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Radam G:

The young GOAT Ali floated like a butterfly and stung like a bee when he had to box. But when it came to cutting a tune, his voice was no fox.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7CHjY8dVJyw. Holla!

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ArneK.:

This info begs the question of whether Hanna Gabriel will return to the ring anytime soon. She's been inactive for 17 months since suffering her first loss at the hands of an 18-year old boxer from the Dominican Republic. She's still rated highly --#3 in her weight class according to the leading organization for female boxers.

I'm been told that Ms. Gabriel has a strong following in Costa Rica.

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Radam G:

Now champion Larry Holmes should pay to be like Milli Vanilli because he is no Frank, James, Michael or Willie. Hehehe!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SU2_-mqpw_Y. Holla!

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ArneK.:

Commish, I'm sure the answer is no since there aren't enough guinea pigs to constitute a useful sample, but I'm wondering if any studies have been done on female boxers?

I've heard it said that women are more likely to suffer long-term damage as a result of punches received in the stomach, but for all I know this is an old wives tale.

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Radam G:

"Radam, you're doing great work as the resident TSS archeologist.



Back around 1979, Joe Frazier and the Knockouts played the lounge at Caesars Palace. This would have been in conjunction with one of Larry Holmes' fights.



I don't remember his singing being that bad. It was actually a good show that had people dancing in the aisles. Of course, Smokin' Joe was backed by a tight little band with some good horn players. Looking back, the band stole the spotlight from Joe's vocals. That was a good thing."




I saw and heard him in the latter part of his live. I can't remember him, GOAT Ali, Larry Holmes, Ernie Terrell, the late Kenny Norton or Evander Holyfield, Roy Jones, Money May, Winky Wright or Antonio Tarver ever being able to carry a note. There song could acoustic a thousand wolves howl.



Now Big Money Oscar Dela Hoya and Da Manny can cut some tunes. Money May is so terrible with singing and rapping that I won't put his song in this Universe no way, no how! Hehehe! Holla!

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The Commish:

I am sure there are many fighters who have suffered injuries to body parts other than their brains, Radam. However, in our study, the majority of the injuries were head/brain related and the most severe injuries were found to be brain related. I do not recall any voice box/larynx injuries, nor do I recall any collapsed lungs.

As far as brain cell injuries, I'd like to know a diet which can repair a punch-mangled brain.

-Randy G.

Reply

deepwater2:

Even if Dirrell is the same as when he was at his best a few years back before sitting out with neurological problems,brain injures, or just an excuse to duck Ward; he is still a very hard fighter to watch. Dirrell ruined the Froch fight by moving and never trading. Dirrell stunk out the Abraham fight. Dirrell made the Stevens fight boring. Those 3 fighters all said the same thing, that Dirrell didn't come to fight.



I like when boxers use movement and boxing but there is a time in a fight where a fighter needs to trade and fight. Dirrell is very reluctant to do that.



Compare that with GGG. GGG punished Stevens badly before he quit and had enough. GGG has knocked out his foes in highlight fashion. GGG cuts the ring off better then Froch,Stevens and Abraham so no way Dirrell has a chance against GGG. Dirrell needs to knock out a bum or two provided by Al Haymon before he can be served up as an opponent for GGG.



I wonder if OUBOBCAT thought his thread would turn out like this?

Reply

Radam G:

"During my seven years at the New York State Athletic Commission, we did several studies on the long-term effects of head punches and body shots taken by fighters.

Not surprisingly, long-term head shots--head trauma--leave residual scarring on the brain, which quite often shows up in later years in rthe form of dementia pugilistica, more commonly know as being "punch drunk." The condition never gets better. If anything, it worsens. Sometimes it takes decades, sometimes it happens fast. It also doesn't happen to every fighter.

Former heavyweight contender Jerry Quarry, who was known to have a solid chin, passed away in 1999 of Dementia Pugilistica at the age of 53. As much as 22 years earlier--in 1977, when he was just 31--you could already hear Quarry's speech pattern changing for the worse.

After beating Lorenzo Zanon that year, Quarry knew it was over and hung up his gloves. Unfortunately, they didn't stay nailed to the wall. He came back in 1983. He needed the money. Despite winning both bouts, Quarry couldn't secure the big-money bout he craved--against Larry Holmes--and he retired again.

