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Skibbz:

"Skibbz, I can't believe you dropped the name Lou Bizzaro. A few weeks ago I was driving through Erie, PA and came across Lou Bizzaro's Ringside Restaurant. Of course, I had to stop. Not a bad place and the restaurant was all covered with boxing posters and memorabilia."



Ahh I've heard about that place, did you see the ring in which he fought Duran in there? It's supposedly 30 by 30! Maybe The Commish can get Algieri one of those next time he fights in NY.. Would love to check that place out myself, and the nosh too of course..

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Skibbz:

On the topic of illegal substances, Her Majesty's horse, Estimate, tested positive for Morphine...

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Skibbz:

I know what you mean Grimm, Duran was knocking welterweights out in the Chorillo when he was barely weighing above 112. Crazy power and ferocity.

The middleweight division is a very athletic division too but my problem is that sometimes in that division it goes a little quiet. When there are genuine middleweights around it can be very interesting but at times in it's history it's lacked several equally great champions and contenders.

I also totally agree on the Heavyweights. It's not for me, there are the odd few who make it interesting but in all it's just not the same in terms of action and consistency as the lower divisions.

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Skibbz:

Phillips wasn't special but he put Tszyu off and took away his gameplan that night. Tszyu came back more determined as Stormcentre noted.

I have also said many times how GGG reminds of me Tszyu in the way he fights, it's very pleasurable to watch. Nice write up.

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brownsugar:

Thanks for the Rodriquez saga... Its interesting how different circumstances can be so impactful in a fighters career. Darnell Boone has given several good fighters a hard time.

Chavez will get KO'd within 4 rounds if he tries to make 160 lbs against Cotto. I don't care what senior Chavez says. The kid ought to be fighting at 168 or 175.

Nice sales pitch for Algieri but I have Al vs Pac filed under the header of lowered expectations.

Finally Lara clearly did himself no favors against Canelo. He allowed the moment to slip from his grasp.

I thought Lara won handily and do not rule out external influence on the decision. but I can't prove it and neither do I care. Because I'd rather watch a fighter who has enough passion to show the audience how badly he wants to win.

Good article.

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deepwater2:

"Another great piece Commish.

I did not realize Al Gavin was not in the Hall of Fame. That certainly needs to be corrected. He was not only a great cut man but great corner man as well. Hopefully, just an oversight that will soon be rectified.

I think Top Rank is going to make Cotto-Bradley. Chavez Sr. can talk all he wants about his boy making 160 but I don't see it happening. Plus, Cotto and his team are very smart businessmen. Even if Chavez could squeeze down to 160, he'd be so much bigger than Cotto. Cotto and his team take calculated risks. A fight with Bradley and then Canelo later on would be for big money (especially Canelo) and much more winnable than entering the ring with a potentially much bigger Chavez.

As for Martinez coming back, well like most I hoped he would retire. He clearly was not anywhere near 100% for his fight with Cotto. And he wasn't 100% either for his fight the previous time out with Murray. I don't see this going well and maybe when he hits the gym will reconsider."


Al Gavin should definitely be in the HOF. My most prized boxing possession is my old amateur passbook with the name AL GAVIN on the cover. I have it framed. When promoter Sal Mushimesi opened The Bulldog Boxing Club Al was the head trainer there. Al was the most serious boxing trainer I ever had. He knew boxing.

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deepwater2:

Great column this week Commish.



It's nice to see Big George Mitchell mentioned. He was in my corner many times as an amateur. He brought me to spar John Duddy also. For such a big man he sure is a nice gentle guy.



If Pac can disregard CA's jab it will be an easy nights work. If he gets complacent and stays on the outside too long PAC can be in for a long night. The commish picked the upset of the year with the CA vs Ruslan P fight, can he do it again? I'm picking PAC but strange things can happen.

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oubobcat:

Another great piece Commish.

I did not realize Al Gavin was not in the Hall of Fame. That certainly needs to be corrected. He was not only a great cut man but great corner man as well. Hopefully, just an oversight that will soon be rectified.

