Andy Lee Says Saturday Fight Is For Emanuel Steward

TSS checked in with fan fave, all around good dude Andy Lee, who gets what could well be his last, best shot at a major crown on Saturday, in Las Vegas, on a Top Rank show portions of which will run on HBO.

Lee will fight Matt Korobov, a Russian contender who turned pro in 2008, and the vacant WBO 160 pound crown will be up in the air.

I spoke to Lee, a pro since 2006, to get a sense of where his heard and heart and body are in the days leading up to the tussle.

Please tell me about camp, Andy. Where? Sparring? Talk to me.

“I’ve had an eight week camp for this fight,” said the 33-2 (23 KOs) hitter, who is promoted by the NYC stalwart, Lou Dibella. “Started with two weeks in London, five in Monaco and then the final week back in London. I sparred with some very good, young and up and coming fighters. John Ryder, Deion Jumah, Ryan Ashton and Cedric Vitu.”

Thoughts, please, on where you are in your career? Is this is a must win?

“This is the fight I’ve been preparing my whole life for,” said the man born in London, who grew up in Ireland. “I believe I hold my destiny in my own hands. Everything I’ve done has put me here and I’m ready to become the man I am!”

Lee last scrapped June 7, underneath the Sergio Martinez-Miguel Cotto tussle, and he scored a thriller KO in round five against John Jackson. He’s been building himself back up to a mental and physical place after being stopped in round seven by Julio Cesar Chavez in June 2012.

You’re fighting Matt Korobov (24-0 with 14 KOs; age 31). Your assessment please on his strengths and weaknesses, Andy.

“Korobov is a very good fighter, I know it won’t be easy,” the 30-year-old Lee stated. “He has fast hands and feet and is his technique is good. But I have everything I need to be victorious.”

The lefty Lee was super tight with the late Emanuel Steward, who acted as that, a steward, to the hearts and souls of many young men who received from him a trove of love and acceptance and structure. I asked Lee–Is this one for Emanuel?

“I will dedicate winning this fight to the memory of Emanuel,” Lee said. “I will make true the praise he placed upon me.”

Here is a release which went out on Lee’s trainer Adam Booth:

ADAM BOOTH: “I’M NOT HOPING THAT ANDY LEE WILL UPSET KOROBOV ON SATURDAY NIGHT, I’M FULLY EXPECTING IT.”

 

LONDON (10 Dec) – Adam Booth had huge stirrups to fill when he stepped into the trainer’s saddle for ex world middleweight challenger Andy Lee two years ago.

                  

The classy Limerick southpaw is clearly one of the most gifted Irish fighters of his generation. However, following two stoppage defeats, the 30 year old was in danger of becoming a talent unfulfilled.

 

Booth – feted for his work with David Haye and George Groves previously – is keen to prevent that happening as he leads the London born traveller into a second world title crack with Russia’s former crack amateur Matt Korobov in Las Vegas this weekend.

 

Boxing writer Glynn Evans tracked down the native south Londoner for a quick chat about Lee’s prospects, prior to his departure for the US.

 

How did your association with Andy come about?

I won him in a raffle, five tickets for a pound!

No, I got his number through an Irish contact of mine, Damien McCann. Damien also introduced me to Belfast’s Ryan Burnett who I’m also now training.

I was aware of who Andy was, knew he was a tall southpaw but didn’t really know much more than that. I’d not followed him closely.

 

What was your initial assessment of Andy? What were you impressed with?

Firstly, he was a very nice man, very easy going….unless you owe him any money!

You could tell that he was very experienced and that he’d been around the block. Having been managed and trained by Emanuel Steward for a long period, you knew he had pedigree.

To be honest, I didn’t know myself how I’d work with him because I’ve very limited experience of working with fighters of his style, tall southpaws. It was quite a challenge to me as a trainer and it took a good year for the changes to start to surface in the gymnasium and another six months before they became apparent in his fights. Initially the progress was steady, lately it’s been steep.

 

What changes did you feel it was necessary to import?

I needed to persuade Andy to stop boxing at just one height.  I needed to help make him less upright. I’ve tried to make him far more comfortable whilst fighting up close. Basically, I’ve worked on the many things that he could already do and tried to make it even better.

 

Lee made a big statement in his last fight, getting off the floor to iron out highly touted Virgin Islander John Jackson with a single counter right hook in round five. What aspects of that performance were you pleased with….and less pleased with?

