've seen fighters go down from believing that a fighter can hits hard. The mind is a strong thing. And is a bytch-arse coward. And will run wide with messed-up illusions. In da game, we call it being "mind f**ked." I cannot count the amount of timess that I've seen pugs believing that a giant dude -- a real Goliath-like pitty-patting bytch -- hit them hard. A lot of time, they did not get hit at all, but felt like a bag of rocks. The Russian heavyweight Valuev could not hit hard enough to bust a grape. Pugs went down in pure fright from him -- not power from him. From way back in da day it was the same with Jesse Willard and Primo Canera. The pugs went down from a fixed fight, or pure fright and/or being winded emotionally and physically. One way that I will put it. Physical power punchers are indeed born. But scare-your-arse-into-a-knockout psychological punchers are made. And can be the greatest optical illusionists to the undertrained eyes. Especially to eyes that think size rules. Holla!


-brownsugar :

Yes, well, I am not sure I agree with the axiom that punchers are born. I think there's more evidence that they're made from years of hard work, sweat, dedication, and practice. I guess it's the old nurture V nature argument. I think the fact that there are so many different physiques and fighters that have (and have not) mastered punching, actually shows that punchers are made. If not, or perhaps better put; otherwise it seems we should see - as per the principles of natural selection and evolution - a typically and commonly structured and/or physiqued fighter that excels in punching. But this is not the case; despite boxing being a sport that - in some ways - not only redefines survival of the fittest axioms - but also lives by it. But, looking at current and past champions within any weight we can see that there are usually no set physical structures for successful fighters and champions. So, if punchers are born, then perhaps one thing that was can be certain of is that for the entirety of boxings' history it appears there is no trend to how born punchers look. Usually when an athlete (in any sport) is hailed as the best in his field (such as a born puncher in boxing) you can and will find associated with him/her a reasonably frequent and rigorous training/exercise regime; sometimes even one that goes back to their early childhood. But then (as if it is not already obvious from what I have written) the claim that "punchers are born" is itself can also, to some extent, be both a philosophical and subjective claim that's open to reasonably accurate interpretation; from sharp and trustworthy minds. As whilst some can "see" the claim that "punchers are born" as simply meaning that some fighters are better suited to learning the tricks of the trade - others actually "see" the claim to mean that being a born puncher actually means that, whether you properly learn the art of fighting and train or not, you will still be able to turn up to a professional fighting bout and (at least) successfully "punch" in a manner that woos both crowds and boxing aficionados. Surely a "born puncher" should be able to do - at least - that. That said, aside from these considerations I actually think the article is still good. Hopefully the
StormCentre gets a chance to complete the algorithm thread this year, as that will go a long way towards establishing whether punchers are born or made. Or maybe it wont. After all everything is - to some extent - subjective; even (sometimes) the amount of objectivity one applies. :) :)
I have to say that makes a lot of sense. I've said this before and I'm saying it again. With the proper motivation and the correct resistance training, any human being that falls within the average parameters of muscle mass, hormone production, and hand eye coordination can be developed into a hard puncher. I was just an average kid physically in high school, I was getting my lunch money taken randomly like every one else before I underwent the transformation. Having been to slow to make the track team. .... too small for football and to short and too uncoordinated for basketball I finally gave wrestling a try. I liked the sport and was 1-7 my first year, my cousin who later played pro baseball usually won the challenges for varsity position but I got to wrestle on the varsity team enough times to letter. By my senior year we were the most feared teem in the inner city. I think I was 20-2, ....... I was three times stronger than a normal kid who didn't play sports.... And that extra strength stuck with me for the next few decades of my life because I new where power came from. It comes from leverage and resistance training... I knew the origins of how to explode with power. I've crushed two knuckles on one hand and fracture both wrists until I could control it. Of course some people are more inclined to have it naturally , but through the magic of youth, testosterone, motivation, and the proper resistance training, developing a strong punch is something that's not limited to a gifted few. The potential exists for the average Joe.