I think Top Rank is going to make Cotto-Bradley. Chavez Sr. can talk all he wants about his boy making 160 but I don't see it happening. Plus, Cotto and his team are very smart businessmen. Even if Chavez could squeeze down to 160, he'd be so much bigger than Cotto. Cotto and his team take calculated risks. A fight with Bradley and then Canelo later on would be for big money (especially Canelo) and much more winnable than entering the ring with a potentially much bigger Chavez.

As for Martinez coming back, well like most I hoped he would retire. He clearly was not anywhere near 100% for his fight with Cotto. And he wasn't 100% either for his fight the previous time out with Murray. I don't see this going well and maybe when he hits the gym will reconsider.

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oubobcat:

"Algieri makes Lou bizarro look like a stand and trade slugger he runs so much. Even Lara would get fits after watching the Provo fight. To re use an old quote, Algieri with his not so cute pitter patter style was like a "fly buzzing around a lions mouth". He's a little top sugary for my liking outside the ring and and he puts on his marathon shoes inside. Why is he on a PPV?"

Skibbz, I can't believe you dropped the name Lou Bizzaro. A few weeks ago I was driving through Erie, PA and came across Lou Bizzaro's Ringside Restaurant. Of course, I had to stop. Not a bad place and the restaurant was all covered with boxing posters and memorabilia.

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oubobcat:

This is getting absurd. Salka is a Lightweight who fought his last fight at 132 1/2. It makes the choice of him as an opponent all the more head scratching.

Look, I understand that fighters need to think about the length of their careers and cannot always fight in tough fights. And Garcia has a very good resume and fought his share of tough opponents on paper. But really, a blown up small Lightweight who is ranked by one place at 77 at a catch weight now of 142. There were plenty of other Jr. Welterweights here who could have got the call. Heck, how about Mayweather's guy Theophane who Garcia beat by split decision some years ago? Why not face him again and try to correct that split decision from the first time around? Its much more compelling that Salka.

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stormcentre:

Yes, good write up and analogy.

RJJ's commentary was - as always - insightful and accurate. He knew Vince loved to throw down and had a unique and sometimes humorous way of letting the audience know.

Phillips was both tremendously tough, and also quite clever in his approach to that fight.

Tszyu, like Vince, fell in love with punching.

And as Kostya's career trajectory reached great heights that love of punching came with a downside that manifested itself with a neglect for the inside game and defence; that themselves would not ignore or remain unnoticed by father time or injuries.

Vince had tremendous punch resistance - perhaps as good as it gets - and that combined with both the above factors and also a game-plan to throw down hard with both lead power shots and KO counters - ensured that Tszyu paid the price for both his love of a shoot out (particularly with someone determined) and also how Kostya's hands almost always dropped after power delivery and upon retraction; leaving himself open for counters - if you could handle the incoming fire.

And Vince did.

In that fight Kostya's ability to easily be drawn into a gun fight, and ignore his superior boxing skills, worked against him.

Luckily, like all great champions that face a loss, he dealt with it, moved on, and still became the unified light welterweight champion.

Not so for Vince, although they don't come much tougher.

If Geale's defence holds up he can beat 3G. But with the form, stamina and firepower 3G has had it is hard to bet against him in hope that his opponent's defence will be watertight.

There are a few holes in 3G game though - but for now he and his pressure and power have ensured that no-one can both find and seriously exploit them.

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thegreyman:

Been waiting for this fight for a while now. One guy who loves to dish it out, and another who adores taking it...

Heads down and start swinging lads!

My money's on Provo though, in a battle like this it comes down to power, chin and grit, and Provo has a serious edge in all three.

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thegreyman:

The fight's a joke.

Absolutely nothing to gain from stepping in that ring.

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thegreyman:

As Kellerman said- 'there's a monster in the middleweight division'. 3 days and the monster is unleashed again. The patient killer, the silent stalker.

