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brownsugar:

Khan recently confirmed (during his last fight) what I've said about him for years,... He's Hyper,... possibly ADD, But that same quality is probably what makes his offence so busily lethal against slower boxers. (yes sometimes he gets caught when he gets too busy)
And its also probably why he talks a little too much too.

I generally wait to see what his promoters and handlers have to say regarding his next move.

Nobody Knows what Floyd is going to do next year, Floyd specializes in keeping certain details concealed while the fans and the media exasperate themselves trying to figure out the next piece to the puzzle. But regarding Khan, He's is solid at 147... and he's has separated himself from the pack. He's good enough now to give Floyd a run for the money or possibly upset him depending on how the fight goes.

There have been around 3 dozen fights in the last three weeks, I'm still watching some of the undercards for the first time. Haven't even had a chance to watch Beterbiev yet... hopefully I'll have them all digested within a week. Until then I will reserve comment on many of them and just check out what you guys have to say.... good vid.

Reply

thegreyman:

I'm sure Ali will take this in this in his stride, and make a full and speedy recovery.

All the best champ.

Reply

brownsugar:

Thanks for the memories Ali, I hope you have a 100% recovery.

Reply

stormcentre:

I once knew a Samoan guy that, for a party trick, and especially if drunk and seriously egged on to do it; would place a coconut on a table up against a (usually brick) wall.

From there he would take a few minutes to psyche himself up - usually as everyone was screaming and yelling words and phrases that they thought would motivate him.

Then he would punch the coconut and almost always seriously split the thing.

Before I knew this guy could do this . . I always thought that even though he was way bigger than me, if push came to shove with him(not that it ever would have as he was really a very gentle, non-aggressive and kind person) my boxing would see me to be the victor.

Of course those thoughts soon changed when I asked a friend of mine that was studying medicine whether the human skull is harder than a coconut.

From the realization day of the answer to the above question onwards Derek and I became even better friends, as I realized that I probably could never be 100% confident of always being able to stop him from grabbing me (he is huge), sitting on me, and then pounding my head.

Turns out that anyone who can open up a coconut with a punch can probably so the same to your skull, and therefore it's best to not get hit by them and ensure they are (and/or remain) your friend. Makes sense doesn't it?

Now what has all of this to do with Wright and Holyfield?

Well RG, your concept of Holyfield fighting Wright made me think of the coconut - or Wright's head - being split.

Reply

Radam G:

"Oh that's just mean."

Hehehehe! Holy needs some money. Billy Wright is right for that fight. And maybe they won't beat one another up too much on that night. For the Middle-age championship of the world, they will be aching-bones outta sight. Holla!

Reply

Radam G:

Ditto, ditto, DITTO! Holla!

Reply

Radam G:

"That is funny. Gary can't even ko the fix he had in front of him last night. I think the tsAH is signing up all the NYC cab drivers to help launch his network deal. It might backfire on him because NYC cabbies would knockout lil Gary .

In all honesty Khan is making a fool of himself. At welterweight he beat a washed up Louie Collazo and out boxed Alexander. Nothing to brag about. He should rematch Garcia for redemption or take on Brook at Wembley.

Khan does not deserve to fight Floyd so that is actually why Floyd will fight him. There will be no Floyd vs Pacman."


Hehehe! You got jokes, D2! But they are so very spot on. Holla!

Reply

stormcentre:

http://www.thesweetscience.com/forums/showthread.php?19077-Wanna-Have-A-Chuckle



:cool:

Reply

Radam G:

Just so that you guys will know, I made my picks based on the rules, culture, glove sides and types, ring type of canvas and referees and judges of nowadays. But if you are taking about going back in days of the old pugs, my only pick who have been successful is Gentleman Gerry Cooney.

All my other picks would have had to be in this weak day and in time of boxing with less rounds and wuzzy refs and doctors who will stop a fight if the opponent breathes on you too hard. Holla!