 

Well, I certainly was not impressed with how he started. Despite lots of work in the gym, he forgot to move his head and paid the price for that against a very big hitter.

But after that I was very impressed. That was the first time that Andy had been off his feet, as a pro, in his long amateur career, or even in the gymnasium. Yet despite twisting his ankle as he fell, he just dusted himself down and responded very calmly. He carefully eased his way back into the fight.

John Jackson is a very dangerous man and he attacked relentlessly but Andy used all his experience to walk him onto a bomb. It was a very special finish but I always knew Andy had that in his locker. I’d seen a tape of him starching (ex WBA light-middleweight champion) Carl Daniels rigid with a very similar shot, earlier in his career.

 

Ideally, would you have preferred more time to work together, prior to entering a world title fight?

 

Not really, no. We’ve been working together for two years now and it’s all coming together very nicely in the gym, of late. I’d like to think he’s improved in all areas, technically and physically. In fact, I’d go so far as to say the timing for this fight couldn’t be better. I’d not swap a thing.

 

What is your assessment of Matt Korobov, the unbeaten Russian southpaw, who Andy confronts for the vacant WBO middleweight title in Las Vegas this Saturday?

 

I didn’t see too much of him in the amateurs but I’ve certainly been aware of him since he first turned pro. I’ve seen enough of him. I’m not about to publically analyse his strengths and weaknesses before I go into a fight against him. Ask me after the fight!

I know he was a very successful amateur, a former two time world champion and an Olympian but amateur boxing is amateur boxing. He’s not really shone as a professional yet but perhaps that’s because he’s not yet had the opponents that would enable him to advance his obvious talent to another level.

I’m not really sure how Korobov will approach the fight and I don’t really care about him. I just care about Andy Lee. Hopefully, I’ve prepared him for every eventuality. Let’s just say that, I don’t enter this fight hoping that Andy will cause an upset, I fully expect him to win.

 

The WBO have ordered the winner to fight Billy Joe Saunders, who at the end of last month won his eliminator against Chris Eubank Jnr.  Billy stepped aside to first allow Demetrius Andrade a shot and when he declined, Andy Lee stepped in. A victory for Lee would pave the way for a huge showdown with fellow traveller Saunders…

Whatever. I’m not remotely interested in discussing anything other than Matt Korobov on Saturday evening. That’s our only focus, right now.

 

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COMMENTS

-brownsugar :

There are so many crossroads-make-or-break fights this week, I can't begin to list them all. Andy Lee's fight will certainly be on my radar. Lee displayed blinding speed combined with beautiful two fisted combinations at the beginning of his career. That was until Brian Vera sent a gassed Lee back to boot camp with an incredible come from behind upset. Later in his career.....Lee's fighting style resembled John Wayne in a barfight. But he's back and he can crack...should be interesting.


-stormcentre :

If Lee (a southpaw) can't get MK Ultra's respect in this fight then he's probably cut fish. Still, Andy (whom I like) also represents a step up in class for Matvey (whom is also a southpaw). That said, sometimes the worst guy a southpaw can face is another southpaw. And I have a funny feeling that, out of the two, the one southpaw that will be more comfortable facing another lefty will be MK Ultra. Either way, both combatants are such nice and deserving guys (cliche I know), regardless of who wins (for me) it's all good.


-Bernie Campbell :

This is a good scrape! Lee has more nuggets because he isnt afraid to fight anyone at his level or above a little! Korobov had beened moved extremely slow! Too slow! Had Knockout power in the beginning! I dont know what happened to this guy considering he was an Olympic and amatuer phenom!


-brownsugar :

This is a good scrape! Lee has more nuggets because he isnt afraid to fight anyone at his level or above a little! Korobov had beened moved extremely slow! Too slow! Had Knockout power in the beginning! I dont know what happened to this guy considering he was an Olympic and amatuer phenom!
Agreed...his technical skill as an amateur defied belief... I liked watching his amateur fights on youtube more than Lomanchenko's ...if I remember correctly RG had a theory about that.