A middle round KO and GGG will hopefully get a big name or two before the year is out.

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thegreyman:

"Given the chance, alot of guys can beat his ***, outside of USA!"

A lot of guys can beat him outside the US?

You're aware that, until very recently, he was based in Germany, taking on all comers?

You're aware that he's faced literally over 350 amateurs, and beaten all but 5?

That's quite a lot of guys that have tried to beat him outside the US, and failed...

What is it that makes him so flawed in your opinion?

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thegreyman:

I can see Algieri cocooning on the ropes after a couple of rounds, receiving hammering combinations from the little man. He'll be beaten to the punch early on, and you can't hope to simply outwork someone when that's happening to you.

Manny has had experience of countless types of opponents- Algieri's height or reach will prove no problem to him, and his long distance running tactics will be of little use to someone who can control the ring, his opponent, and distance, as well as The Congressman can.

Algieri's in for a real tough night- there will be no battling through this one. Everything Provodnikov didn't do- Manny will execute perfectly. Close down the distance, throw accurate combinations, be first and be fast, cut off the ring. It should be a walk in the park for Manny.

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Skibbz:

"I hear ya' Steve. I can certainly understand how many fans thought Provodnikov won vs. Algieri. But I can also understand why so many went with Algieri. That is truly the nature of scoring a fight.



I can also understand how most of you feel Algieri was take more than his share of lumps against Pacquiao, with no apparent firepower to keep Pac-Man off of him.



We'll have to wait until November 22 to find out.



-Randy G."




Algieri makes Lou bizarro look like a stand and trade slugger he runs so much. Even Lara would get fits after watching the Provo fight. To re use an old quote, Algieri with his not so cute pitter patter style was like a "fly buzzing around a lions mouth". He's a little top sugary for my liking outside the ring and and he puts on his marathon shoes inside. Why is he on a PPV?

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The Commish:

"Randy, I have been following you since the days of Ring Magazine. I still have old VHS tapes of fights that you called. I even tried to sell a boxing short story to you when you were the Ring editor. I respect your knowledge and your opinions. But . . . there's no way in heck that Chris Algieri came close to beating Provodnikov, and if he even gets one judge's vote over Pacquiao, I'll . . . well, I'll say I was wrong. Buster Douglas had evident power in his fists when going in against Tyson. Algieri punches half as hard as Little Prince George on his first birthday. Yes, Escalera "beating" Everett was all manner of ridiculous -- I have that one recorded, too; remember how "Flash" Gordon went nuclear over it? --, but to my eye, Algieri's "victory" wasn't much better. The Local Kid lucked up, and now he gets his million bucks for taking yet another thumping, one that his New York judge buddies won't be able to manipulate. Or, at least that's the way it looks from this corner. Steve V."

I hear ya' Steve. I can certainly understand how many fans thought Provodnikov won vs. Algieri. But I can also understand why so many went with Algieri. That is truly the nature of scoring a fight.

I can also understand how most of you feel Algieri was take more than his share of lumps against Pacquiao, with no apparent firepower to keep Pac-Man off of him.

We'll have to wait until November 22 to find out.

-Randy G.

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The Commish:

He knew and loved the sport as much as anybody, but also had an explosive temper. In January 1999, Mike Tyson fought Frans Botha in Las Vegas. I had a freelance asssignment working for Botha as his P.R. guy, hired by Sterling McPherson, Botha's manager.

A few days before the fight, Fernandez called me in my hotel room one night and we talked boxing for at least a half hour. Finally, he asked me if he could interview Botha about his upcoming fight. I told him I would do my best to arrange the interview. The next morning, as we were preparing to go out for a run, I asked Botha if he'd do the interview. He shook his head and said, "No more interviews."

You could see he was getting into his fight mode. He was a few days away from fighting Tyson, and he now had his "game face" on. I understood. He was singling Fernandez out. He was shutting it down completely.