-amayseng :

Nice stuff! Power punchers are born, not made 90 percent of the time. Ten percent of the time -- maybe less -- they are indeed made from illusions, psych and the psychology of the Goliath belief. I've seen fighters go down from believing that a fighter can hits hard. The mind is a strong thing. And is a bytch-arse coward. And will run wide with messed-up illusions. In da game, we call it being "mind f**ked." I cannot count the amount of timess that I've seen pugs believing that a giant dude -- a real Goliath-like pitty-patting bytch -- hit them hard. A lot of time, they did not get hit at all, but felt like a bag of rocks. The Russian heavyweight Valuev could not hit hard enough to bust a grape. Pugs went down in pure fright from him -- not power from him. From way back in da day it was the same with Jesse Willard and Primo Canera. The pugs went down from a fixed fight, or pure fright and/or being winded emotionally and physically. One way that I will put it. Physical power punchers are indeed born. But scare-your-arse-into-a-knockout psychological punchers are made. And can be the greatest optical illusionists to the undertrained eyes. Especially to eyes that think size rules. Holla!
Good point. Some people are just naturally gifted and sound fundamentals can add to that. I had Holyfield beating Valuev and getting robbed. What do you think?


-amayseng :

I have to say that makes a lot of sense. I've said this before and I'm saying it again. With the proper motivation and the correct resistance training, any human being that falls within the average parameters of muscle mass, hormone production, and hand eye coordination can be developed into a hard puncher. I was just an average kid physically in high school, I was getting my lunch money taken randomly like every one else before I underwent the transformation. Having been to slow to make the track team. .... too small for football and to short and too uncoordinated for basketball I finally gave wrestling a try. I liked the sport and was 1-7 my first year, my cousin who later played pro baseball usually won the challenges for varsity position but I got to wrestle on the varsity team enough times to letter. By my senior year we were the most feared teem in the inner city. I think I was 20-2, ....... I was three times stronger than a normal kid who didn't play sports.... And that extra strength stuck with me for the next few decades of my life because I new where power came from. It comes from leverage and resistance training... I knew the origins of how to explode with power. I've crushed two knuckles on one hand and fracture both wrists until I could control it. Of course some people are more inclined to have it naturally , but through the magic of youth, testosterone, motivation, and the proper resistance training, developing a strong punch is something that's not limited to a gifted few. The potential exists for the average Joe.
I would just add anyone can punch and push a bag, looking powerful, though in my opinion it is not. Snapping a punch provides power , although there are different types of punchers, ala Tyson's right hand punching through the target not snapping. Point is, I think natural coordination and ability is superior to hard work and weight training. As a sophomore in high school at 165 lbs I was hitting baseballs near 500', this was 1997 so the balls and bats were not loaded back then, but adequate. I always had off the charts ridiculous hand speed and had phenomenal power with the bat and with boxing gloves on, or off fighting. Sure my fundamentals were perfected with ridiculous practice playing baseball, but even in little league and a thin and normal sized kid I was hitting balls further than people had ever seen. In fact I was cracking and breaking metal and aluminum bats, in little league. As far as fighting power it is attributed to my hand speed and coordination. My coordination was good enough to hit 90+ mph fast balls out of the park and pulling them down the line I was so fast. Point being, being able to punch as hard as I could had nothing to do with perfect fundamentals or strength training for boxing, I merrily just hit the gym for a workout and spar for fun and exercise, I didnt start with a trainer till I was 24. I was just lucky to be the son of my father who passed his fantastic athletic genetics down to me. Point being, I think most punchers are born with that gift, although I agree anyone can become a better puncher through perfecting fundamentals and of course becoming stronger. Just my opinion.


-Radam G :

I have to say that makes a lot of sense. I've said this before and I'm saying it again. With the proper motivation and the correct resistance training, any human being that falls within the average parameters of muscle mass, hormone production, and hand eye coordination can be developed into a hard puncher. I was just an average kid physically in high school, I was getting my lunch money taken randomly like every one else before I underwent the transformation. Having been to slow to make the track team. .... too small for football and to short and too uncoordinated for basketball I finally gave wrestling a try. I liked the sport and was 1-7 my first year, my cousin who later played pro baseball usually won the challenges for varsity position but I got to wrestle on the varsity team enough times to letter. By my senior year we were the most feared teem in the inner city. I think I was 20-2, ....... I was three times stronger than a normal kid who didn't play sports.... And that extra strength stuck with me for the next few decades of my life because I new where power came from. It comes from leverage and resistance training... I knew the origins of how to explode with power. I've crushed two knuckles on one hand and fracture both wrists until I could control it. Of course some people are more inclined to have it naturally , but through the magic of youth, testosterone, motivation, and the proper resistance training, developing a strong punch is something that's not limited to a gifted few. The potential exists for the average Joe.
Sorry! But physically-hitting punchers are straight-up born. It is a hardcore fact of science. Psych-you-out punchers are made. But they could not bust a grape. Frightening their opponents is just mind-f***** up beliefs that a bully or a bigger person can hit. NYET! Fight science do not buy that syet. Dumbarse Tim Bradley is now chopping down on meat because he now has a trickster on his team telling him meat will give him punch power. What a bunch of crock! I'm always amazed how vulnerable athletes can be easily fooled by snake oil peddlers. NEWS FLASH: neither meat nor steroids give you KTFO punching power. Punchers are born just as bullsyetters are made by circumstances of failures and/or false-and-made-up beliefs of gaining super power of diz and dat and da whole nine. Holla!


