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The Shadow:

"Also you said you'd need to see him in with Ward to get a true gauge of his ability.

And yes, I'm aware of the Chavez fight."


EXACTLY! A TRUE gauge! Because then all questions I HAVE will be answered. Duh!

Couldn't care less about what questions you may have but for me -- in my opinion -- to truly see what he can handle, I'd like to see him fight a guy like Ward.

I'm certainly entitled to feel that way, am I not?

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The Shadow:

"It still stands that you said that Dirrell will beat GGG, no matter how you phrase it.

As for improvements since amateur days- GGG has become a master at 160- while Dirrell, who does not fight at that weight, has become master of nothing- he hasn't even won a title."


You can not know who will beat who -- it's all speculation. I explained why I speculated that he could. Is that so hard to grasp?

And how I phrase it has everything to do with it. I wasn't even responding to your dumb a**. I was responding to Brownsugar. And when I said "not saying he beats him.

That wasn't what I was talking about," I was referring to the silly argument that GGG had improved 2x while Dirrell hasn't improved at all. No matter how much you troll and deflect, you have yet to do that.

But again, I'm talking to the guy who thinks Curtis Woodhouse beats Adrien Broner. (Why the f*** do I bother??? I must be a masochist...)

Your last paragraph, once again, doesn't even make sense. He's been injured and straddled with promotional issues. He's had one title shot where he lost by split decision in England.

And a master?? A master of what?! What the **** does that even mean?! You mean a titleholder? A master of craft? Do you even know what you say half the time?

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thegreyman:

Also you said you'd need to see him in with Ward to get a true gauge of his ability.

And yes, I'm aware of the Chavez fight- though that wasn't to validate himself, as you're asking him to do. His management is willing to move him from 154-168 for a big PPV, not permanently. They want to dominate 160, where he belongs. It's not so simple to just pick a weight class outside your own, and dominate it as if it's your home.

And yes, he does walk around at 164- he's a small middleweight, which is why he doesn't mind going to 154.

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thegreyman:

"Me make up my mind on my own? Are you for real?! What the heck are you smoking over there?

Besides, your argument doesn't even make sense. You say he walks around at 164, which he doesn't. You're wrong.

You ask, why does it make sense to for him to "validate himself" by going up? Ummmmmmmm, he was supposed to fight 168 guy who runs around 190-200 and had signed to do so if I'm not mistaken.

Secondly, his management has said they would fight ANYBODY from 154-168. His coach just said they have like seven guys up there they would fight.

You say I don't credit him. WTF?! What have I been doing? What have I been saying?! Is it because I'm not ready to have him shag my wife that I sound like a detractor? I like the dude! His competition has been mediocre but he's a cool cat."


You need to make up your own mind because you're not telling me what it is that Dirrell can do that will bother GGG, in your opinion.

I'm not smoking, just wondering!

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thegreyman:

"This is what I just said minutes ago:



"I said he'd be a threat to him stylistically and that he could win on points or build a lead until he gets stopped."



I like your trolling, though."




If you've forgotten, then you can always refer to post #33 of this thread.

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The Shadow:

"GGG's skill, as with any other fighter, is not measured by their record. Look at how the guy has fought; not who, in order to judge him.

Also you should know never to believe a fighter's public opinion about other fighters- of course they will do nothing but praise past, present and potential opponents, that's just part of the game. Make up your own mind rather than having it made up by the words of others.

You say that you need to see GGG against Ward before you know how good he is. I agree that we wont have seen the best of him until he's fought the best, but surely iyou can credit him before he's faced a top contender... from outside his division. GGG walks around at 164- why does it make sense for him to validate himself as a middleweight by fighting guys who aren't?"


Me make up my mind on my own? Are you for real?! What the heck are you smoking over there?

Besides, your argument doesn't even make sense. You say he walks around at 164, which he doesn't. You're wrong.

You ask, why does it make sense to for him to "validate himself" by going up? Ummmmmmmm, he was supposed to fight 168 guy who runs around 190-200 and had signed to do so if I'm not mistaken.