The next day, I told Fernandez that I was sorry, but Botha was shutting down all interview requests. I also told him that if he gave me a list of questions, I could get Botha to answer them and I would get the answers back to him ASAP. It was a fair offer, I thought.

Fernandez didn't. He yelled and screamed at me on the phone. I told him this wasn't about him. I told him Botha has become understandably sullen. I told him to ask Jacob "Stitch" Duran, the great cutman/cornerman, who was in our camp. Fernandez refused to let up, saying he was going to rip us on his radio show.

After the event, I called Fernandez. He once again went ballistic on me. That was 15 years ago. We haven't spoke since. But I enjoyed his enthusiasm, his sass, his fire and his passion. Recently, I, too, looked for him on the internet. Nada.

Did his sponsors go south on him? Did he run into financial difficulty? Did he lose interest? Did he "hit the wall" from overwork?

I have no answers. Just questions.

I have no hard feelings at all towards Pedro. I hope he returns to the boxing landscape. I'm gonna' look through some old phone numbers to see if I still have his and if it still works.

I hope to reach him.

-Randy G.

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stormcentre:

Forgot to say Perez V Jennings should also be a good scrap.

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stormcentre:

I just love the name of this article - so apt

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stormcentre:

"

Our man Lance allegedly tested positive for it in '99 but it was swept under the rug, much like they said they did with a Carl Lewis test in '88 or around that time.



"






Hmmmm . .



Where was USADA when you (Lance) needed them?



Oh yes that's right - USADA where there, testing, and they came up with naught.



Armstrong simply used hypoxic chambers to fool the body into naturally producing EPO (to mask any synthetic form of it); oxygen molecules are oxygen molecules regardless of whether they're produced by the body or any other means.



And USADA's tests only (then and probably still now) only tested for a ratio of EPO that itself simply took EPO samples from;



a) Areas of the body called basic regions (where synthetic EPO was usually administered in conflict with most sporting body's policies), and then compared/referenced them to;



b) EPO from what is commonly referred to as the acidic region of the body; which is where EPO is naturally produced in the body - such as where natural EPO is produced enabling more erythrocytes (red blood cells) to be produced within the body; which can be within the body's bone marrow.





However, from my post here . . . .



http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?16242-Floyd-and-Maidana-Will-Do-USADA-Testing&p=58436&viewfull=1#post58436



It is clear that EPO is produced naturally in the body.



For those interested please remember . . . .



In the same abovementioned post I refer to a popular method of blood doping, called Endogenous Erythrocyte Production Stimulation.



EEPS blood doping is essentially the outcome of a biological process referred to as Erythropoiesis, that is itself normally regulated by tissue oxygenation within the human body.



When hypoxia (a condition in which the body or a region of the body, such as the tissues within muscles, is deprived of an adequate oxygen supply; such as when you train or even sleep at altitude) occurs, sensors within the kidneys are triggered that in turn lead to increased natural production of the hormone erythropoietin, or EPO.



As soon as scientists and particularly chemists (of all kinds, including the backyard type) realized that the body had a natural way to combat the lack of oxygen at altitude, that, when applied to sea (and not high) level altitudes, if this form of combat or assistance had not disappeared all together and remained at ground level (which it does); it would be a significant advantage to sports - they seized upon it.



Since the abovementioned USADA synthetic EPO tests relied on a ratio of EPO collected from where USADA believed to be sites within the body that served as a good representation of where both synthetic and natural EPO exist (which is as laughable as believing that the analgesic capabilities of an aspirin somehow only goes to the part of your body in pain), all Lance Armstrong (and his well paid Doctor) allegedly had to do was simply increase his body's reference EPO site (that/where USADA believed only natural EPO existed and therefore used as their reference for their synthetic EPO tests) referred to as the acidic region of Lance's body.



Once that was done Armstrong's natural EPO was as high as the synthetic EPO, and then the ratio comes out as you want because 5/15 = 500/1500.



USADA didn't care that both individual readings (the numerator and denominator) where sky high.