-Radam G :

I have to say that makes a lot of sense. I've said this before and I'm saying it again. With the proper motivation and the correct resistance training, any human being that falls within the average parameters of muscle mass, hormone production, and hand eye coordination can be developed into a hard puncher. I was just an average kid physically in high school, I was getting my lunch money taken randomly like every one else before I underwent the transformation. Having been to slow to make the track team. .... too small for football and to short and too uncoordinated for basketball I finally gave wrestling a try. I liked the sport and was 1-7 my first year, my cousin who later played pro baseball usually won the challenges for varsity position but I got to wrestle on the varsity team enough times to letter. By my senior year we were the most feared teem in the inner city. I think I was 20-2, ....... I was three times stronger than a normal kid who didn't play sports.... And that extra strength stuck with me for the next few decades of my life because I new where power came from. It comes from leverage and resistance training... I knew the origins of how to explode with power. I've crushed two knuckles on one hand and fracture both wrists until I could control it. Of course some people are more inclined to have it naturally , but through the magic of youth, testosterone, motivation, and the proper resistance training, developing a strong punch is something that's not limited to a gifted few. The potential exists for the average Joe.
Sorry! But physically-hitting punchers are straight-up born. It is a hardcore fact of science. Psych-you-out punchers are made. But they could not bust a grape. Frightening their opponents is just mind-f***** up beliefs that a bully or a bigger person can hit. NYET! Fight science do not buy that syet. Dumbarse Tim Bradley is now chopping down on meat because he now has a trickster on his team telling him meat will give him punch power. What a bunch of crock! I'm always amazed how vulnerable athletes can be easily fooled by snake oil peddlers. NEWS FLASH: neither meat nor steroids give you KTFO punching power. Punchers are born just as bullsyetters are made by circumstances of failures and/or false-and-made-up beliefs of gaining super power of diz and dat and da whole nine. Holla!


-Radam G :

Good point. Some people are just naturally gifted and sound fundamentals can add to that. I had Holyfield beating Valuev and getting robbed. What do you think?
I too had Holy kicking Valuev's arse. Holla!


-Radam G :

Good point. Some people are just naturally gifted and sound fundamentals can add to that. I had Holyfield beating Valuev and getting robbed. What do you think?
I too had Holy kicking Valuev's arse. Holla!


-brownsugar :

Sorry! But physically-hitting punchers are straight-up born. It is a hardcore fact of science. Psych-you-out punchers are made. But they could not bust a grape. Frightening their opponents is just mind-f***** up beliefs that a bully or a bigger person can hit. NYET! Fight science do not buy that syet. Dumbarse Tim Bradley is now chopping down on meat because he now has a trickster on his team telling him meat will give him punch power. What a bunch of crock! I'm always amazed how vulnerable athletes can be easily fooled by snake oil peddlers. NEWS FLASH: neither meat nor steroids give you KTFO punching power. Punchers are born just as bullsyetters are made by circumstances of failures and/or false-and-made-up beliefs of gaining super power of diz and dat and da whole nine. Holla!
Totally disagree RG,.......There is no such thing as a fact of science which states a person cannot develop punching power. I've done it myself. I dont need anyones convoluted coconut juice logic to validate something I already know......and have experienced on a personal level. Punching harder has nothing to do with drinking cows's blood, eating vegetarian, chasing chickens or eating exotic seeds. Developing Punching power is a direct function of the application of torque, leverage, velocity, and having used the proper resistance... There is no exclusive rules of nature that prevents someone from learning to punch harder, ...there are only varying degrees of motivation and physical limitations. There are countless methods to get the proper resistance that don't have a thing to do with lifting weights or even increasing body mass.....like training in water, using pulleys, rubber tubing, hand weights, calisthenics, palate's, the list is longer than your comprehension. ...And learning how to punch hard has zero affiliation with Tim Bradley's ability or non-ability to punch hard or even an athletes physical appearance. I have met people who can't punch and in most cases its the people who have not learned to even scratch the surface of their potential.