Secondly, his management has said they would fight ANYBODY from 154-168. His coach just said they have like seven guys up there they would fight.

You say I don't credit him. WTF?! What have I been doing? What have I been saying?! Is it because I'm not ready to have him shag my wife that I sound like a detractor? I like the dude! His competition has been mediocre but he's a cool cat.

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thegreyman:

"Nice try, buddy. I was talking about the argument, your position of saying GGG had doubled in progress while Dirrell had stagnated.

Yes, I said that. But like I said, wasn't even talking about that in this instance."


It still stands that you said that Dirrell will beat GGG, no matter how you phrase it.

As for improvements since amateur days- GGG has become a master at 160- while Dirrell, who does not fight at that weight, has become master of nothing- he hasn't even won a title.

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The Shadow:

"GGG's skill, as with any other fighter, is not measured by their record. Look at how the guy has fought; not who, in order to judge him.

Also you should know never to believe a fighter's public opinion about other fighters- of course they will do nothing but praise past, present and potential opponents, that's just part of the game. Make up your own mind rather than having it made up by the words of others.

You say that you need to see GGG against Ward before you know how good he is. I agree that we wont have seen the best of him until he's fought the best, but surely iyou can credit him before he's faced a top contender... from outside his division. GGG walks around at 164- why does it make sense for him to validate himself as a middleweight by fighting guys who aren't?"


He doesn't walk around 164, stop with the nonsense. Me saying I'd like to get a true gauge of his ability by fighting Ward is a testament to his current skill set.

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The Shadow:

This is what I just said minutes ago:

"I said he'd be a threat to him stylistically and that he could win on points or build a lead until he gets stopped."

I like your trolling, though.

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thegreyman:

GGG's skill, as with any other fighter, is not measured by their record. Look at how the guy has fought; not who, in order to judge him.

Also you should know never to believe a fighter's public opinion about other fighters- of course they will do nothing but praise past, present and potential opponents, that's just part of the game. Make up your own mind rather than having it made up by the words of others.

You say that you need to see GGG against Ward before you know how good he is. I agree that we wont have seen the best of him until he's fought the best, but surely iyou can credit him before he's faced a top contender... from outside his division. GGG walks around at 164- why does it make sense for him to validate himself as a middleweight by fighting guys who aren't?

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The Shadow:

"And yet..."

Nice try, buddy. I was talking about the argument, your position of saying GGG had doubled in progress while Dirrell had stagnated.

Yes, I said that. But like I said, wasn't even talking about that in this instance.

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The Shadow:

Nice article! Bang the drums.

I do believe what he says, especially regarding Kovalev's willingness to fight whenever, wherever, but I have a hard time taking promoters at face value when they have an agenda to push.

I don't know, it's almost like an outlet publishing Serena Williams quotes from her Proactiv commercial.

"I had pimples," Williams said in a commercial appearance. "Now they're gone!"

Haha!

Now the pie is too small for award and Golovkin. I'd like to know if they are just guessing or if they've actually sent any inquiries Goossen's way.

I'd take it with a grain of salt.

All in all, since 3K's guy is so adamant about Kovalev not giving a damn what weight, where and how he fights, why not offer a catch weight bout to Ward?

170? 171? He just fought Rodriguez at 170.

Make a public offer, make Ward duck you or step up to the plate. I don't think Kovalev loses any value after losing that fight either.

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thegreyman:

"Not saying he beats him. Wasn't even talking about that. "

And yet...

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thegreyman:

"



Hey, speaking of which, Andre Dirrell, the guy who I think beats him

"




I'm sure I remember you saying Dirrell beats Golovkin...

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The Shadow:

That said, I saw some things in GGG I really liked in his pro game. I'm really feeling his intelligent pressure. He also has quite decent hand speed. And his poise and bodywork, like I've said before, is super nice. He's impressive.

I just wish I could see him against Ward to get a true gauge of his ability. But knockouts sure are exhilarating!