After working at different jobs over the next nine years, Quarry launched yet another comeback, this one in 1992. He was 46 and was only a shell of his former self. At the time, I was commissioner in New York and tried to talk Jerry out of the fight. He sounded terrible, slurring words to the point I didn't understand him.

When he told me he intended to go ahead with a fight in Aurora, Colorado, that he had planned to win this and a few more comeback fights, then go after the likes of Mike Tyson, Riddick Bowe and Evander Holyfield, I knew he was desperate and not thinking straight.

I called officials in Colorado and tried to get them to deny a boxer's license to Quarry. They refused. They said he had passed his physical and was in remarkable shape for a man his age. The physical he passed was a stethoscope on his chest!

Quarry lost that fight by decision to a man with a 3-4-1 record named Ron Crammer. Quarry got hit with seemingly every punch Crammer threw, and took it like Jerry Quarry. After the fight. He retired again.

Deep dementia quickly began to set in. During the last several years of his life, his family took care of him. They fed him. They dressed him. They assisted him in every way. He could see, but saw nothing. He could hear, but heard nothing. On

January 3, 1999, Jerry Quarry passed away. Seven years later, his kid brother, Mike, a light heavyweight contender who had faced Bob Foster for the light heavyweight title and was knocked cold by the explosive-hitting Foster, also died of dementia pugilistica. He was 55.

On the other side of the coin is George Chuvalo. The former heavyweight contender who amassed a career record of 73-18-2 with 62 KO's and faced such talent as Muhammad Ali,George Foreman, Joe Frazier, Floyd Patterson, Jerry Quarry and Cleveland Williams, will turn 77 in a few weeks. Despite the longevity of his career and the monstrous punchers he faced, Chuvalo sounds--even today--more like a college professor than he does an ex-fighter who absorbed some hellacious beatings.

I point these men out, as it is head trauma which is known to do extreme damage over the course of time, but not to all fighters, as seen by the condition of Chuvalo, who had so many fights against such tough opposition but remains unfazed by the punches well into his 70's.

Our study looked at hundreds of amateur and pro fighters who had at least 20 fights. I threw myself into the study, as I had 39 amateur fights and one professional outing. Head scans and body scans, along with blood work and circulatory testing was done. As for myself, I received a clean bill of health.

After all the results were in, any damage that was found was found through EEG's and MRI's of the head. Very little damage was shown to ex-fighter's bodies. The liver and kidney damage which did show up was determined to be to those exs-fighters who abused drugs and alcohol throughout their lives.

Body shots basically hurt and only do their damage at the moment. Any cell damage done to the liver, kidney and spleen--and other internaal organs--is reparable. Those injured cells regenerate. Brain cells do not.

If only they did.

And all this was in answer to a two-sentence question about body punches by Spitbucket. Look how I rambled on.

Hmm. Maybe there is brain damage there, after all!

What were we talking about?

-Randy G.

{Hey, Commish! How many pugs had collapsed lungs on your watch? How many had damaged voice boxes? BTW umpteen studies show that brain cells do regenerate and injuried brains repair themselves and/or make new path ways. You are apparently focusing on the many focused, damaged brains that don't. There is no one brain that fixes all. And, as always, it all begins and ends with diet. Plus blown-up myths are everywhere.

Several fighters have quit the game on the flash after suffering internal body damages. Any of you pugs out there reading this -- and haven't recovered from boxing kidney, liver, heart-chambers and busted blood vessels -- STEP FORWARD! Don't be shy. Everything is cool here. Holla!}

Reply

kelseym:

Glad to see the Rigolution is alive and well.

Reply

The Shadow:

"Easy tiger, we're just discussing boxing!

I said in post #70 how I think GGG's improved- I don't think that Dirrell has made improvements to match that. If you think he has then I'd be glad to have them pointed out to me. The only burden of proof lies with you- to show me how Dirrell has improved as a fighter. There's not much I can do to prove he's the same man, if that's all I see in him.

Since you believe otherwise- do tell."


I did already. I don't think he's improved by 2x. I think he has 80-85% of the tools now that he had then. Since Storm is closely familiar with the E-bloc school, I'd love to hear his take on that.

By comparison, I don't think Dirrell has stagnated. His career may have in recent years. Like the case of Lomachenko showed, you need to adapt and improve to the pro game in order to go more rounds.

Dirrell has done that. Even if it's a 1% improvement, still an improvement nonetheless.

Wouldn't you agree?