-amayseng :

Totally disagree RG,.......There is no such thing as a fact of science which states a person cannot develop punching power. I've done it myself. I dont need anyones convoluted coconut juice logic to validate something I already know......and have experienced on a personal level. Punching harder has nothing to do with drinking cows's blood, eating vegetarian, chasing chickens or eating exotic seeds. Developing Punching power is a direct function of the application of torque, leverage, velocity, and having used the proper resistance... There is no exclusive rules of nature that prevents someone from learning to punch harder, ...there are only varying degrees of motivation and physical limitations. There are countless methods to get the proper resistance that don't have a thing to do with lifting weights or even increasing body mass.....like training in water, using pulleys, rubber tubing, hand weights, calisthenics, palate's, the list is longer than your comprehension. ...And learning how to punch hard has zero affiliation with Tim Bradley's ability or non-ability to punch hard or even an athletes physical appearance. I have met people who can't punch and in most cases its the people who have not learned to even scratch the surface of their potential.
I agree that there is always a way to be a little better and hit a little harder, to what extent is dependent upon each individual and their genetics. Some people are just born naturally with better genetics in power punching ability. I gave examples of how I had ridiculous speed and power naturally, just as my dad did and at such an early age 10-12 years old before I even hit puberty or began lifting weights. In a way, some people are just blessed to have natural power, or speed. You can always get a little quicker but you can not go from Gatti speed to Mayweather speed no matter how many drills you do.


-Radam G :

Totally disagree RG,.......There is no such thing as a fact of science which states a person cannot develop punching power. I've done it myself. I dont need anyones convoluted coconut juice logic to validate something I already know......and have experienced on a personal level. Punching harder has nothing to do with drinking cows's blood, eating vegetarian, chasing chickens or eating exotic seeds. Developing Punching power is a direct function of the application of torque, leverage, velocity, and having used the proper resistance... There is no exclusive rules of nature that prevents someone from learning to punch harder, ...there are only varying degrees of motivation and physical limitations. There are countless methods to get the proper resistance that don't have a thing to do with lifting weights or even increasing body mass.....like training in water, using pulleys, rubber tubing, hand weights, calisthenics, palate's, the list is longer than your comprehension. ...And learning how to punch hard has zero affiliation with Tim Bradley's ability or non-ability to punch hard or even an athletes physical appearance. I have met people who can't punch and in most cases its the people who have not learned to even scratch the surface of their potential.
You can disagree all that you want to. But don't twist around a thing that I've said. You are darn right drinking cow's blood, eating vegetarian, chasing chickens or eating exotic seeds" has zero to do with punching. Punchers are BORN, PERIOD! And you cannot develop punching power, Eddie Chambers hasn't done it. And Mark Stinson and the old, fighting master Jimmy Young couldn't do it. And Chris Algieri won't do it. In his case, it has always been there. And Trainer JDJ will bring it out. Punching power is not "a direct function of the application of torque, leverage, velocity, and having used the proper resistance..." O Babies from the crib are either power punchers or not. Anyway! [My son was knocking out babies. Now he is knocking out eight to 12 years old. My nephew does not and was not born with that type of power. He is just whuppin' arse.] When Rev. (Big) George Foreman started boxing back in da day, he swang and bounced around like a bytch, but he could knock you da double fudge out. Natural power punchers like him are called "heavy handed" in da hurt bitnezz [sic]. When "Iron" Mike Tyson first started boxing, he also swang wide and bytch like, but could knock you out. He was also called "heavy handed." When the late Buster Mathis started boxing, he also swang wide, bytch-like and sissified, but his 340-pound arse could not bust a grape. And when he was taught proper techniques, he could not bust a tomato. My point for naming those six is because they have been studied BIG time in Fight science. But never minid the whole subject. I give up on you. You have become a king cocksure bullsyetter in cyberspace. Have your go. You have no influence on those people in da know, and those who are the real deal. The author of this copy is straight-up right on. "Punchers are BORN." And you cannot do jack to increase that which you were not born to be. Or Eddie Chambers would now be kayoing out chumps like D-Wild is doing. And Tim Bradley is going to become the greatest puncher of all time because he now does "a direct function of the application of torque, leverage, velocity, having used the porper resistance..." Hehehe! NYET! He will forever be a light puncher. He was born that way. OMFG! _____ _____ ____ ____ will post any darn POS on internet to try to convince someone that they are intelligently in da know. It will work for those who are brain-wave catching slow. Have a good day. Holla!