Which in my view is as good as turning a blind eye and/or having the ability to both not ruffle feathers of those in cycling that wrote the big cheques, whilst also being able to say "hey we test for non-natural EPO".



The result was that everybody was happy and everybody made money, and not too many appeared to care about the real issue USADA where paid and tasked with.



Now that doesn't sound familiar to USADA in boxing does it? :)



To me, this was like finding out the manager of your big-ish or light heavyweight-ish looking boxing opponent for your upcoming middleweight bout had his foot under the scales during the weigh in; which the astute boxing readers here will know certainly has happened.



So, by Armstrong basically inducing hypoxia and erythropoiesis in a legal and accepted manner he then elevated his erythrocyte (that is basically the same as red blood cells) levels - which in turn elevated his the levels of hemoglobin molecules, importantly including those he had in the acidic regions of his body where the reference point for the above-mentioned USADA test was.



In doing so not only did he beat the (shamefully laughable) tests but he also ensured there was a significant increase in natural EPO in his body.



This cleverly served many aspects of his game, including getting him ready for the next day's cycling both physically and excuse-wise, and to also offset the diminishing half life of all the synthetic EPO in his system that USADA were clearly not interested in because they only drew suspicion from the ratio; not, laughably, the massive denominators and numerators that were orders above what would normally be found.



This is like knowing that a natural EPO count never goes over, say for the purpose of this discussion; 300. And also acknowledging that both;



a) The sole outcome of any negative synthetic EPO test must be 1.



b) Typical negative synthetic EPO tests return between 5/15 to 50/150 (just for purposes of this discussion); but then not being suspicious with a 500/1500 result because it still returns a 1 from a ratios perspective.



Good stuff eh USADA?



The above method Armstrong used to beat the USADA EPO test is commonly referred to as hypoxia induced erythropoiesis and that same legal method and advantage of elevating one's endurance will be brought to town hard in 3G's fight with Geale this weekend.



To make (USADA) matters even more laughable they, of course, also had no explicit policy that prevented athletes to be tested for synthetic EPO from performing any action that would induce erythropoiesis; whether it be by hypoxia or some other method.



Brilliant stuff isn't it?



Talk about leaving a backdoor open for the top athletes than can afford day to day professional advice and/or chemist's assistance.



So basically if you're powerful, famous and wealthy enough there are 2 rules for you, and everybody else plays by 1 - just as all else get to go home a winner; all whilst the public thinks all is good and well in the land of sporting utopia.



This is, no doubt, why Armstrong became so cocky; as it surely must have become clear to him (because it was to me 10 years ago) that the USADA synthetic EPO tests were designed for more than one purpose or agenda - almost to the same extent that they were easily passed by a guy who won the tour de France (is there a sport that is more endurance dominated) 7 times whilst not only sky high on HGH and EPO of any kind - but also possessing the ability to say "I have not tested positive for any (USADA) test".



And to make matters more laughable, naturally USADA also had no effective policy that tested for HGH or testosterone either, and this went on from about 97 through to 2006.



HGH and testosterone had been in sports a little before 97.



You can just imagine Armstrong - during or after USADA synthetic EPO tests - upon being asked why his red blood cells (or erythrocytes), hemoglobin molecule, or EPO count; was unusually high - if indeed any USADA staffer actually dared . . . .



Only to hear Armstrong (predictably) say "well I get some of my performance from high altitude training - I make no secret of that".



From there the USADA employee would most likely consider their career and family before publishing even a watered down acknowledgement that Armstrong or anyone engaging in such "legal and accepted training" - as hypoxia induced erythropoiesis - would easily defeat their synthetic EPO tests - as much as it would allow them (or anyone that USADA suspected of beating the tests by hypoxia induced erythropoiesis) to simply say "my understanding is that my USADA synthetic EPO (ratio) test turned out a negative and that all I am doing is simulating training at altitude".



From there perhaps a speech could be written . . .



"I would like to thank USADA for assisting me to take part in the fight against performance enhancing drugs in this wonderful sport of ours and to also allow me to categorically substantiate that I am indeed a clean athlete".