Reply

amayseng:

"Stormie, You said it so nice you posted it twice. I commented on the possibility or no possibility of the Mayweather - Pac, fite. What I wrote it the truth, if the fight doesn't happen. Take for example the Jack Dempsey vs Harry Wills fight, both have passed away quite awhile ago and the there is still a debate over that fight that never happened. Yes, my friend, if both retire without fighting each other it will be the same.
Pac has at least stated his willingness to fight even at a lower pay. Mayweather meanwhile is setting conditions that put a damper on negotiations. Sure Mayweather has the right, but he is leaving no room for negotiation. "Must get rid of Bob, must fight on SHOWTIME PPV, Testing, the split, pleeeeeeeeeeeeze."


Agreed.

In Floyd's latest interview on Showtime he put up roadblocks, probably subconciously, he does not even see himself finding ways out of the fight. Who is he to care that the PPV fight take place ONLY on Showtime? You are telling me he is making 100 million dollars or more and he is worried about Showtime solely having the PPV?? GTFOH.

Floyd does NOT want the fight, period.

Reply

Radam G:

No matter what system you use, human judges will get it wrong. Flesh judging flesh needs to be long gone. Laser-eyed robots should be judging. They will never be bias.



Set the rules for judging in their systems, and a mistake would not be made except in the case of an outrage and/or malfunction, or make be a hacker. Then the bout can be canceled until the G-Fam straighten it. Hehehe! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xabQT2mwFqE Holla!

Reply

Radam G:

And ev'ybodee and dey momma used to hate on me for being spot on about G-Russ-Junebug's lack of true power and speed. Of course he is going to look fast against a live punching bag with eyeballs who kept closing his eyes.

Until he fight another pug with a heartbeat and beat him, I will continue to say that G-R-J is a C+ pug perpetrating a fraud. Holla!

Reply

Radam G:

"I have not had a chance to chime in on this subject yet but when I first saw the topic the name that screamed out to me that would give many all time greats a tough fight is Winky Wright.



Up until the very end of his career, Wright was a nightmare for anyone he fought. He was also very avoided particularly in what was really the prime of his career after he beat Andrew Council and Bronco McKart. It took Wright three years after beating McKart to force his way into a big fight against Fernando Vargas and in my opinion defeat Vargas who at that time was just entering his own prime.



Wright was a southpaw of course. His style was unique though and this is what made him so tough to fight. He was a slick southpaw, no doubt but not slick in the manner of a southpaw who uses his legs and moves to frustrate his opponents. Wright would stand in the pocket and use angles and precise timing to land punches, not always hard punches, but land scoring shots. But he was slick enough and skilled enough defensively, especially in his prime, to slip punches in the pocket and rarely get hit clean. He knew what precise angle to throw at to avoid counters landing and would step away at just the right time to avoid punches while going back on his own offensive. Defensively, in the pocket he was always moving his head and a master at picking/deflecting shots whether with his shoulder or gloves.



There was a reason for example why Shane Mosley had such a difficult time twice with Winky Wright and made to look like silly at times trying to land on him in his two losses to Wright in 2004.



Wright was primarily a Junior Middleweight. But I am going to project him at Middleweight in his prime against a prime Marvin Hagler.



Wright would give Hagler a very tough fight. He would stand in the pocket with Hagler and use the slick skills I mentioned above to fight Hagler standing in the pocket all night. It would one one of those fights that would be very tough to score. Hagler would land but not always cleanly. Wright may land more but not with the thud that Hagler's punches may have behind them. I see a very close fight between the two and one of those fights that would go to the cards with nobody really knowing who actually won the fight.



Hagler was great but Wright's style, particularly in his prime, would give a lot of great fighters fits including Hagler."




Wow! Interesting. You and I seems to always be on different trains.



I see Winky standing in the pocket with his ear muffs on and the Marvelous One blasting him to smithereens with uppercuts and hooks, and going to each side of him and straight shooting his rib and armpit with monster shots until Winky finally drop like bad habit.



And fall on the canvas of dat squared jungle like a running-for-his hole, scared-to-death rabbit. Holla!

Reply

Pazuzu:

"OK - fair enough.



Lobby Dino to set up a UI (user interface) on the website that accepts registered forum user's scores/votes on each judge's performance after significant fights.



Whether the identity of the scorer remains published or not can be up for debate.



