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stormcentre:

Just kidding.

Reply

stormcentre:

Oh and John Ruiz!!!!!

Reply

stormcentre:

Toney, Greb, Hopkins and Hagler should also be considered in any top 20 list – if not top 10.

Agree with anyone who says Willie Pep.

Reply

stormcentre:

"Speaking of The Prince:


I think at one stage he was the most exciting fighter that I'd ever been involved with. At one stage, in the early part of his career, he could have gone on to become one of the great fighters. But that disappeared when he didn't fight as regularly as he should have done, when he was cutting corners on his training. It just didn't work out for him from that point on.” – Frank Warren]

"I had hand trouble and could not take the power of my punch," Hamed said. "I needed cortisone injections to take away the pain when I fought, then after every fight the gloves would be whipped off and my hands would be as big as balloons." - Prince Naseem Hamed


“... with his unique, unorthodox, frankly crazy style of boxing, his speed, reflexes and bone crushing power, and the way in which he took the boxing world as a young bright eyed swaggering kid, ruled his division for years, and was a verifiable icon for confidence-crisis suffering kids the world over, Naseem Hamed was a personal childhood hero, the most talented fighter I have ever seen, the most accomplished young fighter ever, and the fact that he retired somewhat prematurely aged 28 should not detract from the golden memories he gave us in the relatively short time he did compete”.- Daniel Fletcher

Let’s cut right to the chase. This unorthodox, flashy and supremely talented southpaw, born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, should be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame forthwith.

With a final record of 36-1, he was the WBO, WBC, IBF, and Lineal featherweight champion, and European bantamweight champion. He also knocked out Wilfredo Vazquez who had just been stripped of the WBA title prior to their fight. He also won a number of regional and international titles. Daniel Fletcher describes his dominance best in a lengthy and compelling article dated May 18, 2012 on FIGHTSPORTASIA http://fightsportasia.com/2012/05/18/requiem-for-naseem/

“… at the end of the day, let it never be doubted that beyond the show and “unfulfilled potential”, Prince Naseem Hamed still accomplished a remarkable decade-long ledger in the sport to go along with his talent, and it reads as follows:

* European Bantamweight champion (1994)
*WBC International Super-Bantamweight champion (1994-95)
*WBO World Featherweight champion (1995-2001 – 15 defences)
*IBF World Featherweight champion (1997 – 2 defences)
*WBC World Featherweight champion (1999)
*Lineal WBA World Featherweight champion 1998 – WBA stripped Wilfredo Vazquez prior to his bout with Naseem
*Lineal World Featherweight champion (with Vazquez win – 5 “defences”)
*IBO World Featherweight champion (2002)
*36 wins, 1 loss (31 knockouts)
*17 world championship wins
*10 world champion opponents beaten

“In short, he dominated the featherweight division for six years, winning 17 world championship fights against 10 world champion opponents, and he unified all the titles. That dominance against tough opposition should count heavily when evaluating his candidacy for nomination into the Hall.

With swagger, style, and showmanship aplenty, Hamed was known for his many spectacular ring entrances and flashy showboating. Not unlike the late Hector “Macho: Camacho, his boxing antics made him the new poster-boy for lighter-weight boxers and his extraordinary charisma attracted large numbers of fans, but despite the flash, there was plenty of substance. He was a very talented, skilled, and had sledgehammer power (with an impressive 83.78 KO percentage) who scored spectacular highlight reel knockouts.

Among his victims were Paul Ingle (21-0), Cesar Soto (54-7-2), Vuyani Bungu (37-2), Wayne McCullough (22-1), Wilfredo Vazquez (50-7-2), Kevin Kelley (47-1-2) in a classic 1997 shootout that feature multiple knockdowns in Madison Square Garden, Tom Johnson (44-2), and the always game Manuel Medina (52-7).