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The Shadow:

"I have the utmost respect for both you guys... TheGrey and Shadow...
So please don't think I'm choosing sides, ....just want to give my opinion..
**** Dirrell was once good enough to get robbed against Froch in his hometown.....at least I thought Dre' won. And he outclassed a prime Abraham's.

But in my humble opinion, even if Dirrell was still in prime shape I don't believe he could fend off GGG for 12 rounds. Dirrell's stamina was always suspect, and even with his superior foot speed and quick ambidextrous hands... I think he'd fall victim to a relentless GGG within the rounds 6-12.

he'd become mentally exhausted trying to defend against GGG's variable offence before he became physically exhausted due to GGG's withering head and torso attack.
And then ...checkmate.

Honestly I seriously doubt Dirrell could even fight at 168 and remain healthy.
The kid looked like he needed to move up in weight when he was still active in the supersix."


Not saying he beats him. Wasn't even talking about that. I was talking about the claim that Dirrell hasn't improved while the others guy's level has doubled. I don't believe that to be the case.

And for the record, I am not saying I favor him over GGG (Hard for me to say before he gets back in the he ring). I said he'd be a threat to him stylistically and that he could win on points or build a lead until he gets stopped.

Is that really that farfetched? (To me, personally, I find other things in boxing far more farfetched but that's neither here nor there.)

And why do I think he's a threat?

For one, he's beaten him before and two, GGG himself has said publicly that Dirrell's style is a problem for him and that he's one of the best fighters (if not the best) he's ever fought. That simple.

For the sake of perspective, I also would like to point out one thing: before Saturday, GGG's best win was against Curtis Stevens -- the same guy a 10-0 Dirrell beat with relative ease.

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The Shadow:

"Great, great post.

Also, Ward was a monster, but didn't he retire like, two, three years ago? We'll see him again at the Hall of Fame inductions in two more years. Well deserving as well."


LMAO! That's classic!

Did Roast hack your account????

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Radam G:

"To set the record straight, college boxing as a full-ride scholarship sport died in 1960 following the death of University of Wisconsin boxer Charlie Mohr. Several western colleges stayed the course, forming their own league, but their tournaments lacked NCAA oversight. And please Radam, there were never as many scholarships offered for boxing as for football.

The sport of college boxing was gaining traction when the plug was pulled. I found this commentary in an old newspaper: "The filth, fixes, fakes and fantastic finishes in many pro televised bouts have started to turn the public against professional boxing and many fans will be looking for college boxing with its high moral standards to take its place."

I'm not sure big-time college sports is the best place to look for high moral standards. Critics of college boxing pointed to recruiting abuses. Coaches were allegedly trolling amateur tournaments for talent and offering improper benefits to land hot prospects. Sound familiar?

College boxing has returned as a club (i.e. non-scholarship) sport. National tournaments have been held for several years now. In conformity with Title 9, there are men's and ladies divisions. In recent years, the service academies, particularly the Air Force Academy, have dominated these competitions. Service academy boxers are on a full ride, as are all of their classmates.

The late San Francisco boxing scribe Jack Fiske attended the University of Alabama circa 1940 when boxing at that school drew larger crowds than basketball games. The star of the Crimson Tide boxing team was George Wallace, a crowd-pleasing featherweight. Fiske told me that he would have made a good pro.

Many people wish that Wallace had taken that route. Instead, he became a four-term governor and one of the most polarizing figures in American politics."


My bad! I meant the 1930$ to 1960$. Holla!

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Radam G:

Perez has a head problem from almost killing a pug in dat squared jungle. Give him a pass. He may not ever be the boxer that he was.

As for 3g, his behavior was probably surly because of losing his father a while ago. He will be back to himself before long.

Referee Harvey Dock was terrible. And why are the officials treated godlike? They are fallible like anyone else. Holla!