I will support it/you so long as the system is not used to vent disappointment, and so long as there is a means by which the judges can also log in and have the right of reply and/or respond to the criticism/applause and explain their actions.



Let's see how much traction it gets."




Excellent idea. I'm in.

Reply

oubobcat:

I have not had a chance to chime in on this subject yet but when I first saw the topic the name that screamed out to me that would give many all time greats a tough fight is Winky Wright.

Up until the very end of his career, Wright was a nightmare for anyone he fought. He was also very avoided particularly in what was really the prime of his career after he beat Andrew Council and Bronco McKart. It took Wright three years after beating McKart to force his way into a big fight against Fernando Vargas and in my opinion defeat Vargas who at that time was just entering his own prime.

Wright was a southpaw of course. His style was unique though and this is what made him so tough to fight. He was a slick southpaw, no doubt but not slick in the manner of a southpaw who uses his legs and moves to frustrate his opponents. Wright would stand in the pocket and use angles and precise timing to land punches, not always hard punches, but land scoring shots. But he was slick enough and skilled enough defensively, especially in his prime, to slip punches in the pocket and rarely get hit clean. He knew what precise angle to throw at to avoid counters landing and would step away at just the right time to avoid punches while going back on his own offensive. Defensively, in the pocket he was always moving his head and a master at picking/deflecting shots whether with his shoulder or gloves.

There was a reason for example why Shane Mosley had such a difficult time twice with Winky Wright and made to look like silly at times trying to land on him in his two losses to Wright in 2004.

Wright was primarily a Junior Middleweight. But I am going to project him at Middleweight in his prime against a prime Marvin Hagler.

Wright would give Hagler a very tough fight. He would stand in the pocket with Hagler and use the slick skills I mentioned above to fight Hagler standing in the pocket all night. It would one one of those fights that would be very tough to score. Hagler would land but not always cleanly. Wright may land more but not with the thud that Hagler's punches may have behind them. I see a very close fight between the two and one of those fights that would go to the cards with nobody really knowing who actually won the fight.

Hagler was great but Wright's style, particularly in his prime, would give a lot of great fighters fits including Hagler.

Reply

oubobcat:

"OK - fair enough.

Lobby Dino to set up a UI (user interface) on the website that accepts registered forum user's scores/votes on each judge's performance after significant fights.

Whether the identity of the scorer remains published or not can be up for debate.

I will support it/you so long as the system is not used to vent disappointment, and so long as there is a means by which the judges can also log in and have the right of reply and/or respond to the criticism/applause and explain their actions.

Let's see how much traction it gets."


I like that suggestion and think that's a great idea. It has to start somewhere and frankly I don't have confidence in the commissions to start a grading system on their own as this has been an ongoing problem in the sport that has yet to be corrected. Its up to us fans to make our voices heard correctly (like you said not to vent disappoint and allow the other side to state their case) and get the necessary change implemented in this sport we all love.

Reply

oubobcat:

"Yes, not bad DD.

Actually, very good.

The flaws with the current sanction(s) scoring/judging system (mostly) all stem from how subjective, and therefore both justifiably different and theoretically correct (because scoring is quite literally/legally allowed to be subjective, rather than purely objective - which is, ironically, how we critiques sometime {wrongly} feel/justify we are judging the judging) each scorecard is.

With many sanctions points or subjective success within each round can be allotted by a judge for defensive moves also - but this rarely happens and as such is often forgotten about when scorecards are presented that seem unusually wide.

Despite how it may be wrong or right; if you and I sit across from each other, watching and judging Carl Froch - on his home turf - swing and miss against Andre Dirrell; but we both score the fight wildly different due to;

1) Your interest in (the highly subjective term) "effective" aggression and also a fighter that "makes" the fight, but lands both fewer but the more powerful blows.

2) My interest in a boxer that can make his mark miss and pay, but in doing so - whilst he easily out-lands his mark - he is in/out so much that some (as many do) see this approach to boxing and/or fighting as one that's afraid to stand and trade - despite the fact that; (a) boxing is the hit and not get hit game, and (b) other than any which morally may exist to spectators and the promoter, there actually is no contracted/legal obligation for any fighter to stand and trade - whether or not he has the ability to hit and make his opponent miss.