-The Commish :

I, too, just like Andy Lee, will be thinking of my friend, Emanuel Steward, this weekend. Emanuel was one of my two gurus and teachers, the other being Gil Clancy. In my frequent lunches and phone calls with Emanuel Steward, one of the fighters he most liked to talk about was Andy Lee. It was always "Andy Lee can box. Andy Lee can punch. Andy Lee can do it all. Andy Lee is a future champion. Andy Lee is going to be great." I believed him. After all, Emanuel Steward told me in 1978 that a tall, skinny kid he had, who fell short of making the 1976 U.S. Olympic Team, and who was now 10-0 as a pro, would go on to become one of history's greatest fighters. The kid he was talking about was Thomas Hearns. And, after all, this was Emanuel Steward, who told me, right after Wladimir Klitschko got smoked by Lamon Brewster in 2004, "all the kid needs is a bit of adjustment to become a great fighter." I looked at him as if he was crazy. Why? This was Klitschko's second loss in around four fights and his third loss overall. Steward was telling me, after watching Brewster leave Klitschko on legs of that of a newborn calf, "He can be a great heavyweight." Wladimir hasn't lost since. None of his fights have been remotely close. So, after hearing how great Lee was going to be, then seeing him lose and hearing Steward tell me, "He needs to make a few adjustments," I have not written Lee off. If anything, I am picking him. I'm probably doing what I do a lot of--picking with my heart. But, even with Emanuel in another place, I somehow feel he will be working Lee's corner on Saturday night. I just don't think this is a fight Lee can lose. This one he's winning for Manny. -Randy G.


-amayseng :

"I will make true the praise he placed upon me." Wow, what a statement, good luck to Lee I hope he brings it home for ES.


-stormcentre :

This is a good scrape! Lee has more nuggets because he isnt afraid to fight anyone at his level or above a little! Korobov had beened moved extremely slow! Too slow! Had Knockout power in the beginning! I dont know what happened to this guy considering he was an Olympic and amatuer phenom!
Korobov, I think, shortly after landing in the USA, had a fallout with his initial trainer/manager (the same guy that used to manage Winky Wright; Birmingham), and that's why his pro career went slow for a while. As like many Eastern Bloc fighters Matvey put it all on the line to come out here.


-brownsugar :

Korobov, I think, shortly after landing in the USA, had a fallout with his initial trainer/manager (the same guy that used to manage Winky Wright; Birmingham), and that's why his pro career went slow for a while. As like many Eastern Bloc fighters Matvey put it all on the line to come out here.
I see...he's still better than 92% of the middleweights but doesn't look any where near as good he did as an amateur...


-stormcentre :

I see...he's still better than 92% of the middleweights but doesn't look any where near as good he did as an amateur...
Yes, you're right - he looked much better in the amateurs. A part of the reason for that is that, as a professional fighter, he has focussed on power and fallen in love with punching. That, technically speaking, could actually be an advantage for Lee. Or maybe it will not, as Korobov is a tough nut to crack?


-The Commish :

Yes, you're right - he looked much better in the amateurs. A part of the reason for that is that, as a professional fighter, he has focussed on power and fallen in love with punching. That, technically speaking, could actually be an advantage for Lee. Or maybe it will not, as Korobov is a tough nut to crack?
This one could be, of all the outstanding matchups this weekend, the best of all of them. What a weekend this will be for boxing fans! -Randy G.


-stormcentre :

This one could be, of all the outstanding matchups this weekend, the best of all of them. What a weekend this will be for boxing fans! -Randy G.
Yep, you're right. Korobov has for a long time waited for a legitimate title shot, so he will come in ready. Same for Lee. If Lee comes in to the early rounds with all guns firing accurately - like he can do - this fight could turn into a real firestorm; with lots of opportunities for Matvey to counter and smash with power as he gets accurately pecked at by Andy. Matvey is a hard guy to control, and even if he's behind on points he is rarely psychologically dominated. Remember, this is the guy that beat up and dropped Kovalev in the amateurs, in a reasonably casual (gee what if I really tried) fashion.


-Yiddle :

I will take koborov in this one yes he's had a slow career but he's also had a less punishing pro career and may have a bit more left than lee who at times has looked a little like he has slipped some


-brownsugar :

On paper Korobov is the runaway favorite. I love it when fights doesn't follow the script. I hope this is one of those times.


-Carmine Cas :

I hope Lee gets the win, he's been knocking on the middleweight championship door for a while only to get knocked down and come back. My heart says Lee, my head says Korobov.