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dino da vinci:

"In all fairness, GGG hasn't met the equivalent of a Donaire, since the middleweight division has been pretty void of special talents for a number of years. Not saying he wouldn't win - he most likely would - but it isn't like he's faced that famous murderers row. The irony is that GGG - possibly the most exciting middleweight for decades - very likely will wrap up his career without never having faced anyone that could give him his defining fight/s, just like every general needs a worthy opponent to really ensure their place in history - unless Ward is willing to dance.



Speaking of Ward, I agree with D2."




Great, great post.



Also, Ward was a monster, but didn't he retire like, two, three years ago? We'll see him again at the Hall of Fame inductions in two more years. Well deserving as well.

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Radam G:

"To set the record straight, college boxing as a full-ride scholarship sport died in 1960 following the death of University of Wisconsin boxer Charlie Mohr. Several western colleges stayed the course, forming their own league, but their tournaments lacked NCAA oversight. And please Radam, there were never as many scholarships offered for boxing as for football.

The sport of college boxing was gaining traction when the plug was pulled. I found this commentary in an old newspaper: "The filth, fixes, fakes and fantastic finishes in many pro televised bouts have started to turn the public against professional boxing and many fans will be looking for college boxing with its high moral standards to take its place."

I'm not sure big-time college sports is the best place to look for high moral standards. Critics of college boxing pointed to recruiting abuses. Coaches were allegedly trolling amateur tournaments for talent and offering improper benefits to land hot prospects. Sound familiar?

College boxing has returned as a club (i.e. non-scholarship) sport. National tournaments have been held for several years now. In conformity with Title 9, there are men's and ladies divisions. In recent years, the service academies, particularly the Air Force Academy, have dominated these competitions. Service academy boxers are on a full ride, as are all of their classmates.

The late San Francisco boxing scribe Jack Fiske attended the University of Alabama circa 1940 when boxing at that school drew larger crowds than basketball games. The star of the Crimson Tide boxing team was George Wallace, a crowd-pleasing featherweight. Fiske told me that he would have made a good pro.

Many people wish that Wallace had taken that route. Instead, he became a four-term governor and one of the most polarizing figures in American politics."


AmeK, you took the "almost" out of my piece. I didn't literally mean "as many scholarships offered (yearly) for boxing as for football," but "almost as many." Meaning allotment allowed for a particular sports based on the team size and playing positions.

At that time, boxing had nine or 10 weight classes/divisions like basketball has five positions. Baseball has nine, etc., etc. Danggit! American football has over 30 positions with offense, defense and special teams. Hopefully, you get the points I was making in comparison to the yearly allotment of scholarships -- not exact same number -- for a particular sport. Holla!

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brownsugar:

Yep Jennings and Perez caused me to nod a few times and I had been looking forward to the fight all week .
I even nodded again when I tried to watch it but I nodded on different rounds which enabled me to technically see the full fight although I had to piece it together from memory like a jigsaw puzzle.

But there was nothing puzzling about my impression.... A fat lethargic Cuban getting "Algierie'd" by a rank novice...there's something blasphemous about that.

Bring on Stiverne vs Wilder to wash out the foul after taste from my mouth.

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Radam G:

Boxing is the hurt business. And it also has more secrecy than the FBI, NSA, CIA, DIA and ____ _____ combined. It is not good public relation to talk about all the dangers of pugilism.

There are more fighters suffering eye and internal body damages than are suffering brain damages. The smartness of the game is to inattentionally blind you with concussions from head trauma than to spill the whole nine of internal damages to the noggin and torso -- especially to the torso.

The body softies are out of the game in a flash. I will guess weekly a fighter somewhere gets a collapsed lung and/or gallbladder, kidney, liver and major artery -- hearts chamber -- damages that you butts in the seats and eyeballs behind the TV and PPV screens will never know about. You hear about the glory or the game, not the gory of it.

I hate to be the bearer of bad news. But you ask. Ask NOT! Or you will get what you GOT! Between each line of pain and glory in a boxing story, there is untold gory. And you will never know until you ask. Holla!

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ArneK.:

To set the record straight, college boxing as a full-ride scholarship sport died in 1960 following the death of University of Wisconsin boxer Charlie Mohr. Several western colleges stayed the course, forming their own league, but their tournaments lacked NCAA oversight. And please Radam, there were never as many scholarships offered for boxing as for football.