Game over and everybody gets to go home a winner.



And . . . it's not like it hasn't happened; for 7 years; on USADA's watch.



Remember how I usually use automotive analogies?



Well where do you think supercharging (the practice of fitting an air pump to an internal combustion engine) came from?



The aviation industry, the war, and the need to get out of harm's way at high altitude.



It didn't take long to work out that shoving more in the motor and increasing the barometric pressure when, altitude-wise, it was not needed; was a great way to enhance performance of cars.



In fact some of the first the supercharger equipped planes required less runway to clear the earth and become airborne; which was a dead giveaway of where the popular aftermarket for automobiles and internal combustion engines was heading.



Now in boxing, we are also in a war of sorts.



I know most of you are not, but let's not fool ourselves that anyone in this great sport - and it is great - particularly those at the top - is not juicing.



Once we do that, in my humble opinion, we cease to become knowledgeable boxing purists and gravitate towards a USADA like mentality.



My take on it all is that it doesn't detract from the spectacle and sensation that is boxing, as boxing has always been entertaining for many reasons including the fact that it is a sport that mixes the good with the bad, sometimes so well it makes you question which is which and why you found what is referred to as bad, really good.



Theatre of life as they say and the things that make you go hmmmmn.



:)

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Grimm:

Totally agree on Duran. If I ever was cornered in a bad street anywhere in the world by a bunch of hoodlums, and had to pick one boxer thru history to stand by my side - or rather, in front of me, hehe - it would probably be Duran. His looks alone would probably have given them second thoughts.

Divisionwise, I consider middleweight to be the premier division - sometimes challenged by welterweight - with its perfect blend of skill, size, power, speed and, normally, great pool of talent. But granted, some fights down at lw are truly special, spectacular and explosive (as well as in the even lighter divisions). Above middleweight, it takes extraordinary fighters to capture my interest. Heavyweights make me sleepy - both their talk, their walk and their zombiestyle of fighting.

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Radam G:

What Mother Nature has given is BEST. And you use it if you want the ultimate conquest. New age Drago jive should be kept on the Big screens. Because every single time that monkey jive, old skool creams.

You can't fool Mother Nature. First, treadmill running doesn't give you the particles of dust, grass, wind and the smell and shine of the moon and sun that you breathe in from running outside. Some of you will say: how in the hell came you smell the moon and the sun? That is something that you have never been taught.

But those who know know. And your body knows and will suck that smell and shine of the sun and moon like a crying, hungry baby goes after his mother's nipples. Oh, YUP! Your bodee yearns that sun and moon and all of Mother Nature while you are inside 24/7/365 New Jacking and weak attacking and new-age Drago inside training on hyped-up machines with small manmade benefits.

So you will never know until you know. But inside on the treadmill doesn't build your immunities. But outside running does. Because like I said, you breathe in particles of this and that -- making your immune system ironside tough against germs and viruses and bacteria that you can pick from a crowd of indoor people with tons of this and that illnesses and rashes.

You get more benefits from climbing up and up and down a tree than you get from going up and down a rope in the New Jack air condition gyms. Beside, gym air condition messes up your cooling system. Cool your arse by bleeding sweat, not by toxic air coming out of an air condition.

I can go on forever, but y'all get my point. Hopefully! Holla!

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stormcentre:

"

"You want an example? Everyone talks about epo. Epo is fashionable. But without adding iron, epo only works half as well. That's the kind of thing you have to know. There are oxygen carriers that make epo work incredibly fast – they are actually better than epo alone. I call my drug "Epo Boost." I inject it and it releases many tiny oxygen molecules throughout the body. In that way you increase the effect of epo by a factor of ten."

""


And those oxygen carriers mentioned in Shadow’s quoted article are exactly what I mentioned here (whether they're called something else or not). .

http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?16242-Floyd-and-Maidana-Will-Do-USADA-Testing

Where I talk of PFCs.