In the context of most sanction's rules; it is entirely possible that we would both be entirely correct in what we did - even if our cards were wildly different.

I don't see how your system would resolve that - often misunderstood - conundrum with prizefighting and its scoring.

That said, you, in some ways, and perhaps indirectly, acknowledge that issue.

Furthermore, you don't profess to solve it.

Therefore, it's fair that your proposal should be reasonably safe from judgment on that aspect of consideration and how it applies.

Reasonably safe, is, as you no doubt are aware, is a subjective term in itself.

I still think your scoring idea, which has similarities to tennis, has merits though.

I see how the main thrust of your construct or concept is that you want to introduce a greater degree of granularity to scoring, and also perhaps expose the quantitative elements and/or the quantifiable data that a scoring card and scored round comprises of.

That's both a noble and challenging thought.

Essentially, if successful, you would - in one move - potentially bring both more transparency and accountability to scoring, and therefore controversial decisions.

This would potentially also remove, or greatly reduce, influence and how it is exerted within commercial boxing matches; which may actually be the the death nell for the idea as much as it explains why out current system has lasted for so long.

But let's leave that thought there for a while - as it is a little negative, and your idea is remarkably positive - or at least it can be advertised as such.

For your idea, and its increased granularity, accountability and transparency to work . . I think there would need to be clearly defined aspects of boxing/judging that points can be awarded and/or deducted for, and a way to ensure points are allocated for those aspects of the game, fight and promotion; which would understandably put a lot more pressure on judges.

If not, the increased granularity that the (extra) numbers themselves represent (that you propose), would possibly give rise to greater questions.

Such as why they exist on certain scorecards within certain fights.

As you can see, along with the increased granularity potentially comes a lot of questions.

And a lot (more) of questions about the way one of the most subjectively judged (both from officials and spectators) sports is officiated, might just (at least in the eyes of those that control large aspects of the sport) expose and/or confirm certain uncomfortable truths about how the sport really works.

In it's current guise the sport has a financial means of profiting from the controversy associated with it's subjective and controversial nature; without anyone really being able to confirm their suspicions as to how/why the controversy and/or concerning scorecard came to exist in the first place.

Usually that means is associated with if not directly connected to commissions and rematches.

I am unsure how the entire establishment, promoters, advisors, and other boxing kingpins would respond to more granularity, accountability and transparency.

Usually small doses of such commodities result in large repercussions and backlashes, and as such they are usually treated as a "problem" in the same way as you have (justifiably) treated the existing, and largely exploitable, scoring system.

None of this means your idea is not theoretically clever - it is.

More than likely - particularly whilst there exists no reliable, objective, and accepted electronic means of tallying scoring punches and all the other boxing aspects/maneuvers (such as effective evasiveness) that may comprise of and/or be associated with the additional numbers and granularity you have suggested - it means that the idea is, practically, uninteresting; due to the changes and "problems" it may represent to the entire establishment, promoters, advisors, and other boxing kingpins.

Where I possibly see it initially gaining traction is with networks, but then if the promoters don't like it, or it gets in the way of how they do business; that will kill the network's interest to.

Change and accountability is a scary thing in this world to a lot of people - particularly those that profit from ambiguity and controversy.

However, within a plutocracy, change can be considered to be downright horrific and as such treated like either the devil, VADA, police or taxman; take your pick - or take them all.

Personally, I like your idea and would like to see it implemented as I have above described."


I have been on this subject for the last week begging that something needs to get done.

As boxing fans, we all know the system is broke. We have known that for some time. And some results from the events last week once again illustrated that point.

I am open to any change. The change I have been pitching for the last week is to implement a simple but necessary grading system for the judges. They need to be held accountable once and for all. I was upset when I saw that for example that Raul Caiz Jr. was on of the judges for yesterday's Showtime card (he was a judge during the main eveny between Jesus Cuellar and Ruben Tamayo). He should frankly be under review and suspension at the moment for the card he turned in for the Tyson Cave-Oscar Excandon fight. In that fight, he scored it 117-111 for Escandon in a fight that Cave dominated most rounds and certainly could not have won only three rounds.