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ArneK.:

Radam, you're doing great work as the resident TSS archeologist.

Back around 1979, Joe Frazier and the Knockouts played the lounge at Caesars Palace. This would have been in conjunction with one of Larry Holmes' fights.

I don't remember his singing being that bad. It was actually a good show that had people dancing in the aisles. Of course, Smokin' Joe was backed by a tight little band with some good horn players. Looking back, the band stole the spotlight from Joe's vocals. That was a good thing.

Reply

The Shadow:

"Shadow there is no need to get so worked up. We have our opinions, some are informed and others are evidently not. If you disagree, there is no need to shout obscenities at someone else whom you have not met or know of."

LOL that's hilarious

Reply

The Shadow:

"GGG does walk around at 164, it's the truth!

And yes, it was a handy beating, whereby GGG controlled the flow of the fight, landed the better shots. Dirrell could only score ineffective blows and jabs when he forced it. Yes that gets you points in the amateur sport, but in terms of the fight? GGG was in charge. He was even landing numerous body shots which the judges weren't appreciating, but I'm sure Dirrell was! Look beyond the scorecard Shadow!

And I never said GGG shouldn't fight at 168, I just disagreed that he needs to do so in order to validate himself."


He walks around 170. He reported to camp vs. Stevens (if I'm not mistaken) at 168, which was fit and low. Man is a pro.

There were things Dirrell didn't get credit for in that fight. But like I said initially, scoring is subjective so I can appreciate and understand that position.

I can also agree with the premise that a fighter doesn't need to move up. However if they build his reputation on him wanting to fight anyone from 154-168, while signing for fights at the weight class, then I do think it's something that should at least be discussed.

But whether it be at 160 or 168, it's the stylistic matchup I want to see. I also said that there are some 154 guys with similar skill sets I'd like to see him face.

There's an Erislandy Lara willing to fight. Tom Loeffler shot that down with a similar position that he had with Ward.

I like what I see in his toolbox but I don't think the guys he's fighting are worthy. But they are tremendous exhibitions.

Reply

The Commish:

During my seven years at the New York State Athletic Commission, we did several studies on the long-term effects of head punches and body shots taken by fighters.

Not surprisingly, long-term head shots--head trauma--leave residual scarring on the brain, which quite often shows up in later years in rthe form of dementia pugilistica, more commonly know as being "punch drunk." The condition never gets better. If anything, it worsens. Sometimes it takes decades, sometimes it happens fast. It also doesn't happen to every fighter.

Former heavyweight contender Jerry Quarry, who was known to have a solid chin, passed away in 1999 of Dementia Pugilistica at the age of 53. As much as 22 years earlier--in 1977, when he was just 31--you could already hear Quarry's speech pattern changing for the worse.

After beating Lorenzo Zanon that year, Quarry knew it was over and hung up his gloves. Unfortunately, they didn't stay nailed to the wall. He came back in 1983. He needed the money. Despite winning both bouts, Quarry couldn't secure the big-money bout he craved--against Larry Holmes--and he retired again.

After working at different jobs over the next nine years, Quarry launched yet another comeback, this one in 1992. He was 46 and was only a shell of his former self. At the time, I was commissioner in New York and tried to talk Jerry out of the fight. He sounded terrible, slurring words to the point I didn't understand him.

When he told me he intended to go ahead with a fight in Aurora, Colorado, that he had planned to win this and a few more comeback fights, then go after the likes of Mike Tyson, Riddick Bowe and Evander Holyfield, I knew he was desperate and not thinking straight.

I called officials in Colorado and tried to get them to deny a boxer's license to Quarry. They refused. They said he had passed his physical and was in remarkable shape for a man his age. The physical he passed was a stethoscope on his chest!

Quarry lost that fight by decision to a man with a 3-4-1 record named Ron Crammer. Quarry got hit with seemingly every punch Crammer threw, and took it like Jerry Quarry. After the fight. He retired again.

Deep dementia quickly began to set in. During the last several years of his life, his family took care of him. They fed him. They dressed him. They assisted him in every way. He could see, but saw nothing. He could hear, but heard nothing. On

January 3, 1999, Jerry Quarry passed away. Seven years later, his kid brother, Mike, a light heavyweight contender who had faced Bob Foster for the light heavyweight title and was knocked cold by the explosive-hitting Foster, also died of dementia pugilistica. He was 55.