He successfully defended his WBO title for the fifteenth and final time in August 2000 against Augie “Kid Vegas” Sanchez (26-1) at Foxwoods Resort in Connecticut with a devastating fourth round knockout. In this one (which I saw live), Hamed seemed to have come down from above on a Flying Carpet as he landed the final KO punch flush. It was a concussive, sudden, and very scary ending to what had been a surprisingly competitive bout. Sanchez remained prone on the canvas for several minutes before he was placed in a neck brace, given oxygen, and removed from the ring on a stretcher. The chief ringside physician, the esteemed Dr. Michael Schwartz, believed that he had suffered a concussion, and he was taken to nearby Backus Medical Hospital where he remained overnight. "Sanchez was very lethargic and slow to respond to commands," Dr. Schwartz said. "He was talking with slurred speech. His pupils were sluggish." It was altogether a tense scene.

The main thing is I wish that Allah makes him nice and safe and there's nothing wrong with him at all," Hamed said after the fight.

Hamed broke his hand in the bout, and following surgery he spent six months out of the gym, gaining 35 pounds in weight. He then signed to for a much-anticipated Superlight with long-time rival Marco Antonio Barrera (52-3) in April 2001, but some said his performance against Sanchez in the early rounds suggested something was amiss. At any rate, he lost to Barrera by scores of 111-116, 112-115, and 112-115.

In an interview after the Barrera shocker, a candid Hamed stated that he regretted taking the fight, due to his inactivity and weight gain, and that he felt drained going in. Despite the poor preparation for the fight, he admitted complacency also had set in and that he never envisaged getting beaten, and added the multimillion dollar offer from HBO was also a motivating factor for taking the fight. But for all practical purposes this was the end of his boxing career, though he did beat Spaniard Manuel Calvo (33-4-1) a year later. Calvo had split a pair with Steve Robinson and had some chops. Again, Daniel Fletcher sums it up nicely, albeit with a tad of bias:

“The more sensible train of thought is that his long known dislike of training camps (as stated by the Prince) and greater dislike of being away from his family (ditto) combined with the gross sum of wealth he accumulated throughout his career, the fact his invincible aura and spot at the top had gone and his “day was done” as he may have sensed, combined with chronic hand injuries and tendinitis, not to mention the frankly disgusting reaction to his solid comeback after his first (and only) loss after 13 months out of the ring, against Calvo, all factored into Naseem Hamed’s decision to never re-enter the gladiatorial ring via somersault ever again.”

Later, after his retirement, Prince Naseem was stripped of his MBE after being jailed over a high-speed crash in his sports car, which left the person in the other car with fractures to every major bone in his body. The crash happened in May 2005, and the honour was removed in 2007 - nine years after he received it.

This perhaps may have played some sublime and/or indirect role in his not being inducted into the Hall, but if it did, then many others should not be in as well. Another reason might be that his career ended prematurely (at the young age of 28) with unfilled potential in the eyes of many.

Since leaving the sport and being inactive for the best part of 10 years Prince has recently founded a sports management company with Clive Richardson, Questa Talent Championships.

Says Daniel Fletcher, “...some stars are so bright they burn out fast, rather than fading away slowly. In this case, while it still hurts that it did, one must be thankful that we saw the star at all.”

It’s time for The Prince to be inducted into the IBHOF."


Yes excellent write up.

And now a little (fun) test for you?

What, physically, was the best (and possibly one of the most overlooked) attributes that Hamed brought to the game?

Do you - or anyone - know?

Hamed was brilliant and he had way more potential than he showed.

Dude hardly trained for Barrera or took instructions during the fight!!