I also like the change proposed above DD. There are some rounds that are razor thin that go 10-9 for a fighter. But other rounds that are dominant by the other fighter also go 10-9. How is that logically possible? Shouldn't we be scoring every second of the fight equally. I think so and I think the scoring system we have in play currently needs an overhaul. The one proposed above is an excellent idea in my opinion.

Its time to change this sport and do it the right way. The old way is broke and we all know it. Lets start implementing pass/fail grades as I have proposed before for the judges (judges only receive a fail grade on blatantly bad cards) and look at implementing a different scoring system such as the one proposed above.

Reply

oubobcat:

"This fight was not supposed to be on tv because it was a joke setup to begin with. Another tsAH special.
The opponent isn't even a featherweight and was knocked out in his last fight. Fights like this should be kept of TV and should not be discussed openly because boxing gets a black eye these mismatches are promoted.

The fact that Gary couldn't knock out this guy says everything about Gary."


It was a horrible fight to watch. It was completely one sided with Martin having zero answers for Russell's speed.

I thought at first Russell was carrying Martin. He was literally playing with him at times. But as the fight progressed, there were spots that Russell sat down and tried to throw harder shots that just didn't have any force behind them. Martin has been knocked out a few times and was coming up in weight. I think this tells you all you need to know about Russell's power.

Jesus Cuellar fought in the main event and knocked a similarly over matched opponent. A fight between him and Russell would actually be very interesting if Haymon would make it. Cuellar is rugged and throws a lot of punches. And he can crack some. Skill wise, no question Russell is much more talented but the rugged aggressiveness and punching power of Cuellar would make for an interesting fight. Its very makeable and if Russell is as good as he claims to be this is an opponent he needs to handle.

Reply

Birddog:

Stormie, You said it so nice you posted it twice. I commented on the possibility or no possibility of the Mayweather - Pac, fite. What I wrote it the truth, if the fight doesn't happen. Take for example the Jack Dempsey vs Harry Wills fight, both have passed away quite awhile ago and the there is still a debate over that fight that never happened. Yes, my friend, if both retire without fighting each other it will be the same.

Pac has at least stated his willingness to fight even at a lower pay. Mayweather meanwhile is setting conditions that put a damper on negotiations. Sure Mayweather has the right, but he is leaving no room for negotiation. "Must get rid of Bob, must fight on SHOWTIME PPV, Testing, the split, pleeeeeeeeeeeeze.

Reply

deepwater2:

That is funny. Gary can't even ko the fix he had in front of him last night. I think the tsAH is signing up all the NYC cab drivers to help launch his network deal. It might backfire on him because NYC cabbies would knockout lil Gary .

In all honesty Khan is making a fool of himself. At welterweight he beat a washed up Louie Collazo and out boxed Alexander. Nothing to brag about. He should rematch Garcia for redemption or take on Brook at Wembley.

Khan does not deserve to fight Floyd so that is actually why Floyd will fight him. There will be no Floyd vs Pacman.

Reply

deepwater2:

This fight was not supposed to be on tv because it was a joke setup to begin with. Another tsAH special.

The opponent isn't even a featherweight and was knocked out in his last fight. Fights like this should be kept of TV and should not be discussed openly because boxing gets a black eye these mismatches are promoted.



The fact that Gary couldn't knock out this guy says everything about Gary.

Reply

amayseng:

"Yes, it's interesting (to the racism in boxing debate) that many white people associated with boxing have actually helped both Frazier and Ali, and even other fighters.

I'm not saying there is no racism - because there always will be.

But, even with Dan Goosen and other guys like Max Kellerman and/or his brother; in the sport there are plenty of examples that blow the "white man hates and/or is prejudice towards the black guy" myth apart.

Your comments on Merchant prove it.

I wonder if Floyd - when he, a few years ago, made his remarks about Larry being racist - realised what Larry did.

Because if Floyd was aware of that - and let's face it, with the boxing/historical knowledge that many of the Mayweathers have, it's hard to imagine that someone in the TMT was not aware of it - then he himself looks rather hypocritical and, dare I say it, silly."