On the other side of the coin is George Chuvalo. The former heavyweight contender who amassed a career record of 73-18-2 with 62 KO's and faced such talent as Muhammad Ali,George Foreman, Joe Frazier, Floyd Patterson, Jerry Quarry and Cleveland Williams, will turn 77 in a few weeks. Despite the longevity of his career and the monstrous punchers he faced, Chuvalo sounds--even today--more like a college professor than he does an ex-fighter who absorbed some hellacious beatings.

I point these men out, as it is head trauma which is known to do extreme damage over the course of time, but not to all fighters, as seen by the condition of Chuvalo, who had so many fights against such tough opposition but remains unfazed by the punches well into his 70's.

Our study looked at hundreds of amateur and pro fighters who had at least 20 fights. I threw myself into the study, as I had 39 amateur fights and one professional outing. Head scans and body scans, along with blood work and circulatory testing was done. As for myself, I received a clean bill of health.

After all the results were in, any damage that was found was found through EEG's and MRI's of the head. Very little damage was shown to ex-fighter's bodies. The liver and kidney damage which did show up was determined to be to those exs-fighters who abused drugs and alcohol throughout their lives.

Body shots basically hurt and only do their damage at the moment. Any cell damage done to the liver, kidney and spleen--and other internaal organs--is reparable. Those injured cells regenerate. Brain cells do not.

If only they did.

And all this was in answer to a two-sentence question about body punches by Spitbucket. Look how I rambled on.

Hmm. Maybe there is brain damage there, after all!

What were we talking about?

-Randy G.

Reply

thegreyman:

Easy tiger, we're just discussing boxing!

I said in post #70 how I think GGG's improved- I don't think that Dirrell has made improvements to match that. If you think he has then I'd be glad to have them pointed out to me. The only burden of proof lies with you- to show me how Dirrell has improved as a fighter. There's not much I can do to prove he's the same man, if that's all I see in him.

Since you believe otherwise- do tell.

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thegreyman:

"Right, that every domestic UK 140 fighter beats Broner, GGG walks around at 164, GGG has improved 2x since the Olympics, he beat Dirrell handily, Dirrell has shown no improvement since being an amateur, GGG shouldn't fight at 168 pounds even though he just signed for one a few months ago...

Those truths?"


GGG does walk around at 164, it's the truth!

And yes, it was a handy beating, whereby GGG controlled the flow of the fight, landed the better shots. Dirrell could only score ineffective blows and jabs when he forced it. Yes that gets you points in the amateur sport, but in terms of the fight? GGG was in charge. He was even landing numerous body shots which the judges weren't appreciating, but I'm sure Dirrell was! Look beyond the scorecard Shadow!

And I never said GGG shouldn't fight at 168, I just disagreed that he needs to do so in order to validate himself.

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Skibbz:

Shadow there is no need to get so worked up. We have our opinions, some are informed and others are evidently not. If you disagree, there is no need to shout obscenities at someone else whom you have not met or know of.

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The Shadow:

"Andre Direll's skill set, while impressive, is not world championship level. He still fights much the same way he did when he was beaten in 2004- and I'd challenge you to point out any marked improvements.

GGG meanwhile, has become a master of cutting off the ring, of controlling distance, of power, of combination punching, of the jab (as Oubob points out, easily one of the best, ie most accurate and powerfull, in the sport), and of effective, intelligent adaptation in the ring. Only Mayweather rivals his ability to adapt to his opponent so quickly. Not only does GGG do so quickly, he does it with devastatingly effectively applied power.

That's how I think GGG has improved- I don't see the same improvements in Dirrell- and as I said, I'd challenge you to prove to me otherwise.

Always a pleasure debating with you Shadow!

EDIT: And by master, yes, I mean master of the division, in that nobody, from junior to super middleweight can beat his present form."


The burden of proof isn't on me, buddy. You still haven't shown sh*t.

You said he's twice as good. I'd like to see that because I don't believe that to be the case. Then I'd like to see how Dirrell has stagnated.

And of course he fights the same way, that's his style.

As I mentioned, to me, the obvious improvement, at to the very least, is that he's able to go 12 rounds. As we saw with Lomachenko, fighting in the amateurs and in the pros are two different things.

He improved from the Salido fight by adapting to the longer fights. I consider that an improvement, which effectively ices your argument that he's stagnated.

And you don't think he has world level skills? That's just bogus.