PFCs are different to hemoglobin (which are the body’s natural molecularly sized carriages that not only allow oxygen to attach to them - but also transports that oxygen through to tissues and muscles; to offset and/or prevent the conversion of pyruvic acid to lactic acid; which delays fatigue) because their ability - “the exchange carriage” I mentioned in my above-mentioned link/post - to not only carry more oxygen - but also extract more carbon dioxide; than hemoglobin alone can.

When the blood passes through the lungs, the abovementioned oxygen molecules then have the opportunity to attach to the hemoglobin when blood traverses through the body's lung tissues, and as that happens the hemoglobin then releases oxygen into the cells.

PFCs and similarly performing AOCPES’s travel through the body’s lung tissues and capture and release gases at a far greater rate than hemoglobin, because they dissolve and (later) release the oxygen via a process referred to as diffusion; which itself has an efficiency or ability to transfer oxygen far, far better than the 4 molecules-at-a-time hemoglobin can.

Dissolving oxygen like this (particularly in tandem to the way the hemoglobin works; remember the hemoglobin is still there in the red blood - it’s why the blood looks red) allows PFC’s to exchange gases, such as oxygen and carbon dioxide - which are both critical to cardiovascular dominated sports performances - far more rapidly and far more efficiently than the hemoglobin molecule can alone.

I think I also mention the ability to mix and match PES in my abovementioned post/link, and from that and Shadow's post you can also see that the author of the article Shadow quotes is referring to a mixture of EPO and the abovementioned AOCPES I mention.

The issue of PES, particularly AOCPES's, is here to stay my friends - because (whether anyone likes it or not) it works.

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stormcentre:

"I think what you say there is why there really is no suspicion of Mayweather. I noticed that when he fought the Ghost that he was noticeably slower and not quite as crisp. The thing is though that when Floyd slows down, he is declining from a talent and skill level so far above everyone else's, that you almost miss it.



As far as him knocking out fighters earlier in his career, Floyd contrary to popular belief use to beat people to a pulp. However, he realized that to KO people he had to sit down and leave himself open to be countered. His style switched to a more protective style which has preserved him through the years. Up until the Maidana fight, you can make the argument that Floyd had been in only one real high pressure scrap in his entire career against Castillo. Cotto and De La Hoya were tough fights but neither would I classify as brawls that really take something out of guys.



I think people also miss out on the fact that being a KO artist takes something out of the guy throwing the bombs too. The amount of torque put on the shoulders, hips, calves, and feet to throw cinder block like punches is tremendous. You often hear of the hard hitting guys needing surgeries on their shoulders and knees late in their career because they have put so much pressure on them for so many years. Floyd has avoided that path as well."




Very good points.



Floyd knows that shoot-outs are where you get tagged and lose (no matter how good you are), and if you can shut the other guy out then - provided you're already a proven and high commodity on boxing's promotional and PPV share-market - there is no need to take this risk.



Prior to Henry Bruseles (which was a matchmaker's dream for Floyd just as much as a walk in the park, ultimately setting up what is probably Floyd's most masterful display; the destruction of Gatti); there was a need to blow guy's out - as Floyd had not reached the stage where he was huge and could call the shots.



That happened in 2007 when Floyd showed how no contractual or other advantages would change the outcome when he was faced with a predominantly Mexican styled fighter.

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stormcentre:

"I can't believe everyone except Deep and myself have overlooked Conte's mustache....




On a serious note I get what RG is saying, PEDS dont give you skill....


However, look at a fighter like Margarito--slow feet, slow hands, plodding no agility, low skill, poor coordination, the guy is BELOW average as an athlete, but look at his style of fighting. His ability to throw 100 punches per round with a granite beard allowed him to have himself a very productive and successful career. I am not saying he used peds, but anything like epo could help a fighter of his poor skill level."


PEDs give you the ability to perform and learn when you're fatigued.

I am not saying they will teach you the tricks of the trade - but they (of correct design) certainly won't impede you either.