"silly" ?

Storm you are always so polite. Let me say it for you, Floyd can be a "dumbass" and his sheep would follow him off of a cliff.

Reply

stormcentre:

Kahn really is running off his mouth about Floyd and the possible fight.

Sounds a little desperate and silly sometimes.

Reply

Radam G:

Hehehe! That was funny. Poor Amir Khan should have taken the gig last time, instead throwing out a ridiculous alibi about the Muslim's Holy month of Ramadan preventing him from training properly to dance with Money May at that time.

Life in boxing is that if on an opportunity you snooze, you lose. Holla!

Reply

Radam G:

Humans are forever bias. I maintain that robots should be judges. Holla!

Reply

stormcentre:

"I hope that Holy comes out of retirement and retires him, and then retires again. Hehe! Holla!"

Oh that's just mean.

Reply

stormcentre:

Yes, not bad DD.



Actually, very good.



The flaws with the current sanction(s) scoring/judging system (mostly) all stem from how subjective, and therefore both justifiably different and theoretically correct (because scoring is quite literally/legally allowed to be subjective, rather than purely objective - which is, ironically, how we critiques sometime {wrongly} feel/justify we are judging the judging) each scorecard is.



With many sanctions points or subjective success within each round can be allotted by a judge for defensive moves also - but this rarely happens and as such is often forgotten about when scorecards are presented that seem unusually wide.



Despite how it may be wrong or right; if you and I sit across from each other, watching and judging Carl Froch - on his home turf - swing and miss against Andre Dirrell; but we both score the fight wildly different due to;



1) Your interest in (the highly subjective term) "effective" aggression and also a fighter that "makes" the fight, but lands both fewer but the more powerful blows.



2) My interest in a boxer that can make his mark miss and pay, but in doing so - whilst he easily out-lands his mark - he is in/out so much that some (as many do) see this approach to boxing and/or fighting as one that's afraid to stand and trade - despite the fact that; (a) boxing is the hit and not get hit game, and (b) other than any which morally may exist to spectators and the promoter, there actually is no contracted/legal obligation for any fighter to stand and trade - whether or not he has the ability to hit and make his opponent miss.



In the context of most sanction's rules; it is entirely possible that we would both be entirely correct in what we did - even if our cards were wildly different.



I don't see how your system would resolve that - often misunderstood - conundrum with prizefighting and its scoring.



That said, you, in some ways, and perhaps indirectly, acknowledge that issue.



Furthermore, you don't profess to solve it.



Therefore, it's fair that your proposal should be reasonably safe from judgment on that aspect of consideration and how it applies.



Reasonably safe, is, as you no doubt are aware, is a subjective term in itself.



I still think your scoring idea, which has similarities to tennis, has merits though.



I see how the main thrust of your construct or concept is that you want to introduce a greater degree of granularity to scoring, and also perhaps expose the quantitative elements and/or the quantifiable data that a scoring card and scored round comprises of.



That's both a noble and challenging thought.



Essentially, if successful, you would - in one move - potentially bring both more transparency and accountability to scoring, and therefore controversial decisions.



This would potentially also remove, or greatly reduce, influence and how it is exerted within commercial boxing matches; which may actually be the the death nell for the idea as much as it explains why out current system has lasted for so long.



But let's leave that thought there for a while - as it is a little negative, and your idea is remarkably positive - or at least it can be advertised as such.



For your idea, and its increased granularity, accountability and transparency to work . . I think there would need to be clearly defined aspects of boxing/judging that points can be awarded and/or deducted for, and a way to ensure points are allocated for those aspects of the game, fight and promotion; which would understandably put a lot more pressure on judges.



If not, the increased granularity that the (extra) numbers themselves represent (that you propose), would possibly give rise to greater questions.



Such as why they exist on certain scorecards within certain fights.



As you can see, along with the increased granularity potentially comes a lot of questions.



And a lot (more) of questions about the way one of the most subjectively judged (both from officials and spectators) sports is officiated, might just (at least in the eyes of those that control large aspects of the sport) expose and/or confirm certain uncomfortable truths about how the sport really works.