He beat Carl Froch on one card in Nottingham. And while this obviously holds less weight, he used to beat up Chad Dawson in sparring when Dawson was undefeated.

But again, the burden of proof isn't on me. I never made the claim he's made the same improvements that you believe GGG has made.

All I said prior to Saturday is that I think he can beat GGG (not that he will for certain) and I told you why.

And of course he still can -- anything can happen in that ring -- and even after this performance, I still think Dirrell presents stylistic problems for him, based on the man' own testimonies and the fact that he's beaten him before.

Would he be the favorite? Probably not. Do I think he troubles him? Yes. Do I think GGG may stop him? Yes. We don't know till they're in the ring.

And when you say holla at you with some facts, I'd like for you to heed your own advice and stop deflecting and outright lying.

And thanks for clearing up the "master" part.

And likewise. Always a pleasure.

116

Reply

The Shadow:

"I'm talking fighters, not comments! "

I don't understand the comment.

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The Shadow:

"Don't get so aloof, I'm just telling the truth!"

Right, that every domestic UK 140 fighter beats Broner, GGG walks around at 164, GGG has improved 2x since the Olympics, he beat Dirrell handily, Dirrell has shown no improvement since being an amateur, GGG shouldn't fight at 168 pounds even though he just signed for one a few months ago...

Those truths?

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thegreyman:

"Indeed. And this is what I said, prior to Saturday's fight with Geale where I came away impressed:

"Nice effort Storm....can't wait for the opportunity to respond. Enjoy the GGG fight tonight ...there will never be another like him.
Do you really think he's that good? I like his body work and poise. Other than that, I really don't know...

Hey, speaking of which, Andre Dirrell, the guy who I think beats him -- or at least builds a huge points lead before getting stopped -- finally got his release from SMS Promotions.

He's supposed to be linking back up with Al Haymon, though this is just speculation at this point. If Haymon takes him back, then wow. Good dude. Say whatever you want but he cares about the fighters when no one else does."

I said I think. And notice what I said in bold. And this comment was based on what I had seen in his last outing -- not counting Saturday.

Nice try, troll."


I'm talking fighters, not comments!

Holla some facts my way!

Reply

thegreyman:

Andre Direll's skill set, while impressive, is not world championship level. He still fights much the same way he did when he was beaten in 2004- and I'd challenge you to point out any marked improvements.

GGG meanwhile, has become a master of cutting off the ring, of controlling distance, of power, of combination punching, of the jab (as Oubob points out, easily one of the best, ie most accurate and powerfull, in the sport), and of effective, intelligent adaptation in the ring. Only Mayweather rivals his ability to adapt to his opponent so quickly. Not only does GGG do so quickly, he does it with devastatingly effectively applied power.

That's how I think GGG has improved- I don't see the same improvements in Dirrell- and as I said, I'd challenge you to prove to me otherwise.

Always a pleasure debating with you Shadow!

EDIT: And by master, yes, I mean master of the division, in that nobody, from junior to super middleweight can beat his present form.

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The Shadow:

"If you've forgotten, then you can always refer to post #33 of this thread."

Indeed. And this is what I said, prior to Saturday's fight with Geale where I came away impressed:

"Nice effort Storm....can't wait for the opportunity to respond. Enjoy the GGG fight tonight ...there will never be another like him.
Do you really think he's that good? I like his body work and poise. Other than that, I really don't know...

Hey, speaking of which, Andre Dirrell, the guy who I think beats him -- or at least builds a huge points lead before getting stopped -- finally got his release from SMS Promotions.

He's supposed to be linking back up with Al Haymon, though this is just speculation at this point. If Haymon takes him back, then wow. Good dude. Say whatever you want but he cares about the fighters when no one else does."

I said I think. And notice what I said in bold. And this comment was based on what I had seen in his last outing -- not counting Saturday.

Nice try, troll.

Reply

thegreyman:

Don't get so aloof, I'm just telling the truth!

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The Shadow:

"Also you said you'd need to see him in with Ward to get a true gauge of his ability.

And yes, I'm aware of the Chavez fight."


EXACTLY! A TRUE gauge! Because then all questions I HAVE will be answered. Duh!

Couldn't care less about what questions you may have but for me -- in my opinion -- to truly see what he can handle, I'd like to see him fight a guy like Ward.

I'm certainly entitled to feel that way, am I not?