Reply

brownsugar:

"Speaking of The Prince:





I think at one stage he was the most exciting fighter that I'd ever been involved with. At one stage, in the early part of his career, he could have gone on to become one of the great fighters. But that disappeared when he didn't fight as regularly as he should have done, when he was cutting corners on his training. It just didn't work out for him from that point on." Frank Warren]



"I had hand trouble and could not take the power of my punch," Hamed said. "I needed cortisone injections to take away the pain when I fought, then after every fight the gloves would be whipped off and my hands would be as big as balloons." - Prince Naseem Hamed





"... with his unique, unorthodox, frankly crazy style of boxing, his speed, reflexes and bone crushing power, and the way in which he took the boxing world as a young bright eyed swaggering kid, ruled his division for years, and was a verifiable icon for confidence-crisis suffering kids the world over, Naseem Hamed was a personal childhood hero, the most talented fighter I have ever seen, the most accomplished young fighter ever, and the fact that he retired somewhat prematurely aged 28 should not detract from the golden memories he gave us in the relatively short time he did compete".- Daniel Fletcher



Let's cut right to the chase. This unorthodox, flashy and supremely talented southpaw, born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, should be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame forthwith.



With a final record of 36-1, he was the WBO, WBC, IBF, and Lineal featherweight champion, and European bantamweight champion. He also knocked out Wilfredo Vazquez who had just been stripped of the WBA title prior to their fight. He also won a number of regional and international titles. Daniel Fletcher describes his dominance best in a lengthy and compelling article dated May 18, 2012 on FIGHTSPORTASIA http://fightsportasia.com/2012/05/18/requiem-for-naseem/



" at the end of the day, let it never be doubted that beyond the show and "unfulfilled potential", Prince Naseem Hamed still accomplished a remarkable decade-long ledger in the sport to go along with his talent, and it reads as follows:



* European Bantamweight champion (1994)

*WBC International Super-Bantamweight champion (1994-95)

*WBO World Featherweight champion (1995-2001 15 defences)

*IBF World Featherweight champion (1997 2 defences)

*WBC World Featherweight champion (1999)

*Lineal WBA World Featherweight champion 1998 WBA stripped Wilfredo Vazquez prior to his bout with Naseem

*Lineal World Featherweight champion (with Vazquez win 5 "defences")

*IBO World Featherweight champion (2002)

*36 wins, 1 loss (31 knockouts)

*17 world championship wins

*10 world champion opponents beaten



"In short, he dominated the featherweight division for six years, winning 17 world championship fights against 10 world champion opponents, and he unified all the titles. That dominance against tough opposition should count heavily when evaluating his candidacy for nomination into the Hall.



With swagger, style, and showmanship aplenty, Hamed was known for his many spectacular ring entrances and flashy showboating. Not unlike the late Hector "Macho: Camacho, his boxing antics made him the new poster-boy for lighter-weight boxers and his extraordinary charisma attracted large numbers of fans, but despite the flash, there was plenty of substance. He was a very talented, skilled, and had sledgehammer power (with an impressive 83.78 KO percentage) who scored spectacular highlight reel knockouts.



Among his victims were Paul Ingle (21-0), Cesar Soto (54-7-2), Vuyani Bungu (37-2), Wayne McCullough (22-1), Wilfredo Vazquez (50-7-2), Kevin Kelley (47-1-2) in a classic 1997 shootout that feature multiple knockdowns in Madison Square Garden, Tom Johnson (44-2), and the always game Manuel Medina (52-7).



He successfully defended his WBO title for the fifteenth and final time in August 2000 against Augie "Kid Vegas" Sanchez (26-1) at Foxwoods Resort in Connecticut with a devastating fourth round knockout. In this one (which I saw live), Hamed seemed to have come down from above on a Flying Carpet as he landed the final KO punch flush. It was a concussive, sudden, and very scary ending to what had been a surprisingly competitive bout. Sanchez remained prone on the canvas for several minutes before he was placed in a neck brace, given oxygen, and removed from the ring on a stretcher. The chief ringside physician, the esteemed Dr. Michael Schwartz, believed that he had suffered a concussion, and he was taken to nearby Backus Medical Hospital where he remained overnight. "Sanchez was very lethargic and slow to respond to commands," Dr. Schwartz said. "He was talking with slurred speech. His pupils were sluggish." It was altogether a tense scene.