In it's current guise the sport has a financial means of profiting from the controversy associated with it's subjective and controversial nature; without anyone really being able to confirm their suspicions as to how/why the controversy and/or concerning scorecard came to exist in the first place.



Usually that means is associated with if not directly connected to commissions and rematches.



I am unsure how the entire establishment, promoters, advisors, and other boxing kingpins would respond to more granularity, accountability and transparency.



Usually small doses of such commodities result in large repercussions and backlashes, and as such they are usually treated as a "problem" in the same way as you have (justifiably) treated the existing, and largely exploitable, scoring system.



None of this means your idea is not theoretically clever - it is.



More than likely - particularly whilst there exists no reliable, objective, and accepted electronic means of tallying scoring punches and all the other boxing aspects/maneuvers (such as effective evasiveness) that may comprise of and/or be associated with the additional numbers and granularity you have suggested - it means that the idea is, practically, uninteresting; due to the changes and "problems" it may represent to the entire establishment, promoters, advisors, and other boxing kingpins.



Where I possibly see it initially gaining traction is with networks, but then if the promoters don't like it, or it gets in the way of how they do business; that will kill the network's interest to.



Change and accountability is a scary thing in this world to a lot of people - particularly those that profit from ambiguity and controversy.



However, within a plutocracy, change can be considered to be downright horrific and as such treated like either the devil, VADA, police or taxman; take your pick - or take them all.



Personally, I like your idea and would like to see it implemented as I have above described.

Reply

Radam G:

I hope that Holy comes out of retirement and retires him, and then retires again. Hehe! Holla!

Reply

Radam G:

"Yes, it's interesting (to the racism in boxing debate) that many white people associated with boxing have actually helped both Frazier and Ali, and even other fighters.

I'm not saying there is no racism - because there always will be.

But, even with Dan Goosen and other guys like Max Kellerman and/or his brother; in the sport there are plenty of examples that blow the "white man hates and/or is prejudice towards the black guy" myth apart.

Your comments on Merchant prove it.

I wonder if Floyd - when he, a few years ago, made his remarks about Larry being racist - realised what Larry did.

Because if Floyd was aware of that - and let's face it, with the boxing/historical knowledge that many of the Mayweathers have, it's hard to imagine that someone in the TMT was not aware of it - then he himself looks rather hypocritical and, dare I say it, silly."


Floyd was and is totally aware of that, as all boxers know the truthfully good guys and the minute amount of racists.

Lil' Floyd is an arch hypocrite, and just pops off at the mouth for effect and to control the dimwitted, naive groupies fanfaronades and lazy-will-never-do-their-research fan boys who go along to get along to get along. Holla!

Reply

Radam G:

"I never thought of Cooney, but I have to agree with you, his size and power could have been too much for many former champs ! I did think of Buster Douglas, but only the one who fought Mike Tyson, not the one who showed up to pick up his check against Holyfield !"

Definitely not the overweight slob who came to fight Holy. Holla!

Reply

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stevensonpromotermichelqadonisisforrealhewontdeceivetheboxingworldq Top Articles
Stevenson Promoter Michel: "Adonis Is For Real, He Won't Deceive the Boxing World"

I saw mixed reviews on Adonis Stevenson from his Friday night takedown of Dmitriy Sukhostskiy, in a light heavyweight tangle which unfolded in Montreal, and on Showtime. His promoter Yvon Michel, not surprisingly, gave his man high marks when TSS checked in with the Montrealer. Yvon, give an assessment on the Adonis showing, please… "No one in boxing has better one-punch knockout power than Adonis," he told me. "We hope to see Kovalev next fall!" That brings me to the next logical query; what'd he think about Adonis' post-fight...

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Andy Ruiz Beats Ex Champ Liakhovich

Saturday, December 20 , Celebrity Theatre in Phoenix,Arizona. Top Rank's Solo Boxeo Tecate UniMas broadcast (11 pm et, 11 pm pt). World-ranked unbeaten Mexican heavyweight contender Andy 'Destroyer' Ruiz of Mexicaliwon a 10-round unanimous decision overformer champion Sergei Liakhovich. Also, two-time Mexican Olympian Oscar Valdez stopped Jean Sotelo of Colombia in the fifth...