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The Shadow:

"It still stands that you said that Dirrell will beat GGG, no matter how you phrase it.

As for improvements since amateur days- GGG has become a master at 160- while Dirrell, who does not fight at that weight, has become master of nothing- he hasn't even won a title."


You can not know who will beat who -- it's all speculation. I explained why I speculated that he could. Is that so hard to grasp?

And how I phrase it has everything to do with it. I wasn't even responding to your dumb a**. I was responding to Brownsugar.

And when I said "not saying he beats him. That wasn't what I was talking about," I was referring to the silly argument that GGG had improved 2x while Dirrell hasn't improved at all. No matter how much you troll and deflect, you have yet to do that.

Please demonstrate that to me. Because that is what you said and I don't think you're right.

But again, I'm talking to the guy who thinks Curtis Woodhouse beats Adrien Broner. (Why the f*** do I bother??? I must be a masochist...)

Your last paragraph, once again, doesn't even make sense. He's been injured and straddled with promotional issues. He's had one title shot where he lost by split decision in England, hence why he hasn't won a title.

I don't even see how that's relevant as to gauging skill. Because Broner has won three titles in three divisions....but you don't think he has much to offer. So come on. You gotta come a little harder than that.

And a master?? A master of what?! What the **** does that even mean?! You mean a titleholder? A master of craft? Do you even know what you say half the time?

Reply

thegreyman:

Also you said you'd need to see him in with Ward to get a true gauge of his ability.

And yes, I'm aware of the Chavez fight- though that wasn't to validate himself, as you're asking him to do. His management is willing to move him from 154-168 for a big PPV, not permanently. They want to dominate 160, where he belongs. It's not so simple to just pick a weight class outside your own, and dominate it as if it's your home.

And yes, he does walk around at 164- he's a small middleweight, which is why he doesn't mind going to 154.

Reply

thegreyman:

"Me make up my mind on my own? Are you for real?! What the heck are you smoking over there?

Besides, your argument doesn't even make sense. You say he walks around at 164, which he doesn't. You're wrong.

You ask, why does it make sense to for him to "validate himself" by going up? Ummmmmmmm, he was supposed to fight 168 guy who runs around 190-200 and had signed to do so if I'm not mistaken.

Secondly, his management has said they would fight ANYBODY from 154-168. His coach just said they have like seven guys up there they would fight.

You say I don't credit him. WTF?! What have I been doing? What have I been saying?! Is it because I'm not ready to have him shag my wife that I sound like a detractor? I like the dude! His competition has been mediocre but he's a cool cat."


You need to make up your own mind because you're not telling me what it is that Dirrell can do that will bother GGG, in your opinion.

I'm not smoking, just wondering!

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thegreyman:

"This is what I just said minutes ago:



"I said he'd be a threat to him stylistically and that he could win on points or build a lead until he gets stopped."



I like your trolling, though."




If you've forgotten, then you can always refer to post #33 of this thread.

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The Shadow:

"GGG's skill, as with any other fighter, is not measured by their record. Look at how the guy has fought; not who, in order to judge him.

Also you should know never to believe a fighter's public opinion about other fighters- of course they will do nothing but praise past, present and potential opponents, that's just part of the game. Make up your own mind rather than having it made up by the words of others.

You say that you need to see GGG against Ward before you know how good he is. I agree that we wont have seen the best of him until he's fought the best, but surely iyou can credit him before he's faced a top contender... from outside his division. GGG walks around at 164- why does it make sense for him to validate himself as a middleweight by fighting guys who aren't?"


Me make up my mind on my own? Are you for real?! What the heck are you smoking over there?

Besides, your argument doesn't even make sense. You say he walks around at 164, which he doesn't. You're wrong.

You ask, why does it make sense to for him to "validate himself" by going up? Ummmmmmmm, he was supposed to fight 168 guy who runs around 190-200 and had signed to do so if I'm not mistaken.

Secondly, his management has said they would fight ANYBODY from 154-168. His coach just said they have like seven guys up there they would fight.

You say I don't credit him. WTF?! What have I been doing? What have I been saying?! Is it because I'm not ready to have him shag my wife that I sound like a detractor? I like the dude! His competition has been mediocre but he's a cool cat.