The main thing is I wish that Allah makes him nice and safe and there's nothing wrong with him at all," Hamed said after the fight.



Hamed broke his hand in the bout, and following surgery he spent six months out of the gym, gaining 35 pounds in weight. He then signed to for a much-anticipated Superlight with long-time rival Marco Antonio Barrera (52-3) in April 2001, but some said his performance against Sanchez in the early rounds suggested something was amiss. At any rate, he lost to Barrera by scores of 111-116, 112-115, and 112-115.



In an interview after the Barrera shocker, a candid Hamed stated that he regretted taking the fight, due to his inactivity and weight gain, and that he felt drained going in. Despite the poor preparation for the fight, he admitted complacency also had set in and that he never envisaged getting beaten, and added the multimillion dollar offer from HBO was also a motivating factor for taking the fight. But for all practical purposes this was the end of his boxing career, though he did beat Spaniard Manuel Calvo (33-4-1) a year later. Calvo had split a pair with Steve Robinson and had some chops. Again, Daniel Fletcher sums it up nicely, albeit with a tad of bias:



"The more sensible train of thought is that his long known dislike of training camps (as stated by the Prince) and greater dislike of being away from his family (ditto) combined with the gross sum of wealth he accumulated throughout his career, the fact his invincible aura and spot at the top had gone and his "day was done" as he may have sensed, combined with chronic hand injuries and tendinitis, not to mention the frankly disgusting reaction to his solid comeback after his first (and only) loss after 13 months out of the ring, against Calvo, all factored into Naseem Hamed's decision to never re-enter the gladiatorial ring via somersault ever again."



Later, after his retirement, Prince Naseem was stripped of his MBE after being jailed over a high-speed crash in his sports car, which left the person in the other car with fractures to every major bone in his body. The crash happened in May 2005, and the honour was removed in 2007 - nine years after he received it.



This perhaps may have played some sublime and/or indirect role in his not being inducted into the Hall, but if it did, then many others should not be in as well. Another reason might be that his career ended prematurely (at the young age of 28) with unfilled potential in the eyes of many.



Since leaving the sport and being inactive for the best part of 10 years Prince has recently founded a sports management company with Clive Richardson, Questa Talent Championships.



Says Daniel Fletcher, "...some stars are so bright they burn out fast, rather than fading away slowly. In this case, while it still hurts that it did, one must be thankful that we saw the star at all."



It's time for The Prince to be inducted into the IBHOF."




I'm sold Kid Blast,... Good write up

Reply

Kid Blast:

Speaking of The Prince:





I think at one stage he was the most exciting fighter that I'd ever been involved with. At one stage, in the early part of his career, he could have gone on to become one of the great fighters. But that disappeared when he didn't fight as regularly as he should have done, when he was cutting corners on his training. It just didn't work out for him from that point on." Frank Warren]



"I had hand trouble and could not take the power of my punch," Hamed said. "I needed cortisone injections to take away the pain when I fought, then after every fight the gloves would be whipped off and my hands would be as big as balloons." - Prince Naseem Hamed





"... with his unique, unorthodox, frankly crazy style of boxing, his speed, reflexes and bone crushing power, and the way in which he took the boxing world as a young bright eyed swaggering kid, ruled his division for years, and was a verifiable icon for confidence-crisis suffering kids the world over, Naseem Hamed was a personal childhood hero, the most talented fighter I have ever seen, the most accomplished young fighter ever, and the fact that he retired somewhat prematurely aged 28 should not detract from the golden memories he gave us in the relatively short time he did compete".- Daniel Fletcher



Let's cut right to the chase. This unorthodox, flashy and supremely talented southpaw, born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, should be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame forthwith.