The sport of college boxing was gaining traction when the plug was pulled. I found this commentary in an old newspaper: "The filth, fixes, fakes and fantastic finishes in many pro televised bouts have started to turn the public against professional boxing and many fans will be looking for college boxing with its high moral standards to take its place."

I'm not sure big-time college sports is the best place to look for high moral standards. Critics of college boxing pointed to recruiting abuses. Coaches were allegedly trolling amateur tournaments for talent and offering improper benefits to land hot prospects. Sound familiar?

College boxing has returned as a club (i.e. non-scholarship) sport. National tournaments have been held for several years now. In conformity with Title 9, there are men's and ladies divisions. In recent years, the service academies, particularly the Air Force Academy, have dominated these competitions. Service academy boxers are on a full ride, as are all of their classmates.

The late San Francisco boxing scribe Jack Fiske attended the University of Alabama circa 1940 when boxing at that school drew larger crowds than basketball games. The star of the Crimson Tide boxing team was George Wallace, a crowd-pleasing featherweight. Fiske told me that he would have made a good pro.

Many people wish that Wallace had taken that route. Instead, he became a four-term governor and one of the most polarizing figures in American politics.

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oubobcat:

The heavyweight fight did turn out to be a disappoint. I was definitely expecting a lot more from each man. To me, Perez looked out of shape. Jennings looked to be thinking too much instead of throwing and too mechanical in the ring. I scored the fight 6 rounds a piece but with the point deduction the fight on my card went to Jennings. I thought a draw would have been very appropriate though.

Regarding the point deduction, I didn't think it was atrocious as was said on the air and understand where the referee is coming from. However, I do respectfully disagree with the call. It was the 12th round of a close fight. Unless an egregious foul was committed or the fighter did something again that he was already warned several times not to do the ref should do all that is possible to not involve himself in a fight. Yes there was a foul committed but I did not think enough to warrant a point being taken away especially in the last round. A hard warning would have sufficed. It did impact the result of the fight ultimately.

Speaking of Steve Cunningham, I want to see either HBO or Showtime give the man a payday and a shot. He has more than earned it. He has been involved in probably the two best heavyweight bouts in the last two years with his fights with Tyson Fury and Amir Mansour. He has been in fight of the year type fights in the past as well. If he is put on the air, he will be in a good fight. Here is a suggestion too...if Glazkov beats Rossy in a couple weeks lets make Cunningham-Glazkov on HBO later this fall/winter. The styles of both fighters will make for a very fan friendly heavyweight bout.

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brownsugar:

"And in their most recent encounter, GGG controlled the fight. Control is more important than punches landed, if you want a comparison to the pro's. There's no reward for quantity in professional prizefighting. Saying that Dirrell once outpointed GGG in the amateurs more than a decade ago, has no bearing on how a fight tomorrow would turn out.

Especially when GGG avenged that loss in style in a more recent engagement.

I'll let you make your own mind up about GGG's improvement- you seem to be saying that his professional experience, and Sanchez's tutelage have had almost no effect. I've watched around 50 of GGG's amateur fights, and all of his professional ones, and I can't say that your opinion makes any sense to me. That's flat out wrong, as I'm sure anyone else here will tell you. The 2004 version of GGG was 85% of the fighter he is now? You know better than that, or you're not watching the same fighter I am.

As for Dirrell's 'bag of offensive tricks that dwarfs that of Floyd Mayweather' I think that you're overestimating Dirrell's skill set. He doesn't have the chin to take what GGG dishes out, the power to wobble the sturdy Kazakh, or the movement to stay away from Golovkin's mastery of the squared circle. He has a decent jab, but no inside game to match Golovkin's. Once the distance is inevitably closed, Dirrell will go down.

This is assuming the fight takes place at middleweight. There's no way that GGG's moving up for a contender that hasn't even fought in well over a year, who's record in world title fights is 0-1 (SD), against GGG's 12-0 (12KO's)."