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Cuellar Beats Tamayo in Sho Feature

Hard hitting WBA Interim Featherweight Champion Jesus Cuellar took down Ruben Tamayo with a 5th round TKO when referee, Mark Nelson, halted the fight after the champ put Tomayo down for the second time in the round and the third time overall. Cuellar (25-1, 19 KOs) came into the ring just three months after his brutal 2nd round TKO victory over former Super Bantamweight and Featherweight Champion, Juan Manuel Lopez. A fight that quite likely ended any chance for Lopez to return to the upper echelon of boxing he was once so firmly a part...

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Gary Russell Jr. Comes Back With Win

Featherweight contender Gary Russell Jr. put on a boxing clinic against veteran Chris Martin tonight and scored an easy unanimous decision. Two judges scored the bout 100-90 and one somehow found a round for Martin and turned in a card with a 99-91 result. Russell out landed Martin by a 293-67 margin. It didn’t feel that close. Russell Jr.’s fight with Martin was not originally supposed to be televised until Anthony Peterson’s camp suddenly replaced his opponent, Yakubu Amidu with the 39-year-old veteran, Hector Velazquez, just three...

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Julian J-Rock Williams Gets W on SHO

Big time junior middleweight prospect Julian Williams took out last minute replacement, Jamar Freeman with a 9th round TKO. Williams (17-0-1, 10 KOs) was to face Edgar Ortega (15-2, 10 KOs) tonight, but Ortega dropped out and Jamar Freeman (13-3-2, 6 KOs) stepped in. The lightly regarded Freeman was taking a huge step up in class, but had won four of his last five. Williams looked every bit the part of the prospect moving up to contender status. Despite Freeman giving Williams almost nothing and taking hardly any chances, Williams showed...

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Julius Jackson Whips Up Win Over Jonathan Nelson

Hot Super Middleweight prospect Julius Jackson (18-0, 14 KOs) opened Showtime Extreme’s televised boxing coverage tonight by scoring a 9th round TKO victory over Jonathan Nelson (19-1, 9 KOs). Jackson, the son of former junior middleweight and middleweight titleholder Julian Jackson dominated nearly every round, save the 6th, scoring two knockdowns along the way. For the fight, Jackson out landed Nelson by a 186-68 margin and connected on 51% (120-236) of his power punches. The undefeated Jackson had taken his last eight victories by KO...

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Jean Pascal On What He Thought of Adonis' Work: "NOTHING!"

Jean Pascal wasn't tres impressed with Adonis Stevenson's work, both in the ring, and on the mic post-fight, on Friday night. JP, who is contracted to tangle with the hammerfisted Russian Sergey Kovalev March 14, was asked by TSS what he thought of Adonis' TKO of Dmitriy Sukhotskiy on Showtime. "Nothing," the Haitian-born hitter replied. I asked for an extended version... "It was the kind of performance you should expect in a mismatch," Pascal stated. "It was a mismatch on paper and in the ring." As for Adonis' post-fight, in-the-ring...

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Malignaggi Weighs In On Stevenson, Beterbiev

Paul Malignaggi is a boxer, analyst, and also, like us, a fan. He wants to see the best fight the best; that came out when I asked him Saturday morning his after-the-fact take on the scraps which unfolded in Montreal Friday night, and on his network, Showtime. "Adonis Stevenson did what he had to against an overmatched opponent," the 34-year-old "Pride of Bensonhurst" told me. "Hopefully next year he can get in with some big guns." Amen, fight dissector. We are all on the same page there. Er…maybe not all. The blowback against Adonis after...

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Boxing Results

FIGHTER Result Rnd

Adonis Stevenson

Dmitry Sukhotsky

KO Rd. 5

Bryan Vasquez

Sergio Thompson

RTD Rd. 9

Hanna Gabriels

Paty Ramirez

KO Rd. 2

Roman Martinez

Herbert Quartey

KO Rd. 2

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Prediction:

65.2%
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