With a final record of 36-1, he was the WBO, WBC, IBF, and Lineal featherweight champion, and European bantamweight champion. He also knocked out Wilfredo Vazquez who had just been stripped of the WBA title prior to their fight. He also won a number of regional and international titles. Daniel Fletcher describes his dominance best in a lengthy and compelling article dated May 18, 2012 on FIGHTSPORTASIA http://fightsportasia.com/2012/05/18/requiem-for-naseem/



" at the end of the day, let it never be doubted that beyond the show and "unfulfilled potential", Prince Naseem Hamed still accomplished a remarkable decade-long ledger in the sport to go along with his talent, and it reads as follows:



* European Bantamweight champion (1994)

*WBC International Super-Bantamweight champion (1994-95)

*WBO World Featherweight champion (1995-2001 15 defences)

*IBF World Featherweight champion (1997 2 defences)

*WBC World Featherweight champion (1999)

*Lineal WBA World Featherweight champion 1998 WBA stripped Wilfredo Vazquez prior to his bout with Naseem

*Lineal World Featherweight champion (with Vazquez win 5 "defences")

*IBO World Featherweight champion (2002)

*36 wins, 1 loss (31 knockouts)

*17 world championship wins

*10 world champion opponents beaten



"In short, he dominated the featherweight division for six years, winning 17 world championship fights against 10 world champion opponents, and he unified all the titles. That dominance against tough opposition should count heavily when evaluating his candidacy for nomination into the Hall.



With swagger, style, and showmanship aplenty, Hamed was known for his many spectacular ring entrances and flashy showboating. Not unlike the late Hector "Macho: Camacho, his boxing antics made him the new poster-boy for lighter-weight boxers and his extraordinary charisma attracted large numbers of fans, but despite the flash, there was plenty of substance. He was a very talented, skilled, and had sledgehammer power (with an impressive 83.78 KO percentage) who scored spectacular highlight reel knockouts.



Among his victims were Paul Ingle (21-0), Cesar Soto (54-7-2), Vuyani Bungu (37-2), Wayne McCullough (22-1), Wilfredo Vazquez (50-7-2), Kevin Kelley (47-1-2) in a classic 1997 shootout that feature multiple knockdowns in Madison Square Garden, Tom Johnson (44-2), and the always game Manuel Medina (52-7).



He successfully defended his WBO title for the fifteenth and final time in August 2000 against Augie "Kid Vegas" Sanchez (26-1) at Foxwoods Resort in Connecticut with a devastating fourth round knockout. In this one (which I saw live), Hamed seemed to have come down from above on a Flying Carpet as he landed the final KO punch flush. It was a concussive, sudden, and very scary ending to what had been a surprisingly competitive bout. Sanchez remained prone on the canvas for several minutes before he was placed in a neck brace, given oxygen, and removed from the ring on a stretcher. The chief ringside physician, the esteemed Dr. Michael Schwartz, believed that he had suffered a concussion, and he was taken to nearby Backus Medical Hospital where he remained overnight. "Sanchez was very lethargic and slow to respond to commands," Dr. Schwartz said. "He was talking with slurred speech. His pupils were sluggish." It was altogether a tense scene.



The main thing is I wish that Allah makes him nice and safe and there's nothing wrong with him at all," Hamed said after the fight.



Hamed broke his hand in the bout, and following surgery he spent six months out of the gym, gaining 35 pounds in weight. He then signed to for a much-anticipated Superlight with long-time rival Marco Antonio Barrera (52-3) in April 2001, but some said his performance against Sanchez in the early rounds suggested something was amiss. At any rate, he lost to Barrera by scores of 111-116, 112-115, and 112-115.



In an interview after the Barrera shocker, a candid Hamed stated that he regretted taking the fight, due to his inactivity and weight gain, and that he felt drained going in. Despite the poor preparation for the fight, he admitted complacency also had set in and that he never envisaged getting beaten, and added the multimillion dollar offer from HBO was also a motivating factor for taking the fight. But for all practical purposes this was the end of his boxing career, though he did beat Spaniard Manuel Calvo (33-4-1) a year later. Calvo had split a pair with Steve Robinson and had some chops. Again, Daniel Fletcher sums it up nicely, albeit with a tad of bias:



"The more sensible train of thought is that his long known dislike of training camps (as stated by the Prince) and greater dislike of being away from his family (ditto) combined with the gross sum of wealth he accumulated throughout his career, the fact his invincible aura and spot at the top had gone and his "day was done" as he may have sensed, combined with chronic hand injuries and tendinitis, not to mention the frankly disgusting reaction to his solid comeback after his first (and only) loss after 13 months out of the ring, against Calvo, all factored into Naseem Hamed's decision to never re-enter the gladiatorial ring via somersault ever again."