I have the utmost respect for both you guys... TheGrey and Shadow...
So please don't think I'm choosing sides, ....just want to give my opinion..
**** Dirrell was once good enough to get robbed against Froch in his hometown.....at least I thought Dre' won. And he outclassed a prime Abraham's.

But in my humble opinion, even if Dirrell was still in prime shape I don't believe he could fend off GGG for 12 rounds. Dirrell's stamina was always suspect, and even with his superior foot speed and quick ambidextrous hands... I think he'd fall victim to a relentless GGG within the rounds 6-12.

he'd become mentally exhausted trying to defend against GGG's variable offence before he became physically exhausted due to GGG's withering head and torso attack.
And then ...checkmate.

Honestly I seriously doubt Dirrell could even fight at 168 and remain healthy.
The kid looked like he needed to move up in weight when he was still active in the supersix.

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The Commish:

So much to think about in the next PxP Ratings:

Is $$$May still inpossession of the skills which once made him #1?

Is very inactive Andre Ward--with no fight in sight--going to remain at #2?

Will Manny Pacquiao move into the #2 slot if Ward drops?

Will GGG advance because of the dominance his showed on Saturday night?

Will Sergey Kovalev be able to crack the Top-10?

If Kovalev does make it it, who will be leaving?

Will Shawn Porter have a better showing?

Will Mikey and Danny Garcia remain the same? Move up? Drop?

You have until Aug. 10 at 11:59pm to get your ballots in. If you already know that Sergey Kovalev will not be on your list, even if he wins this weekend, send them in now. If you need to put all the info possible into the computer called your brain and you feel like waiting--then do so.

It will be interesting to see how--and if--GGG's impressive win affects his standing, and how some inactivity affects others.

-Randy G.

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amayseng:

"I agree Skibbz. Another thing not talked enough about Kovalev is that he has really good boxing skills. He knows how to set up his punches inside the ring. He works behind a very effective jab and uses good footwork to cut off the ring on his opponents as well as set up angles to land his bombs. Kovalev is a much more seasoned fighter than say Stevenson. Hopkins knows this and will stay far away from Kovalev. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to see the fight as well. I just don't think it will ever happen."

Timing

Kovalev has impeccable timing, it is far overlooked.

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thegreyman:

I agree 100% Skibbz. Yet again, the abundance of sanctioning bodies is preventing us from seeing the fights that should be getting made. So long as people can avoid the best champion in the division and still become world title holders, we're all left out in the cold.

GGG needs to get hold of those other bests asap, and he knows it. It may be more of a struggle to get champions into the ring though, than it usually is for him to get them out again!

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thegreyman:

"OK, I appreciate you taking the time to respond to my comment and I can appreciate your passion -- You and yours are great for boxing.

However there's a palpable absence of logic -- if not outright inaccuracy -- sprinkled with a hint of ignorance in your statement.

Handily? Like GGG says, "Are you serious?" I suggest you watch it again, buddy. It was a close, evenly-contested, competitive fight, which was reflected in the scores and the commentary. (I think it was like 17-15 or something with under two minutes left in the fight.)

But OK, scoring is subjective so I won't #ether you with that statement.

Secondly, here is how I think he could pose a problem: he's beaten him before.

Here's what I take issue with in your statement:

GGG had only half the skills then? You mean to tell me he's twice as good now? The notion is simplistic at best and outrageous at worst.

I'd venture to guess -- Stormmcentre, feel free to share your knowledge of the E-bloc school here -- that he had at least 80-85% of the fundamental foundation in the Olympics that you're seeing on I display now.

And that Dirrell hasn't improved since 2004? Really? What do you base those bombastic statements on? (He may not have improved much in recent years; he hasn't competed so we don't know.)

Assuming you're not trolling and/or tripping off some good Afghan kush, I'd genuinely like to hear what you base that on.

Because while he was an exceptional talent in the amateurs, he's improved and adapted to the pros by the virtue of going 12 rounds.