Reply
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commissionerscornerataleoftwodivisions Top Articles
COMMISSIONER'S CORNER: A Tale of Two Divisions

There is a lot more separating the heavyweight division from the middleweight division than some 40 pounds. It's called talent. On paper, Saturday night's bash at Madison Square Garden should have been one of the sport's biggest nights of the year. On paper, the heavyweight matchup between undefeated heavyweights Bryant Jennings (18-0) and Mike Perez (20-0-1), looked to be a phenomenal one. On paper, the matchup in a middleweight title fight between WBO champ Gennady Golovkin and former IBF champ Daniel Geale also looked to be a splendid...

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fightnetworkthrowsuslaunchpartyinny Press Release
Fight Network Throws US Launch Party in NY

U.S. launch party in Big Apple KO win for Fight Network: Ray 'Boom Boom' Mancini named adviser/fight analyst (L-R) - Undefeated WBO middleweight champion Peter "Kid Chocolate" Qulllin, unbeaten world heavyweight contender Charles Martin, UFC star Frankie Edgar, boxing great Ray "Boom Boom" Mancini and Fight Network CEO Len Asper....all pictures by Emily Harney) NEW YORK (July 28, 2014) Last Saturday afternoon in Manhattan, Fight Network hosted a private party at The Ainsworth for media, sponsors and television executives to celebrate its...

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gggwow Top Articles
GGG = WOW

On July 26 at Madison Square Garden, Gennady Golovkin took another step on what he hopes will be a march toward greatness when he knocked out Daniel Geale in the third round. The 32-year-old Golovkin, a native of Kazakhstan, has risen dramatically in the public consciousness since knocking out Gregorz Proksa in a September 1, 2012, bout on HBO. There were 685,000 “real time” viewers for that fight. In three succeeding fghts, real time viewership rose to 813,000 (for Golovkin vs. Gabriel Rosado), 1.1 million (vs. Matthew Macklin) and 1.4...

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onkovalevhopkinsandthecontinuationofthecoldwarthaw Top Articles
On Kovalev-Hopkins, And The Continuation of The Cold War Thaw

I heard on the grapevine that talks are underway for a Sergey Kovalev-Bernard Hopkins fight, so I checked in with Kathy Duva, Kovalev’s promoter, and the boss at Main Events. So, are there talks underway which would pit the Russian hammerfisted terminator type against the aged but still world class master craftsman who has forgotten more than all the rest of the active pros know? “We’ve had a talk about having a talk,” said Duva, chuckling. “But we have not a had a talk. And “we” is Eric Gomez (at Golden Boy...

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countingdowntoaug9goldenboyshowatbarclays News
Counting Down To Aug. 9 Golden Boy Show At Barclays

DON'T BLINK AS BARCLAYS CENTER FANS BRACE THEMSELVES FOR WILD FINISHES AND HUGE UPSETS ON AUGUST 9 CLICK HERE FOR VIDEO WITH THOUGHTS FROM FIGHTERS AND OSCAR DE LA HOYA {youtube}gDE9VU07MKc{/youtube} "The most dangerous fighters in boxing are the underdogs." - Oscar De La Hoya BROOKLYN (July 28, 2014) - With fight night less than two weeks away, the challengers on the Saturday, August 9 card at Barclays Center, "Lightning" Rod Salka, Edgar "El Camacho" Santana and Jarrod Fletcher are preparing hard to shock the world and give the fight...

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examiningchilembavscummings Press Release
Examining Chilemba vs. Cummings

Chilemba-Cummings Scouting Report Boxer vs. Puncher Isaac Chilemba Photo Credits: Rich Graessle/Main Events Atlantic City, NJ: Isaac "Golden Boy" Chilemba (22-2-2, 9 KOs) is a prospect from South Africa with a classic boxer style. He will take on Cory "Black Ice" Cummings (17-6-1, 13 KOs), a puncher from Baltimore, MD, on August 2, 2014 as the non-domestically televised co-feature on the Kovalev-Caparello card at Revel Casino Hotel. Below is the scouting report for this light heavyweight showdown: Cory Cummings Photo Courtesy...

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Boxing Results

FIGHTER Result Rnd

Gennady Golovkin

Daniel Geale

TKO Rd. 3

Bryant Jennings

Mike Perez

SD Rd. 12

Ola Afolabi

Anthony Caputo Smith

RTD Rd. 3

Dusty Hernandez Harrison

Wilfredo Acuna

UD Rd. 8

Julian Rodriguez

Yankton Southern

KO Rd. 1

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