Later, after his retirement, Prince Naseem was stripped of his MBE after being jailed over a high-speed crash in his sports car, which left the person in the other car with fractures to every major bone in his body. The crash happened in May 2005, and the honour was removed in 2007 - nine years after he received it.



This perhaps may have played some sublime and/or indirect role in his not being inducted into the Hall, but if it did, then many others should not be in as well. Another reason might be that his career ended prematurely (at the young age of 28) with unfilled potential in the eyes of many.



Since leaving the sport and being inactive for the best part of 10 years Prince has recently founded a sports management company with Clive Richardson, Questa Talent Championships.



Says Daniel Fletcher, "...some stars are so bright they burn out fast, rather than fading away slowly. In this case, while it still hurts that it did, one must be thankful that we saw the star at all."



It's time for The Prince to be inducted into the IBHOF.

Reply

King Beef:

"I did. I'm sensitive about yestergenerations always claiming to have had TBE and nowadays pugs could not compete with these long-gone boxing jacks, macks, jokes, smokes, hoes and joes.



Money May could whup all, but maybe not Willie Pep, GOAT Ali, Finito Lopez, SweetPea Whitake, Hawk Time And Macho Time, just to name a few ATG P4P.



But Money May is one of the best TBEs of all times PERIOD. Holla!"




It's all good, and I am guilty of that to an extent, I must admit. I would have been great to see the big dogs of today in there with guys the caliber of forementioned ATG's for 15 rounds, but I agree, May certainly can lay claim to one of the best ever.

I think he will the credit he deserves when he's done with the sport, alot of people can't get by the outside antics.

Reply

Radam G:

"While I used to think it was only boxers who wind up broke, I later found out that athletes--and Hollywood stars--can and do wind up in Palookaville and on Skid Row. Why? They think the large money which is coming in is an endless stream of Presidential portraits. Also, when you've just gotten a payday of seven figures, it's easy to go out and buy the house you always wanted for your momma...that large diamond necklace for your girl...that flashy sports car you've long dreamed about...that exotic vacation for you, your girl and select members of your family and entourage...elaborate parties at expensive restaurants. The money comes into your hands and leaves even quicker.

There are closets of expensive suits and attorneys calling you about lawsuits. There's child support. There's investments which were made with poor judgement and on ill-advice. Look at that money fly away, like debris in a tornado.

You do some weekend gambling in the casino. You win $75,000 one night. You lose $125,000 the nexct night. You'll show 'em. You'll hit 'em big the following night. BOOM! You take it on the chin for $250,000.

You hand your money to a grand-fatherly type like Bernie Madoff. He's going to turn your $3 million dollars into $30 million. He turns it into vacations and condos for him and dust in the wind for you (this doesn't just happen to athletes and Hollywood stars!).

Why do so many rich, well-paid individuals go broke and lose so much money?

Because making all that money doesn't mean you're smart.

It just means you're rich.

P.S.--Tonight I'm making an investment. I'm investing a Ben Franklin a few Andrew Jacksons on a romantic dinner with my wife. Now THAT'S an investment I can't lose on!!!!!

-Randy G."


You old romantic rascal, YOU! You DA MAN! Hehe! Holla!

Reply

Radam G:

"Sorry, I probably phrased that poorly. What I meant to say is that those guys call Mayweather the best ever.

But Naseem is up there among the best featherweights. He should be HOF."


No doubt that Prince Naseem should have long been in the HOF! It is some d@mn Yanky Stanky -- I mean hanky panky -- going on. Holla!