-brownsugar :

You can disagree all that you want to. But don't twist around a thing that I've said. You are darn right drinking cow's blood, eating vegetarian, chasing chickens or eating exotic seeds" has zero to do with punching. Punchers are BORN, PERIOD! And you cannot develop punching power, Eddie Chambers hasn't done it. And Mark Stinson and the old, fighting master Jimmy Young couldn't do it. And Chris Algieri won't do it. In his case, it has always been there. And Trainer JDJ will bring it out. Punching power is not "a direct function of the application of torque, leverage, velocity, and having used the proper resistance..." O Babies from the crib are either power punchers or not. Anyway! [My son was knocking out babies. Now he is knocking out eight to 12 years old. My nephew does not and was not born with that type of power. He is just whuppin' arse.] When Rev. (Big) George Foreman started boxing back in da day, he swang and bounced around like a bytch, but he could knock you da double fudge out. Natural power punchers like him are called "heavy handed" in da hurt bitnezz [sic]. When "Iron" Mike Tyson first started boxing, he also swang wide and bytch like, but could knock you out. He was also called "heavy handed." When the late Buster Mathis started boxing, he also swang wide, bytch-like and sissified, but his 340-pound arse could not bust a grape. And when he was taught proper techniques, he could not bust a tomato. My point for naming those six is because they have been studied BIG time in Fight science. But never minid the whole subject. I give up on you. You have become a king cocksure bullsyetter in cyberspace. Have your go. You have no influence on those people in da know, and those who are the real deal. The author of this copy is straight-up right on. "Punchers are BORN." And you cannot do jack to increase that which you were not born to be. Or Eddie Chambers would now be kayoing out chumps like D-Wild is doing. And Tim Bradley is going to become the greatest puncher of all time because he now does "a direct function of the application of torque, leverage, velocity, having used the porper resistance..." Hehehe! NYET! He will forever be a light puncher. He was born that way. OMFG! _____ _____ ____ ____ will post any darn POS on internet to try to convince someone that they are intelligently in da know. It will work for those who are brain-wave catching slow. Have a good day. Holla!
RG did you even read my post, or just automatically go off on an automatic rant? My argument is not with the author, of course there will always be massive punchers like Mugabi, Liston, and Foreman,...as well as fighters who will never even attempt to throw a hard shot. However punchers are also developed.... Much like Hearns, who didn't start to tap into his power until he went pro and Wilder who gets so much leverage and torque when turns over the right hand he can hit harder than punchers like Klitschko What you think of me personally is none of my business and is the least of my concern. Now please explain to me how its impossible for the average fighter to improve his punching power. I'd really like to know how that works.


-Radam G :

RG did you even read my post, or just automatically go off on an automatic rant? My argument is not with the author, of course there will always be massive punchers like Mugabi, Liston, and Foreman,...as well as fighters who will never even attempt to throw a hard shot. However punchers are also developed.... Much like Hearns, who didn't start to tap into his power until he went pro and Wilder who gets so much leverage and torque when turns over the right hand he can hit harder than punchers like Klitschko What you think of me personally is none of my business and is the least of my concern. Now please explain to me how its impossible for the average fighter to improve his punching power. I'd really like to know how that works.
I read your post TRICE. One can only make correction to use the full power that he was born with. No amount of weights, food or steroid magic can increase that physical power. You can only psych one out with psychological power appearance. "iron" Mike Tyson and "Big" (Rev.) George Foreman had pugs so psyched out that they would knockout opponents without touching them. They frightened opponents so badly that the opponents fainted. And a lot of pugs do faint all the time, but many times they are accused of taking a dive from angry and/or naive talking heads. Neither D-Wild or Tommy Hearns were kayo specialists as amateurs because they hit to score points, not to knock out arses. My idol Mark Breland and Sugar Ray Robinson were kayo artists in both the amateurs and pros because they shot punches to knockout arses in the amateurs and pros. So did Ernie Shaver, "Big" (Rev) George Foreman and the late. Great Sonny Liston. There is no weight training, roids taking and being put into a trance that will help your punch shooting anymore than it would help your basketball shooting. My friend shooting basketballs that hit all nets 85 to a 100 percent of the time and shooting punches and knocking out arses 85 to a 100 percent of the time are born. And you can only teach them technique to get to the target. Holla!