Think about how neuromuscular programming works, why would you not be able to neuromuscularly program your body in extreme circumstances with AOCPES in ways that were not normally possible due to fatigue?

Happy to hear from anyone on how I have that one wrong.

This is a very complex and interesting subject that will go away about as fast as ecstasy will disappear from the UK (or any other part of the world) trance and progressive house club scene.

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stormcentre:

"Floyd was complaining about his injuries and brittle hands before 2007 and said the end of his career was near. It is now over 7 years later and he is still here. Does he get tested randomly during the year? Does he still take pain killer injections in his hands, (which is illegal in many states)? Is he a candidate for testosterone replacement therapy? His security team is juiced to the gills. His stable of fighters at his gym get caught numerous times. If Floyd can ask questions about other fighters he should have no problem with people asking him these questions."



Good insightful points.



There are usually only 3 forms of power a guy in this world can have (wealth {or money}, physical strengths like boxing {or a MMA fighter and/or weightlifter} and the mind {the capacity to think, accumulate/retrieve information and be smart}).



Most forms of male related power subscribe to this and/or are subsets of it.



Even though he is no dummy in the ring; the debate will probably always be out on number 3 for money May, but the first two ensures different rules apply.



Mayweather, easily, has the power to ensure - should he wish - new forms of undetectable performance enhancing substances (PES) are designed and used.



Given that winning and his unbeaten record (in one of the most grueling, financially rewarding, and competitive sports on the earth) is clearly the most important thing to him, and (as RS states) he is not only;



a) Surrounded by security that are obviously connected and juiced to the max.



b) Surrounded by some boxing participants that are obviously not strangers to PES.



If not recently, then how long ago does anyone here think it was before the above-mentioned, purposely designed, and/or other PES, I have mentioned in elsewhere posts on this site were offered to MM, if not suggested by other members of his team?



Hell, he wouldn't even have to ask or look, as the guy would be an extremely sought after client by most clandestine chemists, and I have a real hard time thinking that his security staff would be clueless as to who to call for anything of this nature - including the purpose designed stuff.

Reply

Steve V.:

Randy, I have been following you since the days of Ring Magazine. I still have old VHS tapes of fights that you called. I even tried to sell a boxing short story to you when you were the Ring editor. I respect your knowledge and your opinions. But . . . there's no way in heck that Chris Algieri came close to beating Provodnikov, and if he even gets one judge's vote over Pacquiao, I'll . . . well, I'll say I was wrong. Buster Douglas had evident power in his fists when going in against Tyson. Algieri punches half as hard as Little Prince George on his first birthday. Yes, Escalera "beating" Everett was all manner of ridiculous -- I have that one recorded, too; remember how "Flash" Gordon went nuclear over it? --, but to my eye, Algieri's "victory" wasn't much better. The Local Kid lucked up, and now he gets his million bucks for taking yet another thumping, one that his New York judge buddies won't be able to manipulate. Or, at least that's the way it looks from this corner. Steve V.

Reply

Radam G:

No way! No how! Can or will I accept the Commish's poison. There are indeed preordained fixed fights in boxing. And the Lara-Alvarez Bout was one. And scoring ain't hard in a bout like Lara-Alvarez, Algieri-Provodnikov, Alvarez-Trout and Pacquiao-Bradley I. And if it is: Teddy Atlas already gave the answer for that one. "Teach da d@mn judges. And get rid of those who are constantly doing badly...."



There are home-cooking decisions in boxing. And the Algieri-Provodnikov was one. There are jingoistic, political, nationalistic decisions in boxing. And the Pacquiao-Bradley Bout I was one. And the Algieri-Provodnikov was another one.



The game is seedy, shady, sneaky and sleazy. And you have a lot of cliques that go alongs to get along. They stand for anything, so they fall for everything and don't make waves. And the game is so full of squirrels and weasels. WTF!



Let's call a spade a spade, and not hide in the shade. Holla!

Reply
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