Reply

The Shadow:

"Not sure the Prince was echoing Mayweather, or the other way round.

The Prince had a point though- quite possibly the best featherweight of all time."


Sorry, I probably phrased that poorly. What I meant to say is that those guys call Mayweather the best ever.

But Naseem is up there among the best featherweights. He should be HOF.

Reply

Radam G:

"That's all you got was 6-1? The opening line on this was something like 16-1, then dropped over the next two weeks to

11-1. I was able to put my somolians down to the tune of 10-1. I



I hereby challenge Radam to this bet: If his homeboy, Da' Manny, wins the fight, I will whip up a glass of one of his morning drinks, the one with pepper and a few ingredients guaranteed to light me up berighter than the Christmas tree in Rockefeller Center. If Algieri wins, Radam has to devour a plate of BBQ spareribs.



Radam, I guarantee you are gonna' love those ribs.



Mmm-mmm.



-Randy G."




All Thanks to Heaven that you are not going to come anywhere close to winning. Because I cannot do you Kanos' BBQ sqareribs. That jive will stuff up you're arteries, short circuit your electrical system and kill you.



I can do "Real Deal Holyfield Bar-b-cue Sauce" on some Filipino BBQ chicken, water Buffalo or lamb. But I won't have to because "High Hopes" C-Al is whupped already.



Dude does not only not have the skills, he is not mentally fit for a bout of this magnitude. He is babbling like a desperate madman in the desert trying to convince the nomads that a mirage that he is seeing is a beat down of Da Manny/3m.



GTFOH they are laughing at him.



C-Al has never been in the ring with anyone near the speed and shock power of 3m. C-Al is going to feel a lot of nothing. He's going to be hit so hard and so often that he is going get amnesia right there on dat spot in the squared jungle. And then he is going get KTFO. Holla!

Reply

thegreyman:

Not sure the Prince was echoing Mayweather, or the other way round.

The Prince had a point though- quite possibly the best featherweight of all time.

Reply

thegreyman:

I'm with you Amayseng, I don't honestly remember as I was falling asleep myself. In the UK, I had to stay up until 04.30 AM to see the start of that fight. After 4 rounds it went dead, and I wouldn't watch it again unless someone paid me a lot of money.

Clinching itself is not a foul, and doesn't deserve a warning unless it's just blatant holding. In this fight, from what I remember, Floyd was just tactically clinching in much the same was Klitchko does. Incredibly boring though.

Reply

Skibbz:

No I didn't hahaha George wasn't being cheeky he was serious... Confident or a screw loose...? He needs to work on what comes behind his jab cause the jabs a beautiful punch with him but what comes after isn't always as accurate which is a real shame.

Reply

Chris L:

As good a runaway fight that you're going to get, wasn't close but was competitive, I like Groves and I think if he puts the two Froch defeats behind him he can become a dominant champion.

Hahaha did you just see him telling Froch that he still thinks he could beat him and he'd like to go again, Froch's response "Keep dreaming, two - nil" as he gestures a two and a zero with his hands.

Reply

Froggy:

I really think the only reason this fight was made was to give Manny an easy fight for a change and his first KO in about 5 years !

Reply

Chris L:

"That's all you got was 6-1? The opening line on this was something like 16-1, then dropped over the next two weeks to
11-1. I was able to put my somolians down to the tune of 10-1. I

I hereby challenge Radam to this bet: If his homeboy, Da' Manny, wins the fight, I will whip up a glass of one of his morning drinks, the one with pepper and a few ingredients guaranteed to light me up berighter than the Christmas tree in Rockefeller Center. If Algieri wins, Radam has to devour a plate of BBQ spareribs.

Radam, I guarantee you are gonna' love those ribs.

Mmm-mmm.

-Randy G."


Just double checked and it was 13/2 actually, still more or less 6/1. I put it on a couple of weeks ago, I checked a few of others places before too and they were all the same odds I remember. 10-1 is a bargain I would have stuck more on if I had got on it at those odds!