-the Roast :

I read your post TRICE. One can only make correction to use the full power that he was born with. No amount of weights, food or steroid magic can increase that physical power. You can only psych one out with psychological power appearance. "iron" Mike Tyson and "Big" (Rev.) George Foreman had pugs so psyched out that they would knockout opponents without touching them. They frightened opponents so badly that the opponents fainted. And a lot of pugs do faint all the time, but many times they are accused of taking a dive from angry and/or naive talking heads. Neither D-Wild or Tommy Hearns were kayo specialists as amateurs because they hit to score points, not to knock out arses. My idol Mark Breland and Sugar Ray Robinson were kayo artists in both the amateurs and pros because they shot punches to knockout arses in the amateurs and pros. So did Ernie Shaver, "Big" (Rev) George Foreman and the late. Great Sonny Liston. There is no weight training, roids taking and being put into a trance that will help your punch shooting anymore than it would help your basketball shooting. My friend shooting basketballs that hit all nets 85 to a 100 percent of the time and shooting punches and knocking out arses 85 to a 100 percent of the time are born. And you can only teach them technique to get to the target. Holla!
Tyrone Trice?


-Radam G :

Tyrone Trice?
Hehehe! Now that dude could hit. But he had no chin. He was never trice knocked down or kayoed. Dude was put to hard sleep by Simon Brown if I recall correctly from the top of my head. Holla!


-stormcentre :

Hmm . . Amayseng and BrownSugar make sense. Radam, sorry, you're back in dreamland again. Frightening opponents has nothing to do with punching "power". Steroids increase strength and endurance. So - whilst those factors continue to play apart in not only controlling and pulling the series of lever systems within our bodies for extended periods of time - but actually (skeleton-muscularly) constituting what our bodies are also; steroids and PEDs both have to and actually do assist with KOs. That's one reason why steroids and PEDs are banned. :) So, yes you're back in dreamland again. Still, that's both obviously where you're most comfortable and it's also you're right - so have fun there. Please report back on regular intervals with unexplained and remarkable claims so we know you're OK and normal. :) Anyway, check this
StormCentre cat out.
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?21585-Which-Came-First-amp-The-Truth-About-The-Made-Or-Born-Puncher-quot-the-punchers-conundrum-quot That silly guy, he went and wrote a whole essay on the subject of "punchers" and turned it into a silly dissertation/thread called . . . . "Which Came First & What Is The Truth About The Made Or Born Puncher; ""the punchers conundrum""?"


-stormcentre :

Hmm . . Amayseng and BrownSugar make sense. Radam, sorry, you're back in dreamland again. Frightening opponents has nothing to do with punching "power". Steroids increase strength and endurance. So - whilst those factors continue to play apart in not only controlling and pulling the series of lever systems within our bodies for extended periods of time - but actually (skeleton-muscularly) constituting what our bodies are also; steroids and PEDs both have to and actually do assist with KOs. That's one reason why steroids and PEDs are banned. :) So, yes you're back in dreamland again. Still, that's both obviously where you're most comfortable and it's also you're right - so have fun there. Please report back on regular intervals with unexplained and remarkable claims so we know you're OK and normal. :) Anyway, check this
StormCentre cat out.
->http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?21585-Which-Came-First-amp-The-Truth-About-The-Made-Or-Born-Puncher-quot-the-punchers-conundrum-quot That silly guy, he went and wrote a whole essay on the subject of "punchers" and turned it into a silly dissertation/thread called . . . . "Which Came First & What Is The Truth About The Made Or Born Puncher; ""the punchers conundrum""?"