More importantly, Dirrell has quote possibly the most varied offense in boxing along with Top 5 hand speed pound-for-pound.

In fact, I believe if he had Andre Ward's overall toughness, he'd be Top 3 pound-for-pound. Sadly for him, he's a bit of a mental midget; he whines, complains, cries and so forth.

But physically? He's an awesome offensive machine who switches seamlessly back and effort between southpaw and conventional -- and he has a bag full of offensive tricks that dwarfs that of boxing's number one guy in Floyd Mayweather.

(Now you can agree or disagree with that statement; doesn't matter. This is a fact.)

In fact, it was with this skill set and ability to adapt to the pro game (ie. improvement from amateur days) that he traveled to the UK as an 18-0 world level novice to take on -- and arguably beat -- one of boxing's top guys in Carl Froch.

To illustrate the gigantic leap in competition this presented, up until then Dirrell was doing battle with guys like Carlos Cockerham and Kenny Kost (!).

Now, if you disagree when I say Dirrell is a threat, that's fine.

But it's the reasoning behind that makes me go, "wait a minute." You haven't even seen him face that style at that level in the pros.

That said, I'd really like to see a sensible explanation where you demonstrate that GGG has improved 100% with Dirrell showing none.

Maybe you should study his fights with Abraham and Froch. Or maybe you're just saying that because he's been inactive due to injury and promotional issues?

Either way, the burden of proof is on you, my friend. I think you might have a daunting task in front of you."



And in their most recent encounter, GGG controlled the fight. Control is more important than punches landed, if you want a comparison to the pro's. There's no reward for quantity in professional prizefighting. Saying that Dirrell once outpointed GGG in the amateurs more than a decade ago, has no bearing on how a fight tomorrow would turn out.

Especially when GGG avenged that loss in style in a more recent engagement.

I'll let you make your own mind up about GGG's improvement- you seem to be saying that his professional experience, and Sanchez's tutelage have had almost no effect. I've watched around 50 of GGG's amateur fights, and all of his professional ones, and I can't say that your opinion makes any sense to me. That's flat out wrong, as I'm sure anyone else here will tell you. The 2004 version of GGG was 85% of the fighter he is now? You know better than that, or you're not watching the same fighter I am.

As for Dirrell's 'bag of offensive tricks that dwarfs that of Floyd Mayweather' I think that you're overestimating Dirrell's skill set. He doesn't have the chin to take what GGG dishes out, the power to wobble the sturdy Kazakh, or the movement to stay away from Golovkin's mastery of the squared circle. He has a decent jab, but no inside game to match Golovkin's. Once the distance is inevitably closed, Dirrell will go down.

This is assuming the fight takes place at middleweight. There's no way that GGG's moving up for a contender that hasn't even fought in well over a year, who's record in world title fights is 0-1 (SD), against GGG's 12-0 (12KO's).

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COMMISSIONER'S CORNER: A Tale of Two Divisions

There is a lot more separating the heavyweight division from the middleweight division than some 40 pounds. It's called talent. On paper, Saturday night's bash at Madison Square Garden should have been one of the sport's biggest nights of the year. On paper, the heavyweight matchup between undefeated heavyweights Bryant Jennings (18-0) and Mike Perez (20-0-1), looked to be a phenomenal one. On paper, the matchup in a middleweight title fight between WBO champ Gennady Golovkin and former IBF champ Daniel Geale also looked to be a splendid...

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fightnetworkthrowsuslaunchpartyinny Press Release
Fight Network Throws US Launch Party in NY

U.S. launch party in Big Apple KO win for Fight Network: Ray 'Boom Boom' Mancini named adviser/fight analyst (L-R) - Undefeated WBO middleweight champion Peter "Kid Chocolate" Qulllin, unbeaten world heavyweight contender Charles Martin, UFC star Frankie Edgar, boxing great Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini and Fight Network CEO Len Asper....all pictures by Emily Harney) NEW YORK (July 28, 2014) Last Saturday afternoon in Manhattan, Fight Network hosted a private party at The Ainsworth for media, sponsors and television executives to celebrate its...