Reply

Skibbz:

It seems watching the nurse be gifted a decision has everyone ready to jump onto the fairytale. Pac will demolish Algieri who just isn't skillful enough to fight at a world level. I won't go back to the Provodnikov fight but it blew too much hot air into Algieri's head and now he's struggling to keep it firmly on his shoulders.

All the better though, that head will be the prime target for Manny as he fires punches from angles Algieri didn't know existed. As they say, the bigger they are the harder they fall. There's going to be a nurse shaped hole in the canvas when Algieri goes timber!

Reply

Radam G:

"I think you missed the point of our posts RG. It was that everybody is taking May's TBE claim too serious, and that a fighter has to think he is the best to get in that ring. I think you; my rhyming friend, zoned in on my statement about the "big dogs" of old being more gritty than todays stars."

I did. I'm sensitive about yestergenerations always claiming to have had TBE and nowadays pugs could not compete with these long-gone boxing jacks, macks, jokes, smokes, hoes and joes.

Money May could whup all, but maybe not Willie Pep, GOAT Ali, Finito Lopez, SweetPea Whitake, Hawk Time And Macho Time, just to name a few ATG P4P.

But Money May is one of the best TBEs of all times PERIOD. Holla!

Reply

Skibbz:

Good fight 118-110 is how I have it. Groves ran the tank dry by the final bell but he worked hard for the belt against a tough and strong opponent who didn't come to lose his belt easily. Groves showed off some of his skills but he was too eager to get a quick finish in my opinion and spent too much energy in the first few rounds even after it was clear his opponent wasn't going anywhere.

And the new... St GG. Always nice to hear Michael Buffer say those words.

Dirrell has a voluntary before the mandatory with Groves, hope it happens but highly doubtful it happens in the UK, no real chance Dirrell is coming over. I think Groves has the power, speed and skill to beat Dirrell.

Reply

Skibbz:

109-101, Groves certainly sagging but Rebrasse just doesn't have it in him to pressure his opponent. Going into the 12th it looks like a wide UD for Groves.

Reply

Skibbz:

99-91, Groves finding the reserves to put some serious punishment on Rebrasse, but to the Frenchman's credit he's tough with a solid chin. 6 more minutes to fight and Groves should be the Euro Champ and on his way to fighting for the WBC belt.

Reply

Skibbz:

89-82 another breather for Groves but he did the better work. Going into 10.

Reply

Skibbz:

79-73. Groves' jab is working a treat against the Frenchman. Shouts of allez allez allez from his corner as they try to raise their champion.

Reply

Skibbz:

69-64. Rebrasse looking physically strong as he can soak up a lot. Groves' slowing down a bit, feeling the pace..

Reply

Skibbz:

49-46. Calmer round Groves looked for a breather and it isn't in Rebrasse's nature to pressure his opponent so Groves got what he wanted.

Reply

Skibbz:

Tricky round to score.. I'll give it to Rebrasse for 39-37. Not a lesson in pacing yourself or inside fighting this one both not doing great in those respects but it's a fight and much better than I expected it would be. Rebrasse is tough and can soak up a lot.

Reply

Skibbz:

30-27 and it's starting to look very good for Groves. He had the jab hitting the mark preview 6 minutes and this 3 he brought the right hand into play. One straight right shook the Frenchman and Groves followed it up with a combo. Not enough lateral movement from Rebrasse but he's a tough customer and won't let go of that belt too easy.

Reply

Skibbz:

20-18. They took it into the kitchen and Groves certainly looks like he's going to be the one to dish it out. Rebrasse keeps his guard high but his nose is already bleeding. Groves throwing a lot of punches but not all landing, however he looks very game for the W.

Reply

Skibbz:

10-9 to Groves my book, Rebrasse getting hit too easily by Groves, doesn't look like he's all in there mentally.. Groves def much sharper.

Reply

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