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gggwow Top Articles
GGG = WOW

On July 26 at Madison Square Garden, Gennady Golovkin took another step on what he hopes will be a march toward greatness when he knocked out Daniel Geale in the third round. The 32-year-old Golovkin, a native of Kazakhstan, has risen dramatically in the public consciousness since knocking out Gregorz Proksa in a September 1, 2012, bout on HBO. There were 685,000 “real time” viewers for that fight. In three succeeding fghts, real time viewership rose to 813,000 (for Golovkin vs. Gabriel Rosado), 1.1 million (vs. Matthew Macklin) and 1.4...

Read the full story by Thomas Hauser
onkovalevhopkinsandthecontinuationofthecoldwarthaw Top Articles
On Kovalev-Hopkins, And The Continuation of The Cold War Thaw

I heard on the grapevine that talks are underway for a Sergey Kovalev-Bernard Hopkins fight, so I checked in with Kathy Duva, Kovalev’s promoter, and the boss at Main Events. So, are there talks underway which would pit the Russian hammerfisted terminator type against the aged but still world class master craftsman who has forgotten more than all the rest of the active pros know? “We’ve had a talk about having a talk,” said Duva, chuckling. “But we have not a had a talk. And “we” is Eric Gomez (at Golden Boy...

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countingdowntoaug9goldenboyshowatbarclays News
Counting Down To Aug. 9 Golden Boy Show At Barclays

DON'T BLINK AS BARCLAYS CENTER FANS BRACE THEMSELVES FOR WILD FINISHES AND HUGE UPSETS ON AUGUST 9 CLICK HERE FOR VIDEO WITH THOUGHTS FROM FIGHTERS AND OSCAR DE LA HOYA {youtube}gDE9VU07MKc{/youtube} "The most dangerous fighters in boxing are the underdogs." - Oscar De La Hoya BROOKLYN (July 28, 2014) - With fight night less than two weeks away, the challengers on the Saturday, August 9 card at Barclays Center, "Lightning" Rod Salka, Edgar "El Camacho" Santana and Jarrod Fletcher are preparing hard to shock the world and give the fight...

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examiningchilembavscummings Press Release
Examining Chilemba vs. Cummings

Chilemba-Cummings Scouting Report Boxer vs. Puncher Isaac Chilemba Photo Credits: Rich Graessle/Main Events Atlantic City, NJ: Isaac "Golden Boy" Chilemba (22-2-2, 9 KOs) is a prospect from South Africa with a classic boxer style. He will take on Cory "Black Ice" Cummings (17-6-1, 13 KOs), a puncher from Baltimore, MD, on August 2, 2014 as the non-domestically televised co-feature on the Kovalev-Caparello card at Revel Casino Hotel. Below is the scouting report for this light heavyweight showdown: Cory Cummings Photo Courtesy...

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douglasandsorofighttodrawon200thshobox Press Release
Douglas and Soro Fight To Draw on 200th ShoBox

VERONA, N.Y. (July 26, 2014) – Antoine Douglas and Michel Soro fought to a majority draw (96-94 Soro, 95-95 twice) in a bout that was a tale of two halves in the main event of Friday’s ShoBox: The New Generation, live on SHOWTIME® from Turning Stone Resort & Casino in Verona, Calif. The undefeated Douglas (14-0-1, 9 KOs) dominated the first half of the fight, controlling the action with a plethora of jabs against the vastly experienced former world title challenger. A rip in Soro’s gloves caused a halt in the bout midway through...

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Boxing Results

FIGHTER Result Rnd

Gennady Golovkin

Daniel Geale

TKO Rd. 3

Bryant Jennings

Mike Perez

SD Rd. 12

Ola Afolabi

Anthony Caputo Smith

RTD Rd. 3

Dusty Hernandez Harrison

Wilfredo Acuna

UD Rd. 8

Julian Rodriguez

Yankton Southern

KO Rd. 1

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